By on August 15, 2018

In last week’s QOTD, we made a big list of cars that were considered the oddball choice among their market segment, but which you loved anyway.

This week we head in the opposite direction. We’re talking about the popular vehicles you loathe.

This time around, there’s a rule against vehicles in the oddball or outcast category — it’s easy to hate on the outcasts. The vehicles we’re seeking today are those which are presently popular, or which were so when they were new. And you can’t stand them.

Maybe it’s because they have styling that grates on your nerves. Perhaps your chosen vehicle was so popular that you saw it daily, and simply grew sick of looking at it. Or maybe there’s some other obscure reason, psychological or otherwise, for this loathing. Let me give you an example of a single car which fits all the characteristics above.

Here it is, the New Beetle. The moment Volkswagen released its New Beetle, it was everywhere: television shows and movies, around town, school parking lots, and of course in the copious cutesy advertising. I never liked the styling, and I didn’t like how it was marketed. It annoyed me how excited everyone was for the flower vase. It didn’t seem like a particularly good car, per the report I heard from a relative about the bulb change procedure for the headlamps. I loathed it at the time, and still do. The New Beetle 2.0 is better in that it lost some cartoonish features, but not by much. The whole thing makes me shake my head.

But what about you? Which popular cars present or past do you loathe?

H/t to JohnTaurus for this QOTD suggestion.

[Image: Volkswagen, FCA]

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314 Comments on “QOTD: What Popular Vehicles Do You Loathe?...”


  • avatar
    MrGrieves

    Where to begin…? Besides the photo subject vehicles (PT Cruiser and Cabrio Beetle), also the Chevy HHR, Plymouth Prowler, Scion XB, and also the “Trikes”… specifically the Can-Am and my new favorite vehicle to hate, the Polaris Slingshot.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I’m frustrated how much value the plymouth prowlers have held. I always wanted one, but no way I’m going to pay as much as people are asking for them!

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      The Polaris Slingshot makes zero sense since a new Miata is comparable in price. The Can Am Spyder sells to people afraid to fall off a bike but are accustomed to riding a snowmobile.
      I would say the majority of Cruisers especially Harley Davidson are as close as it comes to a loathsome category of machines. Braking, agility, suspension/ride, and comfort are all sacrificed on the altar of nostalgia.
      The boom in scrambler bikes I don’t mind since those machines tend to be more comfortable and actually have decent performance.

      • 0 avatar
        MrIcky

        Skeptical of Slingshot until rented one for an afternoon. They are pretty fun- you sit so low and it makes you feel like you’re going so fast. Very different from a Miata (Miata is a real car, this is just a toy).

    • 0 avatar
      MoDo

      I always tell broke young guys wanting something quick to get a GT Cruiser. An SRT4 Neon in a plain brown wrapper, for peanuts. As for me I dont mind many vehicles except Chevy Astro vans, boxes on wheels that you can’t see around when behind them. Gladly most are now off the roads, but they hung on longer than they ever should have!

      • 0 avatar
        MoparRocker74

        I owned a manual trans GT Cruiser. GREAT car. Helluva lot more useful than the SRT4, better looking (but I hate sedans) and nearly as quick. Much more of a sleeper factor too.

    • 0 avatar
      Master Baiter

      None of those vehicles could be called “popular.”

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Any CUV? ::ducks out of the room::

    Seriously – they’re a dying breed but I really hated the Pontiac Grand Am, especially the ones that were excessively “ribbed” (for her pleasure). They were quite popular in my neck of the woods and were often passed on to teenagers/younger bad drivers.

    The Dodge Charger. So much I shouldn’t hate about the car: available V8, RWD, plenty of room. One of the last affordable “American” cars that’s made to eat up highway miles. I’ve been tempted myself; but as they age, lots of them, especially the V6 models, become redneck mobiles. And I’ve never really liked the front end of these cars; it’s no looker unlike the 300 or the Challenger.

    • 0 avatar
      Alcolawl

      >> Any CUV?

      Be careful. Why wouldn’t you want something with more space to put all of your nothing in?

      I don’t mind chargers really but I know what you’re talking about. the cheap looking V6 models with silver paint and a scraped bumper. Yuck. I like the Charger for what it is, though, and the aggressive styling is great; especially post-facelift. I just don’t think my heart will never not sink when I see a black one sneaking up behind me in my rear view. They’re the new Crown Vic.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @dividebytube – in my part of the world new or new”ish” V6 Chargers, Challengers, and Chrysler 300’s are the preferred ride of young men of Indian(India) heritage.

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      “ribbed” (for her pleasure) HA. HAHA! I enjoyed that a bit too much…but yea you totally nailed the plastic fantastic sad end to a car company.

      I got married in 1995 (for the first time), and part of my wife’s dowry was a brand-new base model Grand Am sedan. Manual windows, power locks, no body cladding and, of course, teal paint. Her family couldn’t stand me (for class reasons) and wanted her to have something of her own when our marriage would inevitably fail. I have never seen a car rattle that much, and my parents were GM and Dodge wagon-owners. The dash would shrink when you used the air-conditioning, the curved doors would nail you in the temple, and the Quad 4 stretched the meaning of the word “powerplant”. Still, it always started, and there were plenty of replacement salvage yard mirrors for cheap as she knocked them off on anything solid next to the road. As soon as we settled into our first house I traded that hateful thing off. Yes, we’re divorced.

      You nailed the demographic though. True cheapskates drove old Cavalier two-doors, while the image-conscious meth-heads with trucker hats plied my small Missouri town in Grand Am coupes with more cladding then metal, smashed hubcaps still clinging onto steel wheels, and five pounds of garter belt/high school tassle hanging from the mirror.

      What will replace them in this role? The current Dart?

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I was also going to say the Charger. Usually the 2006ish model, with the 20″+ chrome wheels, chrome applique on the door handles and B-pillar, and chrome stick-on portholes pasted to the lower part of the door for some reason. And of course, a V6.

      The updated V8 models remain awesome, however.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        This actually makes me hesitate on a Charger. Of course I’d have an R/T or better but it would get depressing pulling up next to a beat up V6 hooptie version at every stoplight.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    The current Toyota Prius – although its sheer ugliness means it is no longer very popular, despite being an improved drive relative to earlier generations.

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      Their inherent reliability combined with their hated image (helped along by South Park) makes them the cheapskate engineer dream-mobile. Most of the poor midwestern owners who get flipped off and honked at here in oil country aren’t actually smug blue-state environmentalists, but rather just skinflints.

      My former co-worker had nursed his to 250k miles, and had refused to give up the last time I saw him. No one ever asked him to drive to lunch.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      Smile, thanks. Agreed on the ugliness thing. Some people like owning ugly dogs and I think there is a streak of that in me. My ’16 Prius ultimately appeals to my being lifelong fuel efficiency freak, extreme performance engineering lover, skinflint(see below), and practical smallish car lover. I’d prefer the exterior appearance was not so awkward, but how an appliance is styled is low on my list.

    • 0 avatar
      dantes_inferno

      >The current Toyota Prius

      Or as I prefer to call it – The Atomic Egg. The automotive symbol of smugness, piousness, and sanctimony.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    Honda Odyssey.

    because I don’t think I’ve ever seen one being driven faster than 10 mph under the speed limit.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Any Honda today worth of loathing

    • 0 avatar
      chrishs2000

      Our family van 05 Ody Touring with 210k miles happily cruises at 85 all day long and people seem to get out of its way, perhaps in shock.

      The reason you rarely see these things go quickly isn’t just because mostly old people drive them. They are just so…pleasant. They drive like big cars in no particular hurry to do anything. It’s hard to find any real fault with the way they drive, especially compared to a pickup or large SUV. And it’s very easy to embrace the “who cares what anyone else thinks” attitude since you’re already driving a minivan around.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      All the modern minivans are stupid wide, to accommodate the “baby bunker” car seats. I hate every one I’ve ever had to follow.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    Big bro-dozer pickups. I’m sick of navigating around these giants in our parking garage at work. I’m still surprised how popular these things are with women. I guess I’m turning into the old “get of my lawn” guy.

    Speaking of popular with women, 4 door Jeeps. I don’t care for them either.

    • 0 avatar
      Robbie

      +1
      They seem incapable of staying in their lane. The width of the car and the width of the ego of the hillbilly driving it makes that impossible.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      don’t forget the confederate flags flying from the bed sides to show what a “rebel” the owner is.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I’m not a fan of bro-dozers either. Great way to wreck a perfectly good pickup. I hate any 4×4 pickup running 22 inch wheels. I cringe when I see 22’s on a lifted truck that looks like it should be a decent off-roader.

      • 0 avatar
        ttacgreg

        My schooling in animal behavior leads to me to the hypothesis that lots of bro-dozers are a material manifestation of the mate selection game. Think preening, show off male peacocks, and peahens finding that show off to be irresistible. Bro-dozers may be as much an estrogen phenomena as they are testosterone ones. All of those accessory items you mention are also displays of wealth, another attractor in the mating game.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          actually I think it’s just a bunch of 18-22 year old wannabe-alpha douches trying to assert their “dominance.” You know, mine’s bigger, and since it’s against the law for me to literally p!ss in your face I’ll bury you in a cloud of soot instead.

          guys like that make me glad I don’t (and won’t) have kids.

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      I drive a low car, so see if this sounds familiar to any other coupe or sedan owners out there. You’re in the right lane waiting for a spot to turn right onto a busy thoroughfare, when suddenly your vision of the entire world on your left is obscured by the Queen Mary on Mud Terrains. The entire line behind you is upset that you won’t turn blind into traffic, and there is no left-turn arrow or tugboat to assist the beast blocking the sun. Until it decides to leap into traffic on its own, you are trapped.

      We can only hope they begin to lift further, as we might then be able to see underneath.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy67

      Yep. Especially the one with huge offsets on their huge off-road tires, that never see dirt, that’s sitting 2 feet off my rear bumper at 70MPH.

    • 0 avatar
      Car Guy

      I loathe the over used term “bro dozer”…..

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Stay hard!

    • 0 avatar
      dantes_inferno

      >Big bro-dozer pickups.

      Concur. Best described as the super-sized pickup trucks owned by those individuals with (as I prefer to call it) “Little Dick Johnson Syndrome”. And I’m referring to those individuals who use them to commute to their air-conditioned office jobs – NOT the hardworking men and women at construction sites, farms, ranches, etc. where pickup trucks are ACTUALLY needed.

      And don’t get me started with those pickup trucks equipped with massive lift kits, gangster wheels, and rear wings. (A rear wing on a pickup truck makes about as much sense as a lift kit on a Prius).

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    All new cars because they all look alike………except for Cadillacs they stand out.

  • avatar
    TR4

    Ford Fusion, and any other vehicle with a fake Aston Martin grill.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    Nissan Rogue of course for all the harping I do on ours.

    Most small CUVs I can’t stand actually.

  • avatar
    arach

    THE TOYOTA PRIUS.

    I have ended friendships with people because they bought a Prius. (not a joke)

    I have the subconscious urge to drive every one I see off the road. (also not a joke)

    I have such a hatred for the Prius and I don’t know why. I should probably see someone for it.

    And I’m not talking about the new prius… I’m talking about all the old priuses. I was about ready to throw a party when I heart prius sales were finally declining.

    • 0 avatar
      srh

      You really should see someone about that (not a joke). That’s unhealthy and troubling (also not a joke).

    • 0 avatar
      bking12762

      I’ve noticed that Prius drivers tend to not use their turn signals.

