By on December 11, 2009

Classic? No. Future classic? Now we're talking...

The Friends of the National Automotive History Collection have voted the Ford Flex as their “Collectible Car of the Future” of 2009. According to the NAHC’s press release, the award process “asked members to predict which of this year’s new vehicles will turn heads in the Woodward Cruise of 2034.” Of course, this criteria allowed only Detroit iron into the running, a stricture that we won’t hold you to here. We don’t care where in the world your nominated vehicle is built or sold, we just want to know what new car sold anywhere will be a coveted classic in 20 years. Our first nomination comes from TTAC commenter gslippy, who figures

Early Nanos will become collector’s items someday, just as the Honda N600 has.

That’s a solid nomination to start things off with, to which I would simply add the BYD F3DM. Not only is it the world’s first mass-produced plug-in hybrid, it has also sold miserably, further adding to its future collector value.

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71 Comments on “Ask The Best And Brightest: 2009 Future Classics?...”


  • avatar
    Areitu

    I’ll probably catch a lot of flak for saying so, but the LF-A has a lot of collectible potential.

  • avatar
    Brian E

    I think the most obvious choice for future collector car would be popular tuner models (WRX/STI, Lancer Ralliart/Evo, Mazdaspeed 3, Civic Si, etc) for the simple reason that most of them will be destroyed by their owners between now and 2034. Expect bone-stock STIs and Evos to be worth a mint.

  • avatar
    Dimwit

    The Dodge Challenger. It’s not selling well but it’s a looker. By 2034 gas pigs should very rare.
    Things like the Alfa 8C, Audi S5, VW’s A6 GTI should do well. Good looking, not over produced with boy racer performance. I figure the Volt should absolutely kill as a collector’s piece if it stiffs like everyone is predicting.

    • 0 avatar
      also Tom

      Agree  the Challenger belongs on the list but for a different reason: it looks really big now. By that time it will look like a barge. It’ll be huge (ouch) as a collectable.

  • avatar
    Jimmy7

    Hummer H2. Pontiac Solstice and Saturn Sky. For the oddballs like myself, the Mercury Grand Marquis.

    • 0 avatar
      lprocter1982

      I don’t think the Grand Marquis will ever be a collectible – Ford’ll just keep building them forever – I bet in 2034, you can still get a new Grand Marquis… and the police will still be using Crown Vics. Actually, they’ll probably be sold right beside the Chevy dealer with a row of 2010 Aveos still on the lot.

      But anyway, in 2034, I bet the Hummer line of vehicles will be collectibles, as will the Australian RWD sedans (Falcon, Monaro)

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean23

      Check that, there is one Marquis worth collecting, the 2003 Marauder.

  • avatar
    Steven02

    I don’t think that special trims such as Civic Si, Mazdaspeed 3 will be worth that much.  Take the current collectibles, most are models of cars.  Special trims in those models are with different values.  But saying a Civic Si will be worth something is implying that a Civic will also be worth something.  I don’t see that happening.  My guess, low production attractive (relative) models…
    Challenger isn’t a bad choice here.  My guesses
    Chevy SSR
    Plymouth Prowler
    I am struggling to find anything else.  But I am sure there are more.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      Civic Si, probablly not. Mazdapseed 3 maybe.  However an EVO or STI, in original condition will be worth a whole bunch of money.  Even more collectable will be a Mazdaspeed 6 due to low volumes, although not an ’09 and thus disqualified from the current debate. Just look at old rare models like a Celica All-Trac. In good condition worth probally 5-6 times more than other Celica models of the same vintage.

    • 0 avatar
      galaxygreymx5

      Seriously?  An immaculate 1999 Civic Si with a clean title already brings nearly what its MSRP was when new.  They’re impossible to find and highly desirable.  I agree on the WRX/STI.
      I think the first-gen Honda Insight will be very collectible as well, given that they are quickly scrapped after small collisions due to their insanely expensive construction methods and materials.  I think less than 15,000 were ever build in the first place and I can’t remember the last time I saw a clean one.

