By on January 3, 2019

2019 Ford Ranger

Ever swapped out the battery in a cloud-car Chrysler, or maybe an old Sebring or PT Cruiser? You’ll be reminded of that when the time comes to change your new-generation Ford Ranger’s oil, assuming you’re a proud member of the DIY crowd.

Job One for those looking to freshen the Ranger’s internal lubricant, besides heading to the store for a couple of jugs of synthetic and a filter, is to break out the jack. You’ll need to remove a wheel.

(Editor’s Note: Ford has reached out to us to inform us that the service procedure we referenced below is incorrect, and that the wheel does not need to be removed. We regret the error, and we have further addressed it here.)

Because the 2.3-liter Ecoboost four-cylinder found in the 2019 Ranger isn’t exactly the same beast as that found in other Ford vehicles, the oil filter migrates to a slightly new location. A larger oil cooler means the filter no longer hangs towards the oil pan near the rear of the engine. Instead, the filter sticks out the left side, at right angles to the engine’s cylinders, making it less accessible for fumbling hands.

Sliding under there and going to town just isn’t in the cards, at least for the oil filter phase of the operation.

2019 Ford Ranger at MAP - Image: Ford

A service procedure obtained by TTAC states that, after removing the left front wheel, a technician or owner must then remove an access panel secured by nine push-pin retainers. From there, one removes the filter with an end cap tool. To actually drain the oil, which of course you’ll accomplish before attacking that filter, you’ll first need to unbolt the power steering control module underbody shield. Four bolts hold that on.

In all, there’s quite a few steps to take before replenishing the truck’s 6.2 quarts of 5W-30.

Tailoring the 2.3L for Ranger duty produced a setup that isn’t likely to annoy those who can’t be bothered to change their own oil — which, let’s face it, represents the vast majority of vehicle owners. They’ll just be happy to have 270 hp and 310 lb-ft to push their rig around. Maybe they’ll stop to boast to their friends about that 26 mpg highway rating, too. Ford would love it if they did.

For others, or perhaps the truck’s second or third owner, this oil change procedure sets the Ranger apart from domestic and foreign rivals, none of which require the removal of a wheel. At worst, there’ll be a skid plate or shield to get out of the way. The V6 Chevrolet Colorado and GMC Canyon twins make up for their lacklustre interior with an oil filter that’s accessible from under the hood. Less time spent on one’s back on cold pavement is a good thing, but there’s tradeoffs for everything.

[Image: Chad Kirchner/TTAC, Ford Motor Company]

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252 Comments on “DIYers Take Note – the 2019 Ford Ranger’s Oil Change Procedure Contains a Big Extra Step [UPDATED]...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Epic fail.

  • avatar
    afedaken

    Is there room for a relocation kit?

    • 0 avatar
      cammark

      always.

      and even if there wasn’t, the DIY’er collective will relocate the engine to the pile in the backyard and install a 4BT or LS or 2JZ…

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Yes, replacing the engine (and about a thousand other related components) is so much easier than changing the oil, and God knows that there will be no access issues with engines never designed to be there.

  • avatar
    gtem

    Typical for a new car with the stupid shielding in the way, but the wheel removal is a new one.

    My old 4Runner’s filter access is also through the wheel well (wheel turned out) and it always dumps a bunch from the filter all over the skid plate, which then drips out over the course of several days. My ES300 also had horrible filter placement that led to oil pooling inside of a motor mount bracket, creating the illusion of a leak from the oil pan. Conversely, I was astounded at how easy and accessible my old Audi’s drain bolt and filter are: right at the edge of the front bumper, no lifting necessary. Love it.

  • avatar
    MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

    Is this one of those “Better Ideas from FORD”??

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    “Tailoring the 2.3L for Ranger duty produced a setup that isn’t likely to annoy those who can’t be bothered to change their own oil — which, let’s face it, represents the vast majority of vehicle owners.”

    Dealer labor in my hometown is $135 an hour. Nobody is spending an extra six tenths of an hour changing oil for free, and that’s before Ford metallurgy welds the wheel to the hub. DIYers may not have liked Chrysler Sebring battery placement, but they were better off than people who paid the surcharges for ‘difficult battery installation.’

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I was at my grandfather’s in law over Christmas, he mentioned off hand that O’Reilly’s wouldn’t install his new battery on his ’07 Sportage because it registered in their system as “difficult to replace” or some such. He had the battery sitting right in his garage so I just brought my socket set over (that of course I keep in my trunk) and popped it right in. It’s literally just the intake tract tubing attached with two plastic phillips head screws/pins to get to the battery.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      “Nobody is spending an extra six tenths of an hour changing oil for free”

      My new Bullitt Mustang came with ‘lifetime free oil changes (every 5K miles or 5mos).’ Good thing, as the beastly Coyote takes 10qts of semi-syn.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Ford usually puts a little grease on the hub to avoid that so a plus there and many vehicle manufactures have coated hubs these days to avoid that.

      The worst offender was Dodge in the early aughts with their dualie trucks. I remember trying to get the rear wheels off a Dodge and beat on the rear wheel so long and so hard the rim had a pronounced wobble.

      Later on a call to the dealership confirmed this was an ongoing issue and the fix was to get a 10 ton hydraulic porta power and place it between both rear wheels and force them off the hubs.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        We were seeing new F150s getting towed in because of flat tires on wheels that owners and tow truck drivers alike couldn’t separate from the hubs with some regularity when I worked for a company that sold tires in 2016. One Ford F150 driver confessed to driving with all the lug nuts removed in an unsuccessful attempt to get the wheel off. RAMs had more problems with bad lug nuts, which my FCA techs told me was down to previous shops using the wrong sockets. Maybe.

  • avatar
    Verbal

    If there is any vehicle type that should be DIYer friendly, it is the pickup truck. Notionally, one would expect truck owners to be more likely to turn a wrench on their vehicle of choice than say, oh I don’t know, owners of shitbox compact crossovers.

    This really is a poor design decision. Or does Ford think Ranger buyers are a bunch of lifestyle poseurs who will never get their hands dirty?

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    This truck is a shining example of mediocrity. The only redeeming quality is the powertrain but even that took a hit because of this stupid oil change procedure.

    Otherwise it brings nothing new to the segment that is full of midsized trucks.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    No surprise here, it’s right out of the F’d Over Rated Disaster playbook.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    If I was shopping for a truck, this would be enough to skip it. I always check owners manual for required maintenance before “diving in”. How could you otherwise?
    I think, old Pathfinder has same issue – wheel well access. I am already p1$$ed that I have to remove few screws to open access hole in my Mazda6. I remember how easy it was to do in Subaru Loyale – you didn’t even need to go under the car. Everything was right there, under the hood.

    • 0 avatar
      redapple

      My 2018 Subaru Forester.
      Oil filter is right there-wide open when you pop the hood.

      Insanely easy.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        Buick LaCrosse is the same deal. Open hood, look down, turn the filter to the left. It is wonderful.

        My first car, 85′ Ford EXP (pattern maybe?) the filter was on the back and directly above the exhaust so no matter what you did you poured oil over the exhaust. Perfect.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      “I remember how easy it was to do in Subaru Loyale – you didn’t even need to go under the car. Everything was right there, under the hood.”

      yup. Current gen Golf–you can change the oil wearing a tux, if you want, and not get a spot of dirt or oil on you. It’s all from the top, if you buy an oil extractor. And who wouldn’t?

      Fiat too, if I recall. Suck the oil out, pull the cover off the oil filter cartridge, replace filter cartridge, screw cover back on, put dipstick back in, fill with oil.

      The dealership owner’s son could do it.

  • avatar
    DougD

    I just saw my first truckload of new Rangers going down the road this morning.

    And just when I’d gotten done cursing the underbelly pan on my Focus this comes up. I don’t think it’s THAT bad, I can trust my DIY self to do these things successfully but what about that dumb kid at Jiffy Lube?

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      I naively offered to change out the cabin filter in a friend’s Fiesta. Boy was that a mistake!

      I guess so they didn’t need a different HVAC system for right-hand-drive, the blower (and filter) is buried inside the center stack. Getting that filter out required removing the glove box (that’s pretty standard), but also a kick panel, and three torx screws, one of which was near-impossible to access. Once you get the filter cover off, you practically have to bend the filter in half to get it out and back in.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      forget about torquing lug nuts

  • avatar
    jack4x

    Can’t wait to see the creative ways this will be screwed up by a $10/hr Jiffy Lube tech.

    It’s hard to believe there wasn’t room for a better solution with a 4 cylinder engine under the hood of a truck, but here we are.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Easy: they’ll just lose a few of the shield fasteners each time you come in, and eventually the shield will disappear too.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Along with the wheel well liner and the lug nuts….

      • 0 avatar
        MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

        “Easy: they’ll just lose a few of the shield fasteners each time you come in, and eventually the shield will disappear too”

        ……reminds me of back when I took over my wife’s 2006 Acura TL – at one oil change they start telling me how messed up the drain plug was; I said well we know who did that! Oil changes had always been at the same place.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          My brother has a customer with an ’07 Grand Caravan, they’ve always taken it to the same Valvoline quick change place for oil. At some point some maroon wrenches the drain plug so tight that it busts the spot welds on the inside lug off so the bolt would just spin with the lug on the inside. Valvoline totally denied any culpability, offered to replace the oil pan at full cost to the customer. My brother ended up getting the job, drilled a hole in the old pan, drained oil, dropped the pan and installed new one, called Valvoline to tear them a new one, that’s about where it ended.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      The quick lube places are going to have a big sign about the “extra” fees required to service these trucks. I can understand removing skid plates or other aero panels (my B5 Passat had this) but removing a WHEEL? That seems excessive for a normal maintenance procedure. In a Lotus I would expect such nonsense but in a mid-sized truck there should be plenty of room.