      • 0 avatar
        christophervalle

        That’s because each blink robs the driver of 0.0127 from their much ballyhooed MPG. That stuff adds up.

      • 0 avatar
        dantes_inferno

        >I’ve noticed that Prius drivers tend to not use their turn signals.

        Based on direct observations of many drivers over the years, I’m firmly convinced that turn signals have become a dealer-installed option on most vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      arach

      Have a party, but save the good stuff. The eventual death of the Prius is only a few years away.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      That’s exactly how I feel about Wranglers

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      @arach
      “I have the subconscious urge to drive every one I see off the road. (also not a joke)”

      Thanks for confirming in English what some driver’s aggressive behavior towards me in my Prius tells me is going on in their minds. Such vehicular behavior towards me is far less common when I drive my Corolla or my Vitara.

      BTW, your urge is not subconscious if you can spell it out with words, so contrats. Self recognition is an excellent first step in dealing with inner demons.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      I spend 5 miles driving a (work fleet) 2nd Gen Prius this morning, and I can’t think of any car I’ve ever driven that I dislike so much. My hatred isn’t political or class based, and I’m positively disposed to hybrids in theory (work fleet 2nd Gen Fusion is nice). Its just such a terrible car in so many ways. I’m only 6′, but the headliner impedes into my vision and I can’t lower the seat. The rear visibility is bad. The car literally stinks, the plastics and upholstery seems to be offgassing an unpleasant vomitty smell, even though the car is rather old now. I hated cycling through the screens to turn the A/C on, and even on MAX it never got that cold. The seat fabric is an awful mouse fur. The engine seems to cut in rather early, and doesn’t sound pleasant, whereas I have gotten good at keeping a Fusion in EV only mode for nice quiet city cruising. The front suspension is noisy. The ergonomics are just distracting and terrible. I was driving back to my work site, curious of the time, and apparently they don’t even have a clock.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        It’s funny how different two people can think of the same car. Yes the gen 2 Prius is a totally un-involving car to drive and the 1.5L screams if you ask for anything approaching brisk acceleration. But I personally happen to be a big fan of the interior. Very open and simply designed, although yes I hate having to navigate a touchscreen for HVAC controls. I happen to be a big fan of the cloth they used in them, it’s been all downhill for Toyota since then IMO. I used to be the biggest Prius hater as a bonafide “car guy” then I drove my father in law’s ’09 for a few days when my then-gf drove it out to Ithaca to visit one time back in 2013-ish. Ithaca is crawling with the things btw, driven by the granola crowd that everyone would stereotype Prius drivers with. But around town, it was actually really satisfying to drive with the ICE/electric switching over, watching the regen down hill, etc. Even with all of Ithaca’s hills, 47-50mpg was entirely achievable. I liked the hatchback utility and 2nd row legroom, the openness of the front cockpit without much of an obtrusive console (which they introduced with the gen 3).

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      Not completely unreasonable. I despise everything the prius is, and to a lesser degree all other hybrids. But the prius is the poster child for pompous granola eating D-bags blathering on about their eco consciousness. Itd be one thing if that crowd was just a speed bump on the road of life, but when they get a cut of my hard earned money in the form of tax credits as well as the ‘free’ plug ins (for cars so equipped) at certain grocery stores and even my job…it makes my blood boil knowing all this costs money and somewhere I’m subsidizing someone else’s choices. Not to get all political, but forced participation in socialism is WAY out of line.

      • 0 avatar
        ttacgreg

        Hey Mopar, have you actually ever met and talked with some fellow human who is/was a “poster child for pompous granola eating D-bags blathering on about their eco consciousness”, or are you having a hate affair with an imagined stereotype?

        • 0 avatar
          quaquaqua

          I think you know the answer to that one, Greg. It’s the Jack Baruth line of reasoning. “Once I heard of a woman in California who fed her placenta to her gender-neutral spouse, so therefore, this is why we shouldn’t question our president’s ties to Russia.” Find an enemy on the other side, paint everyone as being their equal, and use that to defend your ridiculous stance. Wash, rinse, repeat.

          By the way Mopar dude, read up on the infrastructure of the United States – about how roads, electricity, telephones, mail service, etc. were brought to everyone, even in the middle of nowhere. Read up on that and then try to talk about how building an infrastructure for vehicle charging should be run differently. I’d love to hear why.

        • 0 avatar
          dantes_inferno

          >Hey Mopar, have you actually ever met and talked with some fellow human who is/was a “poster child for pompous granola eating D-bags blathering on about their eco consciousness”

          I can answer that question with an unequivocal YES! And I don’t mean just one individual either. Multiple individuals. It’s as though they were spawned from pods from the movie “The Invasion Of The Body Snatchers”.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        How do you feel about Medicare and SNAP?

        • 0 avatar
          dantes_inferno

          >How do you feel about Medicare and SNAP?

          For the elderly and disabled, I’m all for it – such programs represent a safety net for said individuals.

          For able-bodied individuals who can work, but choose to abuse the system, I’m against it.

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    I despise all quad cab short box pickups. F’ing useless POS’s. I wish a an asteroid would wipe them all out.
    :-/

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      I own an original J-code CR-V. It’s old enough to vote. I should sell it, but it’s worth only a few cents more than it’s scrap value, so I delight in taking it to Home Lowes on the weekend.

      When I come out with 8-foot boards for some silly project, I wind up placing them fully inside the little devil and closing the hatch, while the double-cabs next to me leave with most of their lumber hanging over the gate awkwardly with flags. The looks of bemusement/hate that I get when the gate snicks closed are kind of worth the trip. It’s ok though, they get to tailgate me and honk all the way across town, so Karma is happy.

      • 0 avatar
        993cc

        I used to have that same experience with my Geo Metro. I had to pull the back seats to do it but still…
        Disappointingly, the larger cars I’ve had since can’t do it.

    • 0 avatar
      Guitar man

      Dual cab pickups. No power, no performance, rock hard leaf springs to increase the tow rating but they’re completely rubbish at towing because the roll over like a drunk on the mildest of turns, terrible ride quality, evil handling, less interior space than a frigging Yaris, high fuel consumption, dpf filter that drives you nuts.

      And this pile of rubbish costs $65k in Australia.

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    The B&B are ANGERY!!!!

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Every true car ‘guy’ has some deeply rooted loathing of a particular car rational or not….all TTAC did was open the flood gates. I look forward to returning to this thread later in the day; gonna be a long one.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “The B&B are ANGERY!!!!”

      And it isn’t about politics ;)

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Australia, New Zealand, Canada and many other “western” nations had better pick sides soon between China and the U.S., lest they find themselves up sh*t creek without a paddle forever more as a territory under the complete dominion and control of The Peoples Republic of China.

        Out Presidents and congress-slime in the U.S. change every 4 to 6 years, so you may be happier or more upset at U.S. policy given whoever is in office at any particular time, but you will have protection, freedoms and benefits that you will lose forever if you let China put its thumb down upon you.

        • 0 avatar
          carguy67

          “Congressmen;” i.e. members of the House of Representatives, are elected every 2 years; part of the reason they are such slimeballs.

        • 0 avatar
          dantes_inferno

          > Out Presidents and congress-slime in the U.S. change every 4 to 6 years

          Correct on the President, incorrect on the congress-slime as many of those individuals keep getting re-elected many times over. If term limits are good for the President, they’re good for Congress. End of story.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Fvck……should not have mentioned politics, even in jest.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    CHEVY SILVERADO/GMC SIERRA by Guangzhou-Guadalajara Motors (GM)

    “The Ford F-150 contains the greatest number of American-made parts for a pickup truck, with 75 percent of them coming from within the country. The most American SUV is the Jeep Wrangler, at 73 percent, with the General’s Buick Enclave, Chevrolet Traverse, and GMC Acadia close behind at 72 percent.

    ***The Chevrolet Silverado and GMC Sierra twins rank low on the list compared to other pickups,*** with [just] 40 percent of their parts being made in America.*** This is bested by nearly all of GM’s competitors, including Nissan, Toyota, Honda and Ram.”

    http://gmauthority.com/blog/2014/02/just-how-american-are-gms-trucks-suvs-and-vans/

    DO NOT LET THE CHINESE STEAMROLL THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA!

    AMERICANS, DO NOT SPEND YOUR MONEY TO HELP CHINA CONTINUE TO BUILD UP ITS MILITARY AND BUILD OUT ITS INFRASTRUCTURE THROUGH AMERICAN-IN-NAME-ONLY SHELL COMPANIES !!!

    BOYCOTT GUANGZHOU-GUADALAJARA MOTORS (GM) FOREVER MORE!!!

    MARY BARRA
    DAN AMMANN
    MARK REUSS
    STEVE CARLISLE
    AND ALL OTHER GM EXECUTIVES ARE MANCHURIAN CANDIDATE SLEEPER CELL AGENTS!

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      I guess we know where Alex Jones is venting now that he is banned from Facebook.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I support buying stuff from china as long as the product offering is a superior value.

      So let me get this straight…

      I give China a $10 gift certificate in US Currency that must be spent on US goods.

      That $10 gift certificate, compliments of inflation, loses .03% of its value each year.

      So next year, China can buy $9.70 worth of US Goods from the US with the Gift Certificate (US Currency) received from the US.

      So the US gets $10 in value, but China gets $9.70 in value.

      I’m clearly missing the problem here.

    • 0 avatar
      don1967

      Amen Deadweight! Put me down for 3 of your bumper stickers, for my Silverado, my Volvo and my Yamaha.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        You need to replace your Silverado with a F150 or RAM, both assembled now in the U.S., and with 60% to 80% more parts sourced from American-based and American-owned firms, than the Chicom Silverado.

        What year is your Volvo and where was it made?

        I’m totally cool with your Yamaha – great bikes and Japan is our ally, not with an open declaration that they want to first rival, then overtake the U.S. economically and MILITARILY, so that they can run the world, and have the level of hegemony that makes all other nations bend to their will and adopt their value system.

        You guys think that I’m joking, but I’m not, what I’m stating is all open information of the factual variety, and with every dollar you allocate to China, you aid them in achieving their openly stated goals.

    • 0 avatar
      Robbie

      Nothing wrong with a Chinese car, Japanese car, German car, Chinese cellphone, Indian T-shirt, or Thai rice. If the world is a big marketplace, everyone wins.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        Except it’s not…especially when it comes to China, still very much a one-way street with them when it comes to trade.

        As for cars I loathe (or at least carry a strong dislike of):

        MB CLA. Drove a few and just get out of them shaking my head.
        Dodge Caliber (was it ever considered “popular?”) I wanted to like the concept, then drove one. Solved any desire to ever own one.
        BMW 3-series (and this pains me, as a dyed in the wool Blau mit Weiss fan). What they’ve become is so far from the marque I grew up loving. Just sad.

      • 0 avatar
        srh

        ^^ Right on. The big government nannies who use jingoistic rhetoric to try to prevent the rest of us from exchanging in voluntary and peaceful exchange of goods and services disgust me.

        Here’s a suggestion: Provide a better product at a competitive price or GTFO.

        • 0 avatar
          don1967

          “Here’s a suggestion: Provide a better product at a competitive price or GTFO.”

          I agree with your free-market sentiment, but have you considered that competing with China’s pricing also requires us to compete with their standard of living?

          Deadweight does have a point, in that globalism results in a massive redistribution of wealth away from the western working class. As people start waking up to this reality and electing populist leaders, you can bet that the elite who profit from open borders won’t go down without a fight.

