By on July 30, 2018

As you might imagine, nobody at Buick is keen for me to review their cars lately. It’s a shame, because there’s not necessarily a correlation between the quality of the cars that bear the “Buick” logo and the failure of the Buick business model in the United States (to recap, move Encore and Enclave to GMC, kill the rest of the brand with fire).

But no matter — we have access to our own Buick, thanks to the lovely Luisa and the Encore Preferred she recently leased. So I decided to put a few hundred miles behind the wheel of the Opel Mokka Encore and give you guys the lowdown.

Spoiler alert: it’s not terrible. In fact, for the price, it’s downright good. Click the jump for more.

Luisa’s requirements for her first car were pretty simple: she wanted to sit up higher for (perceived) safety, she wanted to be able to get good gas mileage, and she needed to be able to transport small children in the back seat, as she works in the pre-K education space. Lu had checked out all of the models in the segment at the New York Auto Show earlier in the year and put together a list of the cars she liked. Encore wasn’t on her original list, but it’s Mokka stablemate, the Chevy trax, was — she hadn’t even gone to the Buick display in New York, since it wasn’t a brand she was familiar with.

Since she had never owned a car and had only recently acquired a license, she wasn’t able to draw any real comparisons between the Encore and the other competing models, which is why she invited me to come along for test drives.

[Get new and used Buick Encore pricing here!]

As I mentioned in our last Death Watch installment, we checked out the Honda HR-V and the Hyundai Kona before looking at the Encore. We drove the Honda and found it lacking in many ways — even though we tested an EX-L model that was likely above her desired price point, the HR-V felt cheap. The interior was cobbled together from a variety of unattractive plastics, and the motor/CVT combo was painfully lacking in power or torque.

The Kona was worse. The suspension was brutally rough, which is critically important on the less-than-stellar surface streets of Miami-Dade. While I’ve read a lot of glowing reviews about how the 1.6 turbo worked on the roads of Hawaii, the base 2.0 four-banger felt sluggish. Plus, Luisa couldn’t get past the bizarre visuals of the Hyundai’s exterior.

So the Encore was the winner, thanks to its more pleasing styling (beauty is in the eye of the beholder here), upscale-feeling interior, Apple CarPlay, and more responsive motor/transmission combo. The other requirement that she had was being able to transport children. A rear-facing child seat fits, if not entirely easily, in the middle seat, but you can’t fit anybody else back there when the seat is installed, so it’s a one-child solution. For Luisa’s purpose, that’s not a problem, but anybody with two kids in child seats would have issues.

Plus, let’s be honest — the fact that Buick is giving the things away on leases didn’t hurt. Lu’s neighbor is leasing an HR-V for $349 a month, and he jealously eyes the Encore and its $200 price tag every day (and also Lu). She’s had it for three months now and she loves driving it every day, and her friends are all saying that they’ll be getting one as soon as they can. Great.

But it’s easy to impress somebody who’s never had a car before. What about a jaded old man who can find fault with just about anything? Enter the Bark.

Interior

First things first — I have to admit I like the seating position and the ergonomics of the Encore. It’s just an easy car to drive. Forward visibility is superb, and while rear visibility isn’t exactly what you would want, it’s sufficient. Everything about the layout of the interior is intuitive. The touchscreen works perfectly for Apple CarPlay, but there are real knobs and buttons for volume and track advance functions, which is the right combination for me.

In fact, the CarPlay integration has been the most flawless of any car I’ve seen. Certainly that could be specific to this one VIN, but I’ve never had issues with CarPlay in the Encore finding my device, regardless of the multiple cables I’ve tried. The sound system is best described as “above adequate.” Everything from Shakira to Wes Montgomery to Vulfpeck translates fairly well, and Spotify runs flawlessly from the touchscreen.