      • 0 avatar
        sirwired

        I didn’t mind the aero panel so much on my B5 Passat, but it was so damn hard to get that thing fitted back on. It was large, floppy, had three different fasteners, and was hard to get everything lined up right.

        My current chariot, a ’17 CR-V, also has an underbody panel, but it only has two fastener types, is made from aluminum, and really simple to line up correctly. (That said, one of those fastener types is still those 1/4-turn Dzus screws with an impossibly shallow slot, and a stubbornness to engage in anything but a factory-fresh vehicle.)

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          My B5 A4 must be missing its panel (cheap replica RS4 bumper after being wrecked and rebuilt). Easy-peasy! Much like the silver lining of the cheapo aftermarket air intake pipe is super quick disassembly (it also popped off on my while driving, not fun lol).

      • 0 avatar
        FerrariLaFerrariFace

        Kinda funny you say that because I was thinking the wheel was no big deal and the underbody shield was the bigger problem. At least you know you’ll leave the Jiffy Lube with the wheel reattached… albeit scratched and overtorqued. The underbody plastic will be missing more fasteners after each oil change, or just left off completely. There have even been cases where oil change monkeys cut through the panel rather than go through the effort of removing and replacing it properly.

      • 0 avatar
        carguy67

        Yep. Most of those places use grease pits, I believe (I used one once and they didn’t tighten the filter–never again). Removing a wheel will be a PITA for them; they’ll probably have to jack it up and get under it on a creeper.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      Wait until the steering module goes bad because the shield was left off to save time at a stealership…

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @golden2husky – of the 2 recalls I had on my 1997 Escort one was for an improperly shielded airbag sensor that could get corroded and fire the airbag randomly.

        I can imagine the havoc that would be wrought by a missing shield in say a state that is very wet and aggressively salts the roads.

  • avatar
    jh26036

    Every new car should have an oil filter on the top of the engine, full stop.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      The drain plug is at the bottom of the pan, so I have no problem with filters that are accessed while you’re under there anyway. Should there be any disassembly involved? Absolutely not.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        “The drain plug is at the bottom of the pan, so I have no problem with filters that are accessed while you’re under there anyway.”

        You’ve never even heard of an oil extractor, have you.

        Slide extractor tube down dipstick tube. Get a good vacuum going on the extractor. Open ‘er up, put extractor on ground, go away for a few minutes.

        No reason at ALL to be under the car.

        So yes, the oil filters should all be right up top, where God and VW and Fiat put them.

        • 0 avatar
          ldockey17

          Next time u use that oil extractor, when no more oil can be sucked out. Open the drain plug. I ll bet that there is at least a pint or more that the extractor didn’t extract. I know, I have used one.

        • 0 avatar
          JD-Shifty

          VW….LOL

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          I don’t know how many of VW’s frangible dipstick tubes I’ve replaced over the past couple of years. Is using an extractor tube why they tend to come into the shop broken? I’m sure an extractor tube through the dipstick does just as good of a job removing the sorts of things that accumulate at the bottom of the pan as draining from the lowest point of the system.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      on top, and facing vertical. No reason why oil has to spill out all over the place

  • avatar
    Maymar

    It’ll still be a pain to do, but any chance that the panel in question (and the filter behind it) can be accessed by turning the steering full lock?

  • avatar
    IBx1

    I doubt that’s completely necessary but a relocation kit is definitely in the works if it is.

  • avatar
    paxman356

    I had a 2005 KIA Optima, and I had to take off the passenger tire to get to the oil filter. Never understood why they put it there.

    • 0 avatar
      azfelix

      It is not necessary to remove the tire in this model. The design flaw is that oil drips onto underbody pieces once the filter is removed. This is more common than one would expect in a variety of cars.

      I would suggest that the names, phone numbers, and email addresses (maybe even addresses) of all the engineers involved in engine design and placement in a car be displayed on a plaque under the VIN. This might motivate them to consider accessibility for maintenance and repair when they log in to their CAD programs in their cubicles.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Yes, because individual engineers design things like this on purpose, just to make maintenance harder. It couldn’t possibly be because they are held to strict budgets, design constraints from other departments, regulatory requirements, etc.

        Engineers are typically among the most DIY types, myself included. This is the kind of thing that no engineer would want to do willingly. It’s unquestionably a bad decision, but I hardly think shaming a lowly designer will improve anything.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Too often one engineer has no idea where his part of the design is going to be in relation to the overall product. One of the biggest and most hilarious examples was an onboard piece of Navy equipment where an inspection panel was conveniently placed at eye level by the engineer designing that equipment. What he didn’t know was that the ship’s designer then mounted that equipment against a bulkhead–with the inspection panel facing said bulkhead. The only fix? Cut an inspection panel THROUGH that water-tight bulkhead; the component could not be turned because of the way it interacted with other components in the compartment where it stood. So… which designer was at fault? The one who designed the component? The one who designed the layout of those components? The one who designed the overall structure of the ship? Who?

          It seems to me this is exactly what happened with the Ranger’s design… nobody really talked to anyone else and while in some other vehicle it may be quite accessible, in the Ranger it is not.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Everybody has to “fight” for space in the vehicle – that was pretty well addressed in the book “Car”. Then you have to deal with the beancounters who don’t want to spend a thing. As an engineer, I guarantee if a design is a poor compromise, it’s because their input sadly carries the least weight.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    ok, now If l feel a bit better about my 2016 Toyota requiring removal of an access panel, and having to replace the filter element….no handy cartridge for me.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      The good part about Toyota filter – you can buy box of 10 OEM on ebAy at $3.20/ea. Bad part, is when you buy oil/filter deals at pep boys, it is cheap but only if the filter is under $5. And this filter from purolator is $10. It kind of messes up filter/oil balance for me.
      Another bad part, it takes longer to change the element than entire FMJ filter.

  • avatar
    iNeon

    The PT Cruiser battery only requires removing two band clamps and the hold-down block.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    It’s amazing. Cars have existed for what, 120 years? Why is it so hard to design an easy oil change?

    I think I just saw… a Volkswagen?… with the oil filter in the engine bay. I’ve been seeing manufacturers FINALLY put a cut out for oil drain bolts. I get that engineers might not be able to anticipate difficulties in changing an exhaust header or something. But oil changes???

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      My old TDI and my wife’s TSI both have top-side cartridge filters. Super easy oil changes with an oil extractor.

      • 0 avatar
        carguy67

        I don’t trust oil extractors. I think you get a better ‘flush’ with a drain plug on a tilted pan (most plugs are at a low point, and the extractor can’t necessarily get there). But I’m old school.

    • 0 avatar
      FerrariLaFerrariFace

      I’m so tired of hearing this. It’s not hard to design that. But engineers are beholden to the their bosses and the bean counters, not the DIYer or your local mechanic. I know this because I’m one. Once you start signing our paychecks, we’ll engineer an engine bay just the way you like it.

      And don’t give me the “I’m a paying customer, therefore I’m signing your paycheck by extension” line. Because you’re not. You’re way outnumbered by the millions of other customers who don’t give a damn about where the oil filter is.

      This is the truth (about cars). Like it or not.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      It is designed and engineered by Ford of Australia. May be this is the issue

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Completely brilliant. Ford is so amazing. OMG this is just so wonderful, so much better than Toyota and GM. The Messiah pickup is here.

    Pfffft.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    In about a year, some non-DIYers will learn that their old oil filter was never actually replaced, and the shop simply sucked the old oil out through the dipstick and pumped in new oil for $30.

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      That’s totally true. I imagine it’ll get replaced if the consumer is also paying for a tire rotation (because the wheel will be off anyway), but otherwise I could totally see the filter not getting swapped.

      I wonder if the schedule calls for the filter to be swapped with every change? My ’17 CR-V with the 1.5T calls for it every other change, and it doesn’t call for any sort of fancy weird filter (one of the two OEM filters is just a Fram painted blue.) I go ahead and change out the filter anyway, since it’s just a few bucks and I’m already staring at it, but if it was a pain to change, I’d probably just leave it there until needed like the factory calls for.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        To that point, oil change intervals have gotten so far apart now it is basically a no-brainer to rotate at the same time.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Once a year, with included rotation. Yup.

          We’ll see what the interval does going from a V6 to 2.0T sometime this year. (According to Blackstone Labs, the Honda OLI is uncannily accurate.)

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Ditto for the GM Oil Life Monitor. Both the Honda and GM solution in study after study indicated they go, “hey, change the oil,” around 750 to 1000 miles before it has reached the “HEY CHANGE THE FECKIN’ OIL,” point.

          • 0 avatar
            jalop1991

            “We’ll see what the interval does going from a V6 to 2.0T sometime this year. ”

            Well, per my used oil analyses of my GTI, those factory-specified 10K changes are more than fine for my driving style (20k/year).

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            Yes. On one sheet, I had stated that I had just gotten to 10% remaining on the OLI, and Blackstone said there was about 10% of the additives remaining.

            I’ve heard that the GM system is also excellent.