  • avatar
    superbadd75

    Certainly we can’t just overlook the G8. Pontiac’s demise should make it even more collectible, kinda like a Studebaker.

  • avatar
    porschespeed

    I have to go with Dimwit on the Challenger. There will be plenty of Z06s floating around, majority of the Challengers will have been roached and squished.

    The 8C? Do we ge to pick things we can’t get in the US? If we do, +1 on the 8C…

  • avatar
    porschespeed

    I have to go with Dimwit on the Challenger. There will be plenty of Z06s floating around, majority of the Challengers will have been roached and squished.

    The 8C? Do we ge to pick things we can’t get in the US? If we do, +1 on the 8C…

  • avatar
    Garrick Jannene

    In addition to the Challenger, I’m going to throw in the Magnum SRT8 and possibly R/T as a future classic candidate.  The Magnum is both pretty rare and handsome looking.  I think the other LX platform mates though, the 300 and Charger, are too common to really become collector items.

  • avatar
    Steven02

    Pontiac Solstice, especially the coupe.
     
    I don’t think the G8 will because of what is available in Australia.  Same reason why I don’t think the recent GTO will be either.

  • avatar
    mtymsi

    The Pontiac Solstice Coupe. Don’t know what the production figures were but it was only built for about five months. I’m thinking it was by far the smallest production run of any model by a mainstream manufacturer not only in 2009 but in quite some time.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      WOW – didn’t even know they were building those Solstice Coupes. Seems to me that GM killed off alot of desireable products right at the end in order to keep some “meh” products like their SUVs, Impala, and Malibu.
      For the first time in YEARS the Pontiac lineup had several bright spots as did the Saturn lineup. This Solstice Coupe and the Astra were products I would have purchased however I keep my vehicles a long, long time (decade+) and I’m not confident I’ll be able to get parts towards the end of that period when I’ll need them. Also liked the G6 coupe and the G8 sedan (no manual tranny? Really?). I also liked the recent GTO too. Preferred the less “in your face GTO” over the G8 hood scoops.
      With my obsolete aircooled VWs at least I know they were sold for decades in other countries and therefore there are STILL many of them roaming the streets and thus the aftermarket has taken up whatever slack that VW has left in the market.

  • avatar
    mtymsi

    Since the edit function has disappeared……… the ZR 1 and Shelby Mustangs too as both are limited production and most likely not every day drivers so they will survive with low mileage.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    What are you planning on running these “classics”on in 25 yrs?

    • 0 avatar
      Raingler

      Same thing they run on today, of course there will be gasoline 25 years from now. What it will cost is anyone’s guess.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      Makes you wonder if future hot rodders will be retro-fitting whatever constitutes a perfomance drive train at that time into some of the current vehicles. Provided of course that a future performance drivetrain isn’t something made by Shimano or Campagnolo and incapable of moving anything with four wheels!

  • avatar
    ThorS

    Perfomance SUVs; Cayenne Turbo S, Grand Cherokee SRT8, AMG M-class, and so on.
    They’re dying breeds IMO, and will probably be highly sought after in the future.

  • avatar
    Lexingtonian

    Pontiac Solstice Coupe, especially.
     
    I’ll put forward the Chrysler Crossfire, as there are still some on the lots.

  • avatar
    Prado

    2009 Cadillac Escalade. Previous ‘owner’  Tiger Woods.  I hope GM, or whoever owns it  isn’t stupid enough to restore it before they sell it.

  • avatar
    poltergeist

    ’09 S2000.  Still a pretty impressive car even in it’s ninth (and last) model year. 

  • avatar
    peekay

    Anything with a manual transmission.