Daily Driving

Generally speaking, the Encore is a nice place to be in Miami traffic. The air conditioning works well and it cools down the all-black interior quickly. Road noise is surprisingly low for such a small car, and the tire noise is limited. The adjustability of the driver’s seat is such that there’s no difficulty switching between 5’3″ Luisa and 5’9″ Bark, and lumbar support is similarly easy to adjust.

For the surface streets of Miami, the Encore is ideal. The small size of the baby crossover means it’s easy to sneak into the rapidly disappearing gaps in traffic for those difficult lane changes. I genuinely like the speed and feel of the steering rack — it’s light and easy but still precise enough for quick maneuvers. Parking is a breeze, as well, and the rearview camera is positioned well for good visibility.

Highway driving becomes more problematic. First and foremost, other drivers treat the Encore like the little kid on the playground — you quickly get used to people cutting you off and shoving in front of you in merges. You don’t really have enough power to fight back, either. While the little Mokka is a tad more spritely than the competition, it’s not ready to do battle on the Palmetto. When you drive an Encore, you are forced into the role of defensive driver at higher speeds, as you simply lack the available juice to drive your way out of trouble. And since this is TTAC and y’all are likely to ascribe the political belief of your choice to me in the comments, regardless of the validity of the statement I’m about to make, I’ll give you the following trigger warning:

What I’m about to say may make you call me a sexist. Good? Here we go.

I have never seen another man behind the wheel of an Encore. There’s no readily available sales data on this, but I would wager that Encore buyers are at least 70 percent female. I have to wonder if that’s why men seem to drive so aggressively in my general vicinity when I’m behind the wheel — I often see shocked looks on the face of other drivers when they realize the person they’ve honking at non-stop is, in fact, a dude.

Fuel Economy In the Real World

Regardless, that lack of juice doesn’t come with the commensurate economical benefit. Most of Lu’s driving has been around the streets of Coconut Grove and Coral Gables —she’s not entirely comfortable with doing battle on the highway yet. While there’s no doubt that some highway driving would help pump up her economy, thus far she’s averaged about 21.3 mpg over the 1600 or so miles that she’s had the car—comparable to what you’d see from, say, a Boss 302. This is a far cry from the EPA estimates of 30 mpg combined or even 25 mpg city. Because Lu isn’t a high volume mileage driver, she hasn’t worried too much about this — yet. Safe to say that with my typically heavy foot, I didn’t see any improvement during the time that I drove her car.

The Verdict

Ultimately, when you evaluate the Encore, you have to take into account the fact that it can be leased for the same payment you’d have for buying a $6,000 used car over 36 months. Of course, you’d own that used car at the end of the 36 months, but you’d also run the risk of having unexpected repairs, and you’d likely have to replace brakes and tires on any car at that price point.

With the Encore, you’ll have a car with above average reliability that’s relatively pleasant to drive (in comparison to other sub-compact CUVs) for $200 a month. For me, it’s enough to declare that the Encore is a good value, and for Buick, that value prop’s been enough thus far to make the Encore their volume model (they’ve sold more Encores than Envisions and Enclaves combined) — the prospect of a attractive car with several standard features that can be leased at a bargain price.

Is it enough reason to keep Buick alive? Of course not. Would I own one? No. But is it a good car? Yes.

[Images: Mark “Bark M.” Baruth/TTAC]

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92 Comments on “2018 Buick Encore Preferred Review – Bark Reviews What He Wants...”


  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    1) Is Chev offering comparable values on the Trax?
    2) If so, then how do the 2 siblings compare?
    3) We now know how the Encore compares to the Kona and HR-V. What about a comparison with the Soul?

    Thanks (in advance).

    • 0 avatar
      Thatkat09

      The Encore has a much better interior, most notably padded armrests. You can also get an upgraded 1.4T in the Encore that makes acceleration downright peppy that you cant get in a Trax. As for a lower monthly payment, the Trax wins. I’m also in south Florida and I’ve yet to see an actual Encore lease for 0 down, 200 a month. I have seen 0 down, 200 a month Trax leases though.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    IT’S A CAR!