            And by my average over the years, I’d probably be able to get another 750-1,000 miles.

            However, the OLI telltale chimes and flashes at you every time you turn the key/push the button to start the engine after the percentage hits 15%, so it gets damn annoying after a couple weeks; my OCD won’t let me just reset the OLI, then do it again after the oil change, just because other maintenance items are tracked based on the “Maintenance Minder,” and there’s no fixed schedule in the O/M. Cars nowadays sometimes have a facility to schedule maintenance appointments at a dealer, and at that time (or if you accept a disclaimer in the settings), those nags should be able to be stopped until the work is done, or until the OLI percentage hits zero.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Honestly, it doesn’t sound that terrible. The “Power Steering Module Panel” removal doesn’t sound any worse than any number of cars with belly pans.

    While having to go through the wheel well sounds bad, an oil change is also a time to do a tire rotation (meaning I already gotta pull the wheel off), and I generally have pretty good luck with captive push-pin fasteners.

    Though I do worry that the oil dripping out of the filter is going to go all over the place unless that access panel underneath also lets out the drippy mess.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      How dare you make light of this extremely dire and debilitating issue. This is a shining example of how Ford hates everyone and purposely designs vehicles accordingly. Cars have been made exactly the same way for 120 years, nothing has changed whatsoever, not engine designs, not crash standards, nothing except the shiny bits on top. That’s why we have engines with 46 hp that get 8 mpg, must be cranked by hand and last 10,000 miles between rebuilds. Everyone knows that.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Why defend such a thoughtlessly designed process for regular maintenance on a utilitarian vehicle of all things? If it were some kind of luxo sedan that only gets taken to the dealer where this oil change process would only delay you enough to get some more latte sipping in that’s one thing, but on a Ford truck? Kind of pathetic.

        • 0 avatar
          sirwired

          @gtem I’m not saying it couldn’t have been designed better, just that it’s not exactly a major stumbling block to maintenance here. It’ll add no more than a few minutes to how long it’ll take for even the most ham-fisted DIY-er.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            It makes the difference between having to pull your jack (and a jack stand if you’re being safe) out, getting your air/electric impact or breaker bar out, sure not a big deal but another 5 minutes or so (plus the time to get the shielding off) to a task that normally only takes 10 minutes or so to do. Big deal? No. Needlessly Inconvenient? Yes.

          • 0 avatar
            sirwired

            An oil change is generally time to rotate the tires anyway, so the jack, stands, and breaker/impact are already coming out.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            For most modern Fords the OCI is 10k miles so yeah its time for a tire rotation and that’s what I’ve done with my vehicles for ages.

            However I’m betting that turning the wheel to one side, particularly when the vehicle is jacked up you’ll be able to remove the wheel well liner, at least enough to change the oil filter.

        • 0 avatar
          Fordson

          Interested in your thoughts on the Toyota cartridge-type oil filter – you know, the one where you have the aluminum filter housing – that threads onto the engine with a right-hand helical thread – and has the little drain cap that you have to remove in order to drain out the oil that’s in the housing – that threads INTO the housing – also with a right-hand helical thread…which inevitably results in the entire assembly loosening from the engine and dumping that oil all over the place when you try to loosen just the cap.

          After which you have to clean the cap, the housing, the mount on the engine, R&R the cartridge, the two o-rings, figure out how to re-torque the housing to the engine more tightly than you re-torque the cap to the housing…so that next time, you can avoid the mess you had this time…maybe.

          What genius at Toyota Powertrain designed that system rather than just using a spin-on filter?

          • 0 avatar
            Jon

            My thoughts are its cheaper and toyota along with (insert vehicle manufacturer here) does not care about easy to work on and cost for the DIYer.

            Anyone who says modern vehicles are mechanically easier to work on than 20+ year old vehicles has not been under a car with normal DIY tools for a very long time.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Oh I agree in full on Toyota’s plastic cartridge carrier system. I have the same exact issue with that inner metal part spinning off with the whole unit, inevitably dumping a bunch of oil everywhere. That and the plastic cartridge carrier can really get cooked onto the housing, making me afraid that I’ll break something as I try to break it loose with a freaking 1/2 inch drive breaker bar (the one time I did an oil change on my sister in law’s Camry Hybrid with the same 2.5L motor).

          • 0 avatar
            carguy67

            “What genius at Toyota Powertrain designed that system rather than just using a spin-on filter?”

            Ha. Cartridge filters came on my ’56 and ’67 Healeys. I changed them both to spin-ons. I guess old designs become ‘the latest thing’ after 50 years or so.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        God you are bitter. What’s life like being so miserable?

      • 0 avatar
        CKNSLS Sierra SLT

        John-the above is easily your worst post…….ever.

    • 0 avatar
      Fordson

      Ding-ding-ding. If you are DIYing your oil change, you’re probably DIYing your tire rotations, too.

      A minor inconvenience, not a showstopper, all the melodramatic proclamations here notwithstanding.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Only when I do tire rotation, I do one wheel at the time. In this case my car is tilting in one corner and this is not good to change oil. For oil change, I go onto ramps. How can I go there if I need to remove one tire?

        • 0 avatar
          Fordson

          This should be interesting…so you have only one wheel off the ground at one time when doing a tire rotation…? How exactly does that work?

          I think it’s pretty generally accepted that one needs to have at least two wheels off the ground at once to do a tire rotation. Need video…

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            @Fordson
            Very simple. I make all lugs loose to the point when they can be turned by hand. I lift first corner, replace wheel with a spare… repeat 4 more times. Tighten the lugs. Drive 50 miles. Re-tighten the lugs.

            And this is only for Highlander, which can’t be lifted high enough by my small floor jack. My sedans I can do more efficiently (No spare use) by using both, floor jack and regular jack.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Well if you do a 5 tire rotation you only need one wheel off the ground at a time. That is what I used to do in out Mountaineer as it came with a matching wheel and tire.

            For my other cars I pull out the spare as to do a proper rotation on most of my vehicles you can’t just lift one side of the car. The driven axle gets the tires that were on the other side of the car while the non drive axle gets them from the same side of the other end.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Most places that sell tires do free tire rotations. If you don’t have a lift, and most DIYers do not, then rotating tires is a much bigger undertaking than changing the oil on a car that wasn’t designed by the socially promoted.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Agreed with Todd. For me, I’m either rotating tires when I switch from snows/summer tire setup, or on my wife’s car, I take it to Discount Tire for free rotations. I wholly decouple it from oil changes, as I suspect most other DIYers do too.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Are there usually holes in the belly pans? How would you know if any fluids are leaking from the engine or transmission? (I honestly don’t know.)

      That procedure does seem to be a bit much for a non-luxury vehicle.

      I remember one time when I got tired of the OLI nagging me, and I took the car to my local quickie-lube. Ahead of me was a lady in an Audi TT. After thirty minutes, they finally got the Audi done, and apologized to me profusely for the delay: it was because of all the gymnastics required to get the car apart to reach the filter and the drain, not the least of which being the belly pan. (I couldn’t get into line for the second bay because car after car got into line, and the dude in the Buick behind me had to wait until I was done!)

  • avatar
    tylanner

    I hate dealing with lug nuts….but of the interval is really 10000 miles then I’ll let it slide…

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      running a 10k OCI on a truck with a modern turbo 4 motor running thin synthetic that actually sees anything resembling work is a bad idea all around IMO.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        99% of F150s don’t see “work” in that sort of definition.

        And why “thin synthetic”? Does “thick” do more oiling? Flow matters more than viscosity, no?

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          The higher the viscosity, the better the lubrication. Flow matters at low temperatures and when you’re using oil as a cooling medium.

          http://www.upmpg.com/tech_articles/motoroil_viscosity/

          “The lower the viscosity, the more wear will inevitably occur.”

          0W20 and other engine life limiters are all about reduced pumping losses for minutely lower fuel consumption. The manufacturers get to prostrate themselves before Obama’s CAFE and they get to sell you another car sooner. Win-win!

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Higher viscosity does protect better in general. However as rpms rise there is such a thing as the oil being too thick to keep up with the needed flow.

            In general engines that are low rpm and high load can benefit from a thicker oil while those that operate at high rpm can benefit from a thinner oil.

            The use of 5-20 and 0-20 oil is all about CAFE as are the longer oil change intervals.

            The father of the Marauder spent years in power train and did the testing to determine which engines could handle switching to 5-20 and which couldn’t. He also confirmed that there were no changes to the engine designs that made the switch. His recommendation was to use the 5-30 originally used in those engines for the longest engine life.

            If this article is correct, and I think it is, this engine is supposed to use 5-30 which is not particularly thin. For many years 30wt was the standard and the use of something thicker like 10-40 was relatively short lived in the grand scheme of things.

          • 0 avatar
            Jon

            @ Todd

            Higher viscosity does mean better lubrication and you could not be more correct about he CAFE standards and fuel economy. However, if the bearing clearances in an engine are designed for OW20, running a lower viscosity oil (10W40) will cause the molecules in the oil to shear at a more rapid rate. In other words, the oil will provide better lubrication and bearing protection due to the larger oil molecules pressed against the metal surface but will break down much quicker do to accelerated shear rates of the oil molecules.

            The best way protect an engine from premature wear or failure is not to use lower viscosity than what is recommended but to change the oil before it breaks down (long before the manufacturer dummy lamp tells you to).

