By on January 31, 2019

2018 Honda Civic Type R

2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder (306 horsepower @ 6,500 rpm; 295 lb-ft @ 2,500-4,500 rpm)

Six-speed manual, front-wheel drive

22 city / 28 highway / 25 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

10.6 city, 8.3 highway, 9.6 combined. (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $34,700 (U.S) / $42,876 (Canada)

As Tested: $35,595 (U.S.) / $42,876 (Canada)

Prices include $895 destination charge in the United States and $1,886 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

My first press trip as the M.E. at this august website had me driving the Honda Civic Type R on a track outside Seattle. And on road, as well. I pronounced it worthy of the hype.

So naturally, I had to see how it handled the daily grind. There’d be no track driving – I asked, but Honda would’ve needed to do special prep, so that was a no-go – so treks to the grocery store and the suburbs would have to suffice.

Was it still “all that?” In a word, yes.

The Type R might be the best driver’s car on the road right now that’s available for a sticker price of under $40K. Calm down, Miata and GTI fans – I said “might be,” and I’m also aware that Type Rs usually go for way above MSRP.

That last bit is unfortunate, as it has the potential to keep some buyers away. They’ll be missing out on a car with a chassis and steering that feels almost like an extension of your body, tremendous brakes, and a shifter that’s near perfect.

Usually, cars of this type require a sacrifice in ride quality, but the Type R is tolerable on the freeway, especially with the drive mode switched to “comfort.” Tolerable is a relative term – it’s still a stiff ride – but it punishes less on the freeway than a WRX.

[Get new and used Honda Civic pricing here!]

While tracking the car was out of the question, I did have an opportunity to push it on a winding road north of Chicago. As expected, the Type R gripped nicely on dry pavement, with sharp moves that betray no hint of drama. You’ll get some understeer, and a little bit of water in one corner forced me to slow things down, but this thing is just a grin machine.

Not only is it a blast to drive through sharp corners, it’s also relaxed. Not as high strung as a Ford Focus RS, for example. You can hustle this thing or cruise it to dinner. It helps that you can adjust the ride/response via the drive modes – comfort, sport, and +R. Again, the ride remains somewhat stiff even in comfort – longer road trips may get tiring. But it’s acceptable enough for commuting duty.

Honda has the steering perfectly dialed in, and the clutch and shifter are about as close to flawless as you’ll find on the market these days. As a bonus, there’s a rev-matching system, and the stick pairs with a limited-slip differential. The Brembo brakes are stout without being grabby.

This car isn’t just a handler – the 306 horsepower and 295 lb-ft of torque on tap from the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder are evident throughout most of the rev range, and there’s little turbo lag. Punch it in the lower gears and you’ll be a scootin’.

As great as the Type R is on the road, it’s not without flaws. We all know about the wing – there’s no getting around how ugly it is, functional though it may be. At least it doesn’t really block rearward visibility. For the most part.

The bolstered seats that hug you so well on track offer an acceptable level of comfort for shorter drives, but can be a little tiresome if you’re behind the wheel for over 90 minutes or so.

Inside, the cabin is a mess of silly graphics and odd angles on the dash, yet it still sort of works. The volume knob had not yet returned as of 2018, and the silver shift knob will likely burn or freeze driver’s hands in the summer and winter, respectively.

Features wise, there were no options, but standard features included Apple CarPlay, satellite radio, navigation, USB, Android Auto, Bluetooth, push-button start, dual-zone climate control, 20-inch wheels, summer tires, LED fog lamps, LED headlamps, and LED taillights.

Road noise can be a concern with cars of this ilk, and the Type R does suffer from exhaust drone and tire noise during freeway slogs. The three-pipe exhaust with resonator may prevent high-rpm booming noises, but it doesn’t make the background soundtrack pleasant when highway cruising.

