By on July 31, 2018

2018 Buick Regal TourX

2018 Buick Regal TourX

2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder (250 horsepower @ 5,500 rpm; 295 lb-ft @ 3,000-4,000 rpm)

Eight-speed automatic, all-wheel drive

21 city / 29 highway / 24 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

Base Price: $35,020 (U.S)

As Tested: $39,760 (U.S.)

Prices include $925 destination charge in the United States. The Regal TourX is not sold in Canada.

It’s a running joke in auto journalist and car enthusiasts circles that wagons are the ultimate body type, as well as the cure for the crossover crave that seems to bother us  (myself included) in ways that aren’t necessarily logical or rational.

Wagons are better than crossovers because they perform the same utilitarian duties as a crossover while still being closer in form to a sedan. Or so the argument goes.

Whether that is or isn’t “true” is a matter of opinion, of course. But the Buick Regal TourX is an example of how simply “wagonizing” a platform isn’t enough to make a decent car great.

The wagonized Regal does have the advantage of being based on a fairly good platform – Buick isn’t being tasked with turning dirt into gold here. But even if the starting base is good, you still have to put in the work. A solid base doesn’t automatically translate into a great product.

(Editor’s Note: Remember the camera issue that wiped out my Nissan Kicks photos? Well, it also happened when I shot the TourX, as well as another press car that will be reviewed soon. Long story short, I have clumsy thumbs and accidentally changed a setting on my camera that led to overexposure. In the meantime, I am using press shots because I was stupid).

Whether in hatchback or wagon form, the Regal is supposed to be Buick’s sportiest product, but the TourX doesn’t quite feel up to the task. It’s hampered mostly by numb steering that has an on-center dead spot, and while the 295 lb-ft of torque from the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder (250 horsepower) is a solid number, you have to dig a bit into the rev range before you feel it. Low-rev punch could be better, but once you get it over three grand it pulls well enough.

2018 Buick Regal TourX

Aha, you say. Only the Regal GS and Sportback are meant to be sporty! This wagon is meant to haul my kayaks and suitcases and do light off-roading and do it all in luxury!

Well, you’re right about the luxury part. The Regal’s interior is nicely done, in recent Buick fashion, and it does lend an air of “sport” to the car, as well, thanks to a dashboard that swoops down and then back upwards. Underneath Buick’s well-done infotainment system sits a large knob and handful of radio buttons, with simple and logical HVAC controls below. The rear seats can be folded to near flat in order to make hauling cargo easier.

[Get new and used Buick Regal pricing here!]

It’s a comfortable cabin, and the wagon bodystyle does lend size and an airiness to it. Indeed, I get the appeal of a wagon – and Buick is marketing the Regal TourX as a sort of outdoorsy wagon that can haul your kayak or your keister to the campsite.

All-wheel drive is a part of that equation, and despite the extra weight that AWD brings, the Regal TourX feels light on its feet for the most part – it’s a good, if not great, handling wagon. The AWD system has a twin-clutch system that can be used to make sure a rear wheel that has traction can get the car moving, even if the other three wheels aren’t getting grip.

2018 Buick Regal TourX

Buick does fall short when it comes to ground clearance, though. The TourX has just under 6 inches of it, which is less than the 8.7 inches in the Subaru Outback or the 6.9 inches offered by the smaller Golf Alltrack.

Speaking of the Outback, that vehicle poses a problem for the TourX. Not only does it have more ground clearance, but it starts around $3K less than a base TourX. Most TourX buyers will spring for the mid-trim Premium or the loaded Essence (like my test car), putting their purchase price into the low or mid $30s. Subaru offers a Premium-trim Outback for under $30K, although the two top trims come close to TourX Premium and Essence pricing.

Buick’s media materials list the BMW 3 Series Sport Wagon, Audi A4 Allroad, and Volvo V60 Cross Country as the TourX’s main competition, but based on price, I see the Outback being a greater threat. Yes, the Buick has a premium image, but while the interior is upscale, it may not be distinctive enough to make up for the lower ground clearance or to fight against the Subie’s positive reputation.

2018 Buick Regal TourX

The Subie also offers almost 3 cubic feet more of seat-up cargo space and about the same cargo volume with the rear seats down.

The Essence trim has 18-inch wheels standard. Other standard features include heated front seats, push-button start, power liftgate, dual-zone climate control, fog lamps, remote start, satellite radio, USB, in-car 4G LTE Wi-Fi, heated steering wheel, Apple CarPlay, and Android Auto. Optional features include the infotainment system and navigation (part of a $1,095 package), Driver’s Confidence Package ($1,795, includes wireless charging, LED headlamps, cornering headlamps, rear park assist, rear cross-traffic alert, lane-change alert with side blind-zone alert, and other features), and the $995 white paint job. Total as tested, including D and D: $39,760.

Fuel economy is listed at a ho-hum 21 mpg city/29 mpg highway/24 mpg combined.

Like most automotive journalists, I usually gravitate towards wagons over crossovers (despite growing up in the ‘80s, when wagons were uncool). The hatchback utility, car-like ride, and lower ride height appeal to me. But being a wagon isn’t enough.

2018 Buick Regal TourX

The TourX is upscale in feel, but not enough to compete with the nameplates listed above. It doesn’t offer a compelling argument over the Outback. The throttle/engine response below 3,000 rpm is disappointing, and while the car handles well, a weird on-center numbness plagued my tester.

The good news is that this isn’t hard to fix. Changing throttle response and transmission behavior would work wonders, and a little bit of tweaking could turn a solid handling car into something quite fun.

Judged on its own merits, the Regal TourX is a good-enough car that needs a bit of fine-tuning. But good enough isn’t, well, good enough, and the wagon bodystyle isn’t justification enough. There’s a good effort here, but with the Outback lurking and with Buick hoping to lure buyers out of the luxury marques, the TourX is in an odd spot. It’s not quite good enough to out-wagon the Outback, and while it’s cheaper than the competition, it’s not quite premium or sporty enough to seduce the luxury shopper.

It’s nice that Buick offers a wagon, but a bodystyle alone does not a great car make.

