By on May 7, 2018

2017 Chevy Colorado ZR2

About a month ago, we asked which cars you thought would be most unlikely to turn a wheel on their namesake soil. The B&B offered up a lot of good answers … including the entire Saturn and Mercury brands. Hardy har har. Very funny, guys.

Today, let’s flip it around. What model is most likely to be found in the place for which it is named? Given the image above, it’s clear I’m going with an obvious choice.

Americans love their trucks, even midsizers like the Colorado. While we have no idea how many Colorado pickups The General sold last month — thanks to a company now playing its sales numbers close to its chest — we can say the model finished last year just four trucks shy of putting 113,000 new units on the road, a 4 percent increase over 2016.

This is a number nearly quadruples the volume of its Canyon brother, a model moving at the speed of glacier progression in comparison with the Colorado. This mystifies your author on the same level as the Caramilk secret and Will Farrell’s popularity. The chances of finding a Colorado in Colorado is very high.

ferrariportofino02

Another model equally likely (but on the other end of the automotive scale) to be found in its namesake is Ferrari’s fantabulously new Portofino. The 591 hp twin-turbo hardtop convertible begs to be driven on Italian roadways, an environment where it can soak up the curves and adoration of onlookers with equal abandon.

The powertrain is about all that’s carried over from the California T, a model whose front-end styling never seemed to jive with its bulbous rear. The Portofino, on the other hand, looks like a 7/8 scale Ferrari 812.

What’s your pick for a machine that is most likely to ply the roadways of the place for which it is named? I don’t think any of the planets are going to make the cut this time. A few of the continents, on the other hand….

[Images: General Motors, Ferrari]

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63 Comments on “QOTD: Which Cars Are Most Likely to be Found in Their Namesake Land?...”


  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I hear Subarus are popular in Australia. Perhaps it’s common to see an Outback in the Outback?

  • avatar
    mittencuh

    I don’t see a lot of Colorados here in Colorado. For every Colorado I see about 5 or 6 Tacomas. I’m originally from Tacoma, however, and there are a ton of Tacomas in Tacoma.

  • avatar
    tonyola

    A Chevrolet Biscayne in Miami near Biscayne Bay. At least that used to be the case.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Hmmm…. A Torino in Torino, not likely.
    A Falcon on a falcon? Only if the falcon does something stupid.
    A Mustang on a mustang? Ain’t no way. More likely the mustang would end up riding the Mustang, at least for a fraction of a second. Even so, not all that likely.
    A Cherokee in Cherokee? Absolutely. I’d bet on it.
    How about a Concord in Concord?
    A Silverado in Silverado?
    A Sierra in the Sierras?
    Maybe a Rio in Rio (more likely than you might think.)

  • avatar
    Matt Foley

    Charger Daytona in Daytona seems likely, as does a Hyundai Santa Fe in Santa Fe.

    Try as I might, I could not talk my wife into a rendezvous in her Rendezvous.

  • avatar
    Mitchell Leitman

    GMC Yukon and Acadia. Audi A4 (in any office carpark where letter size paper is known as A4 – i.e. outside North America). Seat Arona, Ibiza, Toledo, Leon and Alhambra. Finally, the Ssangyong Tivoli in Tivoli, Italy or near any of the gardens over Europe bearing the Tivoli name.

  • avatar
    CitizenK

    Buick LaCrosse in Wisconsin
    Hyundai Tuscon in Arizona
    Hyundai Sante Fe in New Mexico
    Mailbus are too downmarket for Malibu

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    This one’s easy- a Suburban in the suburbs.

  • avatar
    gtem

    The “America” trim levels of Chrysler’s 80s-90s stuff come to mind, but that’s a trim not specifically a model name.

    A bunch of Russian stuff is easy since they tended to patriotically name their cars after cities, oftentimes where the cars themselves were built:

    Volgas near cities on the Volga river, Moskvitches in Moscow (Moskvitch means “Muscovite,” ie an inhabitant of Moscow).

    Zaporozhets (the air cooled ZAZ 965/966/968) made in the Zaporozhie region of Southern Ukraine. They followed up with the water cooled FWD Tavria, which likewise corresponds to an area of Southern Ukraine.

    Zhiguli (internal market name for rwd Ladas) = mountains near the Volga river
    Lada Samara (FWD 4 door 2109) = region in Russia that the Volga river runs through, near the Tolyatti factory.

    Ural trucks are made in the Urals in factories moved there in the winter of ’41 to keep out of reach of German bombing.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Gtem, looking at a 1997 Maxima 5 speed that needs a clutch for cheap. It would probably be a keeper.