          • 0 avatar
            carguy67

            FWIW, I did all the oil changes on my 2008 Bullitt Mustang for 135K miles (3-6K mile changes depending on how I was driving). Ford’s recommendation was their 5W-20 semi-syn; I had a case of dino 10W-30 on the shelf and thought ‘that should work.’ Well, for whatever reason I stayed with the factory recommendation; found out a little later that the 4.6L Modular had a knack for breaking cam chain guides if a too thick oil was used (took too long for a thicker oil to pump up the tensioners).

            Stay with the factory recommendation. The engine designers know what they’re doing (even if you don’t like where they put the filter).

      • 0 avatar
        Fordson

        I think a 2.3 liter turbo 4-cyl engine with 6.2 quart capacity running synthetic is just fine with a 10k mile OCI. Or you can just change the filter every other change. Not great, but not Armageddon.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          My brother just did an oil change on a 3.5L Ecoboost with 128k miles recently (fleet truck at the place he works), it was 4 quarts low within its standard spec’d OCI. I find that a lot of newer cars running thin synthetics and low tension oil rings, especially when coupled with the higher crankcase pressures of a turbo motor, tend to use a non-trivial amount of oil. So it’s not necessarily the wear on the oil, more so its consumption and monitoring the level.

          • 0 avatar
            bullnuke

            gtem – If you listen to many of the B&B here you know the only modern engine that uses oil is the FB25 in 2013 – 2014 Subaru vehicles. The 0w-20 synthetic it requires and the low-tension oil rings utilized have nothing to do with it. Of course Subaru will replace the short block at their expense for as many times as it takes to lower the consumption to an acceptable amount if it consumes more than 12oz in 1200 miles but, that’s beside the point. That rate of consumption equals around or a bit less than a quart in 3000 miles which was considered acceptable not that many years ago when everyone used the significantly heavier 10w-30. Thinner oil and lighter-tensioned oil rings require owners to keep an eye on the oil level regardless of what and how they drive.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        “running a 10k OCI on a truck with a modern turbo 4 motor running thin synthetic that actually sees anything resembling work is a bad idea all around IMO.”

        And you declare that…how? What backs you up?

        Have you run used oil analyses to back up your blanket statement? No? Hmmmmm.

        Oils are way different today than they were when your father had you sitting at Wally’s knee in Mayberry.

        • 0 avatar
          Jon

          @ Jalop

          How about seven years as a technician (before i entered then engineering side)? Is that enough data for you? When I was a technician for GM and Dodge, the customers who ran their engines on 5000+ mile oil changes almost always experienced some sort of engine failure or oil consumption issue when the vehicle reached 150000+ miles. Sometimes they reached it earlier depending on the frequency and magnitude of the load placed on the engine.

          The machine work and metal quality on modern engines is vastly superior to older engines; rings seal better, bearings are better, oil cooling tech is incredible, etc. For these and many other reasons engines run cleaner and can be run at longer OCI’s because the combustion process does not break down the oil as fast. Furthermore, oil quality is also vastly superior to oil quality of the past. Vehicle makers know this and therefore extend the OCI’s as a selling point for the vehicle.

          My point is that most modern engines are being ran on longer OCI’s for two reasons;
          1. Lower maintenance cost – selling point
          2. Many consumers will simply buy a new car when their current vehicle experiences its first big repair, ie: engine failure. MANUFACTURERS ARE ENGINEERING THEIR PRODUCT TO FAIL AFTER A CERTAIN TIME SO YOU WILL BUY THEIR NEXT GREATEST THING WITH ALL THE SHINY SCREENS AND FEATURES.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Many consumers will simply buy a new car when their current vehicle experiences its first big repair, ie: engine failure.”

            Is it common for people that suffer an out-of-warranty engine failure on a bought-new vehicle to stay with that same brand?

          • 0 avatar
            Jon

            @ ajla

            I dont know. Most folks are probably tired of their car by 120k anyways. They were just waiting for a reason to get rid of it. Regardless of how you look at the situation, its a win for every manufacturer because they all have a new one to sell you and every other person who falls for their trap.

          • 0 avatar
            jalop1991

            @Jon: “How about seven years as a technician (before i entered then engineering side)? Is that enough data for you?”

            No. I asked specifically about used oil analyses using modern oils on these modern engines. I don’t care about your “experience” in “knowing” that 10K intervals “don’t work”.

            And frankly, my experience is that technicians–of whatever field–are the worst to ask about this kind of thing.

            The used oil analysis tells all.

          • 0 avatar
            carguy67

            “MANUFACTURERS ARE ENGINEERING THEIR PRODUCT TO FAIL AFTER A CERTAIN TIME SO YOU WILL BUY THEIR NEXT GREATEST THING WITH ALL THE SHINY SCREENS AND FEATURES.”

            Um, no. ‘Manufacturers’ are having trouble selling new cars because used ones are routinely going over 200K miles with a reasonable maintenance schedules (oil/filter changer, plugs at 100K, etc.). The used market is robust because of this. My 2008 Bullitt Mustang was as strong as the day I bought it at 135K miles, with regular oil changes and plugs at 95K, and used less than a quart of oil every 6K miles (and it still had the original brake pads and clutch). No doubt in my mind it would have gone 200K miles if I hadn’t traded it in on a new one.

            Ford, however, has a problem with horn assemblies; the ’08 crapped at 120K miles, and my new one has a DOA note.

          • 0 avatar
            Jon

            @ Jalop

            If data does not match the hypothesis – claim the data is flawed and the data collector is biased. I was on the side of extended LOF intervals, until I say its effects.

            What normal DIYer can afford to perform an engine analysis for every oil change? If one could, it would likely confirm that with greater engine loads, the oil breaks down faster, often reaching threshold acidity and molecular breakdown levels before 5000 miles.

            It is also important to note that appropriate LOF intervals can vary per climate. While a 6k+ LOF interval may be acceptable in colder climates, it is not acceptable in hot climates.

            @ carguy

            “Manufacturers’ are having trouble selling new cars because used ones are routinely going over 200K miles with a reasonable maintenance schedules”

            This is precisely why they extended the LOF intervals to 5k+. The engine fails earlier and this encourages folks to buy a new car.

            With appropriate maintenance intervals, a modern engine should not consume any oil for any mileage and certainly not 138k.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            @jon, I’ve had oil analysis done on a Ford 2.7 tt in a 2015 F150 that disagrees. At 7500 I had about 20 percent remaining, which was right in line with the oil life monitor. I got antsy letting it ride that long hence the analysis.

            If we are being brutally honest I would think “as a tech” you’d be more likely to want me to change my oil as frequently as you could convince me to change it. I do run fully synthetic though.

          • 0 avatar
            Jon

            @ Art

            You bring up a great point – the percentage. What does the percentage represent? Acid quantity? Amount of molecules left that have not broken down? Is it some sort of measurement of chemicals in the oil that are not supposed to be present? Is it some kind of ratio to the oils ability to retain its viscosity rating? It is a combination of many properties? No one really knows. Correct me if I am wrong but as far as I know, the manufacturers do not release this information.

            Lets assume that the percentage is some general representation of the oils ability to retain its lubricating properties. I totally agree that 20% at 7.5k is accurate (kudos for using full synthetic); Ford and most other manufacturers have an algorithm that accurately predicts oil life percentages. My issue is with how we as consumers interpret that percentage.

            Why run your engine at anything less than 50%. At 50%, the oil has already lost half of its ability to lubricate the engine. So why run it all the way down to 20%. My point is that if the engine oil is used repeatedly from 50% to 20% lubricating capacity, all surfaces that experience friction or are exposed to the oil will begin to deteriorate faster than the same surfaces repeatedly exposed to no less than 50%.

            I understand that shorter LOF intervals can be expensive but in my experience, it is the difference between a 150k engine and 250K engine.

            When I was a tech, I was paid hourly. More oil changes did not benefit my pocketbook in any way. My enthusiasm for short LOF intervals comes from a deep respect for engineering a long lifespan into mechanical devices. I am no longer a tech because I asked too many questions that senior techs did not have the knowledge to answer. So i earned a degree in mechanical engineering to answer my own questions.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          @jalop

          I’m close enough to the service/repair side of things and have enough of an engineering background to see the direct correlation between the switch to thinner oils and looser oil rings in pursuit of fuel economy, as well as higher crankcase pressures from turbocharging to see how that can affect oil consumption. I also suspect the theme of stretching timing chains is linked to thinner oil as well as the chains being engineered for lower NVH and lower drag as priorities rather than outright durability.

          • 0 avatar
            carguy67

            “… higher crankcase pressures from turbocharging …”

            There’s the problem. N/A all the way; Porsche has figured it out:
            https://jalopnik.com/the-porsche-718-cayman-gt4-clubsport-is-bringing-back-t-1831473416

            Oh, and please elucidate how ‘thinner oil’ causes steel timing chains to stretch?

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Worse lubrication/heat dissipation properties at high engine temps?

            Purely speculation on my part, but it definitely seems that more OHC+timing chain motors have been having issues with excessive chain stretch, they seem much more sensitive to oil quality than chains in the past. GM walked back their 10k OCI on the 3.6L Lambdas and 2.4Ls after an absolute deluge of stretched chains at lower mileage.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            https://www.enginebuildermag.com/2015/08/the-complexities-of-modern-timing/

            A pretty good look at the state of modern chain driven OHC valvetrains.

