By on August 1, 2018

Yes, you’re right – the Raptor is as far from a base truck as The Onion is from real news. However, there’s an argument to be made that the Raptor is as much of an individual model as the Focus RS is a model separate from the workaday hatchback. That is the argument I am making here today.

Raptor pickups can quickly climb into pricing’s nosebleed section, stretching bank accounts of off-road fans and vacuuming their wallets clean. Is a no-options Raptor worth their time? Given that the majority of add-ons augment the truck’s performance not one whit, I think it is.

Starting at $50,675, the entry level Raptor is *gasp* a SuperCab, not a SuperCrew. With ever increasing numbers of truck buyers popping for four full doors, a SuperCab F-150 sticks out like a lime-green tee shirt in a sea of drab business suits. Your author cannot recall the last time he saw a SuperCab Raptor with his own two eyes.

Pro tip: selecting a SuperCab Raptor shaves nearly $3,000 off the truck’s sticker price, along with several inches off its total length. The latter will make the pickup more manoeuvrable, whether one is using the thing on trails as intended or busting bollards at the mall. If you have a Raptor, I do hope it’s the former.

Another unexpected bonus of choosing the Raptor no one wants? The SuperCab also has a fuel tank measuring 36 gallons, a marked improvement over the SuperCrew’s 26 gallon thimble. Given the truck’s prodigious thirst, Raptor drivers are wise to carry all the fuel they can.

Both trucks come equipped with legendary levels of off-road kit, including gonzo-sized BFGoodrich All-Terrain T/A KO2 rubber measuring a monstrous 315/70/R17. Fox Racing shocks soak up bumps like those old Bounty paper towel commercials purported to soak up water, while beefy springs at all four corners allow the truck to perform Baja levels of heroics even when piloted by the most hamfisted of drivers.

Only the deep-hued Ruby Red is an extra cost color, with all manner of greyscale plus the fabulous Race Red being offered gratis. Ford loves to show the Raptor in Lightning Blue, so I’ve implored potential customers to select anything but in an effort to add diversity on our nation’s trail system. Leave the optional wallpaper – a $1,075 Exterior Graphics Package and $900 Hood Graphics Package – on the factory floor. It makes for a cleaner looking machine, too.

A pair of options packages conspire to drive the Raptor’s price skyward, including a luxury-focused bundle with 360-degree cameras and the like costing an eye-popping $9,770. I also advocate for the exclusion of interior trim packages which can add thousands of dollars simply for a dollop of color or carbon fiber, along with the binning of Ford’s $1,950 Raptor Technology Package and its suite of safety nannies. The base model’s low-rent audio system is my sole gripe.

Checking all the boxes on a Ford Raptor order sheet will result in a machine cresting the $75,000 mark, nearly a $25,000 jump from the truck you see here. The base trim SuperCab is packed with the same off-road kit and its capabilities in the dirt are legion. Plus, because it’s a SuperCab, chances of seeing a double of yourself out in the dunes ranges somewhere between slim and none.

Last week’s announcement of the Limited trim earning Raptor levels of power reminded me of how good the Raptor is, even if I am not enamored with its engine note. Saving $25,000 over a fully loaded model is simply the icing on the cake.

[Images: Ford Motor Company]

Not every base model has aced it. The ones which have? They help make the automotive landscape a lot better. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments. Naturally, feel free to eviscerate our selection.

The model above is shown in American dollars with American options and trim, absent of destination charges and available rebates. As always, your dealer may sell for less.

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31 Comments on “Ace of Base: 2018 Ford F-150 Raptor...”


  • avatar
    shedkept

    I don’t trust this engine long term.

    • 0 avatar
      Tiberius1701

      I trust it longer than any BMW Twin-Turbo V8.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      I’m not aware of any serious issues with the 2.7 or 3.5 Eco Boosts in any flavor. The only ones I’ve heard of was the little 1.6 issues. All of the “It’ll spit the turbos through the hood at 30,000 miles” were disproven.

      I think the truck motors have been around long enough now to call reliable.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I actually like the SuperCab better, it looks much more athletic which goes better with this type of off-road truck, but with prices in the stratosphere I guess I’ll just enjoy them from afar

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      I like it too since the Raptor gets the short bed with the SuperCab. It looks good even though that makes it completely stupid as a pickup (at least supercrews with the short bed get all that rear seat room).

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        “(at least supercrews with the short bed get all that rear seat room).”

        — Wasted space for many.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          So a 5 1/2 foot bed on a fullsized truck is useless but narrow it down, add 6 inches and slap it on a compact (like my old Ranger) and the dimensions suddenly become perfect. Stupid

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            @Art Vandelay: You misread my statement. It’s the “rear seat room” that’s wasted space. Cut that down to the SuperCab and you gain 10″ to 12″ of bed length.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Ah, true. Yeah if you don’t need the rear seatroom than a super crew makes the truck unnecessarily huge. As soon as my kids are off to college I’m trading it on a regular cab…maybe sooner since we have moved to an area where I may sell my travel trailer and my wife’s Santa Fe can handle road trip duties in the absence of a 30 foot trailer. Ideal truck at that point would be the limited drivetrain (Raptor motor with AWD) in a blacked out regular cab with leather and a console and lightning decals affixed.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    This makes sense, considering a Wrangler can hit $50K pretty easily. As well as an XC60 or RX350.