[Images © 2018 Buick and Tim Healey/TTAC]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

139 Comments on “2018 Buick Regal TourX Review – Being a Wagon Isn’t Enough...”


  • avatar
    Sub-600

    I like this car. While it’s not as cool as a Dodge Magnum, it’s not as lame as a Taurus wagon was either.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      A “Taurus wagon” would be a Flex which is not lame at all and is quite popular among enthusiasts

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Its impossible to talk about any car without bringing up how awful Ford is.

      • 0 avatar
        Sub-600

        “A ‘Taurus Wagon’ would be a Flex” No, a Taurus wagon was a Taurus wagon.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Then why did you pick a car that hasn’t been built in over 10 years to compare to a new Buick wagon? Other then to troll John, of course

          • 0 avatar
            Sub-600

            I picked what I thought was a good looking station wagon and what I deemed an unattractive station wagon. There aren’t many recent station wagons to pick from that aren’t small European wagons. JohnTaurus is paranoid and often concocts dialogue that doesn’t exist such as “Oh, so all Fords catch fire?” and “Millions have died in Pintos”. That is not my problem. The Taurus wagon was not an attractive American station wagon in my opinion. JohnTaurus is free to offer his opinion. Again, I like this Buick wagon.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Aww, you poor innocent sweet thing. Its not like you bring up Ford on just about every article just to point out how awful they are, repeatedly stating that they will burn, because no other car could possibly have an issue with fire. With such gems as saying the Lincoln Continental in Corey’s DBB comparison will burn itself, with absolutely no basis for such a statement other than trolling.

            Btw, I was really making fun of DW and his bringing up 20 year old Ford vehicles that were recalled in an effort to deflect attention from a 2018 recall of a car he likes. But, the fact that you took it as making fun of you speaks to your guilty conscience more than anything.

            Of course it’s perfectly valid to bring up a car that wasn’t being discussed by any stretch of the imagination, and that hasn’t been built in 14 years, just to say how bad it was. Of course doing so has nothing to do with the fact that I drive and like a car that has the same name. How silly of anyone to draw such a conclusion.

            But, the joke is on you, I don’t/didn’t like the Taurus wagon, either.

      • 0 avatar

        Maybe he meant the Freestar / Taurus X?

    • 0 avatar
      pdog_phatpat

      Meh, Dodge sucks.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    A slightly mediocre wagon is better than a good crossover any day, just as a bad day on the golf course beats a good day working – IMHO.

    Fuel economy is listed at a ho-hum 21 mpg city/29 mpg highway/24 mpg combined.

    Doesn’t seem that “ho hum” to me. That’s 1 mpg better than the Terrain with the same basic powertrain, 2 mpg better than the H-6 Outback (power-wise that’s a better competitor than the 4 cyl Subaru), 2 mpg LESS than a much less powerful CX-5, 2 mpg LESS than a Volvo V60 – seems competitive to me.

    I’m too lazy to look it up, what’s the seats up cargo volume on a TourX vs. a Terrain? I’m sure lots of Buick/GMC dealers are more eager to sell the Terrain.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I’ve never seen one in person, but pictures always make the interior look kind of low rent in my eyes. Maybe it’s the cheapo looking cloth they put in the base model. Does it feel more like a common Opel that it is?

    5 grand is a pretty big price premium over the Regal sedan. Too bad they can’t get more than 29 mpg out of this on the highway, when so many other 2.0T’s can do mid-30’s. Both of these problems probably be solved by dumping the standard and unnecessary AWD.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Someone is getting EPA numbers in their TourX.

      http://www.fuelly.com/car/buick/regal_tourx/2018/mrkbrlnd/793306

      The upper trims are $8,000 off MSRP on autotrader.

    • 0 avatar
      jrhurren

      Sat in one, interior seems low-rent in person too. I am surprised to see journos continuing to call this a nice interior.
      AWD is keeping it on my list though. Don’t think I would be interested if it was FWD only

    • 0 avatar
      RedRocket

      The interior in lower trims is awful and inappropriate for a Buick. The dash design is very plasticky too. The front end on these is not particularly attractive either. It is overpriced when trimmed to a proper standard and dealers do not keep many (or any) in stock. And now you are buying a car assembled by PSA in Europe.

      All that said, comparing this to a tinny and agricultural Subaru is way out there.

  • avatar
    ernest

    I can’t be the only one that’s noticing this- the anti-Buick bias is getting old, and it needs to stop. Or you need to pick authors about 20-30 years older that would actually consider a Buick.

    1. There is zero chance that an Outback shopper will cross-shop a Buick.

    2. There’s about the same chance a Buick shopper will notice, or care about ground clearance.

    3. The biggest fault of the Tour X is, IMO, the lack of a V6 option.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Geeze, posts like this make me glad I’m not an auto reviewer. God-forbid I like the car and didn’t find much to complain about, then I’m regurgitating a press release as a paid shill. Then I find some faults in another car and call attention to them, now I’m biased against it for no reason but the name on the grille.

      Honestly, this review wasn’t that harsh on the car. Would you rather him ignore any fault he finds and therefore be less than honest about the car? Mark’s review of the Encore wasn’t bad either, he basically said he doesn’t like the class of vehicle, but such as it is, the Encore is a compelling choice.

      • 0 avatar
        ernest

        Three in a row plus the Buick deathwatch. What would you call it?

      • 0 avatar
        gmichaelj

        I had the feeling it was slanted against the Buick, for example, I noticed the writer wanted to nickname the competition.

        But what I really notice in all car media is the preponderance of reviews about foreign-branded models. Road&Track, AlexonAutos, etc. count for yourself the number of Germ/Jap/Korean vehicles that get reviews vs the number of American-branded car reviews. Even for very low volume cars.

        On top of that, there is always some short coming on the USA car that makes it sound like you’d be a dummy to buy it, while on the Euro or Asian car, a criticism, like lack of horsepower, is downplayed.

      • 0 avatar
        Peter Gazis

        @John Taurus

        Well the author does come across like a Subaru salesman.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      I disagree that a Buick shopper would neither notice nor care about ground clearance. Ground clearance translates into ride height, and a lot of Buick shoppers are going to be considering visibility and ease of entry and exit. While matching the Outback wouldn’t be necessary, another inch and a half would be useful.