          Not sure if this helps explain the propaganda wars currently taking place throughout the western world, but give it some time and it will sink in.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      I sticking with the National Security Threat and CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER GUANGZHOU-GUADALAJARA MOTORS (GM)’TWIN SILVERADO/SIERRA PEOPLES REPUBLIC OF CHINA COMBLOC PICKUPS.

      But I am supplementing answer with the following AWFUL vehicles:

      Honda HR-V
      Toyota CH-R
      Ford EcoSport
      Toyota Yaris
      Cadillac ATS
      Cadillac CTS
      Mercedes GLA
      Mercedes CLA
      Cadillac XT4
      Cadillac CT6 (overpriced pile of sh*t)
      Nissan Sentra
      Hyundai Kona
      BMW X6
      Mercedes G-Wagen
      Chevy Trax
      Buick Envision/Invasion
      GMC Terrain

      I’ll think of some more. There are many more.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        I GOT A LOT OF PROBLEMS WITH YOU PEOPLE AND NOW YOU’RE GONNA HEAR ABOUT IT.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “I sticking with the National Security Threat and CLEAR AND PRESENT DANGER GUANGZHOU-GUADALAJARA MOTORS (GM)’TWIN SILVERADO/SIERRA PEOPLES REPUBLIC OF CHINA COMBLOC PICKUPS.”

        that’s like that little kick you get when the lead actor uses the title of the film in the dialogue.

    • 0 avatar
      Peter Gazis

      @DeadWeight

      BULLSH’T
      Your facts only look at domestically made vehicles, and leave out R&D

      Most of GM’s vehicles are built in the U.S. to stay price competive with the imports they need to import a good deal of their parts.

      While Nissan, Toyota, Subaru, H/K all import about 50% of there vehicles into the U.S.

      All things included GMs Domestic content is about 85% higher than any other automaker.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        “General Motors LLC” (the NEW GM, post-bailout) is a Shell Company that is a sleeper cell entity controlled by the Chinese Communist Government.

        China is using it to steal American Engineering, IT, Hybrid Tech, Battery Tech, and other important technologies that have dual-use military and commercial applications, and is weaponizing this technology against the United States as I write this.

        General Motors should be identified and listed as an entity wholly controlled by a foreign hostile nation-state, and banned and sanctioned from doing any business or even having a presence within the United States of America or any of its territories.

        Its key executives should also be indicted for sedition/treason/espionage, and many other federal felonies, and tried for such crimes in U.S. Courts having appropriate jurisdiction over these claims.

        • 0 avatar
          Peter Gazis

          @DeadWieght

          1st the U.S. isn’t going to war with Canada or Mexico.
          2nd the small engine light vehicles GM builds in China have almost no military use.
          3rd American companies set up shop in China because of cheap labor and a good transportation system. As wages rise and roads become more congested, they will be quick to move somewhere else.
          4th Today’s technology will be outdated in a few years.
          Last as China’s population ages, more of their resources will be devoted to healthcare. With such a large population the focus will be on keeping costs down. A big bonus as these treatments make their way to the west.

        • 0 avatar
          deanst

          And here I was, thinking that Russian collusion was the immediate threat to all democracies. So hard to keep up with the news these days.

    • 0 avatar
      hpycamper

      For a little background on DW’s rant, google the article “Why Does Everyone Hate Made in China 2025”.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        On its own, camper, that article is not enough. DW’s rant relies on Chevy parts made in China when we really don’t know how many of those parts are actually made there. I’ll grant that US-branded pickups do NOT carry a majority of US parts but that doesn’t mean they’re all “made in China”, either; we already know that many parts are made in Mexico and/or Canada. So DW’s rant is essentially irrelevant to the discussion and should be ignored.

        Add to this his extreme conspiracy theory about GM specifically and…

        • 0 avatar
          hpycamper

          Vulpine
          I meant the article as a little background to the broader issues he brings up regarding China, not limited to car parts or content.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          You’re being hopelessly naive, friend.

          Whether this was an auto site or one dealing with optics,the China threat that I raise is serious and imminent enough to warrant discussion on a broad scale, as its potential outcome is ominous if the U.S., including domestic and multinational corporations domiciled within, or doing significant business and manufacturing within, aren’t read the riot act by the legislative body of the United States of America, should they continue in transferring technology at a near free cost to China, and also should that body not act aggressively and decisively to counter China’s ambitions as manifested through manipulating publicly traded corporations’ short term financial goals (and stock bonuses of key execs) to China’s advantage.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Made_in_China_2025

        https://www.scmp.com/news/china/economy/article/2149223/it-time-beijing-ditched-made-china-2025-and-stopped-upsetting

        Even Chinese academics tacitly admit that it’s real purpose is as aggressive as intended, despite trying to spin it otherwise:

        “Zhong Wei, a professor at Beijing Normal University, said the government should, in public at least, play down the significance of the scheme, which is seen in the United States and Europe as indisputable evidence of China’s aim to dominate hi-tech sectors via state-sponsored activities.”

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          … Still doesn’t support your rant against GM in particular.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            GM, through SAIC JV, and various sub-entities,is BY FAR the largest culprit of any U.S. auto manufacturer transferring highly sensitive and formerly proprietary to Chinese SOEs, which are essentially a branch of the Chinese military, knowingly or carelessly (or greedily).

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “GM, through SAIC JV, and various sub-entities,is BY FAR the largest culprit of any U.S. auto manufacturer transferring highly sensitive and formerly proprietary to Chinese SOEs,…”

            Whoa! What?

            How in the world is General Motors automobile tech considered “sensitive and formerly propriety”?

            Keep in mind that American General, a division of GM, did NOT send any US military data or technology to China in its sale of the Hummer brand–all they received was the brand name itself and NONE of its products.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Vulpine what are you talking about, GM never sold the Hummer name brand, they still own the rights and continue to update them every year.

            Also AM general is not a division of GM, it’s a completely different company that has no ties to GM. In fact AM General builds Mercedes cars for Mercedes.

            Am General built the H1 + H2 per contract with GM.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Keep in mind that American General, a division of GM,”

            What? No!

            AM General was originally part of American Motors Corp. (AMC) and was spun off into AM General when Renault took a controlling stake in AMC. This was because at the time the US .gov did not want a defense contractor owned by a foreign nation.

            AM General has *never* been part of GM. The “Hummer” thing was always strictly branding.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Deadweight, where was your computer and it’s components made? Just asking for a friend…

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I can’t stand the Ford Raptor, not because of the truck itself (I think it’s insanely cool) but because of its drivers. And in these parts, the number of people able/willing to drop $68K on an offroadable wide-body truck is quite high, so it’s a popular choice.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I can’t stand nearly everything in Nissan’s lineup. I give a pass to the 370Z and the GTR, though I don’t really like what the GT-R became in its transition from the Skyline to whatever it is now (fast brick?).

    Knowing how much I love the Nissans of the ’80s and ’90s – not to mention the previous generations of Skylines, it is completely unforgivable what they have turned that mark into.

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      I feel the same way – they had some great looking cars 30 years ago…..

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      Same here. I really liked Nissan in the 80’s and 90’s but their current design language does not resonate with me. Plus slapping a CVT in most of their lineup doesn’t help.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      I loath the Juke. LOATHE. Kill that bug-eyed POS with fire!

      But…strangely enough I kinda respect the Versa (which is super popular around these parts among the low income and H1B visa set). I can see the appeal of buying honest transportation, new, for a reasonable price, rather than taking your chances with a used vehicle. I also find the small wheels, bigger body, low slung look kind of cheerily appealing. Maybe because it’s so rare these days.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      I was a Nissan fanatic in the 80s (teenager) and 90s, I dreamed of having a 1992 Nissan 300ZX, a Maxima, and a 4X4 Hardbody truck. I drove a ’87 Stanza that I got from my dad to 210k miles before selling it. Owned two Nissan trucks and a ’97 Altima, the latter seemed really cheapened compared to the ’87 Stanza.

      These days? Uh… the 370Z and the dated Frontier are the only things I would consider buying but would probably end up getting something else.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      Clicked through to say exactly this. I’m actually less forgiving than you are: the 370Z is literally the last car in that segment I’d own, and the GT-R is ancient and overweight at this stage and never stirred emotions to begin with. Given the choice I’d take an R34 over the current GT-R eleven out of ten times.

      • 0 avatar
        dantes_inferno

        >Given the choice I’d take an R34 over the current GT-R eleven out of ten times.

        Agreed. At least the R34 has a proper MANUAL transmission. The GT-R is a bulbous, electronic-nanny laden vehicle which anyone (including idiots) can drive fast. And where’s the challenge in that? No thanks…

  • avatar
    deanst

    Those German “sports utility coupe” or what ever they are called like the BMW X6. They are not sporty, have compromised utility, and are not coupes. They make me so angry I never want to buy anything else offered by the manufacturer. I pass them and wonder about the sanity of the owner. They just prove to me that the firms will produce whatever monstrosity they can sell for a profit.

    I’d have more respect for a driver with the original AMC Eagle sedan.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      No kidding. I effing hate these stupid SUV’s. There is a guy in my neighborhood who has two AMC’s; a wagon and sedan, I give him a wave every time I drive by him.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      ANY 4-door “coupe” qualifies in my opinion. They’re just sedans with compromised rear head room and trunk space. F*$%#@# useless.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Those German “sports utility coupes” actually make me laugh. I enjoy snickering at someone who thinks they spent a lot of money on something cool when in reality they spent too much money to look ridiculous. I can’t think of anyone who’s impressed by them

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      Man, I’d really like me one of those X6 now. The styling is awesome. Unfortunately, that price tag… They also make X2, but it’s just not the same.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    The New Beetle was popular?

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    deanst beat me to it. I as well loath the X6 and the GLE 500; really any SUV w/ the sweeping back that literally removes any usefulness of said utility vehicle.
    But since these have been mentioned.

    I am going to with the MB CLA 250. I have no rational reason for my hatred of this vehicle. I think it comes down to my inner financial nerd that needs to be able to justify a car purchase in terms of resale, utility so and so forth. To me the CLA represents zero value. It is an overpriced cramped sedan that is underpowered that basically screams I can not afford a MB and am really bad at managing my own finances as we all know an Accord, Camry, or various other 4 door sedans would have been a 100x better decision to make. Those with limited funds should not drive German cars….as those limited funds will turn into non-non-existant funds in short order.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      You’re mostly right, but I don’t think underpowered is accurate – they’re quick enough (just a little slower than a V6 Camry), especially for their mission (commuting between a cubicle job, Starbucks, and a yoga studio).

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      I was going to say the CLA250 too. Cramped interior, cheap plastics, FWD, droopy styling. I hate this car so much. A coworker bought a used one and I had to bite my tongue to keep from trashing his purchase. But he’s a badge whore so he was happy.

    • 0 avatar
      tnk479

      It’s interesting how you know how wealthy someone is just by looking at the car they are driving.

  • avatar
    make_light

    08-12 Honda Accord. I have two friends who have owned them. Yes, they are roomy and reliable, but that’s it. Big, ugly, cheap inside, hard seats, incredibly noisy. It’s amazing that Honda was able to pass off such an inferior product, without taking any heat.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I had an 11′ DX MT for one tank of gas. It. Was. Awful.