  • avatar
    Dan

    “The SuperCab also has a fuel tank measuring 36 gallons, a marked improvement over the SuperCrew’s 26 gallon thimble. Given the truck’s prodigious thirst, Raptor drivers are wise to carry all the fuel they can.”

    You have that backwards.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    $50K really isn’t too crazy for what the vehicle is. Personally, if I shell out $50K for a stripper pickup it better have a Philco AM radio or I’m walking away.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @Sub-600. Thanks my first chuckle in a previously bleak morning. When we discuss vehicles rather than politics, I enjoy your posts.

      Now could someone explain just how useful in ‘real life’ a short bed, Super Cab is? In my estimation it is not particularly useful for hauling either construction material or people.

      • 0 avatar
        BunkerMan

        My truck is a Super Crew F150 with the 5.5′ box. I bought it when our kids were a bit younger and needed to tow a travel trailer. I figured I’d like the extra interior space more than the bed space.

        Looking back, I regret getting the SCrew over the SCab. The kids don’t camp with us much anymore, but I am hauling more and more stuff around in the back, including my ATV. The ATV will not fit in there with the tailgate up, requiring more straps to hold it in. That extra foot of bed length would be really nice.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        “Now could someone explain just how useful in ‘real life’ a short bed, Super Cab is? In my estimation it is not particularly useful for hauling either construction material or people.”
        — Not everybody hauls a lot of construction materials OR people and the short bed can still be quite useful. A Raptor owner is more likely to be a DIYer rather than a construction magnate or farmer/rancher, carrying their hobbies around rather than loads of material. It’s not THAT hard to carry a simple load of DIY lumber or other light loads in the back of one, after all. You just need to know how to secure it and mark it safely for transport.

      • 0 avatar
        srh

        I had the last generation Raptor. I loved the truck, but sold it after about 18 months and ~20,000 miles, and replaced it with an F-250 CC with 8′ bed.

        The reason I made the swap? Entirely the bed’s fault. I couldn’t carry my ATV in the bed without the tailgate down, and tailgates are not made to support an ATV’s weight on them while driving. Heck, one of my *BICYCLES* couldn’t fit in the bed! As much as i find the notion of carrying a bicycle in a 13MPG truck ridiculous, it should at least be super duper easy.

        That said, I could and did once fit 4 bicycles side by side in the cab with the rear seat folded up, along with a couple duffel bags of clothes. That impressed me.

        My current truck is an F-150 with 6.5′ bed. That’s a decent compromise; everything I’ve needed to fit in the bed has fit and there have only been a few cases where I wish I had the 8′ bed. In my area the 6.5′ bed is tough to find.. They’re really pushing the 5.5′ bed. Fortunately I knew better than to fall for that nonsense this time.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “Leave the optional wallpaper – a $1,075 Exterior Graphics Package and $900 Hood Graphics Package – on the factory floor.”

    Booooooooo.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    “Starting at $50,675, the entry level Raptor is *gasp* a SuperCab, not a SuperCrew. With ever increasing numbers of truck buyers popping for four full doors, a SuperCab F-150 sticks out like a lime-green tee shirt in a sea of drab business suits. Your author cannot recall the last time he saw a SuperCab Raptor with his own two eyes.”

    — But is exactly the style of Raptor this driver would choose, IF he chose to buy a Raptor of any sort. I have no need or desire for two full rows of seating as the typical back-seat passenger for me would be… one dog. I do need extra room in the cab and the SuperCab is ideal for that purpose but even if I did have a need to carry “people,” one is a tiny grandmother only about 5’2″ tall with short legs and the other is an 11-year-old girl… passengers that might ride with me once a year and to be honest are likely never to ride in my trucks due to my having a different, smaller but with four full doors vehicle we normally use to visit those two.

    I would probably go for the Ruby Red, though I’d prefer some other color that is not monochromatic. When it comes to “wallpaper”, I have my own “wallpaper” supplier who is noted in my area for some gorgeous work and has already decorated three of my last four vehicles. I can promise you that a raptor appliquéd onto MY Raptor (if I had one) would be more fitting to the name than anything Ford would put on and would probably cost less as well.

    • 0 avatar
      ernest

      +1. My passenger would be a Black Lab who loves to ride shotgun.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        @ernest: My pup isn’t normal but I believe he has reason… He survived a direct hit by a hurricane before I adopted him and has a fear of high winds As long as the windows are up, he’ll sit up and look around before lying down for a nap… Windows open? He dives to the floor and won’t come up again until I’m completely stopped.

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    I dunno, reality is looking more and more like The Onion every day.

  • avatar
    Car Guy

    OK, waiting for Ace of Base Corvette ZR1 post…………..

  • avatar
    micko4472

    So I went to Ford’s website and I saw one worthwhile option – a front
    locking differential for $500. Which brings the total purchase price to over $55k. I think for that kind of money you can get a pretty decent
    Jeep Wrangler. You can probably get one for less than $55k. And it
    will go a lot of places the Raptor can’t.

    The biggest problem with the Raptor is it’s size. If you are running around in the open desert, it’s fine. If you go somewhere like, say, Black Bear Pass in CO, a Raptor will have a very hard if not impossible time.

    I lived 20 years in CO, and spent many a summer jeeping on those back
    country trails. I didn’t see too many full size pickups. I saw a
    lot of jeeps and scouts and bobtail broncos, however.

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