    • 0 avatar
      Land Ark

      I’m not aggressively responding to you, just relisting your comment for my ease of typing:

      1. There is zero chance that an Outback shopper will cross-shop a Buick.

      My wife recently cross-shopped this and the Outback. She has a Legacy GT and was looking at the tip-top trim Outback so she could get remote start and a heated steering wheel. The only reason she didn’t end up with an Outback was the mandatory mocha brown seats. She got a Forester XT instead.

      2. There’s about the same chance a Buick shopper will notice, or care about ground clearance.

      She didn’t really care about the ground clearance, though she did give it a moment of pause. She’s short so likes the higher vantage point but it wouldn’t have stopped her from getting the TourX.

      3. The biggest fault of the Tour X is, IMO, the lack of a V6 option.

      Her requirements were AWD, 250hp, longroof, heated steering wheel, and remote start. The lack of V6 didn’t pose a problem, if anything, the V6 would have priced the car out of her range since it would probably tap on the $50k mark.

      The biggest fault was the lack of interest in dealers to sell her the car. She did the math and was essentially willing to pay the advertised prices plus all the taxes and bs fees. But all the dealers wanted to play games and refused to honor their ads. When she pointed out that she had done the math they came back with nonsense replies. I am a current Buick lessee and qualified for an incentive that they would try to tack back onto the advertised price despite the ad saying no incentives were included in the price. It was shameful and happened with multiple dealers. She was sold on the TourX and had the cash ready to buy but the interactions turned her off of the car completely at any price.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @LandArk – The biggest fault was the lack of interest in dealers to sell her the car.

        This is what I am anecdotally observing as well. Being here in the 4 Corners Area – Colorado, Northern AZ, and Santa Fe Buick dealers have a decent selection of TourX (duh that’s Subaru central) but not much advertised in the way of discounts. Many seem to be loaded for the given trim level (meaning a couple of thousand in add-ons compared to base.)

        I think some Buick dealers are feeling burned by the previous generation Regal (which 2017s can still be found brand new on dealer lots) and I’m also wondering given the car’s provenance if the dealer invoice and MSRP are much closer than on other GMC/Buick vehicles.

        My local dealer is so cautious on the Regal right now that they’re ordering only Sportback FWD Preferred package models ONE at a time. Sell one, order one, sell one, order one.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Screw the local Buick dealerships and ship from the lower 48 states. Just use the local schmucks for the freebies like oil changes. Though the prices may be better outside of your area like the midwest, where Buick discounting is the best from what I have found, it doesnt’t hurt to ask what applies to you zip code.

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        Inexcusable to the max! If I was the owner of a Buick dealership and any of my salesmen showed no interest in selling what the customer came in to look at they would get fired on the spot.

    • 0 avatar
      Tim Healey

      No anti-Buick bias, I assure you. Bark’s opinions are his, and he has the right to express them, but they don’t affect reviews. I simply thought the car could be better. I did have a short drive in a Regal GS recently, too short of a drive for a full review, and I liked it. If I drive a Buick I like, I will say so. Reviews are honest, not rooted in bias.

      • 0 avatar
        ernest

        Fair enough, but consider something.

        Back in the 80’s, when we were a lot younger (and poorer) than we are today, we drove Subaru’s. Three of them. The Subaru’s morphed into a Volvo Wagon with the arrival of the first babies, and the Volvo morphed into a series of six Suburbans over a period of 10 years. The Suburbans morphed into three Expeditions, and finally a new Camry as all the baby bears grew up and moved out.

        We’re starting to think SUV, mainly to make it more convenient to haul the Lab, and easier for the wife to climb in and out of.
        the shopping list is pretty short- The Buick was on the list, but more likely is the Durango. The only real question is the cylinder count and the color. No, an Outback isn’t on the list. Nice car, but been there a long time ago. We’ve moved on, and we’ve hit tht certain age where we really don’t care what everyone else thinks of our vehicle choices.

        Did you notice the lack of European brands on the shopping list? Go look at the sales figures- for those of us that can actually afford these vehicles, domestics rule this particular market space.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      “There is zero chance that an Outback shopper will cross-shop a Buick.”

      I dunno, my aunt up in Little Falls has had Outbacks for over 15 years now, but she just turned 50…

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    It must be “Buick Week” at TTAC

    “Wagons are better than crossovers because they perform the same utilitarian duties as a crossover while still being closer in form to a sedan. Or so the argument goes.”

    Not if you like the increased ride height of a crossover, which apparently most people do or they’d buy this instead, which they don’t… at all

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I think lack of awareness may be an issue. I’ve never seen an advertisement for one of these (if it exists, is Buick actually targeting competing models?), nor have I seen one in person.

      Compare that with, say, the Golf Alltrack. Once those reached a critical mass in sales, general awareness took off and they seem to be quite popular in my area. I don’t see Buick putting forth the effort.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Larger wagons to me look ponderous and “over bodied”, while some crossovers also do (the current Explorer for one, although without the same proportions as a wagon).

      However, most crossovers wear their weight better, they don’t look as overweight, and I’m thinking its the taller and sometimes boxier profile.

      Put it this way, a man who weighs 200+ pounds looks very over weight if he’s 5’2″, but he looks far better proportioned if he’s 6’2″.

    • 0 avatar
      Alfisti

      Crossovers also handle being boxy a little better, so for passengers it is a far more pleasant experience and there’s also more back seat room.

      We own an X3 and a 9-3 wagon, we (myself, wife and kids 6 and 2) recently took a trip both, 3 hours each way, we took the X3 despite the hit in mileage because it is simply more pleasant to be in for the rear passengers.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    That is a poor spend of $995 to get white paint???? I do not know if the ground clearance is a big deal doubtful this will ever see a trail, as is the case with the VW or the outback. I like wagons and owned a TDI jetta wagon and I doubt they will sell a lot of these, I would be more interested without the plastic on the fenders.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      That is a poor spend of $995 to get white paint????

      GMs painting scheme on anything other than Chevy is pretty maddening. Looking at the GMC/Buick store and want anything other than plain Black, White, or Red? Be prepared to spend. I’ve realized for GMC the “no extra cost” colors are almost all found in Government Fleet use.

      I wish more manufacturers would emulate Dodge/Chrysler on the paint front. Nearly every color is included as no extra cost.

