By on September 27, 2018

Ford confirmed the assembly locale of its F-150 Hybrid this week, saying the electrified pickup would not stray from its aluminum-bodied brethren. The hybridized F-Series will, unsurprisingly, go into production at the Rouge’s Dearborn Truck Plant in 2020, with additional (non-hybrid) production handled by Ford’s Kansas City Assembly.

The automaker made the announcement as part of its 100th anniversary celebration of the River Rouge Complex. While that left the F-150 proclamation a little light on details, Ford previously said the model would probably not be a plug-in hybrid, but would boast outlets for electrically powered tools/devices — functioning as a mobile generator. However, the announcement itself focused primarily on celebrating the Rouge’s centennial. 

“Just as the Rouge has been a harbinger of progress for a century, Ford is committed to ensuring our trucks continue to power the world in a sustainable way — whether they are powered by EcoBoost engines, hybrid powertrains, or are fully electric,” said Bill Ford, executive chairman of the Ford Motor Company.

Ford also said it will launch a volunteer program with Friends of the Rouge, a local NGO that cleans up and preserves the Rouge River. Paid volunteers will work with the group to clean up litter, clear vegetation, and participate in hikes to learn more about area’s history, according to the automaker.

The F-150 Hybrid’s launch is likely to coincide with that of the fully electric performance crossover with a potentially inappropriate name and a hybridized Mustang, all of which are slated for a 2020 launch. There are also some loose rumors that the company will bring in a second electrified police vehicle to complement its Police Responder Hybrid Sedan that year. All told, Ford is investing $4.5 billion over the next five years to produce 13 hybrid or fully electric vehicles.

[Image: Ford Motor Co.]

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48 Comments on “Ford Confirms F-Series Hybrid Bound for Dearborn, Celebrates Rouge’s 100th Birthday...”


  • avatar
    Firestorm 500

    Everybody else just might as well quit making pickups and cede the market to Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      Menar Fromarz

      I think its a great idea, a bit long overdue, but good for them. Now, if they can keep the recalls to a minimum, and make them closer to the ground so the bed rails aren’t 9 feet off the ground, I may be tempted.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Pickups are one of those things that don’t come with instructions, but you’ll figure it out like everyone else does. You look like a smart fella, slightly vertically challenged. One thing you’ll quickly learn is not to drop small things in the bed you’ll need to retrieve soon. If you don’t want clutter in the backseat, use milk crates.

        Or leave a couple milk crates in the bed, so unless you’re under 5 ft tall, you can reach over the bed rails for the small stuff you drop in them, and or use them to organize bungees, straps, nets, etc. Or even an improvised step, seat, etc.

        Some section off the back third of the bed so nothing slides on past that. Me I always keep a rake back there too. I’m sure you’ll think of better ideas for your needs or conditions, but you’ll appreciate the high sides for security. When you carry expensive power tools and materials back there, and park away from the other cars, it looks just like any empty truck.

        Over 2 million a year, plus untold used pickup users seem to figure it out just fine.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          You see, I’ve owned three pickup trucks — and only the last one made the bed inaccessible due to the height of the bedrails.

          The load floor on that last one (an F-150) was almost up to my sternum. That’s rediculous.

          I helped to load an F-150 last weekend, which had the same problem. The step interested into the bumper helped — but it was just a band-aid to make up for a flaw in the design.

          My Ranger had a bed that was about the same height as a kitchen table, and the bedrails were well below my armpit. My 1998 Ranger which was much better than the 2004 and 2016 F-150 in terms of everyday pickup bed usability.

          A condescending “you’ll learn” doesn’t change get the fact that pickup truck machismo (making the truck taller) is reducing their usefulness (making it harder to load cargo).

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          “..The load floor was almost up to my sternum…”

          Um, that puts you into the midget category. Not that there’s anything wrong with that. The load floor of the current F-150 is less than 3 feet (2.9).

          But also there’s “running boards” that go from wheel arch to wheel arch. I’ve seen F-150s with a step (on each side, ahead of the rear wheels) that pulls down, tucks up. I guess that’s an aftermarket (Pep Boys?) accessory.

          Or I’ll use a rear wheel as a step, poking a toe into one of the wheel slots (stock 5-spoke wheels).