            “We’re seeing much smaller pitch that have less rotating mass which, on some levels, makes total sense. However, smaller components can add challenges on other levels. Components have gotten smaller and more lightweight so we’re demanding more from less material.

            “When you do small pitch systems the sprockets get smaller, your forces go up and the demands on the chain per component go up,” a supplier says.”

            “Engine startup after sitting overnight and cold ambient temperatures can cause a delay in what manufacturers call tensioner “pump up” and can cause a sudden pounding effect on the timing chain causing abnormal wear on the tensioner arms and guides. The arms and guides are normally made of plastic or have a plastic liner for the chain to ride on with an aluminum back/carrier.

            The bottom line, experts say, is that you must use the correct type of oil and viscosity. Remind your installer customer to tell their customers that regular oil changes must be done to maintain a clean oil supply.”

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Flashbacks of changing my ’95 4.6 Cougar. That motor was not meant to be in there and the packaging for DIY oil changes was a challenge. Vacuum extractor it is!

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      ’95 is too young for a cougar

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      Same with my 95 Thunderbird LX with the 4.6. The oil filter is down just above the cross member so it’s tough to get at from above or below. I usually use a strap wrench from above with a pipe on it or a ratchet from below. After the filter is loosened I twist it then let it sit on the cross member where I roll it out. It took me a few years to perfect this.
      The cross member has years of oil buildups on it that I recently cleaned with an old can of carb cleaner.
      One day I’ll go to the car wash and get the chassis steam cleaner.

      • 0 avatar
        ptschett

        Somehow I knew I’d find fellow 4.6L MN12 Thunderbird/Cougar owners in this thread. I was not thrilled with the setup the first time I changed the oil in my ’96 Thunderbird; then I learned the cars were never intended to have V8’s in the first place so it didn’t seem so bad that the price of having sufficient horsepower was threading the oil filter between the power steering pump and the crossmember, and after enough repetition I had a system worked out.

    • 0 avatar
      fiasco

      I remember trying to do an oil change on my mom’s 95 V8 T-Bird. The filter could not come off unless you were on a lift! Thank goodness that was a lease car.

  • avatar
    brettc

    That sounds like fun times for a second or third owner, when the high quality Ford wheel lugs are deformed due to impact gun usage at the dealer.

    Or at least that’s my experience with my ’13 C-Max. I had to buy a new set of lugs all around so I can safely swap winter/summer tires in the future due to the crappy factory part apparently being formed out of lead.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I wouldn’t blame Ford for that one, way too many shops overtorque the sh*t out of lug nuts/studs. Leads to broken studs, mushroomed lug nuts, warped rotors.

      • 0 avatar
        carguy67

        “… too many shops overtorque the sh*t out of lug nuts/studs. Leads to broken studs, mushroomed lug nuts, warped rotors.”

        True this. If ‘your shop’ doesn’t use torque wrenches on lug nuts go elsewhere.

        • 0 avatar
          Featherston

          Whoa, whoa, whoa, carguy67! If basic cable has taught me anything, it’s that good vehicle maintenance involves two things: 1) use of an impact gun and 2) using a grinding wheel to shoot sparks.

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      If your lugs are screwed up you need to replace them anyway so you can rotate your tires (or replace flats I suppose.) The fact that one wheel has to come off to do your oil changes really doesn’t change anything.

      But I’m with you; I hate those two-part lug nuts.

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    Rotate the tires when you do an oil change…problem solved.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      They should have put the oil filter behind the belts so you could change those with every oil change too.

    • 0 avatar
      18726543

      I was logging in to say this too. I change my oil every 5k-7500 miles depending on the vehicle and at those OCIs a tire rotation is always a good idea.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Again, when I do tire rotation, I do one wheel at the time. In this case my car is tilting in one corner and this is not good for oil change. For oil change, I go onto ramps. How can I go there if I need to remove one tire?

      • 0 avatar
        MrIcky

        If you’re running your car up on a ramp for the oil change, then it’s tilting back. It’s still tilting. Do you not rotate your tires? I feel like you’re just trying to make it more difficult than it is.

        Without seeing it in person, here’s what I’d do for the whole procedure keeping in mind we’re doing multiple things now in the same service, and assuming you have a level place to work.
        1) Loosen lug nuts, chalk each tire with intended location.
        2) Chock rear wheels, Jack front up
        3) place jack stands under front.
        4) remove front wheels. oil and filter change.
        5) Jack rear up-leave jack here in up position
        6) place jack stands under rear for safety
        7) reattach wheels in new locations.
        9) jack up rear as needed to remove jack stands/lower rear
        10 jack up front as needed to remove jack stands/lower front

        The jacking up and jack stands is maybe 10 minutes? The rotation isn’t going to take any longer than any other rotation and you have to do it anyway. I put about 12k miles on a vehicle a year so I’d probably just do this in March and September and do a nice wheel cleaning and brake inspect while I’m in there. Or at least that’s what I would have done 15 years ago- now I’ll go pay the dealer to do it because I’d rather do something else.

        I’m not a big Ford fan tbh and I often look for ways to make fun of Ford. But if you’re doing all the maintenance you’re supposed to do at home, then this doesn’t seem like a huge deal and it’s unnecessary to blow it out of proportion. If the only maintenance you do at home is oil changes, then why bother. It’s just not that expensive to pay someone to do it for you.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          Some people don’t rotate their tires with every oil change. I drive 20K miles a year and change my oil every 5K miles. I rotate my tires every other oil change. This is not a positive development. It’s bad design and should be treated as such.

  • avatar
    RedRocket

    Ford craptastic engineering strikes again. This is beyond ridiculous.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    I may sound a bit of a conspiracy theorist but, as with headlight bulb replacement for several of the newer vehicles, this may be another sop for the stealership service departments to entice owners into their tender clutches. “Yes, Mr. Owner, I realize that the charge seems high but with these new high-tech vehicles…”.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      @bullnuke: “this may be another sop for the stealership service departments to entice owners into their tender clutches. “Yes, Mr. Owner, I realize that the charge seems high but with these new high-tech vehicles…”. ”

      Well, now, you know, that Tru-Coat…

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Jeezuz H on a unicycle! At least you can go 10,000km on some top quality synthetics. My DIY days are over, but my last experiences showed me that Japanese cars typically have far higher quality fasteners than NA domestics. I expect whoever does the 2nd oil change will find the frustration compounded by stripped bolts and retainers.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    Bet you a dollar the wheel removal either isn’t really necessary, as many factory steps seem not to really be, or is only necessary to remove that panel, which nobody will ever bother to put back on, outside of places charging by the hour*.

    (* And even they might ask you if you wanna pay for the useless hassle.)

  • avatar
    pdog_phatpat

    LMAO. And we have the expected resulting comments from the peanut gallery. Oh look, a NEW Ford article(mouth dripping furiously). Nevermind this isnt a big deal for DIY’rs. But then, most people here arnt really down to change their own oil, despite what they might have you believe. So, lets complain about Ford because this our chance. We wont buy one or ever have to deal with it but….FORD(!). Its really pretty damn funny watching them scramble for something as insignificant as this.

  • avatar
    thx_zetec

    Somehow they saved 20 cents but then will saddle owner with more labor/costs for every oil change in the life of the car.

    I had a 99 Ford at oil-change place, was told by dipstick broke. WTFluid-change?!! How could a dipstick break??! Some genius at Ford figured instead of a fool proof one-piece metal dipstick they’d use metal dip but a cheap (cost saving) plastic handle. After years of under-hood temperature the plastic handle shattered and the metal stick sank down in the engine. I had to take it home, fish out the stick with needle nose pliers, drive 20 minutes to a Ford dealtership, stand in line for 5 minutes, then pay 60 bucks for a new dipstick. To save like 3 cents?

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Is it stupid? Yes.

    Is it the end of the world or a reason not to buy a Ranger? No. Certainly no more than a reason to buy a Subaru just because the oil filter is right there in the engine bay. If you buy your cars because of the location of the oil filter, that, IMHO is truly the stupid thing.

    On top of that what is an oil change interval these days? 10,0000 miles? Oh no you might have to do it 2x a year!

    Or you know just take it to your Ford dealer and they’ll do it for you if you just can’t be bothered.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      Stupid is not using the quality of the engineering the manufacturer shows you to extrapolate the quality of the engineering that you can’t see.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      I think I’d be more concerned about the required exhaust fluid re-fills–assume these engines require it?–than the filter. But, I don’t like diesel; never have (except for big rigs).

  • avatar
    FrankE39

    *** News Flash ***
    Vehicles are not designed with the primary goal of easy access for maintenance.*
    They are designed for the lowest possible part and assembly cost.

    When you think about it, this makes perfect sense as there will only be about 25-30 oil changes during the life of the vehicle. Assuming 6,000 miles per oil change = 150,000 – 180,000 miles

    * Unless you drive a Subaru. :)

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I don’t know how the newest ones are, but I’ve always respected Honda for making just about any maintenance/repair work on their cars as DIY friendly as possible in terms of access, as well as the cost of OE parts (generally speaking). The one downside is them insisting on Honda specific fluids (ATF, power steering, VTM-4, etc). I’m starting to minivan shop and the Odyssey is winning me over with its easy to service transmission: an honest to God drain plug and dip stick! The rear bank of plugs is accessible without removing the intake manifold or any special swivel sockets! And I’m A-okay with them continuing to use timing belts on their J-series V6. It’s the VCM that I’m most worried about.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        @gtem: “It’s the VCM that I’m most worried about.”