    • 0 avatar

      The Buick white is genuinely a nice color and is worth a premium. $1000? Maybe not.

    • 0 avatar
      Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

      “White Frost Tricoat” is a three-stage pearlescent color, not basic gloss white paint.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Ok – if it was $300 to $400 for all of the Buick premium paint options it would be palatable. But almost a grand?

        Especially when there are only 2 or 3 no extra cost paint options.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    I like it. I really don’t think being more expensive that the Subaru is an issue. GM is known for slapping big incentives on models if they are not selling in the numbers they want-in addition I don’t think the traditional Subaru buyers are going to cross shop Buick.

    I could see replacing my truck with one of these when I’m done towing a travel trailer.

  • avatar
    john66ny

    I do wish this was available in Canada.

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    My current DD is a 9-3 wagon so i am a wagon lover at heart. In saying that, as middle age creeps on and having badly scraped my front valence more than a few times, i do appreciate thee half pregnant “raised wagon” thingies. I realise that is sacrilege but i hey it’s my preference.

    I disagree the outback is a competitor here, the engines and the interiors are so far behind the times that the price reflects the reality of what the Outback is, cheap and cheerful at best.

    This goes more head to head with the euro competition GM lists IMHO.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    Agree – needs a V6. And specifically, a V6 turbo, like the Cadillac V-sport. ~400 hp in this, charge $45-50k, a good transmission and I’m there..

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I was able to sit in one last week, it was on the showroom floor. In black, it is a handsome wagon IMHO with the wheels in dark gray. It was noted above, the interior looks cheap from my vantage point it did not feel cheap, I generally like the Buick interior myself though so internal bias could be prevailing.

    While I agree the TourX needs the V6 from the Lacrosse, it also needs the rear seat leg room from the LaCrosse. I have not sat in an Outback in a long time, so I really do not have point of reference as to how the Buick compares, but it seems small to me.

    I sort of understand Tim’s, and others, comparison of the TourX to the Outback, I also feel it is a bit of a disingenuous comparison. The Buick, especially in the upper trim is a luxury car. The Subaru is not, nor will it be in the foreseeable future near as I can tell. Again, I have not ridden in a Subaru in quite awhile, but I am wiling to wager the Buick is much quieter place to spend ones time enjoying the ventilated seats on a summer road trip.

    Long story short, get one while you can. If the proposed tariffs on autos are brought to fruition, the value proposition for this car drops to zero if you have to hike the price another 25%.

  • avatar

    I think Buick made a huge mistake by marketing this and the sedan/hatch as a “Regal”. They saddled a nice contemporary looking car with a nameplate that evokes the velour tufted “personal luxury” Buicks from decades ago. The Insignia name would have been a much better choice.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Having spent some time in a Magnum when they were first released, I found them to be claustrophobic. The opposite of what one expects from a wagon.

    Having followed a Nitro to work yesterday, it strikes me that it is a true ‘midsized’ wagon. And one that if I would cross shop with a Subaru or VW.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Sorry meant Kia Niro. The ‘t’ was included accidentally. Surely did not mean that brick that Dodge sold as an SUV.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Lol I was wondering how anyone could think of the Nitro as a station wagon.

        Then again, it was cited as a failure of Sergio Marchionne’s leadership and called a crossover, even though it came about long before he was in the (Chrysler/Dodge/Jeep) picture and wasn’t in any way shape or form based on a car.

        I do believe the Kia Niro (which my autocorrect keeps turning into “But I”) is more of a wagon, but marketing it as such would be begging for failure.

  • avatar
    TW5

    The CUV vs wagon contest is settled by my height. I’m too tall to stand under the liftgate of most wagons and hatchbacks, and the older I get, the less willing I am to bend myself into pretzel shapes to reach various parts of the cargo area. CUVs have better proportions for my height, and SUVs are better still because they rear bumper height and rear shocks are conducive for using the cargo area as a bench seat for gearing up.

    It’s a shame the TourX is kept at sedan ride-height, when a small lift would have made the vehicle more useful for lifestyle buyers, and it would have made the TourX a direct competitor to the Outback. Unlike the Outback, the TourX has turbocharging for superior high altitude performance. Raising the TourX’s ride height would also have made it the spiritual successor to the original C5 Audi Allroad.

    • 0 avatar
      slap

      I prefer the lower height of a conventional wagon. It’s easier to get stuff in the back with the lower sill height, and loading things onto the roof rack such as lumber or my 17′ sea kayak is easier with a lower roof height.

      I’ve never had any problems with the liftgate height on the four wagons I’ve owned, but I’m only 6′ tall and in my 60’s.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Yes, if your tailgate ledge is just above your knees loading and unloading is a straight in and out process and so much easier then bending down, also that tailgate needs to be a few inches above your head, makes for pleasant loading on a rainy day. Little things like this add up and become important especially as you get a little older. I find if I’m standing at the driver’s door and have a passenger on the other side waiting to enter if I can’t see them the car is the right height

    • 0 avatar
      Daniel J

      I wouldn’t have been interested in it if it was outback height. It drives better than the outback on the road imho.

  • avatar
    Garrett

    I don’t get how Buick fails to see the opportunity to bring back the Roadmaster.

    Take a suburban. Lower it to 1980s era sedan height. Slap badge on it. Call it a wagon. Profit.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I watched Alex on Autos review the current Enclave Premium trim and as he was describing the ride and handling the thought that went through my head was: “Buick B-body Estate circa 1987”.

      I mean that as a compliment.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        There are a surprising amount of people who still think a big Buick is a nice car to have and to be honest the new Enclave is a good looking big Buick. It could even carry a name like Electra or Park Avenue without a problem https://kreuzfahrten-2018.info/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/buick-7-seater-maxresdefault.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      mjg82

      Yes please

  • avatar
    sckid213

    I think this will do better than many expect on the coasts. Here in Los Angeles there are TONS of Encores rolling around, many driven by young women and young families. The zero-down, $199 leases, “premium” accommodations, and lots of standard kit of the Encore hit a sweet spot. It’s perfect for a young couple with a baby. And it’s way “nicer” than a Subaru Crosstrek.