          As an owner (of an ’04 STX 4X4 and 5’9″ tall), I prefer the higher bed sides, decent ground clearance, good size tires, big brakes, etc.

          Either way it’s not quite the ordeal drama queens exclaim. What’s up, Vulpine? Some of them I’m sure just like to hear themselves complain/whine/snivel, having never owned a fullsize pickup, and rarely around one in person. I’m sure that’s not you though…

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “You look like a smart fella, slightly vertically challenged. ”

            “As an owner (of an ’04 STX 4X4 and 5’9″ tall),”

            LOL

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          In San Francisco, if you leave a pebble of gravel in the bed of the tallest pickup in the state of California, parking it in the city’s toniest neighborhood; some crackhead will have stolen it within 5 minutes, on the offchance that it just may be something he could smoke…..

          On a different note, at full articulation, there’s not all that much space between the top of the rear diff and bed height on newer trucks. They’re taller because they have beefier axles, bigger wheels/tires, and stiffer, fully boxed frames. “Macho” looks is more a result of, than a driver for, the height.

      • 0 avatar
        redapple

        Menar:
        9 feet off the ground….. Exactly.
        I remember when you stand next to a pick up bed and actually place your elbows on the top of the bed.

        They have gotten yuge. They are silly size. Cartoon size now. And because they are so big, they fit in parking spots and ding the sheet out of MY NEW CAR.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          For city use, I do believe the latest Superduty,in 4×4 trim, has jumped the shark, by getting too tall for too many parking structures. It’s basically Transit Van height now. The halftons, in regular (as in non-Raptor) trims, are still OK.

          Can’t say I like Ford’s decision to blow past the standard 19′ parking spot length in the latest F150 on account of “We are Ford and we are so big the world can adjust,” instead of getting their bigger cab the Tundra way, with a shorter hood; but now everyone is stuck following the 150s lead towards 19 1/2 foot length “standard” models.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            They’re allowed to stick out of a parking space, they just can’t block the aisle. Ford would be shooting itself in the foot with a 7ft tall pickup. They know exactly how high they can go, the tallest F-series being 81.2 inches, with lowest minimum parking structure clearance of 84 inches.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        a big part of the growth in height is that 4×4 is considered the norm these days which raises the truck, and that “half ton” pickups can carry more payload than the F350 from not that long ago.

        A 2WD F-150 is not that bad. that used to be the “standard” way people bought pickups; a 2WD regular cab.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “Everybody else just might as well quit making pickups and cede the market to Ford.”

      Bwhahahahaha. Good one.

      Ford is BY FAR the weakest of the three domestic trucks right now. Rather than invest in innovation, they put all of their eggs in one very expensive aluminium basket. And they are paying dearly for it.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        They’re outselling everyone quite comfortably…

        Their high buck trims look like cheap, tarted up pimpmobiles next to similar trims of the new Ram; but the STX is still the Baddest Looking standard truck on any lot, for those who care about that sort of thing.

        They have more engines than the rest combined, allowing anyone to find one that fits…

        They’re still the only pickup make with any form of trailer backup aid. Which, while you yourself may not need it, is certainly a lot more innovative than adding another 3 inches to a diagonal touch screen…

        The Raptor is still pretty unique.. As is Livedrive in the HDs..

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          the 2019 Ram is indeed very nice, but it’s important to remember it’s all new after 10 years of the old one. The F-150 is getting on 5 years old now (’18 was a pretty minor refresh.)

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff Weimer

      GM has tried the hybrid pickup – twice – and the take rate both times wasn’t enough to keep the option in production.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        GM has done the hybrid pickup 3 times and the first and current are the totally lame BAS version with very very limited availability, ie there are only 500 per year and you can only buy them if you are a CA resident.

        The second one was a real hybrid but that was limited in sales because they didn’t have the ability to produce many and in an attempt to be able to amortize the costs at limited volume it was only available on top trim vehicles. Also being an overly complex and thus expensive to produce transmission didn’t help them much, but that is what you get when you get in bed with the Germans.