    • 0 avatar
      chrishs2000

      Agreed on this. So much cost cutting compared to the prior gen Accord. They were piles of cheap crap, but large, like an older Impala. The 09-13 TL based on it was ugly as sin but incredibly nice inside to the point it was hard to believe they were based on that junky POS. The European Accord (TSX) was also much nicer inside. But Honda guessed right that they could pass cheap crap off to the Americans as long as it had an Accord badge on them.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        I don’t think the TL interior escaped the cheapness. Seats and door panels are just fine, but the dashboard in that car is a hyperactive dystopia of tech design themes. It’s way too busy and the fake metals, carbon fiber, and grey wood are not remotely convincing. The swooping arcs of imitation carbon fiber that flow flamboyantly from the flanks of the center console to the doors are really off-putting. Everything in that cabin is overstyled and undercrafted. Between that, the Accord-like button-itis of the center stack, and the slight drivetrain vibration humming subtly through the structure, I have no trouble believing it was based on that Accord the same way I have no trouble believing the cheaped out 2009 Lexus ES350 was based on the highly unimpressive Camry of the time.

        • 0 avatar
          chrishs2000

          Actually the trim was not fake metal, it was real metal – PVD coated. Look it up, it’s actually pretty interesting how they were produced. I don’t think it was meant in any way to look like CF, since it looks nothing like CF and it has a textured feel to it. Now 7gen Accord 6MT’s had a piece of paper printed with a CF pattern under a piece of plastic in the door trim which had obvious distortion as it curved, THAT is fake CF. Also there was no fake wood in any 4g TL trim, they all had the PVD coated interior trim. Are you thinking of an RL or 3g TL?

          The design was quite busy but it was very well laid out and switchgear was top quality unlike the playskool giant Accord buttons. Every reviewer who only sat in the car for 5 days complained about “all the buttons” which they didn’t have the time to learn the locations and uses of, but the dual screen setup they went to on the TLX was way more confusing and less functional. Materials were all a step or three above the Accord. Never had any vibration issues in my 2011 while I owned it nor have I seen widespread reports of them on the Acura forums, but I wasn’t really talking about the drivetrain or chassis. Lots of faults with that car but the interior was pretty legit.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            No, I’m talking about the 4th. The one I drove was a 2012 I believe. Apparently I don’t appreciate the finer things if Acura was using real metal in there. The fake wood I’m referencing was on the center console and the rolltop cover for the cupholders. Some trims had it:

            http://archive.boston.com/cars/newsandreviews/overdrive/2011/03/18/2012-Acura-TL-interior.jpg

            There was a prominent panel gap below the air vents as well. It just didn’t leave a great impression to me, but admittedly I just didn’t like the industrial-techy design language of that dashboard and instrument cluster. I’d rather see fewer materials but higher quality ones.

            I don’t want to slag the car overall, though. The seats and driving position were faultless for me, and the powertrain was a gem and those are no small things.

          • 0 avatar
            chrishs2000

            Ahhh okay, I didn’t know any trim had that. I don’t know if I’ve acrually seen it before in the several 4gTL’s I’ve been in. My Tech 6MT has some silver-grayish plastic that was inoffensive but scratched easily. That certainly some truly hateful “wood”. All carmakers need to never do such things.

            I actually didn’t like the driving position that much, I thought it was too high in relation to the shifter haha. And the dashboard was truly massive which is probably why they had to make it so high. Close to being a great car, not quite there…

      • 0 avatar
        dantes_inferno

        >But Honda guessed right that they could pass cheap crap off to the Americans as long as it had an Accord badge on them.

        Every foreign automaker has figured out that game…

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Not only “no heat”, but richly rewarded. Car and Driver 10 Best each and every one of those years, dontcha know.

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      Oh, they took heat. Accord fans skip right from Gen7 to Gen9; these atrocities don’t exist. Why Honda set the W-Impala as their performance and ergonomic target for that era of Accords, we may never know.

  • avatar
    Car Ramrod

    Any lifted pickup, unless the drivers suddenly learn to do the following:
    – Adjust your lights, the rest of us don’t enjoy being blinded
    – Get used to parking six miles from the door instead of taking up four spots
    – Remove your hitch ball, we all know you’ve never used it
    – Turn off your LED light bar. They’re not substitute brights, they’re for *off road*, and you aren’t going there in a $60,000 truck
    – Stick with the right lane

    Given the likelihood of these trucks to have a big orange “T” decal in my neck of the woods, their owners probably aren’t smart enough to figure any of this out.

    • 0 avatar
      crispin001

      “– Adjust your lights, the rest of us don’t enjoy being blinded….
      – Turn off your LED light bar. They’re not substitute brights, they’re for *off road*, and you aren’t going there in a $60,000 truck…..”

      +1000

      Mostly just turn OFF your frickin’ fog lights…..THERE’S NO FOG in Colorado dammit!!!! Grrrrrrrrr….

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      The hitch ball, four feet off the ground, has often entertained me.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Lexus-the overwrought Zorro takes it to a bar of soap styling is cringeworthy. I prefer the clean understated styling of the first generation IS with the classy chrono gauges and previous version of the LS.

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    I don’t like cars that fail at their basic premise, but the Scion FR-S was never popular, neither was the Honda CR-Z. FIATs aren’t popular, either.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    2008 Camry. That thing was not drivable. It was total POS but popular.
    1987 Ford Taurus – reliability nightmare but best selling car.
    2018 – any Honda

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Not driveable? I get cost-cut interior complaints about that generation, but it was the same comfy/mushy quiet serene Camry to drive.

      An anecdote:
      I had a coworker stop by with a fairly ambivalently maintained ’07 with 140k miles just for a quick look-over, he was concerned that he needed to trade in for a newer car since he does a lot of long trips in his car. I poked around and checked the drivetrain and suspension, brakes, went for a drive in it, etc. It was basically like-new from a mechanical perspective, without anything concerning on the horizon. Contrast this with my friend’s 2009 Mazda3 with 156k that I helped him sell this summer, that car felt and looked much more used up, CV boots torn, clunk in the suspension (likely just swaybar links), rust starting to creep in on the rear quarters, A/C compressor on its way out, the exhaust shield insulation was falling off in clumps onto the exhaust. Mind you it wouldn’t be terribly difficult or expensive to bring that Mazda back up to snuff, but it goes to show that even the hated generations of Camry live up to the expectation that they will just keep driving nicely without issues in the hands of a typical American owner longer than most other makes.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        Ive driven a few Camrys from that time myself, theyre okay, sterile but miles ahead of any CUV. The soft ride and heavy insulation are good at hiding defects.

        In comparison I tried out a Mazda6 from that time, I didnt exactly care for the road noise nor the stiff ride. Its as if the whole “sporty” angle means “cheapness”.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        gtem,

        This Camry comparison to Mazda3 has no relation. someone can destroy any car in a year. I had 98 Protege for 17 years and CV boots were original @195K when I sold it for $1K. In fact, the few things I’ve changed in that Mazda were 2 pieces of exhaust (muffler survived), alternator, O2 sensors and A/C compressor (compressor didn’t fail but its clutch froze to it).

        the Camry in question has so much lean in curves that I don’t think it is safe to drive. The engine sounds horribly. It burns more oil that Mobil can produce. There is no steering or brake feel in it. Build quality is bad. It nose dives every time you brake. Come-on, this is POS. The long lasting argument is stupid. Because after 7 years Camrys need new shocks and struts. So, yea, I did no repairs but I drove 60K miles like [email protected]

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Well a Protege isn’t a Mazda 3. The 3 my friend owned was garage from new, generally decently maintained, driven a lot on the highway as it had racked up about 20k miles per year. I wouldn’t call it an exceptional use case.

          “Camry in question has so much lean in curves that I don’t think it is safe to drive…Because after 7 years Camrys need new shocks and struts”

          All you’re doing when you say things like that is lessen what little credibility you may have. The ’07 with 138k miles I drove still had perfectly servicable struts, quiet, no leaks, rode great. Yes they ride soft and have body lean, that’s what most generations of LE/XLE Camrys are like. I’ll agree that Toyota had a hell of a problem with oil burning on some of the 2.4L 4cyl motors and I think some of the 2.5L as well early in the run.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            gtem,

            I am not seeking anyone’s approval. When I say – I know.
            Protege != Mazda3 – yes and no. You can say 2012 Mazda3 != 2014 Mazda3. This is not the issue. Mazda3 replaces, renames Protege and it is made by same engineers, at same factory, so there is continuity here. Something was better in Protege, some other things are better in Mazda3. I tell you this – 2011 model is super solid choice vs 2010 and 1st gen, and Protege.

            As far as struts go, they don’t have to leak to be bad. I’ve seen them have no leaks but in cold weather car would be like a boat on waves. Toyota has real problem in struts/shocks department. It is not new. It runs since times of “best Camry ever”, i.e. 92 model. These things don’t leak, don’t make noise, they just don’t do the job.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            slavuta I had a 1996 ES300 with 209k miles on original struts that indeed were needing replacement, they started to ride poorly over large bumps at high speeds, and in the cold would start to make noise, and especially after a cold winter and bad roads in the spring were starting to make noise all the time. The car still handled competently and safely in that case. Or my 1996 4Runner when I bought it at 99k miles in 2013 needed shocks and struts all around, it was a floaty/tippy mess. What I’m saying is that at 138k, my coworker’s ’07 Camry still rode and handled within factory spec. Is that factory handling mushy and rolly on a 2007 Camry LE? Sure.

            You still had original CV boots on your Protege, fantastic. That 07 Camry was on original boots. The 2009 Mazda3 boots were torn to crap on both sides, and I can’t say that it was used in some excessively abusive way or in some excessively harsh environment (the same one the Camry was used in).

            I don’t doubt that the 2010+ “smiley” Mazda3s had improvements to corrosion engineering in particular, I think that’s great.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            More tight turning you do, faster cvboots will go. so I expect city cars to tear theirs faster than suburban/rural cars. But you know what, my old nissans, hondas whatever… didn’t even lasted 100K back in good old days. I remember hammering those CV Joints off way more than now.

      • 0 avatar
        ruckover

        One posibility—the 3 gets driven harder. I have owned a Camry and own a 3, and the Mazda makes me want to corner hard and, generally, abuse it. I respect my old Camry, but I enjoy my 3.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      The 87 Taurus was revolutionary and was quite reliable by the standards of the day. But stay hard!

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I’m not so sure. I worked with a woman in 1995 who had a pre-facelift 1st generation Taurus wagon. I thought nothing of it until another coworker said something about how rare they were due to their glass AXOD transmissions. That was when I realized I hadn’t seen another in a while. Then we tried spotting more, and it took days. I lived somewhere that was full of anti-American academics, so domestic cars weren’t as popular there as they were in middle-America. Still, American cars had made up the majority of traffic half a dozen years earlier. The Taurus had a far lower survival rate than GM A-cars, for example. Compared to Accord and Camry? Forget about it!

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      The 87 Taurus was revolutionary and was quite reliable by the standards of the day. But stay hard!

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        @Art,

        Stop telling self false truth. The real truth is, every component in that car would go bad under 120K. From heating core to rear brake cylinders. Fuel pump… everything

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Lol, what a load of crap. I’ve actually owned several first and second gen Taurus, they were reliable but not without faults. They sure as hell didn’t need “everything” before 120k. My current one is rapidly approaching 250k, original drive train, most of what I’ve had to do to it is perfectly normal for a car this old and with this many miles (springs/struts, a motor mount, subframe mounts, etc). I don’t deny that the earlier transaxle was prone to failure, but regular maintenance usually extends their lives considerably.

          But, go ahead and believe that they all died before 120k if it makes you happy. I just happen to know better.

    • 0 avatar
      dantes_inferno

      >2008 Camry. That thing was not drivable. It was total POS but popular.