    Now, let’s say young family’s super-cheap Encore lease is up and they have another kid on the way. They’re already in the Buick family, so show them the TourX — wow, kinda like a Subaru, but “nicer”! Kinda like an Audi Allroad too! If they can offer compelling leases on these, they will move these.

    Too bad about the dead spot on center with the steering – a HUGE pet peeve of mine, and GM can do better when it wants to (the steering in my gen-2 CTS is shockingly good). But honestly, considering the audience for the TourX, which cares more about CarPlay than steering – it’s good enough. (And even at good enough – I’d take a TourX over an Outback)

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    “that needs a bit of fine-tuning”

    Upon reading this, I expected Norm’s avatar to come crashing through the computer screen like the Kool Aid man while hollering “DID SOMEONE SAY TRIFECTA?!”

    I wouldn’t mind hearing someone’s comparative impressions between this and an Outback 3.6, but I wouldn’t be cross-shopping them. As a former Sportwagen owner, this Buick is appealing and the Outback isn’t for the same reasons any other crossover isn’t. But if the market thinks an Encore is an SUV, then perhaps the Buick’s rugged plastic cladding on a wagon with five and a half inches of ground clearance is enough to sway some Subaru shoppers.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “a bodystyle alone does not a great car make”

    Yet, every CUV.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      What about the original Corvette or T-Bird? Perhaps not ‘great’ but certainly highly coveted.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      @28-Cars – my point exactly. An AWD 2.0T Terrain (with funny push-button transmission) can be optioned out and MSRP-ed out to almost match a TourX step for step.

      Terrain – 29.6 ft³, 63.3 ft³ with seats folded.

      TourX – 32.7 ft³, 73.5 ft³ with seats folded.

      But here in our present day America if you bring a Terrain home your neighbors won’t blink cause CUV, we must all have CUVs!

      Bring home a TourX and I’m sure you’ll be getting WTF stares for a month.

      I know which one this Dad would rather be driving on a Costco run.

  • avatar
    davewg

    This thing is crying out for the engine, suspension, and interior upgrades offered in the Sportback GS.

    Had they rolled out a TourX GS I’d probably have one in my driveway.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      The power is available with a ecu tune on the 2.0T with the handling that matches Stinger GT in MT figure-8 times of 26.2s. With the thousands off MSRP you can line the interior with what ever leather quality you want.

  • avatar
    FAHRVERGNUGEN

    I’m on my fifth or sixth Subaru; the third wagon (’87 Loyale Turbo, ’97 Outback, now ’05 GT) with a Forester and an old Legacy sedan in the mix.
    I wouldn’t buy another Outback (too much clearance) or Forester (wife has her Jeep), and Subaru threw in the towel on Legacy wagons, and I would seriously look at the Buick Tourettes if I were shopping for a new car. But I only buy off-lease.
    As for price differential, Subaru probably holds its value better, so at the end of a three-year lease I expect the Buick would be less expensive.
    If you’re the first owner, please buy it in black and treat it well!

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      But I only buy off-lease.

      Good news for you because the only factory incentives I can find right now on a TourX in my area are for leases.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      A OB 2.5i dropped 32% based on new 2018 discounted to $24K today and 2015 2.5i with 36,000 miles under $17K on autotrader. My 2016 Envision Prem ll has 17K miles and has dropped 25% off of discounted price of $35K today. Not seeing the OB holding it’s value today or in the future.

      • 0 avatar
        ernest

        I don’t know your location, but in Portland (Ore) the only real question is how long you will have to wait if you’re stuck on a particular color, trim, or option setup. Cheapest Outback ads run in the mid 27’s and go up from there. Used prices are beyond stoopid.

  • avatar
    kkop

    We rented the smaller sibling (but with same engine I believe), the Astra wagon (‘Sports Tourer’) for a recent vacation in Germany and Austria. Didn’t find that one (6MT) underpowered really. As long as you kept the revs up it had no problems merging on the autobahn and keeping up with traffic @ 120mph.

    Steering was fine as well. Alps, Autobahn, city streets – it handled it all just fine. I didn’t realize the larger version was available on our shores – I would definitely consider it when the time comes for a new vehicle.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    “(Editor’s Note: Remember the camera issue that wiped out my Nissan Kicks photos? Well, it also happened when I shot the TourX, as well as another press car that will be reviewed soon. Long story short, I have clumsy thumbs and accidentally changed a setting on my camera that led to overexposure. In the meantime, I am using press shots because I was stupid).”

    — Those can be repaired digitally using software likely already on your desktop/laptop, whether you’re using Windows or MacOS. If you want, send me a copy of your images (with EXIF information) and I may be able to repair them for you.

  • avatar
    Ermel

    Yawn. An Opel Insignia Country Tourer by any other name still isn’t an upscale car. Wagon. Whatever. And guess what — no-one buys them in Germany either, neither the cladded-and-raised Country Tourer nor the normal-wagon-style Sports Tourer (or indeed the hatchback). Not because of the bodystyle, but because of the nameplate. I had to google to check it’s indeed the same thing as this Buick, because I just don’t see any in the wild. At all.

    It’ll be interesting to see what, if indeed anything, will replace the Opel/Vauxhall on the one hand and the Buick/Holden on the other when the model’s time runs out.

    • 0 avatar

      If no one in Germany buys Opels because on name why PSA would spend hard earned money to own Opel brand? PSA can do miracles but Opel still will be Opel unless PSA changes the name. And then if you want French car why do you buy Opel esp if its name is Opel when you can buy highly regarded and more prestigious (esp in Germany) Peugeot or Citroen?

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I don’t get the wagon fascination. My midsize sedan’s trunk is cavernous, and my wife’s MKX is even more so. Whenever I buy appliances, they have free delivery (except for a fiasco with a Sears Outlet, but that’s for another time). If you are really fixated on something with good driving dynamics and a big square cargo aperture there are boatloads of hatchbacks ranging from the Honda Fit to the Golf R.

    So to recap, unless you are in that rare intersection of people who regularly haul appliances/wood/large but light industrial parts that can only have one car and absolutely demands something with good dynamics, I’m lost.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @sporty: Let me introduce you to the Canadian passion called hockey. Many (most) Canadian parents spend the majority of their spare time driving their offspring and often their teammates to and from rinks. This requires them to carry hockey sticks in their vehicles. An adult or juvenile sized hockey stick does not fit into a car trunk or the back of a hatch. Therefore you would need to fold down part of the back seat on a sedan or hatch, thus limiting you to a maximum of 3 passengers.