    Actually the loaded Encore tempted my wife back when she eventually bought a 2016 Terrain at the turn of the 16-17 calendar year. The Buick had so many toys (like heated seats etc) and AWD plus $5K off from GM but ultimately having extra space was the greater luxury.

    I have driven the base version with the base 138 hp engine when my wife was given one as a service loaner. That was a miserable little box that made her old 2005 Vibe look highly desirable.

  • avatar
    Coopdeville

    No issue with the review, but I take issue with you repeating that this is a “$200 a month” car. This isn’t a $200 per month car for a normal person, and so that shouldn’t be a part of your general consumer review. After visiting the story you linked and which I had missed originally:

    “her roommate had a Mini Cooper parked at the same address. Ding! The dealer was willing to accept it…After some final haggling from her friend Bark (that’s me), which included a lot of screaming and yelling, walking away from the deal several times, and signing the final paperwork at 11:30 p.m. (thirty minutes before the rebates expired)…”

    Those are not the actions of a typical consumer, nor should they have to be, and the dealer even allegedly appeared willing to commit fraud in order to get a rebate the consumer didn’t qualify for. (Maybe the rules on those rebates have changed since I was in the game, but woe to the person at our store who tried to submit for that dealer cash without a properly titled prior registration as proof. We even ran into problems with name changes due to marriage, etc.)

    I can recall plenty of 10:30 signings on the last day of the month, but 11:30? No, we would have closed long before that. I would either have been willing to shake your hand much, much sooner, or would have have politely explained that we were open again tomorrow at 9. I can’t decide if that dealer REALLY needed that last car in order to make their corporate per-unit incentive (in which case, again, take your loss and close the deal early in order to lock the deal down) or really didn’t need it at all (in which case, why in the ever loving #^&% did you stay open til 11:30 to make a loser deal you didn’t need?)

    Either way, thank you for reminding me why I left that soul-sucking business behind.

    • 0 avatar

      A car is whatever the transaction price is. True Market Value for an Encore is less than invoice. Rebates aplenty. It’s a $200 car. If somebody else is foolish enough to pay more for it…well, that’s on them.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        I keep hearing a commercial on the radio from a local Buick-GMC dealer. It always makes me laugh.

        “We’ve NEVER been able to offer 40% off a new vehicle before!” (in reference to an Encore)

        Because you’ve never had one priced at 40% above what people are willing to pay for it. Unless they had Pontiac back in the day and had an Aztec or two…

        • 0 avatar
          dwford

          The discounts are getting crazy. I got similar discounts on my Chevy Cruze. By the time you add up the dealer discount, regular rebate, GM financial rebate, owner loyalty/competitive owner rebate and GM Card points, you’re approaching 1/2 price.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “If somebody else is foolish enough to pay more for it…well, that’s on them.”

        Where does Joe Six Pack have access to actual ATP data (assuming they even know what it is)? I can calculate depreciation curves and true market value when I’m given enough data but without data I can’t see the average prole understanding the true value on new vehicles. In this respect Coopdeville has a point.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/12/86-year-old-african-american-woman-charged-sticker-last-years-buick/

      Head on a swivel grandma.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Surprised you didn’t tell the BB the price she paid as that is what you negoiate.

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      The Buick dealer down the road is offering the “Preferred” trim on a 39 month lease for $199.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        With how much money down? How many miles per year?

        An aside: I never saw the point of a 39 month lease–you pay another full year’s registration on the car in exchange for three more paid months of use, and in many states the cost of another year’s registration exceeds the savings from stretching the price out by three months.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        And at lease end when she returns there will be another +$1,500 in lease loyalty waiting her.

    • 0 avatar
      seanx37

      No, it’s not. It is a $179 a month car. OR less. Dealers practically give these things away. Of course, I live in Warren. And sticker prices are…humorous suggestions.