  • avatar
    George B

    I assume the collector cars for 25 years from now are cars that men in their 20s to early 30s today either wanted, but couldn’t afford, or had to give up when they started a family.  Bonus points for being rare and attractive.  I vote for Ralliart/EVO because I think Mitsubishi will be gone by then and the Audi A5 because it’s an attractive car that was priced just out of reach and not well suited to child seats.  I also like the Infiniti G-37 Coupe , but not sure if the target demographic will want one in the future.
     
    I kind of like the Ford Flex, but I can’t imagine future middle aged men having an emotional attachment to it.  Same with cars built to appeal to baby boomer nostalgia for hot rods and muscle cars.

    • 0 avatar
      mtymsi

      I respectfully disagree, I think today’s muscle cars are every bit as attractive to younger buyers as they were to the baby boom generation in the original muscle car era. They just aren’t practical and affordable. I don’t know for sure but I would imagine a large number of Mustang and Camaro buyers today are younger. Not so much the Challenger because they weren’t born when the original model was produced. Since it’s highly unlikely more powerful versions of the Shelby Mustang, Camaro SS and Corvette ZR 1 will ever be built IMO the current models will be collector cars

  • avatar
    djn

     
    Easy……Fiat Abarth 500 Esse Esse and Alfa Romeo Mito GTA
     

     

  • avatar
    mtypex

    The most collectible car of 2004 is the Oldsmobile Alero. Head towards 2004, young man! or not.

    • 0 avatar
      supremebrougham

      It’s funny you should mention that. I had an ’04 Alero, built one month before the last one rolled off the line. I entered it in the Oldsmobile Homecoming in 2008, and it was the newest Olds there. If it hadn’t started causing me trouble, I’d still have it, I loved that car. I had all the literature and assorted Olds memorabilia that makes for a good show car display, actually, I still have all the stuff.
       
      But yeah, a well cared for one, in particular a Final 500 Edition could and should, make the cut.

  • avatar
    v65magnafan1

    You know, I have to say. I like the Flex. Every time I see one, I can’t stop staring. Not a road-kill stare–so ugly you can’t stop looking at it. More like a curious stare. I might like it because it reminds me of the station wagons my dad used to drive. Of course, my wife won’t be seen in one. To her, it’s a hearse. Well, my dear, they’re not all black.

    Then again, what do I know? I drive a 2000 Crown Vic and have no intention of getting rid of it.

  • avatar
    smokin j

    For cars sold new as 2009 models, I’d say: Solstice/Sky, CTS-V, G8 GXP, S2000CR, Black Ed. Benzes, M series BMW’s, Audi’s S cars, Z06, boutique Mustang variants (ie GT500, Roush), Camaro SS, Challenger SRT, STi, EVO MR, Lexus LS F, and a VW R32. That’s all I can think of right now.

  • avatar
    DangerousDave

    Aztek.

  • avatar
    Facebook User

    Anything which is:
    1. Cheap enough for young people to afford
    2. Fast enough to be envied (And wrecked in large numbers)
    3. Sold enough for people to actually remember it in 30 years
    Also, things like Corvettes and Mustangs are givens, as are all high-end exotics.
    The WRX, DSM and Evo are three that spring to mind. Other turbo Subarus and Mitus don’t have the rep of the WRX, so they’ll probably be minor collectors items.
    Also, I honestly think the Prius and Insight will be classics someday. They’re along the same lines as the old VW, and those are still going strong.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    Are we talking classics, or “Curbside Classics”?
     
    I can’t think of many MY2009 cars that fall into the former (the Solstice coupe and possibly one or more Hummers, likely the H3 Alpha).  I can think of a lot of Curbsiders, though.

  • avatar
    allythom

    In no particular order:
    Smart, Nissan GTR, Porsche 911 (especially GT3) & Cayman,  Any AMG Benz, Honda S2000 CR, STI, EVO, CTS V, Audi RS6, Maybach, Lexus LFA, Chevy Aveo (they WILL be rare), Lotus Elise, M3 & M5

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      Chevy Aveo will be like a Chevette or a Pinto I suspect. Not worth anything but rare and worth a look in a car show to marvel at what we drove (and liked it! or not…) many years prior.
      At least with the aircooled Beetles there were alot of customization to make them interesting.