2018 Honda Civic Type R

For what it’s worth, the low tire pressure warning light popped on during my time with the car, but no tires were actually short on PSI, at least not by eyeball test (I was sans pressure gauge when the light came on). I was told the fleet had replaced tires and perhaps brake pads for one reason or another before my loan, so I chalked it up to one of three things: A bad sensor, a tech who forgot to reset the sensor, or a sudden change in temp leading to a small pressure change (the kind that wouldn’t affect ride but would cause alarm among the electronics).

Living with a track-focused sports car is often an exercise in compromise, but a relatively stiff ride and short-haul-only seats were the only real drawbacks of grocery getting in a Type R. That, and the stares. You aren’t winning any automotive beauty contests with this thing.

Rare is the track car that can be easily daily driven, and the Civic Type R fits that bill. If you can live with the boy-racer styling, you’ll live happily with this track-ready ride.

[Images: Tim Healey/TTAC]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

89 Comments on “2018 Honda Civic Type R Review – It’s Still All That...”


  • avatar
    dantes_inferno

    It needs every bit of that 306 hp just to outrun its looks.

    I’ll pass.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Styling is subjective but yes this looks like the designer was one of the 5th Graders I was speaking to this A.M.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      “It needs every bit of that 306 hp just to outrun its looks.”

      Priceless.

      “… the silver shift knob will likely burn or freeze driver’s hands in the summer and winter, respectively.”

      Can confirm (had one in my ’08 Bullitt; Ford saw the light and went with a cueball for the new one).

      • 0 avatar
        Blackcloud_9

        Can also confirm…
        My son-in-law had a Challenger SRT with the aluminum “pistol-grip” shifter while living in Tempe AZ. He had to literally put a sock on it in the summer months to prevent blisters – it got that hot.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          A friend of mine went to diesel mechanic school in Phoenix. He reported that during the summer they kept the tools they needed immediately at hand in a 5 gallon bucket of water so that they wouldn’t hurt themselves.

        • 0 avatar
          nrd515

          I had a Hurst “Dual Gate” shifter on my ’79 Trans Am, and one afternoon, after the car had sat in the August sun all day, I got in and grabbed the shifter to back out of the parking spot and got branded with “TSRUH”(As close as I can make it on a PC) on the palm of my hand. I went to Tandy Leather and they made me a nice leather boot for it and even imprinted HURST on it.

          • 0 avatar
            PeriSoft

            “…on the palm of my hand. I went to Tandy Leather and they made me a nice leather boot for it and even imprinted HURST on it.”

            Seems like it would have been easier to cover the shifter instead. ;)

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      I’m an adult, no way I could get away with driving something that looks like this, even if I wanted to , which I don’t.

      Mike mine a Golf R. Or, come to think of it, I’d spring for a Giula. Not as fast or as track focused, but 99 percent of my driving is on the street.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    While I don’t doubt its cred, the sight of a new Type R makes me glad that I chose my GTI.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Good golly, Miss Molly! 300 horsepower for $35k!

    What is the world coming to?!

    *(US $)

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      That is what 2019 Buick Envision 2.0T are going for with the same 295 lb-ft of torque. :-B

      • 0 avatar
        thornmark

        “Buick” Envision.

        BARF.

        A Chinese “Buick” made in China: SAIC GM Dong Yue Foundry, Yantai, Shandong

        “Today’s announcement by General Motors that they are importing the Envision from China is a slap in the face to U.S. taxpayers and the men and women who worked so hard to save GM during its darkest time,”

        Hopefully GM will withdraw the Envision mess from he US.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      The base Mustang at $27.4k has slightly more power and significantly more torque.

      (Only two wheels, natch, and not FWD, which may or may not matter.

      Similarly, the 370Z starts at $29.9 and has Type-R comparable power, if less torque.)

      We live in a golden age of automotive performance.

      The Type R is nice, but it’s probably not the best raw bang/buck if that’s the goal – however, it is a compelling total package if you can swing the price.

    • 0 avatar
      theBrandler

      That same money will get you 460hp in Mustang GT, and for $2k more it will get you 455hp in a Camaro – why are we shocked by 300hp? My van has 300hp for darn-sakes.