      Show me the average Camry driver and I will show you a driver without a pulse.

      Including the Jr. Camry (Corolla) and the Sr. Camry (Avalon).

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    Any FWD Nissan/Infiniti from the past 15 years or so. Big shout out to Altima, Pathfinder.

    Almost (yes, almost) any Toyota/Lexus, special “honors” to Tundra, CH-R.

    The last gen Mitsubishi Galant, mostly because of how much I liked the previous model.

    Agree with the PT Cruiser and new beetle, although I did like the Audi TT which was similar. I don’t necessarily hate retro cars, those two were just junk and too “cute”.

    Ford Windstar/Freestar (along with pretty much any Ford with a version of that Essex lump of crap engine)

    GM FWD minivans

    Dodge Caliber, Dodge Journey, Jeep Compass (don’t really hate the Patriot version).

    First gen Equinox, although the Pontiac Torrent was far better looking.

    Agree on the “coupe” CUVs by the Germans, and the CLA.

    • 0 avatar

      Oh yes, think of how many Ventures they sold. And they were absolute junk. Gimme an Astro any time. I liked the TT as well, it had a cool factor the Beetle didn’t. It aged horribly after about four or five years, but that’s the early-00s styling game.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        I’d take a dustbuster style Olds or Pontiac with the 3800, but that’s about it. Even though I know that a good engine does not a good vehicle make. At least they were distinctive, and not underpowered with a better chance of being reliable with that engine. The second gen was bland, the third ugly.

        I guess if I had to choose a FWD minivan, Transit Connect excluded, it’d be a first gen Odyssey, a later Villager Sport or as a last resort, 4 cylinder Plymouth Voyager.

  • avatar
    bpscarguy

    Hands down Toyota Prius!

    Its horrid. Always has been. I hate it. And the drivers are usually the slowest and most inattentive on the road. There are plenty of examples of nice looking hybrid cars on the road (Fusion to name one) so there is no reason they couldn’t make that thing look nicer.

    Other honorable mentions:
    Honda Element
    Nissan Juke
    all recent Nissan/Lexus front end styling

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Subarus, especially ones without B-pillar welds.

    Actually, I loathe boxer engines and 5-cylinder engines.

  • avatar
    cammark

    GM Lambda vehicles (Acadia, Enclave, Traverse), 5-door Ford D4 vehicles (Explorer, Flex, Taurus-X, MKT), current gen Pathfinder (transverse, uni-body).

    I lump these all together because they’re all the same thing (and that’s part of the problem…) minivans trying to look like they’re not minivans. Instead they look like an SUV, but badly swollen. They are used in place of a minivan by people who think the critical line between lame, middle-aged kid chauffeur and not is hinged vs. sliding rear doors. They’re dopey and frumpy and what’s worse, less practical/functional than the minivans.

    Every time I see one all I can think is “there goes someone who should have bought a minivan but was too self-conscious.” Sad.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      This times 100.

      The lambda minivans are all hideous and complete jokes. And I’ve heard confirmation multiple times from people that bought or were looking to buy them that they would have preferred a Tahoe, but something something too expensive. GM get your shit together.

      • 0 avatar
        kcflyer

        I’m going to need a safe space:). Our 2008 Enclave did eat a transmission at 60000 miles. But GM paid for the new one and loaned us a new Acadia while it was being fixed. Beyond that its a beautiful vehicle IMO and rated to tow 4500 lbs. Most minivans are capped at 3000 lbs towing capacity. You could argue the lamdas should be capped at a lower rating based on our experience but there you go. There are few vehicles that offer as much passenger room and towing capacity unless you spend the extra coin on a body of frame full size suv.

    • 0 avatar
      Ubermensch

      I have also heard from mechanics that they are all “piles”, as Scott Turbowski would say.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      All of the Lambdas are rolling dumpster fires, even by Guangzhou-Guadalajara Motors (GM) abysmal average reliability scores.

      They are absolutely plagued by transmission issues, and beset by a plethora of electical/electronic issues that are hard and expensive to repair.

      Burn or use as offensive missiles via catapult method at will!

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        The sad irony is that those 1st gen Lambdas had some of the highest domestic content out of all of GM products at the time, as high as 82% some years. They had some serious body sealing issues, and the water that got in as a result wreaked havoc on the electrical system. My brother has dealt with a few Acadias and Enclaves that were absolute nightmares, with the GM dealer packing it in diagnosing the cars so the owners resorted to driving multiple hours to have a professional take a look.

  • avatar
    srh

    First gen Audi TT. I think it looks like a tylenol gelcap.

    • 0 avatar
      SilverCoupe

      I felt the same way when I first saw the TT, I called it a squashed bug, but when I went looking for a sporty AWD coupe/hatchback with a first class interior in ’01, my options boiled down to one, the TT, so I bought one, and kept if for a decade. But yeah, distinctive, but not gorgeous.

      My answer to the question is the Nissan Juke. I cringe whenever I see one coming at me.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Hummers, looked like some kind of cartoon truck. When my friend was loading timing equipment for a autocross event, he couldn’t fit it in, so he took his F150 instead. Fortuantly I rarely see them anymore.

  • avatar
    N8iveVA

    Merc CLA250
    Jeep Cherokee- the squinty eyed ones
    SMART car
    Prius- although I respect the technology
    Any sloped roof SUV/CUV- looking at you X6 and the like
    Edit: oooh and the hideous Juke. ugh

  • avatar
    N8iveVA

    oh and ANY predator grilled Lexus

  • avatar
    jeoff

    I hate the Lexus hour-glass grill. A lot of the monster grills are bad, but Lexus has the worst across an entire line of cars. Yuck.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I clean and drive them for a living, and Ive grown to loathe CUV/SUVs.

    They handle worse than my old Crown Vic, they dont always have good leg room, theyre hard to park…. Jeeps in paticular are bad. A Kia Soul will do your CUV things but better.

    Other cars I cant stand are ones that are simply overrated. This used to be Toyota/Honda for me, but now its older Mercedes (snobby owners) and Subarus (I dont know how you can love rod knock and headgasket leaks).

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I used to be of the same mind but owning/renting some CUVs of different classes has kind of softened my stance.

      The ’03 Pilot that I had for 6 months or so was initially acquired purely because it was a smoking good deal and it would be a nice car to drive in the winter versus a RWD ranger. But after fixing it up and commuting and doing a few longer trips in it I came to appreciate it. Powerful engine, comfortable and very roomy interior, much better highway manners than my 4Runner and slightly better MPG (not much but better). It was just a really useful and usable jack of all trades.

      I just took a new Ford Edge for a long drive down to Charlotte and back last weekend, a free upgrade from the fullsize sedan I had reserved. Was initially entirely ambivalent about the upgrade, but as the miles wore on, and especially after a section of driving through the Cumberland Gap in a downpour, I decided I felt more relaxed behind the wheel of the Edge than I would have in a regular sedan. Sure a lot of that was purely psychological, but sitting up higher a bit out of the water spray in the rain kept me less tense and at the end of the 9 hour drive I was less fatigued overall.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        Ive found Escapes and CRVs (chiefly the second generation) to be bearable. They were spacious and for the most part drive okay.

        Little stuff like the Chevy Captiva and nonsense like the Dodge Nitro I’ll never get. The latter having remarkably little foot room.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      You’re kidding, right?

      The Crown Vic can’t handle… period. It has the road manners of a pickup truck with the ride of an ocean-going barge. If your Crown Vic is anything short of a police interceptor in civilian clothes, then I pity you.

      Jeeps, in particular, are among the best CUVs on the road with relatively tight turning radii for their size. My Renegade can turn inside of almost anything its size and even challenges the Fiat 500 Pop for tight turning and agility in traffic. The only reason the 500 Pop is better is the shorter wheelbase. Even the Wrangler Unlimited versions can do a u-turn in the width of a three-lane highway without hitting the shoulders; few other vehicles with similar wheelbase can do as well.

      • 0 avatar
        Pete Zaitcev

        C-t-c turn for Renegade is 35.3′. For a comparison, Wrangler (with solid axles!) does 34.6′, Crosstrek – 35.4′. It’s true that most other vehicles lose. For example, HR-V makes 37.4 – whole 2 feet loss. However, the CX-3 makes 34.8, thus being better than any Jeep except Wrangler.

  • avatar
    gtem

    The base-engined (2.5L NA) GMC Acadia I rented a few weeks ago. There are vastly better vehicles in the same class for the same money.

    BMW X1 – you most definitely bought it for the badge, just another indifferent entry in the class of…

    Most subcompact crossover things- worse to drive, with less comfort and utility than the compact crossovers they share a showroom with for basically the same money.

    Not a particular make or model but many modern drivetrains that employ a CVT or small turbo motor, or worst of all a combination of both. I just hate how they sound and how they feel to drive, time to just go electric already. I will say the 2.0T Ecoboost in my rental Edge felt and sounded fine and got decent MPG, same with a 1.4TSI Jetta. Conversely I really don’t care for the Honda 1.5T/CVT.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I agree in both the CVT thing and subcompact CUVs.

      For me the worse CVTs are the ones that have simulated gears, kinda defeats the whole point of a CVT.

      Subcompact CUVs typically have no more room than the hatchbacks theyre made from. They just cost more on average while being worse in every way.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      X1 has a lot of merit with the badge removed. The platform is basically the Countryman, but the infotainment does not have the insufferable joystick. It really was the best little premium SUV until the arrival of Volvo XC40.

  • avatar
    salmonmigration

    Jeep Renegade. I rented one to go to a wedding a couple years ago. The interior is slathered with an unbearable level of “twee”. Front and center on the dash there are faux-stencil letters spelling out “SINCE 1941”. There’s little pictures of Willys MBs all over every spare inch of plastic.

    The whole car is what Italians must think people like Jeeps for (a fashion accessory). It would look great parked next to your Vespa. It’s also way bigger outside than it is inside, totally numb feeling, and I would bet in 3 years all the plastic interior hatch trim or something will have fallen off.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “The whole car is what Italians must think people like Jeeps for (a fashion accessory). ”

      — Except that the Renegade was designed by Americans in the American Jeep facilities while the Cherokee was designed by the Italians in their Italian Fiat facilities. Of course, exaggerating the “twee” just shows you don’t understand Jeeps anyway. The Renegade is a remarkably good little car, even if it is built in Mexico.

      • 0 avatar
        MLS

        U.S.-market Renegade is built in Italy alongside its FIAT 500X platform-mate. Compass is built in Mexico.

        Of the FIAT-derived Jeeps, I suspect Cherokee and Compass were most subject to U.S. influence, since both are far removed from the platform’s origins. By comparison, the Renegade and 500X are very closely related.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          I would note that the new Compass interior is virtually identical to the Renegade’s. The platform is identical outside of being less than six inches longer. It uses the same drivetrains, including the three-differential AWD system. The Renegade, Compass and 500X are virtually the same under their respective skins.

          • 0 avatar
            Pete Zaitcev

            I may be ignorant, but AFAIK Renge does not have 3 differentials. You might be confusing it with Cherokee (based on Dart). That one even has a 2-speed PTU, which I kinda find astonishing for a transversial engine car.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      I never gave the interior of Renegade much thought. The only thing that matters about that car is that it has a 1:19.6 total ratio with the ZF 9sp and 1:18.43 with the C635 manual and the optional 4.438 final drive. That alone pretty much keeps it at the top of the pile. Oh, and also it has a good headroom.