    • 0 avatar
      ma1234

      You’re right, it’s not a $200/month car. Closer to a $175/month car since they often lease for less.

      Also, zero fraud was committed, because those incentives are based on household. Doesn’t matter if the Mini is registered to a roommate, it’s the same household and that’s how GM defines it.

  • avatar
    dwford

    So what you’re saying is that those girls in the Buick commercials actually exist? Who knew…

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I think they may have been startled that you were young, as much as male. Over here on the God’s Waiting Room side of FL, these are a choice geezer-mobile. I can see two of them parked in neighbors driveways as I type this. Old folks know a bargain when they see one.

    What magic does Ford do that lets a Mustang get 20+mpg in Miami traffic? I just spent a week in suburban LA with a Hemi Charger, and even with my usual extremely light-footed because I have no idea where I am rentalcar driving style, I got *14.5mpg* over about 150 miles. And I only really sat in stop-and-go traffic for maybe 15 minutes total.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      That 20+ figure has to include highway miles. My life time figure is sitting right at 19.0 with 20K miles. It can do high 20’s on the highway, but city driving is as bad for mileage as you’d think.

    • 0 avatar
      Johnster

      I agree with them being the car of choice for senior citizens. That’s who I see driving them. I imagine partly it is because they can no longer get a LeSabre or Century and can’t really afford a LaCrosse or Enclave, or even a Regal or Envision.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        A new LaCrosse starts at $29k. A 2001 LeSabre started at around $24k, which is equivalent to over $34k today. So, a new LaCrosse is cheaper than a new LeSabre was (although not as cheap as a deeply-discounted Encore), and its a far better car with more equipment.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “and its a far better car”

          Let’s not get carried away here.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            Besides the 3800 what else is there?

            A left rear quarter panel that will rust around the fuel door? An interior that eventually peels? Or a battery that is stupidly placed UNDER the back seat?

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “the 3800”

            That.

            And the bench seat.
            And more interior and cargo volume.
            And a better trunk opening.
            And an engine that won’t turn off at each stop sign.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            No one cares about bench seats. Just like they don’t care about wagons, a decrease in interior volume, diesel car engines or cargo room. Imagine the horror when “traditionalists” find out that the Encore is from South Korea and the Envision is from China.

            The last Buick was built in June of `99. Everything after that has been poorly built, including the rust bucket 2000-2005 LeSabre.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            K.
            Got it. I’ll save the bandwidth next time.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            The 00-’05 had fewer Chinese parts and an engine that won’t stretch the timing chain. But nor will I disagree with SC5door’s comment that things went horribly wrong after ’99 as far as the Lesabre is concerned in terms of quality and styling (inside and out). If you’re gonna go old school GM H body, get one of the good ones.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “I have never seen another man behind the wheel of an Encore”

    Around here I see lots of men driving Encores, none under 70, but men just the same. These are so popular with seniors around here I’m wondering if there’s an octogenarian rebate available. Hell, if Buick would send my 90 year old mother a regular looking grocery store coupon for 15% off she’d buy one in a second

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    I’m not surprised at the rather low city driving MPG. With only 1600 miles on the clock mileage won’t be as good until everything wears in and the transmission adjusts and learns over time. Most folks I have spoke with that own one of these with more mileage have reported figures ranging from 22.4 in all city driving to over 32 on the open road and mid to high 20’s in between. It’s still an SUV after all but of smaller proportions.

  • avatar
    mjg82

    If not for the lacklustre horsepower and mileage, I’m a dude that would consider one of these. I’ve always found them really attractive with respect to the class of vehicle, and I like the seating position. My upstairs neighbour just replaced her Beetle with one of them last week, and my partner said he’d like something like that to replace his Rio hatch. I wouldn’t sway him away from that decision.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      I’d guess the combination of bad aerodynamics and deficient power accounts for the bad gas mileage. I notice lately that Civic and even Accord size cars can get similar MPG, especially on the highway, compared to minicars. You save on price when you buy a box on wheels, but you don’t necessarily save on gas.