  • avatar
    GrandCharles

    I would bet G8 and G3 for two very different reasons…and an answer as to why did Pontiac died…(not the G8 of course!). Of course a Vibe on a two year production run will be kinda rare too…Also flex, cube, soul and nano

  • avatar
    FishTank

    Allythom – without a doubt – the 2009 or 10 Nissan GT-R. Also the Audi S5. First of its name/series, timeless lines, ridiculous performance (in stick – drove my pal’s and loved it. Heard auto is too insular).

  • avatar
    ajla

    If GM never makes a civilian version of that Caprice cop car- I could see it becoming a collector’s item.

  • avatar
    RGS920

    Solstice Coupe:  Production numbers 1152 Retail Ordered Solstice Coupes (approx 68% GXP).  Source http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f11/2009-wilmington-production-numbers-58244/  confirmed by http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/05/automobiles/autoreviews/05solstice.html

    That seems like a sure fire winner for a future classic (The regular solistice coupe, as opposed to the GXP, might actually be the true collectors item since there were fewer made.  
     
    If I had to make a list of possible future collectors items of (non-exotic cars) based on limited production  it would be:

    Chevy Cobalt SS (Turbo) Sedan   (500 made)      
    Pontiac Solstice Coupe                   (1152 made)         
    (Neon) SRT-4 ACR                           (1,175 made)          
    Mazda Protégé MP3                       (1500 made)
    S2000 CR                                            (<2000 made)
    New Corvette ZR-1                           (2000 planned)
    Crossfire SRT-6                                 (3012 made)
    Ford GT                                                (4038 made)  (Well, sort of exotic)
    Mazda Speed Protégé                    (4500 made)
    Integra Type R (DC2)                    (4800 made)
    Mazdaspeed Miata                         (5428 made)
    2001 Mustange Bullitt                  (5582 made)
    Corolla XRS (2ZZ Engine)            (6100 made)
    BMW M Coupe (z3)                         (6318 made)
    Mercury Marauder                        (11052 made)

    I included the Marauder just because I didn’t even remember Mercury made this car until i started this list and I doubt many remember that in 2003 Mercury revived it.  A few other cars I thought of, but  i couldn’t find production numbers were, 350Z 35th Anniversary edition, Audi B6 S4 Avan, 1st gen R32.  If any one else can think of any other rare non-exotics made in the past 10 years that I might have missed in my list?  (I didn’t bother to list SUVS and Trucks btw).

  • avatar
    RGS920

    Solstice Coupe:  Production numbers 1152 Retail Ordered Solstice Coupes (approx 68% GXP).  Source http://www.solsticeforum.com/forum/f11/2009-wilmington-production-numbers-58244/  confirmed by http://www.nytimes.com/2009/07/05/automobiles/autoreviews/05solstice.html

    That seems like a sure fire winner for a future classic (The regular solistice coupe, as opposed to the GXP, might actually be the true collectors item since there were fewer made.  
     
    If I had to make a list of possible future collectors items of (non-exotic cars) based on limited production  it would be:

    Chevy Cobalt SS (Turbo) Sedan   (500 made)      
    Pontiac Solstice Coupe                   (1152 made)         
    (Neon) SRT-4 ACR                           (1,175 made)          
    Mazda Protégé MP3                       (1500 made)
    S2000 CR                                            (<2000 made)
    New Corvette ZR-1                           (2000 planned)
    Crossfire SRT-6                                 (3012 made)
    Ford GT                                                (4038 made)  (Well, sort of exotic)
    Mazda Speed Protégé                    (4500 made)
    Integra Type R (DC2)                    (4800 made)
    Mazdaspeed Miata                         (5428 made)
    2001 Mustange Bullitt                  (5582 made)
    Corolla XRS (2ZZ Engine)            (6100 made)
    BMW M Coupe (z3)                         (6318 made)
    Mercury Marauder                        (11052 made)

    I included the Marauder just because I didn’t even remember Mercury made this car until i started this list and I doubt many remember that in 2003 Mercury revived it.  A few other cars I thought of, but  i couldn’t find production numbers were, 350Z 35th Anniversary edition, Audi B6 S4 Avant, 1st gen R32.  If any one else can think of any other rare non-exotics made in the past 10 years that I might have missed in my list?  (I didn’t bother to list SUVS and Trucks btw).