      • 0 avatar
        Pantherlove

        To be fair, neither the Mustang/Camaro or your van weight 3100 pounds

        • 0 avatar
          JimC2

          All fair points- Norm about the (Chinese built, badge engineered) Buick, Sigivald and Brandler about the pony cars and the Z, and finally Pantherlove about vehicle weight and horsepower (there *is* a substitute for cubic inches and that is a lightweight car).

  • avatar
    jatz

    Fit gone bad.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    It’s amazing how few of these I’ve seen on the road.I’ve seen exactly one in toney Southern Johnson County where I live. I mean FO RS’s are rare, but I’m more likely to see a GT3. So I guess alot of people are missing out. It has to be the looks that steer people away, I bet in the Midwest you can probably get one for sticker.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I’ve seen one Focus RS and at least three Type Rs, although that includes when they first arrived and dealer personnel were strafing around town in the first one delivered. In my new neighborhood, I’ve seen three GT2 RSs in as many months. I wonder if the drivers are disappointed to see each other coming and going.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Insurance quotes may kill sales dead in their tracks as well. I remember $40K EVOs costing twice as much to insure as 120K 911s some years back.

  • avatar
    pdl2dmtl

    Hi Tim,

    Thank you for your review. Looks is an acquired taste, definitely.

    You may want to check the “As tested” price in CDN $ – it does not make sense.

  • avatar
    dougjp

    Around 300 HP and Torque are the numbers all 2.0 turbos should have. Its STILL a supremely ugly car.

    Honda, via Acura, should make a luxury/performance compact out of the ILX, starting with this engine. Isn’t it obvious the ILX without a motor is just a waste of time (check sales numbers).

    In addition to the manual, they need to find an automatic that could be paired with it. The adjustable ride settings have to be changed toward softer so that comfort could be just that. Ditch the black wheels for something classy and bright, the ILX wheels will do.

    • 0 avatar
      ACCvsBig10

      It still depends on the size of the turbo fitted to the engine, but it would nice for all 2L turbos to come with 300/300 from factory

    • 0 avatar
      charlieo

      I agree that the ILX has needed some attention for a long time, and although I don’t need/want to pay for the luxury associated with Acura, I’d be willing to pay just to get an automatic (not CVT) and avoid the ugliness. I appreciate Honda’s loyalty to manuals, but they take it too far: I remember the Accord coupe, if you got it with an automatic, they gave you cylinder management and a smaller intake (or exhaust, don’t recall) manifold. Just because I don’t want to ‘engage/disengage’ repeatedly doesn’t mean I don’t want to drive as aggressively as possible. I hear that Acura is coming out with a Type S, 1st in the TLX, then in the RLX, and then lastly, the ILX. I think the ILX should come before the RLX, personally.
      I’d be happy if they made the SI or even the Sport better looking and gave me the automatic they reserve for Acura, and as long as the new age of Turbos hasn’t hurt reliability, I’ll buy one.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Acura sedan lineup needs an overhaul

      Next ILX should be a good looking Civic sedan with the Accord’s 2.0T + 10AT and hybrid powerplants

      Next TLX should combine with the RLX and be based on the Accord, with the only engine option being a new 3.0TT and SH-AWD, along with a higher HP hybrid option.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      @dougjp–I’ve been preaching this for a couple of years now.

      I love my GTI and am anxious to see what a Mk8 R looks like, but an ILX–even FWD, but even better AWD–with this motor and a killer suspension for the road, not track, plus adult clothes inside and out would make me take a loooong, hard look.

      Must have killer DCT or better. If it doesn’t feel like my GTI, GTFO.

      • 0 avatar
        Nedmundo

        I’ve been saying this too, over on an Acura forum. I can’t believe the ILX still rides on the 9G Civic platform, when the 10G has been on the road for years. This leads me to believe the ILX is finished. It will probably be replaced by something like that small SUV Acura sells in China.