        As well you should be.

        I have sworn off Honda products after they screwed me over 10 years ago on the vaunted transmission problem, but my wife insisted on buying a friend’s used 07 Odyssey (10 years old, 33K miles) to replace our aging and higher mileage 2002 Odyssey.

        I did some research, and VCM was absolutely an issue. In fact, a buddy of mine had the first year VCM in an Accord, and Honda ended up buying it back–it kept burning up one of the cylinders, and after a bunch of denials Honda didn’t have it in them anymore to continue denying.

        So, I bought a resistor pack to toss into the harness to stop VCM from coming on (it plugs into the coolant temperature sensor and biases the voltage downward to fool the computer into thinking the coolant is a few degrees cooler than it actually is). I’ve had it for over a year now, and my wife and I have seen the dreaded “Eco” light flicker on only a few times. We even did a long drive to the beach in July and never saw it come on.

        American Honda has a sweet spot in cars: lightweight, 4 cylinder, manual transmission cars. The farther they go from that formula, the worse their problems.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Jalop my understanding is that 2014-2016 Odysseys are the sweet spot in terms of reliability in regard to the VCM-II system and complaints regarding oil burning and motor mount issues (although perhaps they’re still a bit too new to start seeing excessive mount wear). I’m between that narrow range of Odysseys, 14-’16 Siennas (to avoid the new 8 speed), or just accepting my fate of inevitable TIPM issues and go the Caravan/T&C route and save a bundle up front.

          • 0 avatar
            Carrera

            No issues here with the VCM on my 2006 Pilot. I just turned 193,000 miles. I get the “misfire cylinder 1,2,3..etc every three months or so but I cancel it with my code reader. I have a lot hwy driving on it so yes the ECO light came on a lot. Should I start losing sleep now over the VCM?

          • 0 avatar
            MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

            The problem with newer Odysseys is their hideous ugliosity. I have the last of the cleanly styled ones, and it has only needed one new transmission in 200k miles LOL. After this I plan to go back to Siennas, the Lexus of minivans. I did spend 2 weeks in a loaner midlevel Pacifica last year, and came away rather impressed. It really is a whole new animal compared to the current (ancient) Grand Caravan.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            When I took my car in for its inspection the day after Christmas, there was an Odyssey being quoted for its electronic engine mounts at 133,000 miles. $2,472.00 for the mounts installed at a place with labor that’s fifty dollars an hour cheaper than the dealer. I wonder how much fuel VCM saved in 133,000 miles? I’m guessing it wasn’t enough to pay for re-ringing an engine or engine mounts that wear themselves out and cost three times as much as usual to replace.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Seems like it’s “pick your poison” with minivans currently, although I suppose the Sienna remains the safest bet (jury still out on the 8spd autos). I really like the Pacifica as far as how it drives, ergonomics, styling and material quality inside. But it is yet a farther step in the direction of even more modules, auto-start stop (which has been shutting cars down on the highway). The old Caravans are at least a known quantity as far as what goes wrong and how to fix it.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            FWIW, my 2013 Accord’s VCM system used a third of a quart of oil, presumably while the rings were seating, and I’ve had zero oil loss between changes since. The VCM is simpler, 6->3, and the only time it gets objectionable is when running at around 50mph with the transmission in top gear and locked-up in cold weather after the car has been sitting all day.

            OTOH, my Dad’s 2011 Accord V6’s VCM (with the more problematic 6->4->3 implementation) is damn near undetectable in operation.

            And my dealer has told me that replacement of the mounts isn’t a huge deal, and has rarely been an issue in their service department. (My guess is that the packaging of a minivan would make such work a chore, versus a car or SUV (think Pilot).) I think they did admit that the 2008-2009 Accords were more problematic, but they got the problems sorted out by 2010.

            Of course, at least on the Accord going forward, VCM won’t be an issue any longer. (And I’m not sure — I will confirm with my dealer — but a replacement turbocharger, including labor, may come in under the cost of the timing-belt/water-pump swap necessary in the J-series V6s.)

      • 0 avatar
        tonyola

        I’m not so sure about Honda. My 1984 CRX 1.5 was not much fun for servicing. First off, the engine compartment was crammed pretty full. Second, there was a spaghetti mess of various tubes and vacuum lines. Regular-sized fingers were a disadvantage. I lost a bit of skin and blood changing the spark plugs.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Yeah the older carb’d Hondas had that whole thing going on. But most anything into the early 90s with a D-series or F-series 4cyl is cake, and like I mentioned their transverse V6s are about the best in the business for ease of access in the engine compartment. Fluid changes are always easy without any special tools. When I had my ’03 Pilot the drain plugs for the trans and rear diff/VTM unit were just 3/8 inch square drive, easy drain and fill.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            Of late, Honda doesn’t have a transmission dipstick, so you have to reach under a hot engine to remove the fill plug! So I just had the dealer check it every oil change, and change the fluid after three years. The end.

  • avatar
    kamiller42

    Really odd design given the Mustang engine this is based on has the easiest access to an oil filter and plug of the cars I’ve owned and worked on over the decades. And it take 5.7 liters of oil. 6.2? 2.7L V6 in F-150 takes 6 liters.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      I would suspect that the oil pan is different for the different chassis and Ford typically puts more oil in their trucks and SUVs than they did in passenger cars.

      • 0 avatar
        carguy67

        “Ford typically puts more oil in their trucks and SUVs than they did in passenger cars.”

        10qts for the new Gen 3 Coyote (has a cooler; probably the integrated one that would normally be used for a slushbox).

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    My pit crew down at Walmart isn’t going to like this, not one bit

    @Lie2me

    They will just leave some of the pins off that hold that box in and not tighten the lug nuts just to save time to go to the next oil change. Drive down the street a few miles and both the box and the push pins have fallen off. I have had those mechanics not put all the bolts on my oil pan shield and have had to replace those bolts. They are usually in a hurry to get the job done.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    I think I actually just felt the value of last gen Rangers go up.

    This is beyond stupid, Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      Well, the ‘last gen’ had a known problem with an O-ring on the filter adapter:

      https://www.explorerforum.com/forums/index.php?threads/oil-filter-mount-gasket.233462/

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Is it not effectively the same engine as a Mustang? What is the filter change procedure on the Mustang?

  • avatar
    fiasco

    I’m hoping Nissan keeps making the current Frontier until the wife’s 2017 Sienna is paid off…I want tried and true and durable, without the Tacoma premium pricing and a maintenance nightmare.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      You should Google up on the Frontier issues. On top of an interior that scratched if you look at it funny, you had transmission failures due to the radiator allowing coolant and transmission fluid to mix and timing chain guide failures causing catastrophic engine failure. The bed metal was thinking enough it would flex under the severe load of me on my hands and knees and the front facia was a different shade of red than the rest of the truck (I got it new with 2 miles on the odo…no wreck and others were like it. My crew cab F150 beats it at the pump as a bonus. Old doesn’t automatically mean proven.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    The reality is that this is the “factory procedure” and not likely how it will be done in the real world.

    On our 2010 Fusion the factory procedure to replace the R headlight was #1 remove RF wheel, #2 remove wheel well liner, #3 remove bulb. I just turned the wheel all the way to the right removed the fasteners on the front of the liner, pulled it back enough to reach up in there.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Novel

    https://www.roadandtrack.com/car-shows/detroit-auto-show/a15840269/ford-focus-rs-ranger-engine/

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Just go electric – problem solved.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Poor design Ford.
    Like biting into an apple with a worm. Ranger looks good on the outside, rotten on the inside.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Sooooo…just like my 95 Nissan Hardbody?

  • avatar
    Pete Zaitcev

    The title of this post made me afraid that the oil change required an interaction with a computer in the dealership, cryptographically protected. But nope, it’s just a filter that might be as difficult to reach as on an old Nissan pickup. Clickbait!

  • avatar
    Jacob

    Folks, stop the whining. This is actually not that complicated. If this procedure pisses you off, chances are you’re not doing oil changes by yourself even on a vehicle with “normal” placement of the oil filter.

    I am an amateur home car mechanic/hobbyist, and one thing I have learned very quickly is that your life will be much easier if you own a set of 30 dollar 3-ton jack stands and a 40-dollar floor jack with rapid pump (tools you can get in any shop, at these prices or even less when on sale). This means that I can remove the lug nuts (30 seconds per side), lift the car (30-seconds per side), and place it on the stands (30-seconds per side) in about three minutes if I really needed to. Removing the wheels is annoying, but you know, if you do the oil changes only every 10-15 thousand miles while using a quality synthetic oil and filter, then you can also take a moment to rotate the two front tires and also check the brakes, which shouldn’t hurt either.

    The part’s that’s going to be truly annoying is the panel clips which are bound to eventually get lost or break on their own, and finding true replacements is always pain.

  • avatar
    cdrmike

    Reminds me of changing a fuel pump in an early S-10. Rigid line, brass fittings. Why lord Jesus, why? Clearly, we have not yet learned, 30 years later.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    Good old Ford. Reminds me of the Boss 429 Mustang where you had to unbolt the brake reservoir and jack-up the ‘engine’ to get at the last sparkplug.

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      Also reminds you of the Chevrolet Monza V8. To access the spark plugs you had to jack it to get clearance remove the wheel and use a long extension with the ratchet.