      RE GM’s in general (no pun intended), I think a lease rather than purchase is the appropriate way to acquire them. When you look at the Consumer Reports tables on long-term reliability, there’s a worrying tendency for every part of every GM vehicle to start going into chronic failure around the 5- to 7-year mark. I attribute this to the company’s long-term policy of squeezing component suppliers rather than sustaining mutually beneficial relationships with them. Nissan and the other American makers do this too; Toyota and Honda don’t. I don’t know what the Koreans do, although longevity doesn’t seem to be a strong point for them either, 10/100 warranty notwithstanding.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        Fuelly has the Encore at 26-27 in mixed driving.

      • 0 avatar
        mjg82

        I trust south Korean reliability just fine, anyone I know with a mid-00’s or newer SK car have been satisfied. My moms 08 Tiburon has been flawless and I’m testing reliability for myself in a ’15 Optima turbo now. Flawless so far but any 3yr old car should be.

        My’ 05 Buick Allure definitely had wonky electrical issues around year 9 but nothing to leave me stranded. My sis still drives it and her mechanic husband has worked out a lot of the bugs. It was easy more problematic than my ’02 Regal.

        • 0 avatar
          SC5door

          The 2.0T and 2.4 Theta II family are absolute pigs with fuel. It’s why Hyundai went the other route with the Tucson and used the 1.6T and then screwed up the 7 speed DCT. I average 27-28 in my Chicago commute. (dropped for 2019 for the NA 2.4)

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Go to Buickforums to see most are in the middle 30’s in daily driving. We could see almost 40 mpg at 60 mph…with AWD.

      • 0 avatar
        mjg82

        I get about 21 mpg mixed with my Optima with the 2.0, driving it hard in sport mode. I don’t imagine I could muster up anything in the 30’s with as hard as I’d have to thrash the Encore to enjoy it. But it’s still pretty.

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      If only they’d put the 3.6 in it, it would really move.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I would drop all derision of this thing if there was a 3.6 option. That would just be gloriously ridiculous.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          The big engine, tiny SUV combo is fun. Remember the Saturn Vue Redline? In place of the standard 130 hp I4, they put a 260 hp Honda V6. Literally twice the power. Unfortunately the great engine mostly served to highlight how disappointing the rest of the car was. (If your engine mounts are so bad that they make a Honda V6 resonate and vibrate through the cabin, on a brand-new dealer demo no less, it’s time to give up.)

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      2017 Accord is big, comfortable and makes 40mpg highway. Why buy this?

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        I’d say it was the ride height, but really it’s just trendy to have a crossover. Even a lame crossover is better than a good sedan in the eyes of many people. Most women I know want nothing to do with sedans anymore. The main reason to buy a crossover is because that’s what everyone else has.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        How could anyone choose a vehicle that you don’t like? The nerve of these people! Buying what they like instead of clearing it with you first. Sheesh.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        The Accord is almost a full two feet (23.7″) longer than the Encore, and it’s 3.4″ in wider. That matters if you deal with narrow streets or tight parking with any regularity. I’m 5’10”, and the the Encore has one of the smallest footprints of any vehicle that passes my “sit behind myself” test.

        Yeah, I’d prefer a city-friendly car that’s packaged more like an E70 Corolla (if RWD) or a Fiat 128 (if FWD), but there’s not a lot on the market like that now. I haven’t sat in it, but I imagine the Mk7 Golf comes closest.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Featherston,

          good point. I lived in Boston for whole month this year. And had to street-park. Smaller cars definitely have advantage. But at the same time, I always thought that if you’re city person, you park your car once and then go to work on a public transportation. In fact, my friends in NY do just that. They are weekend drivers. Their car is there for trips, not commute. In this case, who cares what size it is. Bigger – better. You can push over all these Encors to the side.