        This is frustrating, because I’d love to replace my 2010 TLX with a killer ILX, and Honda already has much of the necessary hardware: 10G Civic platform; 2.0T from Accord/CTR; SH-AWD; 6MT (from 4G TL SH-AWD); and a few DCTs, one of which might be adaptable to an SH-AWD ILX. I would want 6MT, but would tolerate a DCT, or maybe even a good AT, if everything else is in order. Such a beast could crush the S3, at a much lower price.

        As it stands, however, I’m looking at the Accord Sport 2.0T and Genesis G70 Sport/MT. I’d probably love the Civic Type R most of the time, but my car needs to work well for long drives.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Just make a version that doesn’t look like it spun out in the accessories aisle in Pep Boys. I have driven one and it is that good. It is on the short list when my Fiesta STs lease is done, but it would be at the top if it wasn’t so hideous. As it is the Golf R is more likely.

    • 0 avatar
      NG5

      The car looks a _little_ bit better in person, but I think the Type R and current Civic in general are the only vehicles on sale I couldn’t have just due to the looks. The fake vents on the rear bumper are impossible to ignore. I hesitate to drive any of them because by all accounts the platform is a good driver and quite livable – I am afraid of getting charmed by the drive.

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      I believe there is a “wing-delete” option. Which would go a long way towards toning down the “boy-racer” aspect of the car

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Incidentally, they sell the motor in crate form so hopefully someone blazes the trail for dropping one in a gen 2 Integra by then. I suppose that would be the Japanese equivalent of the LS in a Third Gen Camaro

  • avatar
    formula m

    I have two top trim brand new Type R’s available below MSRP CDN

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Spam, much?

      • 0 avatar
        formula m

        Kind of relevant considering the article’s content. You literally spout so much garbage about anything and everything possible in your life on here. Doesn’t take a detective to gather from your 100’s of posts per week you send from free wifi at Dunkin Donuts that you can’t afford a new Tundra/Civic or Mirage plus you have poor taste in the POS that you drive. Bam! Spam! Thank you little man

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          formula m, BRAVO!

          I told yawl that clown had no cred, and he proves it with every comment he makes.

          That clown diminishes and detracts from the community that ttac is trying to promote.

          BRAVO for your comment.

          Others would not have wasted the digital ink and time to type a reply.

          • 0 avatar
            formula m

            I live in Canada and don’t care for your NEW MEXICAN life issues or politics mr. deserter

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            That’s OK! I’m not selling anything.

            I admire your candid comments, and “I have two top trim brand new Type R’s available below MSRP CDN” comment as very appropriate.

            You never know who might be looking for one.

          • 0 avatar
            formula m

            OMG I sell cars. I should be ashamed. You do have interesting comments regarding vehicles and seem to have strong opinions. I do like that.

            I feel like you need a little nudge to sometimes to keep you on the road

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Nothing wrong with selling cars. I had four brothers with new-car dealerships in four US states.

            And they drafted me to do the forecast analysis for them and their partners 1985-2015.

            BTW, years ago when the Yahoo Auto Board was still active, one reader lamented that he was unable to locate a certain vehicle.

            Another guy commented that he had just the car this other guy was looking for at the dealership where he worked in the Pacific Northwest, Tacoma or some such place.

            The rest is history and the guy looking for that car was a happy camper, while the salesman (who turned out to be the new car sales manager for the dealership) made someone very happy by picking him up at the airport and made sure he got off to a great start in his dream car.

            You never can tell.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    Can you get it with an automatic and no carrying handle, for people who aren’t Tokyo Drift cosplayers?

    No?

    No, thanks.

  • avatar
    James2

    I see one on almost a daily basis (memo: change route to work). Once seen, it cannot be unseen. The designer of this hideous beast needs to be reassigned to Honda’s lawn mower business.

  • avatar
    EGSE

    “tremendous brakes”

    About farking time Honda.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      At 13.8″ the front stoppers are .2″ bigger then the Brembos on my Z51 C7 and the Honda has around 300 less pound to worry about. Out back the C7 has 1″ bigger brakes plus a dual piston setup.