  • avatar
    baldheadeddork

    Arial Atom 3. Rare, jawdropping performance, mold-breaking styling, and remarkably efficient.

  • avatar
    GS650G

    Gm Saturn EV-1
    Already rare and collectible.
    Just about any muscle car, even the 65-67 ‘stangs are collectible today and they made 3 million of them.
    I could see mint Vipers going for huge amounts.
    But it seems low production, highly refined and well made cars will still be desired. With gas around 50 dollars a gallon 25 years from now only certain cars will be worth it. I plan to still have my classic Japanese motorcycles still, I may have to refine my own gasoline by then however.

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      Are there ANY EV-1 electrics out in the wild? I heard all were crushed except for a few given to universities and the Smithsonian. All were disabled (controllers ripped out literally). One university that tried to get their example roadworthy got a letter from GM lawyers warning them they would be in serious legal trouble if the university put it back on the road.
      A real shame GM didn’t just sell those cars. Good tech crushed.

  • avatar

    this year’s new cars??? Now that’s FUNNY! Let me wrack my brain.

    Mustang.
    Mustang.
    I don’t know, maybe Flex. Maybe not. Maybe Fusion. Maybe not. Csaba Csere put words in my mouth to the effect that it’s a “really striking car.” It’s not at all, but it’s vaguely more distinctive than a Camry.
    Maybe PT Crucible. Maybe not.
    Various Subarus.
    Eurovan.
    Mini Cooper, although this is weird. I mean, it’s an imitation of an old Mini Cooper, which is a classic. Yeah, I’m sure there will be a bunch of them at Carlisle, in various stages of disrepair.
    Odd as it may seem, there may be some Hyundais. I mean, classics, if we’re talking Carlisle, yup, and some of these Hyundais are actually high on the curve, although the 2009 curve would probably fall in the lower 20% of the 1964 curve.
    There just isn’t much. From the last 20 years? 

    first gen Saturn.
    Volvo 940 and 760.
    To a lesser extent the 850.
    240 series
    Last and second to last gen Caprice and badge engineered twins.
    Probably Crown Vic.
    first gen Taurus, definitely
    Late ’80s Mazda 323
    early ’90s 323–the inverted bathtub that resembles a pacer
    various civics
    various accords
    various integers
    Murano (just kidding!!! Hopefully they all will have disappeared! gag me with a spoon)
    New Betul
    Shmart

    The really nice contemporary cars, Porsches, the Audi TT, and maybe others, the Bangle Beemers (which I think are very nice), some of the Mercs, maybe the Lotuses, perhaps the Tesla if there are any left, these may be more the equivalent of today’s antiques, since they are a cut above the classics.
    How ’bout some of them new electrics???! And how ’bout that GM skateboard thingy?

  • avatar
    IGB

    I’d love the Evo to be collectible but they’ve been around a while and so far they’ve not shown a glimmer of “collectibility”. I love mine and it’s fun but too “niche”. Ricers will die out in time and there won’t be enough of them to fund a collector market in the future.
    The S2000 has a good shot as does the Challenger. The Magnum SRT8, maybe but after selling mine for an anal clenching depreciation hit, I’m not so sure. Absolutely nobody but Carmax wanted it.
    G3’s and Aveo’s will be as desirable as Metro’s and Festivas are today ie not.
    I would toss the 135i into the ring.
     

