2019 Subaru Crosstrek Plug-in: Heartbreak in Colorado, Rejoicing in Vermont

Steph Willems
by Steph Willems
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2019 subaru crosstrek plug in heartbreak in colorado rejoicing in vermont

Specialty green models don’t normally end up in lots across the country, at least not initially, and the upcoming Subaru Crosstrek plug-in hybrid is no different.

The resurrected green variant of the wildly popular Crosstrek, which bit the dust following slow sales in 2016, appears late this year as a 2019 model, only this time with real all-electric range and a corresponding plug. It’s a model born of the automaker’s partnership with Toyota, and the Crosstrek PHEV borrows powertrain components from the plug-in Prius Prime. (Whether it’s a direct carryover remains to be seen.)

As your author noted on Twitter the other day, this model seems tailor made to become the darling of hip, achingly progressive enclaves everywhere. While that could one day be the case, four-fifths of U.S. states won’t see the model upon its roll-out.

According to the Colorado Springs Gazette (via Torque News), only California and the nine other states that signed on to its zero-emission vehicle (ZEV) mandate stand to get the Crosstrek PHEV. Interested would-be buyers in the majestic, Subaru-friendly state of Colorado are reportedly dismayed to learn their local dealer won’t stock them.

Will Toor, transportation program director for the Southwest Energy Efficiency Project — an organization devoted to improving energy efficiency in a six-state region — isn’t pleased.

“Despite the fact that Colorado has some of the strongest consumer demand for electric vehicles, most car manufacturers don’t sell all their electric models here,” Toor said. “States that have adopted zero emission standard get up to three times as many models. The new plug-in hybrid Subaru Crosstrek is a great example.”

No ZEV law, no Crosstrek plug-in. That’s what Subaru meant when it described the model’s “limited availability.” It’s still better than BEVs like the Honda Clarity and Hyundai Ioniq, which, for now, only reside in California (or in the case of the Clarity EV, California and Oregon.)

Buyers in many other states, however, will get their wish. They include California, Connecticut, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Surely, demand will be fierce in Portland and Burlington. You’re out of luck if you live north of the border, though Subaru Canada claims its parent corp. is considering introducing it outside of the U.S., Autotrader reports.

A full list of specs and pricing will arrive closer to the lifted hatchback’s on-sale date.

[Image: Subaru]

Steph Willems
Steph Willems

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  • Night driver Night driver on May 22, 2018

    @derekson - the first compliance PHEV was the Prius Plug-in, which sold from 2012 to 2015. The current Prius PHEV, the Prime, is sold in all 50 states and Canada.

  • Cimarron typeR Cimarron typeR on May 22, 2018

    Sheesh, just buy an Outlander PHEV, and get more cargo room for the hemp wares.

  • Carsofchaos The bike lanes aren't even close to carrying "more than the car lanes replaced". You clearly don't drive in Midtown Manhattan on a daily like I do.
  • Carsofchaos The problem with congestion, dear friends, is not the cars per se. I drive into the city daily and the problem is this:Your average street in the area used to be 4 lanes. Now it is a bus lane, a bike lane (now you're down to two lanes), then you have delivery trucks double parking, along with the Uber and Lyft drivers also double parking. So your 4 lane avenue is now a 1.5 lane avenue. Do you now see the problem? Congestion pricing will fix none of these things....what it WILL do is fund persion plans.
  • FreedMike Many F150s I encounter are autonomously driven...and by that I mean they're driving themselves because the dips**ts at the wheel are paying attention to everything else but the road.
  • Tassos A "small car", TIM????????????This is the GLE. Have you even ever SEEN the huge thing at a dealer's??? NOT even the GLC,and Merc has TWO classes even SMALLER than the C (The A and the B, you guessed it? You must be a GENIUS!).THe E is a "MIDSIZED" crossover, NOT A SMALL ONE BY ANY STRETCH OF THE IMAGINATION, oh CLUELESS one.I AM SICK AND TIRED OF THE NONSENSE you post here every god damned day.And I BET you will never even CORRECT your NONSENSE, much less APOLOGIZE for your cluelessness and unprofessionalism.
  • Stuki Moi "How do you take a small crossover and make it better?Slap the AMG badge on it and give it the AMG treatment."No, you don't.In fact, that is specifically what you do NOT do.Huge, frail wheels, and postage stamp sidewalls, do nothing but make overly tall cuvs tramline and judder. And render them even less useful across the few surfaces where they could conceivably have an advantage over more properly dimensioned cars. And: Small cuvs have pitiful enough fuel range as it is, even with more sensible engines.Instead, to make a small CUV better, you 1)make it a lower slung wagon. And only then give it the AMG treatment. AMG'ing, makes sense for the E class. And these days with larger cars, even the C class. For the S class, it never made sense, aside from the sheer aural visceralness of the last NA V8. The E-class is the center of AMG. Even the C-class, rarely touches the M3.Or 2) You give it the Raptor/Baja treatment. Massive, hypersophisticated suspension travel allowing landing meaningful jumps. As well as driving up and down wide enough stairs if desired. That's a kind of driving for which a taller stance, and IFS/IRS, makes sense.Attempting to turn a CUV into some sort of a laptime wonder, makes about as much sense as putting an America's Cup rig atop a ten deck cruiseship.
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