      But yeah… still too ugly.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Honda needs to stop it with the boy-racer styling antics – it’s obviously over the top on this model, but they managed to put a silly wing on the back of the Si as well.

    Still, like this car, it’s hard to argue with how the Si drives.

  • avatar
    nels0300

    If only Honda had hired Peter Schreyer.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I don’t care how good this car is, it is so ungodly ugly I would never ever buy it on that alone.

    Has to be one of the worst car designs in history, at least for a mainstream model.

    It is too bad. If it was restrained like, say, a GTI then we’d be talking!

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    I’m looking to get a new car this summer and this (or the MX-5 Grand Touring) is on the list. Don’t need a lot of space (thank you company vehicles to haul stuff) and can live with the boy racer styling for that slick Honda feel.

    For Tim Healey and TTAC readers who have taken a serious look at the Type R, what kind of markup in the Midwest (Ohio/Kentucky) is slapped on? I’ve done the whole Edmunds.com thing not too long ago and it said expect to pay around MSRP, but everything I read says that price is fiction. I just want to arrive prepared, or ready to go to a Mazda dealer instead! If this $35K-ish Civic suddenly turns into a $40K+ budget-buster, ouch…

    And doesn’t the volume knob return with the 2019 models? FINALLY!!!

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      And how! I went in to buy one under the premise that it’s a manual hatchback that I could get below invoice, I kid you not. I read this site a lot and this is something they say shouldn’t sell. Boy did I get a rude awakening! Suffice it to say that I do not drive a Civic Type R, and am now pretty cynical about what manufacturers and journalists are telling us about market trends.

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        It might be a manual hatchback, but a manual hatchback in limited numbers with a hot engine! It’s such a limited market these days given that the intended target are 20-somethings that can’t afford the car (unless they somehow already have deep pockets) or people my age (a little older) who like Honda products, can get beyond the styling for what is inside the car, and can afford it. Plus fewer people out there can/will drive a stick shift, so that limits the sales even more.
        So Honda limits the numbers, stuffs a nice engine and suspension on the inside, and is able to charge the hell out of it, and people will buy it. It’s what the dealers do with the gouging that borders on unethical.

        • 0 avatar
          Superdessucke

          What you say makes sense. They’re building under the demand basically, so they can charge more and dealers can make a mint in gouging. Logical strategy.

          If you do not value your enthusiast customers that is. I was pretty put off by the whole experience, to the point where I’m questioning if I want to buy another Honda again. That’s how bad of a taste that left in my mouth.

          • 0 avatar
            theflyersfan

            I remember top line Honda performance models like the Prelude Si and then the SH were always at the upper end of what would be called fair pricing. This Type-R just carries on the tradition. But there were the reasonable models like the S2000 and CRX Si.
            History repeats itself – the current Civic Si can be called reasonable while this Type-R borders on overpriced, especially when muscle cars aren’t too much of a reach from this price. But none of them have the Honda smoothness and reliability.
            That’s unfortunate with the crap the dealer put you through and I hope that isn’t common practice for this model. 11 years ago, I was considering one of the last S2000 models and thankfully it wasn’t a terrible experience. I also don’t want to see 5-10K markups! Not for a Civic…

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            It’s the “Honda tax.”

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I don’t mind high pricing. I think at MSRP it’s worth it. But by time you slap on the “market adjustment” you’ve blown past some serious cars and it is no longer the best option.

      • 0 avatar
        Superdessucke

        After getting laughed out of the first dealership, I tried emailing and calling multiple dealers and didn’t have any success. They would refuse to give a price and then try to get me to come in to talk to their “Type-R Specialist.” It’s obviously a scam. So much for the public’s thirst for CUVs and total disdain for passenger cars and manual transmissions as is constantly reported here over and over again.