        So none of that is relevant as to how Ford, a leader in Hybrid technology, will do with theirs that is not going to be limited in availability in any artificial way.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        What I see in the GM Truck forums for the latest edition of the hybrid pickup is that dealers are pretty clueless how to fix them as well when something goes wrong.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          Well when you are only producing 500 of them it doesn’t make sense to have a proper training program. It is cheaper to send a guy around. Though I’m not sure what is so complicate about a BAS hybrid and they have had those on other vehicles on and off over the years.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        the two-mode hybrids were really neat, but the bankruptcy is what killed it.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    “All told, Ford is investing $4.5 billion over the next five years to produce 13 hybrid or fully electric vehicles.”

    WHEN GAS GOES UP, FORD WILL BE BEGGING FOR A BAILOUT! SO SHORT SIGHTED!

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    An electrified pickup with Ford’s history of electric gremlins, what could go wrong? I mean, besides fires. I can’t wait to see the power numbers on this boat anchor. Ford cannot suck enough.

  • avatar
    ItsBob

    I really think posters that comment on “every” story of ANY particular brand with a slam should go hang out on PickupTrucks.com. That’s where the other kids are.
    It’s kinda silly that when you see the title of a story that you anticipate the same ridiculous comments from the same folks before you even clik open the story.
    Grow up. If you don’t like a particular brand, ignore it.

  • avatar
    TwoBelugas

    Ford pretty much has to at this point with Ram already leading in both diesel and hybrid games. I can see the F150 hybrids with high MPGe numbers thanks to the relatively light weight from the aluminum program.

    Remember that the more they sell electrified high MPGe trucks to people looking for latest and the greatest, the less pressure there is for traditional V8 gas only trucks to deliver margin and thus cheaper prices for the rest of us who don’t care for battery based drivetrains.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Hybrids don’t have MPGe numbers, that is for Plug-in vehicles.

      But you are correct that they should post some high numbers, particularly in the city, and yeah for every one of those that gets a high CAFE number they can sell another with the V8.

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      Vehicle weight and the weight of contents doesn’t make as big a difference with hybrids as conventional cars and trucks. Most of whatever energy is used for a given speed increase or to lift the weight up a bill, is recovered during speed retardation. On regular vehicles the additional energy is just wasted.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    There is more than rumors about another hybrid joining the police fleet. It was announced here months ago and the order sheet is out and open to order your 2020 Police Interceptor Utility, whether NA 3.3, EB 3.0 or 3.3 Hybrid for Jun 2019 production.

    2020-0519-010 2020 Ford Police Interceptor AWD Pursuit-Rated Utility/SUV, 3.3L V6 Direct-Injection (136-MPH Top Speed), 10-Speed Automatic Police-Calibrated Transmission (Column Shifter), 255/60R 18 All-Season BSW Tires; HD Steel Wheels, HD 80-Amp 730CCA Battery, HD 250 Amp Alternator, 21.4 Gallon Fuel Tank, 3.73 Axle Ratio (K8A/500A) THIS IS THE BASE VEHICLE — Please review standard specs to view complete description. $0.00

    2020-0519-011 NEW – Alternative Engine, 3.0L V6 EcoBoost with 10-Speed Automatic Transmission, 3.31 Axle Ratio (148-MPH Top Speed) (99C/44U) $4,041.00

    2020-0519-012 NEW – Alternative Hybrid (HEV) Engine System [Includes 3.3L V6 Direct-Injection Hybrid Engine System, Lithium-Ion Battery Pack (does not intrude into the cargo area), police calibrated high-performance regenerative braking system, DC/DC converter 220-Amp (in lieu of alternator), H7 AGM Battery – 800 CCA / 80-Amp, 19-Gallon Fuel Tank, 8-Year/100,000-Mile Hybrid Unique Component Warranty] (Not compatible with 3.0L V6 EcoBoost option) (99W/44B) $3,302.00

    Create quote 2020 Ford Police Interceptor AWD Pursuit-Rated Utility/SUV 2020 Ford $32,800.00 Yes No 2020MY order bank open now, production starts June 2019. All new engines, including HEV option.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      2020-0519-010 2020 Ford Police Interceptor AWD Pursuit-Rated Utility/SUV, 3.3L V6 Direct-Injection (136-MPH Top Speed), 10-Speed Automatic Police-Calibrated Transmission (Column Shifter), 255/60R 18 All-Season BSW Tires; HD Steel Wheels, HD 80-Amp 730CCA Battery, HD 250 Amp Alternator, 21.4 Gallon Fuel Tank, 3.73 Axle Ratio (K8A/500A) THIS IS THE BASE VEHICLE

      Man I like those specs, (especially the column shifter) but I’m a civilian.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I’m betting the civilian version will have similar basic specs but of course it will have a console holding its shiftier, most likely a dial. Of course you can always wait around 5 or 6 years and pick one up at the Mt Prospect auction.