      A minivan is the most effective vehicle for this task. Many also use an SUV/CUV. Some sadists use pick-ups which can result in their children having to put on freezing (and or wet/damp) equipment. And a frozen composite hockey stick is much more prone to breaking, which at up to $400 per stick is a very expensive problem.

      So a wagon fits the bill without being a mini-van or SUV/CUV. It is also useful for ski trips, carrying dogs or trips ‘up north’ to the cottage, in ways that a sedan or hatch cannot.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        I don’t know anything about hockey, but a quick Google search shows that an adult size stick is about 5 feet long. Unless you lay the sticks over the seatbacks, wagon, sedan, minivan, crossover… I imagine you’re going to be folding a seat or running them through the ski pass through. I guess with a minivan you can just lay them on the floor, but that’s not happening in a wagon.

        Plenty of people don’t play hockey either.

    • 0 avatar
      kkop

      The same argument could be made for the rear seat in most cars. And even the passenger seat, based on my observations of the average commuter car.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Hardly; way more people transport children every day than (insert active lifestyle object here). And plenty of people live in multi-car households with something cargo friendly.

        I would put the wagon’s real world practicality justification at the same level of low simmer as that of pickup trucks and crossovers. Most people don’t “need” the practicality these form factors offer; they just use them as a means of rationalizing their preferences (which need no rationalization). Wagon fans are unique though in that they use their preference as a means of signaling moral authority/superiority (“crossovers are poopie, wagons are the same but better cuz driving dynamics nobody cares about”). Whole thing is stupid.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          For those of us who DO care about driving dynamics, wagons and hatches are more practical than sedans with no real downside. And these days, since you can’t get a sedan with square rear doors anymore, they are also better for carrying people.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      I agree. A minivan is more practical, a crossover is 90% as useful but 100% better looking. Also, an Edge (or your wife’s MKX) has a much more comfortable rear seat than an equivalent wagon, with more useful room and a better seating position.

      If my Taurus was a wagon, I never would have called about it, much less bought it. I know some love wagons, and that’s fine. But, there are very few that I’d consider owning, and would almost always rather have a utility vehicle, minivan or sedan.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      A wagon used to be the most utility at the lowest cost (less than minivan or suv with better mpg), the proliferation of affordable crossovers has basically taken over that space IMO. My family owned a 82 civic wagon, 90 civic wagon, 07 fit and really appreciate and utilize the capacity.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      “I don’t get the wagon fascination”

      CUV practicality with sedan ride height and handling. Yeah, I know an Accord isn’t a McLaren compared to a CR-V but I can tell a difference and still prefer it. I’ve got two kids and even our compact-class Jetta Sportwagen handled the very important kids + cargo combination better than a midsize sedan or, especially, a truncated Golf. Without kids, I’d be all over the hatchbacks.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        As I said above most pickup and crossover owners aren’t really utilizing the utility of their vehicles’ form factor with any regularity. I’d wager most wagon drivers are the same.

        Now if you just want that combo of practicality and dynamics go for it. I’d love a hatchback. What annoys me are wagon snobs.

        For what it’s worth I prefer low cars as well, to the point that I have lowered every car I’ve owned but three (first car, 350Z, current car which I’ve had for about 3 months).

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          sporty your “logic” is tipping ever closer to Vulpine’s. “I don’t think people need this so it’s silly.”

          If a AWD crossover helps someone get out of their slightly inclined unplowed driveway on all seasons and take their kids to school, that’s utilization enough.

          Hatchbacks don’t have much trunk length, less than their sedan counterparts enough. Good luck getting a dog or two in the back of a hatchback to boot.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Ultimately, hatchbacks can carry people OR cargo, while wagons can carry people AND cargo, or somewhat more cargo. As a single guy, my GTI is fine, but had I the choice I would have gone for a longroof GTI. With the GTI whatever doesn’t fit inside just goes on the roof.

            It’s my innate Yankee frugality that takes offence at AWD in non-offroad capable vehicles. You pay too much for too little added benefit. If you need it to get the power to the road you have more power than necessary.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            I take offense to that!

            I think people should drive whatever they want. I’m not one of those idiots who thinks my preferences should be law.

            But I’m just not sold on this huge “need” for the practicality of wagons. Again pickup and crossover drivers rarely use the practical aspects of their vehicles. So for wagon snobs to say they need their body’s practical uses more than others doesn’t jive.

            And hatchbacks are great if you do a lot of parallel parking in a crowded city.

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    I don’t get it……whats the problem this website has with Buicks? i’m starting to feel like i did in the 80’s and 90’s when i would read a Motor Trend or Car and Driver magazine that had little to nothing good to say about American cars………………yet constantly was found kissing German and Japanese ass. Not everybody wants to buy a vehicle that can cream the Nuburgring and the curves that come with it. The wagon is nice and i would’nt mind owning it. As a buyer i,m not gonna sit there and ask if it can outhandle a Porshe. I would be more concerned with the safety of my kids. Yes i would like it to handle really good…….but if i went out and bought a 1976 Buick Estate wagon………….i would’nt expect it to handle like the Volvo 240 wagon i once owned and cetainly not like the BMW 330xi i daily drive…..hell i wouldnt expect it to handle like my 88 Sedan Deville. my point being that people buy and drive cars for different reasons and uses. I’m sure the Buick would fill most car buyers expectations.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    As I’ve mentioned previously, I have a ’16 Regal GS and I quite like the TourX. I am still considering it despite my wife’s tribulations noted above and despite the obvious to me cheapening of the interior versus my car.

    The worst part is the steering wheel which felt like the leather was loosely attached and of not terribly high quality.
    The leather of the seats also feel much more coarse and of lower quality than mine.
    The sunroof cover, should you option one, does not have a fully opaque cover meaning light will always come through.
    And the chrome around the shifter looks fine, but when the sun is reflecting in your and your passenger’s eyes, it is really annoying.

    Otherwise, they improved this generation by getting rid of what is my biggest gripe: the stupid touch controls for the temperature and heated seats. They also added some nice touches like the mirrors that lower when you put it in reverse.