  • avatar
    SixspeedSi

    I don’t tend to loathe that many cars, I’m generally content with others buying stupid products. However, the lastest sub-compact Crossover craze annoys and puzzles me. I don’t hate crossovers that much and will preach the value of sedans/wagons first, but these little useless utes drive me insane.

    Why someone would pay dang near 25k for such a small, underpowered, hardly efficient vehicle that isn’t good at anything makes me question society. The perceived notion that sitting up high is safer just goes to show the failure of our driving training. Why spend so much on a useless cuv with “awd” for snow, when my GTI on snow tires can get up the same hills.

    I want to blame the increase in personal pickup truck sales for causing everyone and their mom for needing a higher of the ground vehicle, but I like driving trucks so you won’t hear me loathe them (besides when they are lifted to no purpose and have stupid hid lights) /rant

  • avatar
    IBx1

    The Polaris Slingshot.

    It could have been great as a 3-wheeled Ariel Atom if they used a fun Honda K-series engine, but no, it got some economy car tractor engine from a Cobalt.

    The worst part is the owners/renters though. Attention enthusiast 40-50 y/o men with rainbow pride LEDs covering every inch of every wheel well and blasting terrible [THE CURRENT YEAR] mumble rap. The worst part is they don’t realize we’re laughing at them.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      “Attention enthusiast 40-50 y/o men with rainbow pride LEDs covering every inch of every wheel well and blasting terrible [THE CURRENT YEAR] mumble rap. The worst part is they don’t realize we’re laughing at them.”

      I saw this exact phenomenon with a group of older black guys standing in front of their proud chariots in downtown Charlotte last weekend. Really bizarre.

    • 0 avatar
      SixspeedSi

      Good call! I too loathe these things and always see them around with those LEDs and in my case blasting country or old rock (nothing wrong with that, just nobody ever cares what music you’re playing).

      Sad part is they aren’t cheap and you could get a way better driving experience for the same price..and also not have people laugh at you.

  • avatar
    Jeff Weimer

    The Prius.

    Mostly because of the clouds of smug they emit.

  • avatar
    ajla

    0. E300 (one of the worst turbo-4 engines on offer)
    1. C300 (see above but at least it’s cheaper)
    2. Encore (there many things I don’t like about the Encore).

    I’d also like to bring up the Jaguar XE, but that’s not popular at all.

  • avatar
    crtfour

    A few that come to mind :

    Kia Soul : Frankly tired of looking at them and usually some geriatric behind the wheel.

    Any small Jeep (Compass, Patriot, etc). I see one and wonder why anyone would choose one of these with the much better crossovers out there.

    Prius : Very hard on the eyes.

  • avatar
    John Scott

    Gotta go with the brodozer. The nitwits who “drive” them – more like vaguely pilot in a general direction – make dealing with the ludicrous contraptions even worse. Can’t count the number of times some wife beater wearing numbskull pulls up so far in the left turning lane you can’t see anything but the fake rim lock wheels on their “off road” truck so making a right turn on red becomes a crapshoot. Boneheaded rude creeps!

  • avatar
    BrentinWA

    Prius, Prius, Prius, Prius, Prius, Prius, and Subaru’s. They conspire to get in front of me and slow me down

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Wow! Where to begin?

    PT Cruiser: A vehicle I used to want. Not anymore.

    1st gen New Beetle: A ball on wheels. The 2nd gen is more faithful to the original in style.

    Dodge Charger: Enough already! A Charger only has TWO doors!

    Early 2000s Chevy SS everything. They’re not “SS” in spirit, and an Impala SS, like the Charger, only has TWO doors!

    Porsche and BMW CUVs. Who’s kidding who?

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      Todd Deiken of Everyday Driver has a Porsche Cayene. Or, rather, his wife has it. Supposedly it’s quite good and practical. Of course, he bought it with 30,000 miles, after the initial depreciation.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    The Pontiac Sunfire and Chevrolet Cavalier. The styling is terrible and build quality absolutely horrible. I get that they are reliable transportation, and the fact that I still see them around in Quebec is proof of that, but I wish they would all die already.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    The smart cars. They offer nothing to the typical north American driver that any compact or midsize car can’t do better except parking in a tiny spot.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      And I think that pile requires PREMIUM gas, and they don’t get good mileage for the size. I’ve got a coworker who has owned one for years, but he’s also a complete weirdo. Nothing like trolling the lot for a space and thinking you’ve found one and nope, it’s just his stupid nub of a car pulled all the way up in the space.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    Pretty much any Corolla built between 1991 and 2013, but especially the earlier ones. Not so much the car, which I refer to as “cockroaches” because they’re unkillable, but because of the driver.

    I know what I’m getting with a Corolla driver – someone who’s terrified to be on the road. They won’t move up in the turn lane, they won’t pass stationary vehicles, they won’t drive up to the speed limit. As soon as I see one, I move to get into another lane based on the assumption that it will become a virtually stationary obstacle on the road.

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      Can’t believe it took so long for someone to get the winning answer.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      exactly, but I’ve noticed that owner stereotype is transitioning into the Rogue over the last few years

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      My test drive of 2011 Corolla S MT lasted 200 yards. This is when I turned around, gave it back to the dealer and never looked at this POS again. There was nothing good about it, nothing!

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      Apparently you have not witnessed me driving my Corolla. Move b##ch, get out’the way!

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I adore the 88-92 and 93-97 gen cars, the ’98-’02 are still okay, things started to go downhill with the ’03-’08 and dropped off a cliff face for the ’09-’13 and onward. I’m most familiar with the ’93-’97 having been around a number of both Corollas and Prisms of that generation. They tend to start burning oil past 150k miles but are absolutely tough as nails mechanically. The balljoints on those things are damn near indestructible, the only things that really need replacing are brushes in the starter motors, rebuild and keep on truckin.’ The 93-’97s have genuinely nice interiors in terms of material quality and sound insulation, and ride really well for small economy cars as well. My family has taken a beaten to death courier-spec (4AFE, 4spd manual, leaf sprung beam rear end) ’94 RHD Corolla wagon through the steppe near Mongolia, through water crossings that had some water coming up onto the hood. The damn thing ate it all up.

      • 0 avatar
        ttacgreg

        My 2000 Corolla has not been a stellar quality Toyota. The ventilation controls were not calibrated in the (now Tesla) factory, the manual transmission needed a rebuild at about 80K, it would not stay in 4th gear, the rear struts bent (my bad hitting a sudden unseen rise on a dirt road at speed) and an airflow sensor replacement covered in dust that got past the air filter, again my bad for driving the car on the dusty Black Rock Desert, which was a hoot. Set the cruise at 60 mph and put your hands behind your head and relax. With miles of flat lakebed all around why bother with the steering wheel?

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        gtem, curious what went downhill in the 03-08. Other than miserable front seats set up for five-foot-nothings and exactly zero styling or driving interest, they seemed like nice little cars with class-leading interior materials, reasonable refinement, and solid reliability. Several friends use these as appliances in the truest sense and are running them to higher mileage. Anything they need to watch out for?

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Further decontenting from ’98-’02 IMO, the sort where they made things cheaper/worse where you weren’t looking. The switch to a rear beam axle. Another example the longevity of the exhaust piping on one of those Corollas is absolutely inferior to the previous ones, but the poor ergonomics definitely seals the deal. If I was looking for a cheap commuter for a short friend in a pinch I’d still recommend one, but they’re far from my favorites.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Here’s a nice Caldina for you:
        https://www.japaneseclassics.com/vehicle/1993-toyota-caldina/

        Room enough for baby seats, and your neighbors will think you bought an old Subaru.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Yea, ’92 was pretty good. The only things that went wrong – starter, and then knobs and handles were falling off. It was a pleasant car.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      Then you never met my mother. My family owned three consecutive Toyota sedans, starting with a 1981 Corolla, then a 1993 Camry and finally a 2003 Corolla. All three spent most of their years plying the Autobahn at very respectable speeds. Of course, one data point does not a trend make, but I thought this QOTD had to do with vehicles, not drivers.

      Except for the fact that her ’03 was an automatic, in the top-spec trim that it was, with leather and sunroof, that thing was actually a rather nice little ride. Not a fan of the generations that have come after it, though.

  • avatar
    seabasstin

    #1 all current trucks/large suvs on the market aka all brodozers. They need to all die out like the dinosaurs who drive them.
    #2 all CUVs and the lazy useless auto execs who put them out into the world without actually addressing the needs of the people buy them.
    #3 camaros, chargers, and dressed up jeep wranglers that men use as replacemnt “members” to swagger about. (If they were new york subway riders they would take up three seats while man-spreading).

    A side note, to the angry anti Prius crowd.
    If you are angry because Pruis drivers represent a specific social class position. I get it. If you are angry because the prius is environmentally sound I dont get it and twards this it is actually winning not loosing (ie it has made it possible for tesla and bmw i series to exist, and makes). If you are angry because its a terrible anti drivers car well I am 100% with you on this but technically the majority of the cars out there are terrible anti driving cars so it feels funny to focus on Prius.
    Ps: having so much anger at Prii that you wanna drive them off the road means you need to get counseling, that is not normal. It is though normal to go out of your way to rip off truck balls whenever you see them. Also those diesel truck coal running pipes.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Okay to be angry at someone for choosing to buy a large truck/SUV, going so far as to wish death upon them.

      Not okay to be angry at someone for being a smug SOB because they’re driving a rolling “I Care” badge that happens to be hidiously ugly.

      Got it.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        “Not okay to be angry at someone for being a smug SOB because they’re driving a rolling “I Care” badge that happens to be hidiously ugly.”

        No, it’s not okay. The C-Max is a quality automobile.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Toyota, and Nissans …all of them ..especially the wannabe Trucks . I’m looking at you Titan ! All the Asian offerings Pi$$ me off ..That being said..if Ford ,GM and FCA were to cease to exist , I could probably live with a Honda product.

    Hey TTAC….You asked !

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Weird tribalism. I own two Toyotas and don’t get pi$$ed off when I see a domestic, even a high-Chinese content domestic.

      Am I doing this wrong?

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      I respect Toyota and Nissan for attempting to build full size pickup trucks for Americans. They picked the market segment where US domestic manufacturers dominate and attempted to catch up to a fast moving target. Toyota may get there eventually. Nissan found a market for panel trucks for work.

  • avatar
    scott25

    Agree with the above statements on brodozers, and“Corolla drivers” which are now becoming “Rogue drivers”.

    I personally hate Jeeps and CLAs and they’re the only vehicle I’m compelled to insult the owner’s judgement about. Of course the owners of each 99% of the time are sunburnt 30 something white women pretending they’re still 18 and southeast Asian 20 something’s with aviators and gelled hair coasting on their parents’ bank account, respectively.

    Always enjoy the American hatred of Priuses. In Canada they’ve always been far more likely to be driven by the cheapskate crowd than the smug liberal crowd. Mostly because 90% of Canadians are cheapskates. Hence why the Pony and Mirage were such big hits here.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      “In Canada they’ve always been far more likely to be driven by the cheapskate crowd than the smug liberal crowd.”

      That’s been the case in the US as well since about 2006. My engineering/management father in law is geeked out by the tech and loved saving some money on gas, but he’s pretty far removed from the pseudo-environmentalist “smug” crowd that South Park famously lampooned.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      It’s drying up now thanks to DieselGate, but I used to find that TDI drivers seemed to fulfill our version of the Prius stereotype, mindlessly clogging up the middle or passing lanes.