  • avatar
    Dynamic88

    CamCords.    Collectible cars don’t have to be high performance vehicles, nor do they have to be low production rarities.     Go to any car show and count the number of tri-five Chevies.    Today a 55 post sedan is worth a lot of $.   In it’s day, it was just basic trasportation.    Cars that represent their era.

  • avatar
    mtymsi

    Historically all high performance cars have become collectibles and I don’t see that changing.

  • avatar

    Muscle cars and sports cars:
    Ford Mustang, Chevrolet Camaro & Dodge Challenger
    Chevrolet Corvette and Dodge Viper
    Mazda Miata
    Saturn Sky and Pontiac Solstice

    Generally sedans never gain much of a collector following. Some exceptions might be:
    1994-96 Chevrolet Impala SS (already has a collector following)
    Mercury Marauder
    SRT-8 editions of the Chrysler 300 and Dodge Charger

    Station wagons from the 1950’s, 1960’s and 1970’s are increasing in popularity with collectors. This could indicate a limited degree of future collectibility for modern family trucksters (SUVs and minivans). This category is a long shot, but who knows.

  • avatar
    criminalenterprise

    Everything becomes a collectible as it gets older and rarer.  I see no one has mentioned the supercar makes (Furrie, Lambo, Aston, etc.), which sometimes soar in price while others suffer in value purgatory until the scrappage rate eventually graduates the redheaded stepchildren into collectible status.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Not much I could add to what hasn’t already been nominated but I would also the Audi R8.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    A lot of what makes a car a collectable is the emotional connection it has with the collector.  That is, we want to own cars that we had when we were kids, and re-live the good old days, or we have the cars we wanted to have when we were kids.  Some cars, I do believe tend to stand on their own, because they’re too big, too beautiful, too impressive to be dismissed.  Cars like the custom bodied Duesenbergs and Cords.  Then there are the odd birds, the quirky weird cars that like the Heinz 57 breed of mutt that shows up on our doorstep, we collect because in our hearts we know even white elephants need to have a home. 

    I cannot imagine why anyone would want to collect any of the current appliances that we use for daily transportation.  Nor could my dad ever figure out why I’d like to have a 1960 Starliner or a 1955 Chevy, (both of which we had as family cars) they were just used cars to him.  But not to me.  I don’t want them because they’re rare, or because they’re the best example of their age, but because they connect me with a part of my life.  I know that other people collect for other reasons.  But if you’re considering what contemporary cars will be collected in the future, the ones that we rode in as kids, the ones we wanted when we were young are the first places I would look.

  • avatar
    Andy D

    Collectables of the future will be limited by how easy it is to keep their engine management stuff going. I have acquired enough spares to keep my 88 528es running for quite awhile.
    My age is showing, but I dont consider a FWD appliance of any sort to be collectable

    • 0 avatar

      At the risk of being a poopmeister:
       
      What Andy D said, x100.  An 80’s or 90’s car is hard enough to find electronic bits for (I’ve got a collection of K-Jet ECUs for my Volvo 240).   An early 21st Century car will be more and more of a nightmare with every passing year.
       
      It’s not just engine management you’ll have to worry about… it’s the whole damn car.  Dashboard displays, a/c controls, transmission, braking, you name it, all inextricably dependent on each other, all dependent on ICs, network connections and microprocessors, all parts that have relatively short production runs.  Making parts substitutions will be extremely difficult… you won’t be able to just swap in a small block Chevy and call it a day.  Make one subsystem unhappy and they’ll all be unhappy.
       
      Repairing your 2009 car running in 20, 30 or 40 years will be like trying to repair a 2009 model cellphone: virtually impossible, even for a professional.
       
      Therefore, I submit to you: 2009 model cars will be collectible only as sheet metal sculpture.  They may still run, but only as long as the electronics hold out.  Once they give out, that’s all she wrote, my friends.  Replacements will be as scarce as hen’s teeth and next to impossible to replicate.
       