        I really don’t consider the Si to be a reasonable alternative. It’s a pretty cynical effort and really not that much different than the Sport Touring beyond the limited slip differential and a few extra ponies due to a larger turbocharger. So unless you’re going racing (the only place you’ll notice the LSD and handful of extra horsepower) you might as well save a few grand and get the Sport Touring. If the power deficit bothers you you could just chip the Sport Touring

        I think the closest thing to a reasonable alternative in the Honda stable would be the Accord Sport 2.0 T with the 6-speed. That is a pretty tempting car but I have a 2015 Accord Sport and I think it’s too large. I live in a big city and that extra mass can make parking and maneuvering in alleys difficult.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          It is true that the general public won’t buy a car with a manual transmission, but the people who buy a performance car are not the general public and it is rare that they want an automatic. Ditto for the CUV thing, most people prefer it over a car, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t people and specifically like performance cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Nedmundo

      From what I’ve seen around Philly (go Flyers!) sale offers at MSRP are deceiving, because they tack on lots of accessories that push it about $5k over. Total BS. I’d recommend going on cars.com, and searching for CTRs within a certain radius, and start calling and emailing dealers. Or, check over on civicx.com, which has a thread about “nice” dealers selling CTRs at reasonable prices. Good, knowledgeable folks on that forum.

      I wouldn’t pay more than MSRP, especially because I’d need a set of 18″ wheels to deal with Philly streets. Those 20″ wheels would last about half an hour driving around my neighborhood.

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        In the same boat. This winter has torn the roads to shreds, especially this current cold snap and all of the plowing. 20″ wheels wouldn’t make it down my street so a set of dedicated winter tires and wheels downsized is a must.
        Thanks for the info – I’ll check it out. Hopefully by the late spring, the “dealer accessories” and “marketing adjustments” won’t be as extreme. I don’t need paint protection, extra fake carbon fiber trim, and the rest.
        Always a Philly Flyer fan!

  • avatar
    theBrandler

    I really wish the Si had even half this things character for being 2/3rds it’s price. The Si is awful, I’ve driven it twice, trying to convince myself to buy it. NO THANK YOU. Yet while the Si is trim and relatively good looking, especially in black coupe form, this fugly buggar would be unlikely to make it into my drive way even if I could afford it.

  • avatar
    Gedrven

    Where’s the weight?!

    In 20 years, the Civic Type R ballooned from 1070kg (2359lb) to 1417kg (3117lb), a 32% increase. What’s been gained by all that bloat? Two more doors don’t weigh 350kg. Does it ride any better? Doesn’t sound like it. Does it have a big heavy engine? Nope, and a ~50lb turbo kit on the original’s B16B would match the new one’s power. Has Honda finally discovered road noise deadening and slathered gobs of it here? (That’s not a rhetorical question, by the way. How quiet is this thing on the highway?) Maybe the weight gain is from the mandatory stack of paper bags to wear over your head while driving this styling atrocity.

    …Which is a shame, because the shape has potential, especially in the window lines. The details ruin it.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Did the car have as many airbags and other safety equipment (including things you cant see, as in stiffer crash structure and intrusion beams, etc) 20 years ago? Did it have as much room? As much refinement?

      Yes, vehicles tend to get bigger and heavier than they used to be. This is not a revelation, nor is it without reason.

      • 0 avatar
        theflyersfan

        Interior-wise, this is about the size of an Accord several generations ago. That’s why the Fit was introduced – the Civic moved up, and they had a space to fill in the entry-level market. Add the crash structure, door beams, reinforced pillars, turbo hardware, larger brakes, airbags, and all of the stuff that we want or need in our cars now, and everything has packed on a few pounds over the years.
        (Lose the spoiler, drop 50 pounds!!! Kidding…)
        I know those of us that are a certain age look back at the late 1980s – early 1990s lightweight Civics with the low hoods, double wishbones, huge greenhouse designs, and wish we could have those days again. Ain’t gonna happen! There’s just so much extra safety equipment and requirements that makes that impossible, plus compared to today, they weren’t exactly the safest cars. I’d love to have an early 90’s hatch with this Type-R engine (or something similar) bolted in and just have ungodly fun with it. But I’d also like to be able to walk away from when I do something stupid, or someone stupid does something to me.

      • 0 avatar
        Gedrven

        Bigger? Certainly. Is the extra room actually usable?