      Finally got down to my uncles and I can go get the 1971 F-100 anytime. I am arranging it for this week.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        Where would you get the clutch done? That’s not a cheap job at most shops unless you know a friendly indie. Coincidentally I am ALSO looking at a ’97 Maxima with a stick! A Georgia-fresh peach with 200k and zero rust in my case, in the fairly rare “Neptune Blue.” Seller’s north of me a few hours and seemed interested in some sort of trade for my Ranger until he realized I was that far away. It’s not a super clean one owner car and has a few odds and ends (exhaust, A/C, belt squeak) but for me the big thing is a total lack of rust, paint looks original and straight. I think older Maximas are really fun cars, with a stick in particular. People don’t realize how light the 4th gen cars are (sub 3k lbs). The original VQ30 is turbine smooth, makes great power all through the rev range, and is stone cold reliable aside from an occasional coil pack or injector as they get older. Timing chain to boot.
        They are really simple cars in general and cheap to keep going. Torsion beam out back, mac-strut in front. They dont’ ride as nice or feel anywhere as heavy or solidly built as a 90s Camry, but that is part of the appeal as far as being more engaging and fun to drive.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Well, I was going to do it myself. Since I don’t *necessarily* need it right away, I would fix it at my own pace, even if it takes a long time.

          I’ve been working on the Taurus a lot. It reminded me that I could use an extra car for when its taken apart or otherwise inoperative. There I was with the front bumper, grille, header panel, lights and the rear bumper off the car, and my cousin calls and tells me they’re cooking crawfish at his fishing camp. Uhhggg. Lol

          Anyway, I was looking at a 3/4 ton 1994 Silverado 4×4 that needs an engine, but that isn’t something I can do. I don’t even have an engine hoist. But, I believe the Maxima is doable. Problem is, its not close and I need to round up a truck and trailer to go get it. If I had that, I’d be there by now.

          The paint on this one isn’t great, but not terrible, the body looks fine and its a southern car, so no rust. It has cloth seats and a sunroof lol very Japanese. Also has 200k.

  • avatar
    Waterview

    Didn’t see a Capri in Capri . . . . .

  • avatar
    e30gator

    In the small, central Florida town of Sebring, I’d wager a bet that there are many, many derelict cloud-cars that were at some point bought cheaply for basic transportation and are now littering the yards and fields of homesteaders in various states of disrepair throughout the surrounding area.

  • avatar
    ernest

    Second easiest one, behind the Suburban. A Wrangler Rubicon in Moab, on the Rubicon Trail.

  • avatar
    RHD

    You might still find a Montana in Montana, and a Monterey in Monterey. There’s certainly an occasional Fiesta at a party. Someone in Lafayette surely has a Lafayette. And who wouldn’t love to drive an Alpine in the mountainous forests, or a LeMans at LeMans?

  • avatar
    ptschett

    I owned a Dodge Dakota for a dozen years in North Dakota. My dad still has his 2 Dakotas in South Dakota.
    My other car for a lot of that time was a Thunderbird. Consuming Thunderbird in a Thunderbird would be a bad idea.

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    It’s interesting how this worked with more upscale locales in the past- a Park Avenue on Park Avenue, a Fifth Avenue on Fifth Avenue, a Monterey in Monterey, etc. Nowadays it’s all rugged and outdoorsy, like a Sierra in the Sierras or a Sonoma in Somona. Funny how tastes change but the marketing gimmicks remain the same.

  • avatar
    deanst

    There is only one answer…

    I see Dodge Omnis…………everywhere.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    King Ranch

  • avatar
    jmo2

    RR Corniche?

  • avatar
    don1967

    Catera CTS, as seen reflected in the eyes of a 70-year-old.

  • avatar
    jeoff

    Guarantee you—if you find a Ford Galaxy (or Galaxie) it is in a galaxy (the Milky Way to be more specific).

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Guarantee you’ll find Accords in Accord, New York, and Tahoes at Lake Tahoe.

  • avatar
    arach

    I think the winner is Ford Probe. 95% of them have got to be at dump sites, eh?

    Diahatsu Charade is a joke everywhere you can find it.

  • avatar
    gtem

    I suppose some of the handful of surviving Diahatsu Rockys might be found in the Rocky Montain area. Tough and capable rigs by all accounts, but finding parts is a chore, no doubt.

  • avatar
    npaladin2000

    Anyone know if Robert drives a (de)Niro?

    I assume there’s a lot of Santa Fes in Santa Fe, and the Kona was introduced in Kona. Last time I was in Tucson I saw a decent number of Tucsons.

    I figure there are plenty of Tundras on the Tundra, and even more Tacomas in Washington.