    • 0 avatar
      panzerfaust

      I agree, the plastic parts will be the most difficult to replace, in as much as there’s little or no repairing to be done.  Then add to that the desire to make cars out of materials that have less environmental impact and you’ll have rot happening quicker and out of materials that may be rarer than the car itself. 

  • avatar

    Panzerfaust is right. Its either the cars you had or the cars you wanted. Although within the cars you had, some may stand out more than others. I couldn’t care less about having the ’57 Chevy, even though we crossed the country twice in that car, or the ’50 Stude, and I’m not even interested in a 1970 Valiant, which was a really nice car. I lost interest in the ’57 after I realized it was a piece of crap, although I do enjoy seeing and photographing them at shows. I do want the ’65 Peugeot, badly, though, perhaps because of all the road trips we took in that car during the year in France, and the fact that it drove better than any of the other cars my parents had, unless you factor in the pickup on the Valiant, at which point a lot of people might prefer that.
    On the other hand, so many of today’s cars have so little personality that maybe Carlisle is not going to be full of Camcords and Hyundais. I love going to shows and photographing old cars — check out my website, Motorlegends.com–but so many of today’s cars would be a waste of pixels.

  • avatar
    dolorean23

    Agreed w/ Holzman. This list is perennially what we want as car enthusiasts, so it stands to reason other car junkies out there would too. I’d like to add the resurgant Taurus SHO and the Caddy CTS-V, both of whom are rather nice sports sedans that have all accoutrements coupled with rarity of build on a nice design. Simple works. Also the ’09 Mustang GT-500 and Camaro SS for the same reasons as the last of the great pony cars (may insert Genesis Coupe here, time will tell). The BMW 1 series and Infiniti G37 for luxury sports. The Mazdaspeed 3 and VW Golf/Rabbit R32 are obvious adds for the small car segment.

    For the Oddball, the VW Eurovan of the last decade is certainly  a keeper, especially if you have the Westphalia package with VR6 under the hood. Also the Saturn Astra XR 3 door or the 5 door XR with the panoramic sunroof option. The VW Jetta Sedan and Sportwagen TDI with 6 spd transmission and the Scriocco for you lucky damn Europeans. The Flex will be an interesting wildcard as will the Traverse.

  • avatar

    It will be interesting to see Japanese cars become mainstream collectibles. At this time older Japanese cars have a very modest following compared to older American and European cars.

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    It’s an easy question, really.
    1. Anything that appears to be a muscle car on paper, and to a lesser extent, by outside appearance.
    2. Anything that sells above MSRP.
    3. Anything that is considered a “sports car.”
    4. Any car that is currently tacked up on the bedroom walls of teenagers who aren’t old enough to drive, or can afford the desirable car on their wall.
    Everything else is scrap waiting to happen.
    I seriously doubt any kid has a Ford Flex tacked up on his wall.

  • avatar
    fincar1

    Subaru SVX.

  • avatar
    ohsnapback

    RX-8.
     
     

  • avatar
    coatejo

    American RWD cars (not trucks) powered by V-8’s will be very collectable. If I had a nice clean Chrysler 300C with a Hemi I would hang on to it….they will be a dying breed, either by CAFE regulation or economics. Crown Vic, Grand Marquois, Magnum/Charger, Camaro, Challenger, Mustang, Shelby, Corvette, again American V-8 power = lots of interest in 25 years I think. I also like the Australian GTO and G8…they are keepers too.

  • avatar
    davey49

    Collectible cars are not always rare, Mustangs, Chevelles and Novas sold by the tens of thousands and I see them at car shows now.
    Toyota Prius
    Honda Element
    Scion xB
    Chrysler Aspen
    Dodge Nitro
    A Jeep Liberty with the wide open roof option

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Agree with 1st gen Scion xB. Fairly limited production. Interesting, if unusual design. Interesting marketing. Potential for modification reduces availability of original cars.
     
    (I also just bought one, and really, really appreciate it!)