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    Good. Good. Let the hate flow through you.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Cars aren’t the problem – the drivers are. If you’re driving like a jackass, I hate you. If you don’t use your turn signals, I loathe you. If you use both feet to hit the brake and gas at the same time, you should have your license revoked.

    If you suffer from road rage when people treat you the way you treat others, you should be using Uber.

    And if you’re texting and I honk at you and you get mad, here’s what you should do as you pull into your driveway tonight: Put the car in park but leave it running. Floor the accelerator and once the car red lines I want you to shift into Drive but keep the car floored.

    We’ll all be thankful of the result.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Brodozers: covered.
    Corollas with cowering, inattentive drivers: covered.
    Ugly little subcompact CUV runts: covered.
    Hypermiling Priiiii: low-hanging fruit

    Let’s go more controversial: Any full size diesel pickup before DEF.

    I know, I know, they are the real-deal bonafide sh*t-kickin’ workin’ man rig meant to tow tow tow it all to hell and back and put food on the table while flying Old Glory to scare off the commies and liberals, but like that loud abrasive coworker in your office who just cannot use an indoor voice or read social cues, they are inherently tiresome to share space with. They respect nobody’s personal bubble.

    RATA-CLACKA-TACKA-CLAAAAAACKKKK! down the street at even light throttle, fuming out intersections even when running “well”, belching soot under heavy throttle, and all this is amplified as they age and are owned by people numbed to the noise and stink, or aggressively proud of it. People, for instance, who idle obliviously next to an open-air restaurant, screwing around on their phone while waiting for someone to get done in the adjacent store.

    When these battle tanks finally leave the road I’ll be happy. If gasoline engines replace the newer diesels, I’ll say Hallelujah. Even those are starting to fart soot as they age.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      Eh I get going after the obnoxiously modified ones, but my brother recently had a farmer friend’s bone stock ’94 regular cab 4wd stick shift F150 Powerstroke with zero options in for some diagnostics, and man that is a cool rig. Just utilitarian and capable to the max, no fake machismo. A basic and awesome tool with zero pretensions. How could a car guy not love that?

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        A car guy would have no trouble loving that. The car guy’s neighbor, on the other hand, may find less charm in the abundant noise and exhaust that does not stay within the car guy’s property line :)

        If I lived in a sparsely populated area, this wouldn’t be on my radar.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          It’s definitely farm country out there, even my brother’s cardiologist-turned horse stable owner has a crusty old gas F250 that makes lovely loud burbly sounds chugging across their field. These are 50+ acre lots too, I don’t think anyone minds.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Meh. I’ll let em live.

      I’m surprised you live in a non-sparsley populated area but are having many run-ins with old diesel trucks in the first place.

      The bigger issue around here is definitely people with newer diesels installing “deletes”.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        I get two responses and they’re an “eh” and a “meh”. Close to striking out…

        Lots of 90s-mid aughts Powerstrokes and Cummins still around in our Western suburban sprawl, so the soot, smell, and clatter with every throttle application can get tiresome if you’re stuck near one in traffic.

        I agree about the coal rollers but wanted to bring up something a little different.

  • avatar
    mikey

    In Canada we are bombarded with the most horrible Nissan ads. Abdominal Snowman chasing soccer Moms. A frightened young girl learning to drive in a construction zone. A couple off dudes off roading from a limited excess highway…

    Not to worry folks, the rolling POS with a Nissan badge will hold your hand through any calamity you may encounter on our roads.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I don’t watch much TV, but for a while I was getting some Nissan ads online targeted at inattentive women drivers.

      “Stop-and-go traffic got you down? With the new Rogue, you won’t even have to worry about operating your brake pedal or staying in your lane! Let this cheap mommy-mobile built to the lowest common denominator do the work for you while you play with your phone!”

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    I personally loathe all full-sized pickup trucks. They’re much larger than they need to be to perform their typical tasks and in nearly every case, now posses capabilities once relegated to Medium Duty (classes 4, 5 and 6) trucks and which should still require a heavier frame and a CDL to perform such tasks safely.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      So theyre larger than they need to be, yet they have greater capabilities, but then they don’t, for some reason. And they’re much larger than they used to be, like a whole 6 inches longer than 20 years ago, a couple inches taller and the same width.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Also: Loud Pipes Save Lives

    I know motorcyclists need to be handled with kid gloves in these discussions because of how dangerous it is to be on the road with idiot cagers, but these straight-pipe bikes that blast enough decibels to damage your hearing are another matter altogether. It stems from a childish sense of entitlement and arrogance rather than a desire to improve safety. When I hear one of these open up on my street I have a hard time suppressing the hope that someone pulls out in front of them.

    These riders know what they are doing to the people around them, they just don’t care.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      THANK YOU, and you beat me to it.
      I will add, said same motorcycles that have all of the brightest intense as the sun, high beams and or auxiliary lights on.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      What bothers me is that they get a pass. If my car made that much noise, I’d get ticketed daily.

      I leave next to a freeway. Never notice the cars. Have to pause conversations when modified bikes go by.

      Care so much about your safety? Stop weaving around in traffic!

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      If the “loud pipe” a-holes cared so much about the “saves lives” part, would they be riding around in tank tops, shorts and flip-flops?

      Their helmets are the absolute minimum.

      One “loud pipe” a-hole lives in my neighborhood and everyday at least twice would downshift through all the gears coming by my house, the backpressure is turned way up on the thing, gunning the engine at the stop sign in front of my house, then racing away setting off various car alarms and getting dogs in the area riled up.

      All conversations had to stop, hit the pause button, etc, until he was gone.

      I mentioned to a friend I was going to follow him home one afternoon, come back, uncork the Mustang GT after the X-pipe, wait ’til he’s probably settling in watching ESPN, or Wrestling or whatever, enjoying a peaceful evening, then BLAH, BLAH, BLAH, BLAH in front of his house going by slowly again and again, doing an Italian Tune Up, every night until he got the point, points a gun at me, or what have you.

      Of course I never followed through, I’m non confrontational, but I didn’t get a chance to. My friend knows a lot of people so word got back to this a-hole, Mike at the corner house with the block wall was p!ssed at him, so he started using a different street to and from his house.

  • avatar
    Dan

    BMWs. All of them. The ultimate a-hole machine.

    I know that those a-holes have long since moved on, and the brand today plays German Buick to Benz’ German Cadillac.

    But the visceral reaction remains.

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      As an ex-325i owner, I would go out of my way to be polite to other drivers on the road. I thought it was my duty to try and fight the stereotype.

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      My lease is just about up on a 320i. I will admit that I will miss the way it handles when it’s gone, and the 8spd auto is a fantastic transmission.

      And, can’t discount the dealership experience as it’s the best I’ve ever experienced. If I were wealthier, I’d order me up the plainest 540i they’d let me build in blue with white leather interior.

      I’m also kind of an a-hole. Thank you so much for noticing. :)

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Holy hell, you just summed up contemporary BMW in two words: German Buick.

      Well done!

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    All Corollas ever, maybe not the RWD models, but the hateful little shitboxes that still litter the roads with their completely oblivious drivers who can’t turn off their highbeams, get up to speed, make clear their intentions via signaling or anything basic driving requires.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Sport compact cars with deliberately mismatched panels, 9000 overlapping stickers and dangerously modified suspension geometry. Seems like every under 25 these days. Stance-nation does me a disservice.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      Oi oi oi. Where do you think the next generation of enthusiasts is supposed to come from? If not for the guys you loathe, there SUVs would have conquered the world long ago.

  • avatar
    MLS

    So much to loathe:
    1) The Subaru lineup in its dowdy, dorky entirety. Going back at least two decades.
    2) Corolla, 2000-present.
    3) Grand Am, especially fifth generation.
    4) Civic, current generation.
    5) Lexus RX, especially first generation.
    6) Mercedes CLA/GLA.
    7) Sonota, sixth generation. Overwrought styling, aging poorly. Especially hate chrome window trim that extends to headlight.
    8) Solara, second generation. Laughably bloated styling.
    9) Lexus SC430, second generation. See above.
    10) Highlander, first generation. Mind-numbingly dull.
    11) RAV4. LOL.
    12) Rogue, first generation.
    13) Smart fortwo. No reason for it to exist in USA.

  • avatar
    ravenuer

    I’m gonna say a Mercedes R350,(I think that’s what it’s called),kind of a long station wagon/suv. Always reminded me of a hearse every time I saw one. Guess I’m not the only one, they’re gone.

  • avatar
    George B

    I get annoyed by the success of the Lexus RX350. Because of the volume and profitability of the RX, every auto manufacturer has to make their own egg-shaped feminized CUV too. After conquering the woman of a certain age market, Lexus then puts the predator grill on the RX to go after the Chinese market. Contrast it with vehicles like the 80s and 90s Jeep Cherokee which were sold to the 1st owner as a family hauler, but became fun vehicles for guys in the aftermarket once their price became low enough.

    • 0 avatar
      MoparRocker74

      Agree with that. I have no problem with these tubby CUVs replacing midsize sedans…the awd capability and the extra cargo room are a small upgrade.

      What ticks me off is that they’ve largely replaced BOF sports utilities. Only a handful of those aren’t over bloated mallcrawling barges. Jeep Wrangler and Toyota 4 Runner are the only two that really stayed true to roots. I just want my swb Hemi powered solid axled open topped Ramcharger, dammit!

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      I think the problem was that most manufacturers decided that BOF SUVs were just entirely on the way out and committed to transforming those nameplates to FWD-based crossovers. I think Toyota played it smart by fielding both: Highlander came out in 2001 at the tail end of the 3rd generation 4Runner (LC Prado 90 chassis), and the two have stayed as 2 distinct separate entries in the lineup of family utility vehicles. Toyota has the advantage of selling the Land Cruiser Prado midsize SUV all over the planet so the costs of another vehicle in the lineup is much more amortized compared to some other more US-centric makes, but nonetheless they could have easily dumped the 4Runner back in the slow-selling 2009 model year. They didn’t, and are now rewarded with 120k+ annual 4Runner sales on top of close to 200k annual Highlander sales. Nissan let their Xterra rot on the vine and took the Pathfinder down the CUV route, and they sell fewer Pathfinders than Toyota sells Highlanders alone. Ford has done well with the crossover Explorer, but I suspect they’re missing out on quite a few potential BOF midsize/compact SUV sales right now, and are finally moving to bring something back to the market.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    Okay, I have plowed through over 180 entertaining and even enlightening commentaries here and not one mention of . . . . . . . . .
    Motor homes and giant campers in tow by a giant pickups?
    Is there anybody here who likes sharing the road with them?
    Maybe they are less of an issue in the flat lands, but here in Colorado it is not uncommon to see even semi trucks passing them on the upgrades, which is known here as “snail races” because it backs the rest of us up a half mile or so when traffic is heavy.

    Oh, and how about simply the general category “semi trucks”?