  • avatar
    tonyola

    This reminds me of the oil filter on my ’75 Duster 360. It was located underneath the engine in a narrow space blocked by a torsion bar. I couldn’t just remove the filter directly – I had to juggle the filter along the bar with my fingertips to an opening large enough for the filter to drop. Meanwhile, hot oil would be dripping on my hands and face. Not fun.

    My ’65 Mustang six was a completely different story – I could easily get the oil filter from above.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      I had a 75 Dart Sport with 360. PITA to replace that oil filter, but not unmanageable. When the kids still lived at home, I had a 97 Cavalier with the 2.2 OHV engine. The oil filter was hard up against the firewall and you had to reach up and around the exhaust pipe get to the filter. Rarely did I not douse the whole driveway with oil. I eventually had the tall skinny kid do it at the Chevy dealer Fast Lane oil change. It was muuuch easier that way.

      My hands-down favorite was my Yugo. The 1.1L Fiat motor had the oil filter facing and below the radiator. You could reach under there on your knees and twist the thing off. I had a 13mm Allen wrench to undo the drain plug on the oil pan. The was no reason why that oil change took longer than 10 minutes…

  • avatar
    don1967

    Loving my straight-six Volvo even more after reading this. Open the hood, slide the PS reservoir out of its bracket using your bare hands, and there’s your oil filter. Some Subarus and Hyundai V6s also use top-mounted oil filters.

    Throw in a $100 oil extractor, and you might forget what the underside of your car looks like.

    Come on Ford, it’s been what, 115 years?

  • avatar
    A1957

    In other news, you must remove the hood to change the rear license light bulb and brake rotors are removed through the glove box opening.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    This is silly but hardly the end if the world. Ever tried changing the starter on an “easiest car to work on eva” Volvo 240?

    How about the rear plugs on a Toyota Camry V6?
    The exhaust wrapped oil filter on Subarus?
    The timing belt on the older praised Honda Accord?

    All cars have to make a diy compromise in one place or another. Only difference is that older (and more used up) cars tend to be glossed over for some reason.

    That being said Ford does make some very stupid engineering decisions at times. My own “invincible easy to fix” Crown Vic requires one to disconnect the engine to do valve seals in one side, among other bad ideas.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Also, my old “greatest vehicle ever engineered” Toyota Land Cruiser had a heater hose at the back of the motor right against the firewall that step one of the replacement procedure was “remove engine from vehicle”. When I actually had the motor out for other reasons I reengineered that so this would no longer be required.

    The Ranger isn’t the first to require this, won’t be the last, and in the big scheme, again it’s like 5 extra minutes.

    Every car out there has something stupid going on like this. If you don’t realize this you probably don’t DIY. Heck I bet the splash shields that require removal on my wife’s Hyundai and my F150 take more time to get off than a tire which again, as a DIYer you should be rotating at such time anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I had to do that with a few cars myself, one of my Volvo 240s had a plastic fuel line crammed into the back beside the flame trap, guess what broke by accident while I was doing scheduled maintenance?

      Had to find some extra thick fuel rubber hose at an odd size, and clamps. The old hose had been crimped onto nipples are something weird.

      Its quite baffling how many car guys shrivel at the thought of doing a little extra work, dont you guys drool at stick-shifts and mock of slush-box drivers for being lazy?

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        “Its quite baffling how many car guys shrivel at the thought of doing a little extra work, dont you guys drool at stick-shifts and mock of slush-box drivers for being lazy?”

        I don’t quite follow your loop-the-loop of logic. Us “curmudgeons” like mechanically simple and reliable things that are EASY and straight forward to wrench on.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Is comparing a one time heater hose replacement procedure really equivalent to needlessly complicating literally the most common maintenance item on a modern vehicle? Agreed on splash shields, they are varying degrees of frustrating. Best case scenario it is an engineered small access panel that pops off. Worst case is the whole aero-shield/mud guard has to come off.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Yes, I think it is actually worse. Oil changes tend to be done in my garage with me listening to some hair metal in my garage while drinking a beer. 5 extra minutes in that environment, who cares?

        When I have had a heater hose blow, well it was never in my driveway. Hence why I do them preventatively…unless of course you have to pull the freaking motor to do it. But hey, just limp it home, right? Then you can find out all about the thermal properties of long aluminum cylinder heads as opposed to iron blocks.

        Yes, having removed the engine and trans from that truck as I am a DIYer to the end I can say I would rather remove the tire to change the oil 1000 times than do that once.

  • avatar
    multicam

    My now-departed (thank god) 2012 Camaro was super easy- I could take the filter out without spilling a drop. It was one of the few things I liked about the car compared to my 2012 Mustang. This sounds really annoying but wouldn’t necessarily be a deal-breaker.

    I wouldn’t get a new Ranger for other reasons though. My next vehicle will either be a 2006 Wrangler or a 2019.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    Jon, can you tell us (for my benefit), what is considered “modern” and what changed in modern engines? (“machine work and quality on modern engines is vastly superior”)

    The main parts are still cast and machined. If anything, with more aluminum, I’d think they are more delicate.

    The biggest change is going to fuel injection. I can see THAT making a difference, since fuel is delivered far more precisely with an fuel injected, computer monitored and controlled system, vs a carburetor.

    Where the tolerances in a Chevy small block V8, or an Olds Rocket V8, that much worse than a GM V8 built since 2000?

    I’m not arguing your point, but I’d like to know why.

    THanks

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Just on a whim, I know things like rings have changed. They tend to be lower friction/tension than back in the day in the name of fuel efficiency. Bottom ends are probably stronger with girdles and structural oil pans integrated in most engines, but the cranks and what not are lighter. Computer management has allowed for tighter combustion chambers and compression ratios that were track only not long ago.

  • avatar
    jfb43

    If you’re a DIY-er this isn’t a big deal. You’re probably going to jack it up anyway, and most modern cars have air deflectors you have to remove to get access to the filter anyway. Besides, oil change intervals are about the same as tire rotations…so while you have one tire off, you may as well rotate.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Question: are you a DIY oil changer? If so, do you really rotate tires yourself in your driveway every oil change?

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        I do. The tire rotation is called for every 10000 miles. My Oil life monitor typically hits 10% around 7500 miles at which point I change it so I fudge it a little and just do it all at once. Filter is perfect though…cartridge design right on top so it doesnt drip a drop.

        The interval worried me, but I’ve had the oil analyzed by Blackstone and it was good.

        The Fiesta gets 5k on both because I drive it harder and figure the tires will wear more quickly.

        My wife’s Hyundai gets the tires rotated every other change because it’s an appliance BUT it is by far the most difficult to change the oil on. I wish I could pull the tire and do it rather than its design that gets oil everywhere. I have a piece of vinyl flooring we roll out for the oil change and park it on for like a week after so that the drips can be easily cleaned up.

        It’s better than her old Hyundai which sliced my arms routinely though.
        My S Series Saturn was the easiest.

        Do the water pump on a 323i. After that any engine in vehicle repair is frankly pretty easy. That one is pretty much dissassemble the front of the car around the water pump.

      • 0 avatar
        jfb43

        I am a DIY-er and do pretty much all maintenance that is reasonable for a DIY-er to do. I change my oil about every 5000 miles. I don’t drive much, so that’s about every 9 months on the 3 vehicles I have. Not unreasonable. I rotate tires every other oil change, usually.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I wonder if eventually they will make engines with internal oil filters and no drain plugs requiring you to go to the dealer like maybe every 20k or 25k miles which would be monitored by the oil monitor that they put on most new vehicles. Some manufacturers have already eliminated the dipstick. This seems to be a trend where it is harder for the do-it-yourself mechanic to work on vehicles. Some of the lawnmowers now come with sealed lubrication where you cannot change the oil or add oil. Not saying I like this but this is a way to increase the business for the service department and increase the cost of the service which eventually will make most people trade the vehicle in sooner.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @Jeff S: “Some of the lawnmowers now come with sealed lubrication where you cannot change the oil or add oil.”
      — It’s interesting that you mention this, considering the number of corded and now battery-powered electric lawn mowers (even riding mowers) now on the market. It’s almost like they’re trying to drive customers to the electric versions by making ICE costs higher.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        It’s almost like the real plan is for all ICE powered machines to fail shortly after engines are banned. The cars of a decade ago may have been built to last fifteen years with normal maintenance, but you’d have to be pretty ignorant to expect the same of anything turbo/direct-injected/stop-started/belt CVT equipped/multi-speed automatic/dual-clutched/plug-in/variable-displacement/composite-engine-part-equipped/etc…

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        This is why I purchased a 1985 John Deere from a rocket scientist vs a new one. I think with respect to cars we are in a golden era, but small engines are firmly malaise.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    I don’t see the big deal. Unless you’re talking severe service, just switch to full synthetic (once it’s broken-in correctly) and increase the oil change intervals to 50K miles and you’re good. Then you’re only changing the oil once every few years.

    Modern car engines (long blocks, hard parts), are the last thing you need to worry about. They’re overbuilt for the task.

    But if does get severe service, who cares? The rest of the truck is going to hell fast enough anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Oh boy, I forgot all about you and your 50k oil change intervals lol.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Who can you believe? Think about why they’re telling you to change your oil religiously, 10K miles or less, even if it’s full synthetic.

        I can’t recommend 50K intervals for everyone, every car, every use, but if it’s a darn everyday Ford or something with a non exotic engine and commonly found everywhere, what’s the big deal?