    I hate the cheap plastic cladding and that there is no easy way to remedy it and the wheels are not attractive.

    However I really like the size, it has adequate power, and it handles very well. The biggest drawback is the price. Depreciation is going to murder the first owner if my generation GS is any indicator.
    I have yet to see a base model listed for sale anywhere, not that I would buy one. I can no longer live without a heated steering wheel.

  • avatar
    darex

    I’ll distill the article into three sentences, and spare you the time to read it:

    I claim to prefer wagons. The ground clearance here sucks. I guess I prefer crossovers after all.

  • avatar
    Coolcar2

    I honestly don’t understand the Outback love fest. I have driven in a couple and they feel hollow and sterile and lack any power in 4 cyl version. I do think these will be cross shopped with a portion of the wagon crowd but the volume will be too low to matter. Subaru is playing off their lifestyle theme, Buick does not have that image. They should discount and get these suckers on the road to influence buyers instead of playing stingy for high sales prices. Good luck Buick, I am sure you will get it right at the very moment you are about to cancel the model.

  • avatar
    make_light

    Comparing to an Outback Premium trim isn’t a fair comparison- this car has much more power available at a far lower price than a V6 Outback. There’s also little mention of ride comfort or NVH, which I’d imagine is better in the Buick. Plus, you get to ride around in something a bit more unique, which I still think is important.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Not bad, but the Pontiac Grand Prix-esque roof ruins it, low and wide does not make for good cargo room.

    I anticipate this cycle again:
    Car Buff: Man, why don’t they make wagons anymore?
    GM: Builds a real station wagon
    Car Buff: I dont like it, it needs to be turd brown.
    GM: Withdraws car because no one buys it.
    Car Buff: Man, why don’t they make wagons anymore?

  • avatar
    Daniel J

    I don’t get this review at all. I’ve test driven both the outback and the tourx. The tourx handles and drives like a car. The outback is a a jacked up wagon and a glorified cuv and drives like one. As soon as it’s pushed into curves or around corners it bounces and leans all over the place.

  • avatar
    rje_nc

    I test drove a mid range TourX a few months ago and liked how it drove. What scared me away is that this will be a total orphan when Buick decides to not update it and drop it from the lineup, particularly given that is not made by a GM division now. I also see how little Buick is featuring this vehicle that tells me they aren’t serious about it. My local dealer typically only has 1 in stock at any given time.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Hey, $995 and there was not enough white finish the job? Painter missed the area around the wheel wells and every wheel!

  • avatar
    brettc

    I saw one of these coming out of a strip mall the other day, still had the spam dealer plate on the front of the car. Looked nice in white, but it’s a pricey vehicle. The used C-Max I bought is well appointed as well, except for Carplay/Android auto since it’s a 2013. But I only paid 12K for it, about 1/4 of the value of a new TourX.

    It will be interesting to see what the pricing is on one of these in about 5 years in the used market. Maybe then it’ll be something to look for.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    I’ve driven the Volvo and the 3 series wagon and this doesn’t remotely compare.

    The only real issue I have with it is cabin quality and infotainment is very dated. Exterior is nice although I’d prefer the non-cladded Opel. Size is quit good as well compares to the Outback and V90.

    As to wagons, I like them but they offer nothing of benefit over a CUV to the general public. Being lower to the ground or having a lower center of gravity is worthless in this class of vehicle. The only time that matters is in something like a CTS-V wagon or an E63 wagon (or Magnum R/T-SRT).

    Had Buick dropped in the turbo 6 from Cadillac in a Tour X GS then it would make a lot of difference.

  • avatar
    SteveMar

    CUVs are getting more adept at offering more than just utility. I’ve been a wagon lover for years and think a premium wagon makes a nice compromise between luxury and utility. But a number of CUVs offer a very similar driving experience with some added space. Why the TourX vs.a BMW X3 or a Mazda CX-5? The BMW in its latest version offers a pretty solid combo of driving and practicality. It vastly outsells the 3 series x drive wagon – and the drive experience is pretty similar.

    Compare the Buick with a more mainstream model like the CX-5 and again, aside from the more powerful engine, it offers little advantage in handling, ride, space or convenience. Plus, as others have mentioned, I think it has the potential to be a unicorn – will GM continue to offer it with its existing lineup of CUVs in the same showroom?

    So while I applaud GM for offering a wagon, I think it’s doomed unless it offers something seriously different than the more popular CUV alternatives. The TourX doesn’t really do that.

  • avatar
    stevelovescars

    The brand attributes I’d expect of the Buick vs. the Subaru are noise and ride comfort. I expect a Buick to be quiet and comfortable while my experiences with Subarus recently are the opposite. The article doesn’t mention road noise or ride… how does this car do on the open road? To me, that would be a key reason to choose one of these over the Outback.

    I don’t really care about ground clearance (and I live in snow country and haven’t needed it) and would actually like to see one of these with the normal Regal suspension and without the cheesy black “outbacked” body cladding. But I drove a 2001 Taurus wagon for three years, so my opinion is obviously to be taken with a grain of salt. For comparison, my Alfa Giulia AWD did great in heavy snow last winter here in Michigan.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    My 2 cents about Buick’s position/aspirations in the luxury marketplace because this review seems to credit Buick as a luxury brand. Subaru is not a luxury brand. But if your friends and colleagues drive A4s and 3 Series and you show up in an Outback, you will have zero explaining to do. The car will not be recognized as a luxury car but it will be understood. The Subaru brand means something and people know why they buy them or why other people buy them. If you show up with a Buick, all of a sudden there’s some explaining to do. You will need to show off the interior as being as nice as Audi or BMW. You may need to reference the spec sheet and explain horsepower or rear seat legroom. As a luxury purchase, a Buick needs to be justified…and there’s the rub because luxury purchases are supposed to justify themselves based on brand/reputation/image/cachet.
    Regarding the comparison to the Outback, there’s nothing here about the incredibly boring power train in the Outback. I don’t know how the TourX behaves dynamically but it has to be more satisfying under acceleration than the Outback with the base engine. The Buick also has to be much quieter than the Outback.
    Aside from the comparison, I’ll make 2 more points. 1) This car should have a higher ride height or it should not have the black cladding. Instead we have the ugly cladding to give the illusion of greater ride height…no thank you. 2) GM completely mismanaged it’s ownership of Opel and the re-branding of Opels for the US. In the US, German cars sell at a premium whether they are luxury (Audi, BMW, Mercedes) or not (VW). So GM has a German automaker under its umbrella and they rebrand those cars as Buicks and Saturns. What were they thinking. GM should have set up Opel dealerships around the country and sold these cars as European imports.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Buick will be similar priced as Subaru but offer near-luxury and longer base warranty. But also cost much less than European equivalents with similar driving dynamics and much better than a Stinger GT.