      • 0 avatar
        ShoogyBee

        Ride height, ease of ingress/egress. In fact, the 2018 Accord (and Camry, for that matter) has a lower hip point than the previous generation.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      There is an older lady I know who lives just around the corner from me, she has a first gen New Beetle. I have thought of an Encore for her. It seems like the perfect choice given she wants more practically (and cheaper service) and liked her Rendezvous she had before the beetle (her husband that she is now separated from had talked her into trading it in, he’s of the mentality that a car is used up at 100k miles, and in that case, he might’ve been right although I don’t believe it was problematic for her, surprisingly enough).

      Given the heavy discounts, the decent interior and the seating position, it seems just perfect for her.

      • 0 avatar
        mjg82

        She was swapping her Beetle for her friends 03 Jetta Wagon when she needed a bigger car, right up til the week before she got the Encore. On top of swapping cars pretty often she has a big dog that she’d get into the backseat of the Beetle, which always looked ridiculous. Not surprised to see her finally upgrade and by all accounts it seems like the ideal trade up.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I wondered why anyone would buy one of these – until I saw my dad try to sit behind the wheel of my recently bought Mustang. It was a lot of moaning and complaining as he had to swing his legs under the steering wheel.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Out of curiosity I added up all the money I’ve paid for cars and came up with $203/mo over a 50 year period. Less if you consider trade in. I can say with authority that none of them were as boring as this SUV even if Car Play works great.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    “She’s had it for three months now and she loves driving it every day, and her friends are all saying that they’ll be getting one as soon as they can.”

    What a stupid mentality – My friend jumped off the cliff. I should do same thing

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Assuming that’s what happened is a “stupid mentality” as well. You mean you’ve NEVER driven someone else’s car and liked it, or used a product they used and found it useful?

      Because people aren’t allowed to form an opinion based on experience with what someone else has first? Maybe they like her vehicle and it has swayed them into thinking about one for themselves.

      One of my cousins is a 20 year old female, she drove my other cousin’s wife’s 2016 Accord Sport on a road trip, and loved it, so she bought one of her own (albeit used and a couple of years older) a few weeks later. She liked how the car drove, the style, the interior and the gas mileage, so she decided based on that experience that it was the car for her. It isn’t blindly playing “follow the leader” necessarily, it could just be that they discovered that they really like the car after being in hers, just like my cousin.

      Excuse my interruption of your judgement of these people you don’t know. You may now resume calling them stupid because they happen to like her Buick.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Dear John,

        I appreciate your reminder that we all have freedom of choice. Now. If you follow narrative closely, you will note that neither the main character, nor supporting cast have much of experience in cars. But they have great experience of herd mentality, I am sure. You know, in this imagined context, assuming they saw the car and they gonna buy one – free people, right? They could go over to many dealers and check other cars and see, may be there is something they like better? You see, something’s missing. Missing part is – hey, I like your car and will consider it – no, it says – “they’ll be getting one as soon as they can”.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          And that makes them stupid? None of what you said takes away from my point that perhaps they like her car enough to get one for themselves. I don’t find that stupid at all.

          Like you said, these are not car people. They’re not interested in testing out all different types of vehicles from different manufacturers, they could care less about spending weeks researching and debating what to buy. They’d be more likely to wonder on to a [insert make that isn’t Buick here] lot and end up with a [insert model here] that they wouldn’t like nearly as much as they do her Encore.

          We are car people, we make decisions based on many variables and its hard to understand a person who doesn’t think that way. Most of her peers probably wouldn’t have thought about a Buick in a million years, yet they were exposed to one by her having one, and found that it was a viable choice that works well for what they want and/or need.