        If it’s an old beater, why even think about changing the oil? Ever! Switch to a full synthetic and never think about changing the oil again.. Just don’t forget to check the oil level every couple 1,000 miles.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      There are people out there that run crazy intervals, but they all run aftermarket filtration that gets changed more often than the oil and the ones I know have had labs do oil analysis to verify the interval. Modern oil can in fact typically go longer than the average interval, but that big orange FRAM filter will get stuck in bypass long before then.

      I would not just willy nilly run 50k. I saw first hand a 30k Saturn S series motor back in the mid 90’s. She didn’t know you had to do it and you could stand a putty knife in the sludge. Ironically, Saturn fully warrantied it.

      But bottom line, filtration is the weak link if you are running a top of the line, true synthetic.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Do oil filters clog if there isn’t already a problem? Couldn’t a healthy engine on full synthetic run just fine, indefinitely with the filter bypassed (for some odd reason)?

        It’ll take apart my 50K mile filters just for giggles, they’re not clogged and there’s no discernible difference from 3K filters. The oil on the dipstick looks clean and light brown the whole time, smells OK too.

        That’s all I need to know and go on.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Sure, it might. It isn’t a question of the filters clogging…they were just cheap and failed in a mode that 99.9 percent of people would never notice. I’d skimp on oil before I skimped on filtration. Cheap oil changed frequently probably is fine. Good oil unfiltered for 40k miles, I don’t see it.

          Now if you are talking something like my old 95 Saturn I never changed it. It blew a quart out the tailpipe between fuel fill ups so I figured it was generally fresh. When it got the new motor this was not the case however.

          But I know people who run these intervals and yes, they are fine and have analysis to back it up (none of the vehicles are new…think motors like Ford 300 sixes and old school 305s in trucks), but they all run an aftermarket cartridge style filter that they tear apart after they change it. They are pretty obsessed BUT both of the motors I mentioned are over half a million miles (one dude worked on the main engines for the Space Shuttle so I don’t question him with regards to a small block Chevy)

          But yeah, if you are running a top shelf synthetic (true synthetic, not hydrocracked “synthetic”), you’d probably be fine assuming you don’t have something failing and putting metal in the motor. Even then, my Land cruiser had a ton of metal shavings around the magnet in the pan and the bearings ended up looking OK…most of the noise I heard was piston slap.

          I’m inclined to take your approach on the car in my fleet that is leased. Something all the “smart” people that get smoking deals on CPO cars should keep in mind lol.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            There’s always a chance something can go wrong (in 50K miles), but it’s not a Ferrari, nor am I in love with it. It’s an ’04 F-150 4.6 V8 STX 4X4 with high miles I’ve been abusing, neglecting, and otherwise driving into the ground since brand new, just like any other tool. So what’s the actual exposure?

            A used engine? Scrap the truck with a bad engine? It’s a risk I’m willing to assume, and a very small one from my experience. I don’t care if a million experts tell me it’s a bad idea.

            I just hate wasting time/money more than anything.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    @DM: I can live with 10K – 15K oil changes; that’s what I’ve done with most of my cars pretty much from the beginning but especially so when I started using semi-synthetic blends. I will admit I usually did the first oil change on “schedule” but until recently that oil change was to switch from petroleum oil to a synthetic blend. With my last two vehicles, they’re full synthetic from the outset and FCA in particular doesn’t push an oil change until the car demands it–usually at 9K – 10K miles, with which I am comfortable. Haven’t seen how far my Colorado will go, but at 1500 miles it’s saying I still have 70% oil life remaining, suggesting about 5K. I may change oil brand and see if this is a timer or an actual sensor in the engine.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It comes down to what you feel comfortable with, what’s the stakes and how much you’re willing to gamble. I’m confident what they recommend is total overkill for most cars and their uses.

      With modern diesels, yeah I play it slightly more conservative, because of the stakes, 15 to $20K overhauls, and how they use motor oil to push the injectors, how easily they can jam, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      They do not sense the condition of the oil. The GM system monitors how the engine is used and time.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        2009 Ecotec. I’ve always maintained it by the owner’s manual recommendations, using the on-board oil change reminder, Dexos oil and GM filters. With as little as we drive these days , we get about 5K between oil changes. At 140K miles, I’ve got a light varnish on the internal parts, but nothing to write home about. The car will rust away before the engine pukes…

        For a while, the Chevy-mega dealer’s “Fast Lane” oil change personnel were pushing hard to use BG oil additives in my cars. I finally told the guy to back off, I had no intention using an additive when the car has no real issues. Good lord, they already charge $50 for a Dexos (Not Dexos1 full synthetic) oil change. I’m not adding another $20 for some bullsh!t issue they invented in the oil change lane…

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          I’ve only ever heard of additives being a good idea on older, flat tappet camshaft cars that needed more zinc or something than modern oil has. Still, you just steer clear of the “energy conserviving” marked oils and they are fine.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @Scoutdude: Not surprised. Do intend to change brands from what GM starts with, however. Do you happen to know what they start with?

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Puralator “pure one” filters are highly regarded by those I know that obsess over this stuff. Basically stay away from stuff painted orange. I know for a time the OR GM filters my vehicles ran had wix stamped on them.

          Even with OE though the specs vary. The filter my Land Cruiser shipped with and that was available in Japan had a different media than the US ones with the same part number. I still have a couple I think.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Thank you Art. I’ll admit I was thinking more about the brand of oil rather than the brand of filter when I asked that question but yes, the brand and quality of the filter is important, too.

  • avatar
    mpzz

    How is this oil change not going to cost $150?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @DenverMike–I believe most new vehicles come with synthetic oil and recommend using synthetic oil. My wife’s 2013 CRV has 0w20 synthetic oil. I switched to Mobil 1 5W30 on my 2008 Isuzu but I have been reluctant to switch from dino on my 99 S-10 which use 5w30.
    er
    Briggs claims that on their closed oil systems that the oil is less likely to get dirty since it is not exposed to outside elements but then again these are lawn mower engines without filters. Could the car companies possibly build an internal system with the filter inside the engine similar to an automatic transmission filter which is inside the transmission? Maybe, especially if the filter was designed to last longer and the internal oil system was tight enough to keep external contaminates out. But then at some point the oil and filter would have to be changed unless the manufacturer designs the vehicle to last maybe no more than 10 years. In the case of the Briggs engine it was designed to last 12 years which Briggs stated was the average life of a lawn mower under average noncommercial usage.

    Cars last much longer than they use to and maybe this would be a way for the car manufacturers to get people not to keep them as long. Also many people are leasing cars and don’t keep them more than a couple of years. Many people don’t even know how many cylinders their vehicle has and never look at the owner’s manual. BMW has done away with the oil dipstick and Chevy Malibus don’t have a transmission dip stick. Most dealers don’t even put a mileage reminder on their oil change stickers just at 15% useful life change the oil. Oil monitors are on most new vehicles along with check engine lights.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      @JeffS : “I have been reluctant to switch from dino on my 99 S-10 which use 5w30.”

      I would suggest using a synthetic blend. I’ve seen better economy and clean oil changes in all of my pre-synthetic vehicles from my ’08 Wrangler all the way back to an ’85 Toronado I drove back in ’94. After the deposits I saw in a 5 liter Windsor Ford (’73 302c.i.d.) aver 75,000 miles from Penzoil petroleum oil, I switched brands and went synthetic blend. I try to use the same brand full synthetic but the shops that used to let me bring my own oil won’t let me do that any more.

      • 0 avatar
        JD-Shifty

        Jeff S, I just use whatever Synthetic is on sale in my S10 with 477K. I have been looking at Tacomas, Frontiers and even Ridgelines. After 500K it may be time. I do have another S10 in the garage. It’s a stick 4WD that has 60 thousand on it. I don’t want to ruin that one driving to work.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Don’t just run what’s on the cap. Even my newest cars still specify a range based on temperature. I run the thickest that fits that temp range. Cold start in the winter in Northern Alabama is different than in upstate NY.

      Both of my turbo Ford’s came with and recommend synthetic blend. I changed to full synthetic at 3k in both of them.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @DenverMike–Just saw you comment about oil filters. The manufacturers could design an internal oil system without the filter.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      Oil filters go back to the 1930’s, I think. The oil filter as we know it became available in the mid 1950’s, IIRC. Even then, it was optional. I think they may have become standard issue in the early 1960’s.

      I really like the alternative ones from the 50’s-70’s, where you could place a roll of toilet paper in a canister and screw it on to your engine. I cannot imagine these things did anything but shred upon first use and clog your engine with bits of paper fiber. The modern corollary would be the magnets you stuck on your fuel line to “align” the gasoline molecules. Or the little fan you could stick in your intake plumbing to “supercharge” your engine…

      LOL.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I remember those filters. My granddad’s 63 IH had a cartridge one that had a drain plug on it as well as having the usual drain plug. The filter was huge much like a tractor filter on the old gas tractors. My parents 64 Impala wagon had a cartridge filter as well. I heard about using the roll of toilet paper but that would be all over the inside of a engine. My father’s 62 Chevy II had a spin on filter.

  • avatar
    mountainman

    Ranger off my list. No way I am taking off a tire and the wheel well clips to change the oil. Same reason I am getting rid of the wife’s Acadia the next time the headlight goes out.

    Don’t fuck with the department of DIY, Mr. Anderson….

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