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    Why would anyone have to explain what a Buick is?? Everyone knows that Buick is a luxo car company. It’s also older than most car companies on the planet. If i pull up in a buick people will say…………Hey nice ride!! Theres something wrong if you feel you have to explain to people what you drive. Even BMW and Mercedes owners would know what a Buicks purpose is. They are not going to sit there and drill you about performance specs and the like. They will look the car over and say…………nice!! I agree with you that the height is low. there should be an option to a wagon thats a bit higher off the ground. As for GM’s past stupidity’s(and there are lots of them)Whats the point??? they are learning from there mistakes, unfortunately they are not learning from thier past successes.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      Nobody under the age of 65 would ever compliment a Buick owner. They’re teetering between their traditional image of “old man car” (Lacrosse)/“old lady car” (Enclave) and their more modern image of overpriced Chinese/Korean garbage. The Regal fits in with neither of those, and most people’s reactions would just be “why?”.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        A few reviewers who have had a TourX (Buick provided of course) for a week or so of real world driving have said that people have stopped them to ask them what it was.

        Part of that is simply because it is a fairly large wagon which is pretty much an extinct segment.

      • 0 avatar
        DEVILLE88

        Old lady car?? you’re mistaken we are talking about Buick not Lexus. And apparently China/Korea apprciatte American cars more than you do.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      With strong ties to the PGA Tour, Buick comes off as “aspirational luxury” at best. A target audience of guys who wish their waistlines were smaller than their inseams is not the making of a luxury marque. I live in the far western suburbs of D.C.; three Buick dealers are sorta convenient to me, one is located on an on-ramp to I-66, one is somewhere in the suburban sprawl/heck that is Tyson’s and one is at the end of the Dulles tollroad and is a true old fashioned four-square dealership. You’d think GM would make one of the megadealers open up a more convenient to reach Buick dealership. Anywhoo, couldn’t I buy a VW Golf Sportwagen for half as much and get almost the same performance? Yeah, VW forums show how to do real “Trifecta Tunes”.

  • avatar

    I drive Ford. Do I need explaining to do why I am not driving Camry or Accord? If yes – please ask me. BTW no one asked me yet to do presentation about car I drive at moment. Or what brand clothes I wear, what restaurant I go for lunch and so on. And why Kenneth Cole and not Levi’s?

    BTW we had a guy who was driving Mini and then one day traded it in for the new Camry. He could not come up with explanation. It is a mystery to this day his strange behaviour. May be Mini simply sucks?

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    A few simple things would help this vehicle quite a bit. For starters make the black plastic wheel well cladding part of a sport package along with another inch or so of ride height.

    Make more paint colors free and limit the extra cost to the pearl white, red tincoat and maybe the odd off color.

    Substitute GM’s 9 speed for the current 8 speed.

    Add some extra padding and a better grade of leather on the seats with some stitching.

    Offer the wheels from the hatch on the Tour X

    Offer the GS’s V6 as a top of the line option.

    Add the safety equipment to the Essence trim level.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    >>Yes, the Buick has a premium image<<

    ???? Buick is the discount warehouse as Norm says.

    Buick is de facto the opposite of premium.

  • avatar
    wstansfi

    Plus one for incoherent review.
    Writer claims to like wagons, then criticizes this wagon for having the ground clearance of a sedan. Then spends the remainder of the review comparing it to the Subaru Outback, which is a cross-over, and has never been described as sporty or lux in any version! I haven’t been in this version of Buick, but have been in a recent high-end version of the Outback. The interior there is best described as “utilitarian.”

    Seems like the article would do better to compare to the closest wagon competitor: the jetta sportwagon. Possibly the Volvo V60. The Audi allroad is a bit jacked up compared to the A4 sedan. Mercedes now has a C-class wagon but it’s definitely in the lux category (although pretty tight inside if you are tall.) Same for the BMW 3 series wagon.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    Buick deserves points for making a truly unique vehicle. It it is long—like shockingly long, freakishly long, 1960s Chrysler Imperial long. It it is low. It is wide. It is damn good looking.

    But they seem to have fallen short of the mark. The interior doesn’t look premium enough. The road and engine noise level don’t sound premium enough (if you’re going to make me take a 4-banger, don’t make me hear it drone). The option pricing makes this a far more expensive car than it first appears (for example, it costs extra for any color but refrigerator white). There are no screamin’ deals on the website—in fact no lease price is offered at all. The AWD totally hoses MPG, blunts acceleration, and raises the price—and offers nothing in return, since the car sits too low for shoppers who actively desire AWD.

    Drop the standard AWD. Use the dough to make the base car better equipped and better isolated. Offer a teaser lease to get us into it.

    Or really do something radical and drop a Voltec powertrain into this thing. It’s wide enough you could run the T-shaped pack down the middle of the cabin no problem, and having 300+ lb ft of torque at 0 RPM would be sweet. And it would be a good way to counter Honda Clarity PHEV, which is eating the Chevy Volt’s lunch because Honda actually listened to shoppers and made the upgrades Chevy failed to make in the second-gen car: more room, better materials, softer ride. If you’re going to have a very low volume car anyway, may as well go balls to the wall and make it unlike any other in the world.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • forward_look: There’s only two problems with living in New York: politics and rust. Car life is measured in...
  • redapple: Hatch struts still work? W T Fudge? My sawed off broomstick handle was always in the back.
  • kosmo: “How’s that Ranger Raptor coming, Ford? Oh, it isn’t? I see. Thanks for the mobility scooter,...
  • dividebytube: When I’m down south I’m taken aback by the number of decent looking old trucks and even G...
  • redapple: RED…. Great catch. Love it.

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States