  • avatar
    B10er

    I for one seriously doubt there will be many modern classics in the future. 

    Cars used to come in a great variety of shapes, designs, colours, and used often diverse technological approaches. Indeed, European, Japanese, and American cars were instantly distinguishable at first glace.  Some worked, some didn’t, but either way people often loved their cars often in spite of their flaws, and often became intimate with them at least on some level because they could and had to.

    Today, as result of government/safety regulations, slavery to wind tunnel testing, general lack of automotive originality, and an ever more bland buying public, most cars are remarkably similar in computer generated style, appearance, and substance – which shade of black do you want sort of thing.

    I don’t know how many cars post c.1990 really inspire people with their style and design. Rather I think its what they can do that impresses most – whether it be fuel efficency, performance, cargo room, etc. In each area, there can always be room for improvement, and as such its the next one that has the draw.

    How many environment-types will want a 1st Gen Prius 30 years down the road, to go through the effort and hassle finding trim bits, disposing of batteries, and waiting weeks for parts to arrive? Esp. when the 8th Gen Prius gets 95mpg? I dunno…we’ll see I suppose.

    In my humble opinion, the golden era of the automobile was  when the modern car shape took hold and their lines were penned by actual human designers  unincumbered by regulations and computer aerodynamic testing. Chevrolets, Mercedes, SAABs, Rovers, Fords, Alfa Romeos, Porsches, Datsuns and Toyotas were all so different from each other – being a brand loyalist had meaning, and there was genuine diversity. The era began to fade in the 1990s, and I don’t know if it will truely be back.  

    Will a Prowler will ever steal a show when a Superbird sits next to it? In 15 years, or 20, or 25? Will a Z8 be that much cooler than a 507 in 20 years? Hmmm…

    What is a classic even? Some cars will of course age better than others, and remain desireable when 10, 15, or 20 years old, and have brand fan-boys defending how much better their’s are than the exact same thing from another make, but does that make it a classic?

    I agree with the comments about WRXs, but that also saddens me, as watching a rally dominated by Mitsubishis and WRXs is so painfully dull compared to the manly coolness of say the 1960 Monte Carlo Rally.

    I don’t at all care for a Miata, but in terms of sporting impact, re-ushering in the roadster into the automotive marketplace, is pretty big. Then again, the Miata was nothing more than a better engineered but much blander copy of genuine and much more pretty cars – Elan, Healy 100 or 3000, TR4 and so on. The same applied to the new Mini – very cool, but an improved copy of a real classic…

    I’d love to own a new M3 saloon or m5, but in terms of classic-ness, even the e34 M5 is hard pressed to be called a classic, and its earliest examples are now over 20 years old and although very smart looking, is still an early form of the modern aero-bubble – clean but not distinctive. The e30 M3 is becoming a genuine classic, of only because it was an actual homologation special, plus the fact that it was a blast to drive and one of the last boxy cars. Will a new M3 or M5 be a ‘classic’, or just a really hot car that will eventually destroy unsuspecting owners with repair bills?

    The only thing I really can say for sure is, the Dodge Nitro, Jeep Liberty (with any roof, unless the rare .50 Cal turret option), Chrysler Aspen, Honda Element, Aztek, and Hummer H2 will NOT be classics, outside of their brand fanboys. Perhaps the Aztek and Hummer H2 will be remembered as incarnations of an era gone wrong, a la Cadillac Cimarron or AMC Pacer, but less cool…

  • avatar
    Ralph Kinney Bennett

    I believe the first Acura Legend and the first Lexus LS400 will be collectibles.  they are both milestones in the truest sense of the word.  The Legend  revitalized the idea of the sports sedan with its build quality and performance.  The LS400 just blew everyone away with its overall quality.  It woke up everyone in the luxury class.  It’s spare lines may have been uninspiring to some  and a bit derivative,  but its fit and finish, its attention to detail and the promise of quiet, luxurious, dependable performance it delivered make it a landmark car.

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