        More refined? Apparently not the ride. As for noise, I’m genuinely curious, but the review doesn’t mention it.

        More unnecessary equipment? Of course. You’re right, it’s likely down to more steel for a bigger and stronger body. I drive a car to drive it, not crash it; to not do stupid things in the first place, rather than rely on electronics to bail me out. Something like a CTR should be light and tossable, not a rolling bomb shelter, but the line between the two is admittedly arbitrary – a case of “reasonable people can disagree.”

    • 0 avatar
      TheChamp

      The nurburgring times speak for themselves. I switched from a race-prepped DC5 to a bone stock Civic Type R. And the Type R is loads faster despite 500 lbs of extra weight. Also near silent exhaust and 4 adult-usable seats. I came in very skeptical about the looks, but once I drove it, I understood. Real downforce from the aero and brake cooling from the ducts.

  • avatar
    kobo1d

    I don’t care what it looks like, this is one of the few cars sold today I could see myself owning. What it does is kind of dumb, but it unquestioningly does that dumb thing better than anything else. In other words, I appreciate the sheer absurdity of trying to make the best-performing FWD car ever. A lot of passionate engineers clearly went all out creating this car, pushing things to the absolute limit they could despite the obvious design limitation of being based on a compact family car and needing to sell the thing for less than $40k. Despite the vastly different starting places, it reminds me of the Porsche 911, where year after year passionate engineers try to push things as far as they can without addressing the underlying design flaws/constraints (in the 911’s case, putting the engine on the wrong side of the rear axle, of course).

  • avatar
    vanpressburg

    About the tire noise, is this car more noise than wrx?

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    Why not a manual transmission Civic Sport sedan with Type R hardware? It would be the best of both worlds. Still missing AWD, however.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    I wish Honda had balls. You know who has balls? Chrysler. They turn out dumb ass crazy cars that are absolutely awesome but come with the long term ownership concerns they’ve always come with.

    Honda, as an experiment – maybe 2-3k units – why don’t you offer up a Type R CRV?

    You know us Americans will buy any CUV, and the CRV is selling well. Why not offer one up with this engine/suspension set up, but maybe change the spring rates to make it more comfortable? Maybe even offer up an all black version!

    I bet you’d sell ’em all and get enthusiasts with kids interested in what you’re doing.

    I’d prefer to see that kind of set up in an Accord, but not enough people are buying it as is.

  • avatar
    KOKing

    Yes, it’s ugly AF. But sometimes looks just don’t matter. I do wish it was smaller, but it does drive nicely, and is frankly more comfortable than my F55 Mini with way-too-stiff-they-discontinued-it suspension.

    Anyone want to sell me one at MSRP Freedom Dollars? I haven’t been able to find anyone locally who is willing.

  • avatar
    cdrmike

    My 5th grader is a fan. But he can only pay $11.

  • avatar

    Honda has traditionally had a very deep bench, but only puts out the second line in most attempts. Read the euro Honda catalog for a good cry.

    Unlike some companies, Honda has proven they can do it, but don’t bother often. Acura ? Why ? Honda can carry high content/tech, but again, lame efforts.

    I have scarred in my brain a Mugen Civic a few years back, with a 10k ADP sticker. It was the same end price as a six fired properly optioned 3 series. You had to really want it….

  • avatar
    legacygt

    The truth is that the wing doesn’t really make the rear of the Civic look much worse than it looks without.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • redapple: Freed I think you got it. They are not big on Autonomy either. They let others work the bugs out and...
  • FreedMike: I’d say that if Toyota has something up its’ sleeve with batteries, then it makes even more...
  • MRF 95 T-Bird: My next door neighbor growing up outside of NYC had a 80 Omega in the same tan color. By around 1985...
  • brettc: Maine uses salt on major roads, but then they use a lot of sand as well on lower trafficked roads. I’m...
  • rpn453: The Micra is still available in Canada at an MSRP of CDN$10500 (US$7900). I’d be interested in test...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States