    I’m pretty sure Suburbans live in the suburbs. But have any Malibus been shipped to Malibu? Any Cruzes on a Cruise Ship? Probably not.

  • avatar
    relton

    100% of the Ann Arbor cars manufactured are still seen in Ann Arbor, MI.

  • avatar
    azmtns

    You used to see quite a few Scottsdales in Scottsdale.

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    Sierras in the Sierra Nevada Mountains? (Maybe back in the heyday of the GM A-Bodies, the CIERA, as well!)

  • avatar
    Mitchell Leitman

    You definitely do NOT see a lot of Alfa Romeo Montreals in my hometown.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    El Camino

  • avatar
    PentastarPride

    (Dodge) Ram Laramie in Laramie, WY; Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo in Laredo, TX; and I’m sure there are a few Durangos in Durango, Mexico.

    Dakota in both of the Dakotas; Sebring in Sebring, FL.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      “I’m sure there are a few Durangos in Durango, Mexico.”

      I bet there’s a ton. The thing that stood out the most about my time in Mexico for work was just how saturated the roads were with 1990s American BOF SUVs, it’s like the cars made a run for the border back in ’08 during Cash for Clunkers. The ‘jellybean’ mid 90s Explorer is the single most common model, followed by the ZJ ’93-’98 Grand Cherokee, then 1st gen boxy Explorers, S10 Blazers, Durangos. It makes sense they were dirt cheap to buy in the US given the massive supply on the used market, and they stand up to the rigors of rural Mexico well enough, and parts are readily available, the OHV engines aren’t too picky about fuel quality.

      Man now I want to go back to Mexico.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        “Man now I want to go back to Mexico.”

        How ’bout I go for you?

        Ensenada for a couple of weeks fishing and scuba diving and maybe Cabo San Lucas relaxing with our #3 son for a week on the way home.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Rub it in why don’t you! :p

          I’d really like to go down there on my own time, I have a friend in Puerto Vallarta that I made through work, just need to find the time. The Baja peninsula is on my bucket list of places to visit as well, preferably in a 4wd of my own (or rented).

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            You’re better off renting, if you can afford it.

            Coming back into the US from Old Mexico is a REAL pain in the @ss! Even for US citizens.

            Customs (El Paso, San Ysidro) is very thorough on ALL vehicles since President Trump’s war on illegal drugs started, and they have been hugely successful in confiscating all sorts of stuff, some legal, some not.

            Then you have to worry about the Border Patrol stations within the first 100-mile range of the border.

            When you cross into the US driving your car from Old Mexico, they snap a picture of you and the car and your license plate, automatically.

            They do the same when you approach a Border Patrol station and because your license plate matches the one from the border, you get pulled over again for a search.

            That’s why we use Mexican vehicles with Mexican nationals as drivers when we go South.

            They pickup or drop us off at the Customs House and we walk across, OR they pickup or drive us to our destination in San Diego or El Paso and then they/we go back to Old Mexico.

            Smooth! No pain. All gain.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Bet you there are even more Durangos in Durango, Colorado.

      https://www.durango.org/

  • avatar
    Garrett

    All the Audi A-models can be found on the Autobahn, which is numbered A1, A2, etc.

    The El Camino is an obvious pick as well, since you can find them on The Road.

  • avatar
    Igloo

    Dodge or Chrysler Aspen in . . . ? Probably not.

  • avatar
    RHD

    Time for a vacation. We’ll drive an El Dorado in El Dorado Hills, climb Mt. Diablo in a Diablo, reach the summit in a Summit, then drive a City to the city, a Fifth Avenue on Fifth Avenue, and take a St. Regis to the St. Regis.
    The next morning it’s a Frontier along the border, cruising in a Windsor in Windsor, a Mulsanne in Mulsanne, a Monaco in Monaco, a Verona in Verona, and a Sapporo in Sapporo and finally, a Sienna in Siena (Italy).

    And is that a Mirage on the horizon, in the mirage, or is it a Horizon?

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    Don’t want to see a Tundra on tundra. It takes decades for tundra to repair the damage done to it by a Tundra.
    Years ago some tourist in a huge 4×4 got stuck off trail in tundra ing the Colorado San Juans . He got a big, fine, good!

  • avatar
    road_pizza

    I’m guessing the Victoria, BC police probably used Crown Victorias, so…..

    • 0 avatar
      Mitchell Leitman

      The newer cars used by the Victoria police have larger crowns on them, but you can just make out a Crown, in Victoria on a Crown Victoria: https://www.bclocalnews.com/news/update-man-hospitalized-in-mental-health-crisis-police-evacuate-victoria-hotel/

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