          I take issue with you assuming this is a “stupid mentality”, it may be ignorant, but even that word is too negative IMO. They discovered that they like this vehicle after seeing (riding in? driving?) hers. For anyone, that isn’t stupid, its what we’d call word-of-mouth advertising/exposure.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Ok, I can replace “stupid” with “uneducated”. And still will laugh of these idiots (for not getting educated). I always say this – if you buying a house, you need to learn how. Buying a car – learn how. If you don’t learn – you’re stupid. Brain develops with learning and degrades without it.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    About your “sexist” apologetic statement.

    I can’t believe that Americans willingly turned this country into Soviet Union – totalitarian state where you better watch what you say. Just say it, god [email protected] Be a man and be careless what these feminist m0r0ns have to say about.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Turbo gas mileage is very tricky. I had a Golf TSI rental for a week and it got ~30MPG combined. With the same lead foot on the same commute I’m doing about ~20MPG in my Optima SX-L. They’re supposed to be within ~3MPG of each other at both ends.

    I was going to suggest that maybe it’s due to a difference in lbs per car per lb of displacement but they’re close (1.6lb/cc vs 1.7lb/cc). Who the hell knows. In any case I’d definitely look up real world gas figures. EPA figures are pretty much useless. C&D’s numbers seem to match mine to the tee.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Considering your name and turbo engines. I really don’t know what Honda is doing? 2017 Accord literally makes 40mpg on highway and even more in 45-50mph driving. It reported by CR that new 1.5T scored 2mpg less than 2.5L Mazda6.
      Turbos definitely funky stuff. They make cars quick and EPA -friendly. but…

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        If there are no compelling EV/PHEV options my next car will probably be a Civic 1.5T. Especially if they give it an Insight like MMC facelift. 10th gen Accord is too big/long.

        Gas mileage is nasty though. My boss has an Accord 2.0T and gets about 30MPG on basically the same commute.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      The H/K Theta II engines are gas hogs, especially behind the 6 speed auto. Soon to be replaced by another engine family. The 1.6T puts out comparable numbers to the 2.4 and wipes the floor with it on fuel economy even with the turbo.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    The one person I know who owns this is a married guy in his 30’s with two small kids. He lives in a dense urban area, and I think it’s their only car. Seems to work for them, but I know he misses his VW.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Bark/Mark said he got weird looks driving this but I see little dudes like him behind the wheel of these in the Metro Detroit area all the time.

    And by the way, these are LEGITIMATELY $109 to $129, $0 down sign and drive perpetual lease specials in the Metro Detroit area.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Hi John!

    I missed your inevitable 300 posts Friday night, Saturday and Sunday, as I literally got home at 10:35 pm last night from a really nice weekend up on Glen Lake.

    Did you have a nice weekend?

  • avatar
    Dingleberrypiez_Returns

    Even with the numbers quoted, this isn’t comparable to a $6,000 used car, and its disingenuous to present it as such. First of all, $200/month over 36 months is $7,200, not $6,000. Second, what are the transaction costs? and insurance costs compared to a used car? And most obvious of all, your paying for the $7,200 of depreciation over 36 months, not $7,200 worth of car.

    I’m not saying it’s a bad value, but Bark’s predisposition and bias towards buying new stands out in nearly every review or car buying piece of advice he writes… same thing (albeit to a lesser degree) from his bro.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    “I often see shocked looks on the face of other drivers when they realize the person they’ve honking at non-stop is, in fact, a dude.”

    Maybe a haircut and a gym membership might help with that?

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Is Luisa a “woman of a certain age”? (I can’t quite tell from the post)

    Encores around here are overwhelmingly driven by such. I count four in the admins parking lot where I work, I know three of them are piloted by these women. Not sure about the fourth. Don’t really care…

    Living in GM Country™, it’s hard to tell sometimes whether the cars are a good deal, or if everyone is buying because of their friends and family discounts.

    I’m glad to see that it worked out for Luisa, no matter what.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    “Buick” in the title; I expected a great many more “Fountains of Normgasms”.

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