  • avatar
    Luke42

    A hybrid F-150 is intriguing.

    While I’m most interested in green cars, I’ve owned several pickup trucks over the years. A 5-seat tow vehicle would be nice, and a hybrid drivetrain would fix most of the driavability annoyances that plagued the last two Fords I’ve owned (and an Escape V6 and a 4.3L F-150, both from MY2004).

    I became irritated with the driving experience in both vehicles. At the time, Ford was trying too hard to butch it up to match their marketing, and they succeeded — to the detriment of both vehicles. The recipe was a coarse and unrefined family car, while the F-150 applied an awful lot of sound and fury under the hood just to move it’s overweight self down a suburban street.

    Hybrids are much smoother and quieter, and they save gas too!

    • 0 avatar
      brandloyalty

      I speculate the tow rating will be low. At least with the drivetrain of the Escape Hybrid, almost all the meager engine braking available goes away once regeneration fills the battery to the maximum charge allowed. At low speeds even the regenerative braking is unimpressive. After regen stops, there is only slight engine braking from higher rpms. This means all braking is then being done with the mechanical brakes. This may be ok most of the time, but not descending a long steep mountain grade with a heavy trailer. Hence a conservative rating.

      It may be a different story if the hybrid pickup is equipped with a normal transmission.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Not a problem, the newer Ford Hybrids have a “overdrive” cancel button for increased engine braking without the need to go to the L setting for a lot of engine braking. The stuff I have read indicates that they will not have a lower tow rating than the base truck, but they certainly won’t be available with the Max Tow or Max Payload packages.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      There are some nice advantages to a hybrid drivetrain. Regen braking lowers brake wear. If like Toyota hybrid drivetrains, the vehicle travels with the gas motor at 0 rpm, then there is less motor wear. (According to the dash displays, my ’16 Prius has traveled 20% of its miles with the gas motor off) The electric motors provide instantaneous response and peak torque at 0RPM. Finally of course, is better fuel efficiency. As this site has pointed out many times, increasing a 15 mpg pickup by 2mpg conserves way more gas than boosting all the 40+ mpg cars up to say 50.

      On another note, concerning the comments on here about ride height. I wonder if there will come a time when they start lowering pickup trucks with no loss in functionality in order to reduce frontal surface area to ease aerodynamic losses.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Ford is way ahead of Toyota in engine stopped operation. The system used in the C-Max and current gen Fusion and MKZ can stop the engine at up to 85mph, though initially they were limited to 65mph. The older versions could do 42mph back when the Toyotas could only do 20 something.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          honestly I think that’s mostly to do better on the fuel economy test; the non-plug-in hybrids (Prius included) don’t have enough battery capacity to travel any meaningful distance at those speeds.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            It is not necessarily about going a significant distance under battery power at those speeds and all about the fact that if the engine isn’t turning then it isn’t burning any fuel nor creating any drag. However they can end up going some good distance at speed under battery power as they are set up so that when the engine does start back up it runs at a higher output and charges the battery for the next time it can run on battery power.

            With our MKZ and C-Max after a run down into town there more than half of the miles will be covered with the engine stopped. Now back up to home only about 25% of the distance will be covered engine off due to the altitude change between the two.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        No matter what you do to their nose/frontal area or ground clearance, there’s way too much turbulence in the bed plus abrupt, straight up, rear glass and tailgate. It’s best to maximize pickup’s usefulness and leave it up to drivetrain or other tech to do the rest. Possibly 100 psi tires and active suspension.

  • avatar
    brandloyalty

    Funny how a hybrid pickup comes along and there are no comments in the article or by readers about:
    – excessive payback times,
    – expensive battery replacement,
    – virtue signalling,
    – lithium shortages,
    – rare metal mining pollution,
    – rare metal mining human rights abuses,
    – poor highway mileage,
    – toxic waste of old batteries,
    – diesels get mileage just as good.

    Did I miss any of the classic hybrid myths?


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