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    Pretty much every mainsteam and boring midsize sedan or CUV. Just worthless and pointless wastes of money. Every hybrid and electric vehicle ever. The costs FAR outstrip the few benefits they offer, they can absolutely NOT trump ICE vehicles in every category, they are bonafide money losers that no one wants, yet regulators and beauracrats are doing everything in their power to stack the deck in favor of these pieces of garbage.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Agreed, I don’t understand how someone can go to their place of work, every week for years, decades, and then spend the money they made from being there on a Camry, Malibu, Fusion or anything else in that category. It defies logic.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Some people just to prefer to spend money/energy/personal interest elsewhere? You need to realize that most of them (and they do make up the vast majority of the population) would read what you wrote and think you’re as crazy as a guy that would run up to them and in a foaming-at-the-mouth diatribe rant about why they bought the wrong washing machine and are missing out on some great features and fun.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      My friend drives a Leaf. It’s a fairly practical car that saves him a ton of money. Not needing any maintenance, basically. Electricity is inexpensive (for now). He works as a charter pilot for a local Part 135 outfit, drives a Lear 45. It is a fairly respectable machine for real pilots – none of this computer stuff. He also has a Remos GX, a share in a 182, and a Tacoma. He uses the Tacoma to deliver fuel to his airplanes. You know, buying something like eGolf or worse – SV-1 – back in the day meant a complete nutcase. These days, a cheap electric car only tells us that its owner has a short compute and lives in a private house where he can install a 208V charger.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    200 comments in and I get to be the first to say every Land Rover and Range Rover product.

    The value you get for your money with these must be among the lowest of anything you can buy. I don’t think they offer anything I couldn’t buy for thousands less in something that won’t break down every week. Can’t understand why they are so desirable.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      For some buyers, vehicles are a fashion statement. My father for example. Appearance was all he cared about. It could be a piece of crap in all or any other way, he could have cared less.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        No doubt about that. I just wonder how they became fashionable in the first place. I certainly don’t think a Range Rover is any more or less attractive than any other anonymous luxury SUV, the hideous Evoque convertible aside.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    I find Smart cars really annoying. When someone is driving one, it looks like one of those creepy fortune telling machines, but with a real person sitting in it. It’s like a bad horror movie, where the mechanical fortune teller sitting in her machine is chasing you down the highway. When they’re sitting parked and empty they look like a claw vending machine. I’m surprised that no one moves them from the parking lot into the entry-way of WalMart and doesn’t put them next to the Coke and Pepsi vending machines.

    • 0 avatar
      ttacgreg

      Okay, this Prius owner is absolutely guilty of being smug, but that happens only when I sight a Smart car. With the exception of fitting into really tight parking spots, and a lower purchase price, what does a Smart car do better than my ’16 Prius? Okay acceleration is a tie, but fuel economy? Nope. Utility? No. Interior space? I could go on and on.
      That said, if someone wants and buys one, good on them. Choice is good, and I will not hate on you or stereotype you for your vehicle choices.

  • avatar
    SnarkyRichard

    This is the funniest thread ever ! I always thought of Lambda as the fraternity in Revenge of The Nerds , not a class of vehicle .I’m still laughing over brodozer . Not a particular class of vehicle I dislike , but it’s usually the drivers of European cars (BMW and Mercedes as well as the aforementioned brodozers) who are either tailgating or going well under the limit in front of you . Also the pseudo tough guys on loser cruisers with loud pipes . They’re usually just fat bastids in a tiny peanut helmet playing pirate and polluting the world with noise . Special mention to the old men putt-putting around not a single mph over the speed limit in new Corvettes !

  • avatar
    BunkerMan

    The RAM 1500. Not all of them, mind you, but the Sport models with the pipes out the back, body colour grille, and hood scoop.

    I actually don’t mind the more reasonable models with chrome, a diesel, or even the Pentastar ones. It’s the Sport ones in particular.

    It’s stereotyping, I know, but there are a ton of these things in my area, and they all are loud, usually with multiple stickers in the back window. They all seem to be driven by short men with white rimmed sunglasses and their hat on backwards.

    The GM and Ford trucks I see on average, just aren’t as obnoxious.

    I think the Pontiac Sunfire coupe drivers of the ’90s now all drive RAM sports. :)

  • avatar
    FWD Donuts

    Here in the cult-like insanity of Silicon Valley, it’s the types of people attracted to certain cars that drive me nuts:

    1. Toyota Prius: Righteous clown who drops anchor in the fast lane as they passively / aggressively hypermile their way along — determined to get in the way of as many people as possible so they are forced to drive slowly and save the Earth while doing so. 90% chance of a political bumper sticker representing someone you’d have to be crazy to vote for.

    2. Anything by Tesla: Hello. I code for Google. I’m making $400K a year and recruiters tell me I’m underpaid. I have no social skills. I know nothing about cars, either, but have a Tesla because, um, I really don’t know. I drive like crap — but am sure to step on the gas whenever somebody wants to get ahead of me because, um, I’m coding for Google and making $400K a year. I’ve had my car for over a year now — but don’t have the sense to have washed it yet. I’ve ground the faces off all of my wheels — and put a hole in the sidewall of one of the tires while doing it — yet the minimum wage loser at the tire store told me I couldn’t get it fixed. The lying scumbag. One star on Yelp for him. The OEM tires that came with the car were really expensive — so I put on a Ling Long Anti-Spark Red Panda instead.

    3. Toyota Sienna: Why, yes. I just cut you off because paying attention to cars closing at a speed 30 mph higher than mine is just too much work.

    4. Honda Odyssey: See 3.

    5. Nissan Altima: My car is bad ass — so every time I leave a stop light — game on, sucker. Although if the light turns green and I don’t move — it’s only because I’m looking at something more important than you on my phone.

    6. Anything Acura: Just got off the boat and am in middle management at Glumtron. American cars are crap and those German ones are soooo expensive. Got a great deal on this Acura because Honda doesn’t make the Crosstour anymore. Some people say it’s ugly — but what do I care? I’ve never watered or cut my lawn and for two bucks got enough newspaper to cover up the first floor windows in my house. My kids love it as the rear windows are so crusted over with crud they draw pictures in the grease then rub it out to draw something else. It’s like an Etch-A-Sketch!

    7. BMW: See 2. Income reduced to $100K a year for those leasing 3 series.

    8. Mercedes: Why, yes. My CLA’s leased. How’d you know? Just cleaned it up a bit. Used the squeegee at Art’s Discount Gas to touch up the windows and hood a bit. Got some scrapes on the bumper. This Hello Kitty decal covers it up. Banged into some jerk who cut me off while I was sending a text.

    9. Anything Oldsmobile: Honest to God — every time I see an Olds anymore — it’s driven by some angry guy in the middle of a road rage incident. Beware.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    You know Robin Williams’ line about cocaine being God’s way of telling you you have too much money? The G-Wagen applies just as well. I live in an affluent enough city that expensive cars are common enough, but those rolling monuments to income inequality make me want to start ranting about the bourgeois and seizing the means of production and such.

  • avatar
    MoparDave

    My ‘Loathe-Mobiles’?

    Generation #2 Dodge Durango and Generation #3 Dodge Dakota…
    Yes-as a Mopar fan, these are the two that I refuse to like or even acknowledge.
    Both replaced extrememely nicer-looking and far better-proportioned designs with ugly, ponderous, mis-shapen designs. The Damlier-Benz (Conquering and Looting/Sacking… er..”Merger of Equals”) era was not kind to these two……

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      You hit the nail on the head Dave. The 1st gen Durango and 2nd gen Dakota that shares its styling are two of the handsomest and best proportioned trucks/suvs to come out of the 1990s. Make mine a Durango SXT with the unpainted flares and factory oversized 265/75R16 tires.

  • avatar

    Didn’t actually “loathe” it but the original Barracuda was one I did not care for due to the front end styling (or lack thereof). I remember at the time it came out trying to figure what could have been done differently, but my junior high school self never came up with anything that made more sense if one kept the rear of the car the same.

  • avatar
    jfk-usaf

    Anything FCA.. and most things GM

  • avatar
    Farhad

    Toyota Prius
    Kia Soul

  • avatar
    DweezilSFV

    Hyundai Veloster: looks like something squashed under a sci fi monster’s foot.

    New Civic: pre-wrecked school of styling

    Honda Odyssey: looks like a badly welded mash up of two different wrecked minivans.

    Prius: every generation but the first one.

    Chrysler Crossfire: like a VW Beetle surgically altered with a Chrysler Sebring front clip [oops… a non popular vehicle]

    Saturn L 03-05, Cavalier 03-05, the last Monte Carlo. First ever CTS.

    Colorado/Canyon [Carnival vehicles with the Z or whatever with the trim cladding that looks like it was crookedly applied ], Bizarro side panel pressings and a retrograde move compared to the S10 and GMC.

    Mitsubishi Montero 99-2006: Lumpy takes a bow.

    The Spark. Makes a Yugo look clean and classic.

    • 0 avatar
      Pete Zaitcev

      Montero is a timeless design. 4-corner IFS, too. It’s superb. Many are still on the road today.

    • 0 avatar
      dantes_inferno

      > Hyundai Veloster: looks like something squashed under a sci fi monster’s foot.

      Godzilla: “Don’t look at me, I wouldn’t touch the Veloster with a 100-foot pole. EVEN I have STANDARDS!”

    • 0 avatar
      dantes_inferno

      > Mitsubishi Montero 99-2006: Lumpy takes a bow.

      Concur. The front end looks like it took its design cues from the beak of that buzzard from the old Warner Brothers Looney Tunes cartoons.

  • avatar
    forward_look

    Cars that have no color. Black, white, gray, silver, “magnetic”. I realize this is 95% of the cars on the road but I still think they look like refrigerators.

    GM colors are shitty, though. Beige or mixes of everything, like Dr. Pepper.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    CUVs. Why buy a fake 4X4 when they still make the 4Runner and the Tahoe?

  • avatar
    offthewireblog

    Toyota Prius. Ugly ancient technology it’s done. They don’t even make a BEV version. Get rid of it.

  • avatar
    socalduck

    What do I loathe? Nissan Altimas, as they are almost invariably piloted by some of the worst drivers on the road. Also, the hideous first gen Lincoln MKT, which is truly ugly from every angle. Not a fan of the Ford Flex, either, but it’s not in the same league of loathsome as the MKT.

  • avatar
    dantes_inferno

    Introducing:

    The box. By Honda. (Element)
    The box. By Scion. (xB)
    The box. By Kia. (Soul)
    The box. By Ford. (Flex)
    The box. By Nissan. (Cube)
    The box. By Mercedes. (G-Wagon)

    Nissan Armada and its Infiniti equivalent – uglier than sin.
    So is that bulbous excuse for a Mercedes minivan known as the R-Class.

    I would add the Toyota LandBruiser to the list, but at least it has some elements of style and is actually off-road functional – unlike the Nissan Armada.

    I will add any Tesla cult-mobile to this list, however. The earlier Tesla post was a classic.

  • avatar
    hpycamper

    d-i
    The Box. By Honda. (Element). Not pretty, but its box shape makes it more useful than its brother, the CR-V.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    THE UNITED STATES & HER ALLIES MUST LAUNCH A 1ST STRIKE ON CHINA, COMPLETELY DESTROYING ITS MILITARY CAPABILITIES AND INFRASTRUCTURE. We, along with those allies, can help China to rebuild itself into a democracy that no longer has, as its main priority, the desire to soon confront the western powers, as well as Japan, Taiwan and South Korea, in an all-out military conflict, in order to become hegemonic and export its truly warped value system on the world.

    My comments above all stand, and I am being proven correct, yet again, in my assessment on a major and significant topic of current times.

    I’m currently getting ready for a work trip out to Las Vegas, but do hope that our military is prepping comprehensive, tactically sound, and complete plans for a devastating 1ST STRIKE on China’s military forces/sites, infrastructure and political leadership.

    The sooner, the better, as we lose ability to achieve complete and total success in this necessary endeavor with each passing day.

    PROC is at least as big a threat, and likely significantly larger, given all historically proper historical economic and military adjustments, to the west and our now-Asian allies, than Nazi Germany was in the 40s.

    THE TIME FOR ACTION HAS ARRIVED.

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