QOTD: Which Cars Are Least Likely to Be Found in Their Namesake Land?

Matthew Guy
by Matthew Guy
qotd which cars are least likely to be found in their namesake land

Sometimes, a car’s name accurately captures its spirit. Diablo. Testarossa. Golf. Okay, maybe not the last one. There are plenty of examples; even Silverado makes my list of machines whose identity matches the name carved into its trunk lid (or tailgate).

There are definitely some, though, that absolutely do not. This leads us to today’s question: what car (or truck) do you think is least likely to be found in the part of the world that bears its name?

First to mind? Corsica. A mundane sedan peddled by The General for nearly a decade from 1987 to 1996, it was the perfect four-door solution to insomnia, particularly equipped with the four-cylinder engine and a slushbox. On paper, V6 versions were sold with GM’s venerable 3.1-liter under the hood, an engine whose exhaust note ripped through the air with a distinctive roar. (I can attest to this – Ed.)

I’ve seen few in the wild, even when new. I can’t imagine seeing any at all in, y’know, actual Corsica.

The Dodge Monaco is another example, as I severely doubt any of the large-and-in-charge rear-drive versions could have even fit on the streets of Monaco, let alone navigate them. The rare-as-hen’s-teeth twin to the Eagle Premier, produced for four model years, is the exception, given it was loosely related to various Renault offerings as a result of the strange AMC/Renault/Chrysler love triangle of the era.

What others can you think of, B&B? We’ve started you with two — Corsica and Monaco — and now it’s your turn to rhyme off a few machines that will never turn a wheel in the part of the world for which they are named.

[Image: Murilee Martin/ TTAC]

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  • Big Al from Oz Big Al from Oz on Apr 17, 2018

    My BT50 Mazda probably has the best acronym (naming convention). BT means "Built in Thailand.

  • Pwrwrench Pwrwrench on Apr 17, 2018

    Someone got ahead on the Chevy Biscayne being somewhere near Biscayne Bay. Hopefully a mate from Down Under can tell us how many Subaru Outbacks are actually in the... Outback?

  • Arthur Dailey Ford was on a roll with these large cars. The preferred colours being either green or brown. The brown was particularly 'brougham'. Chrysler vehicles also seemed particularly popular in green during that era. Ford's 'aircraft' inspired instrument 'pod' for the driver rather than the 'flat' instrument panel was deemed 'futuristic' at the time. Note that this vehicle does not have the clock. The hands and numbers are missing. Having the radio controls on the left side of the driver could however be infuriating. Although I admire pop-up/hideaway headlights, Ford's vacuum powered system was indeed an issue. If I left my '78 T-Bird parked for more than about 12 hours, there was a good chance that when I returned the headlight covers had retracted. The first few times this happened it gave me a 'start' as I feared that I may have left the lights on and drained the battery.
  • Jeff S Still a nice car and I remember these very well especially in this shade of green. The headlights were vacuum controlled. I always liked the 67 thru 72 LTDs after that I found them bloated. Had a friend in college with a 2 door 71 LTD which I drove a couple of times it was a nice car.
  • John H Last week after 83 days, dealership said mine needs new engine now. They found metal in oil. Potential 8 to 9 month wait.
  • Dukeisduke An aunt and uncle of mine traded their '70 T-Bird (Beakbird) for a brand-new dark metallic green '75 LTD two-door, fully loaded. My uncle hated seat belts, so the first time I saw the car (it was so new that the '75 models had just landed at the dealerships) he proudly showed me how he'd pulled the front seat belts all the way out of their retractors, and cut the webbing with a razor blade(!).Just a year later, they traded it in for a new '76 Cadillac Coupe de Ville (they had owned a couple of Imperials in the '60s), and I imagine the Cadillac dealer took a chunk out to the trade-in, to get the front seat belts replaced.
  • CaddyDaddy Lease fodder that in 6 years will be on the 3rd owner in a poverty bound aspirational individual's backyard in a sub par neighborhood sinking into the dirt. The lending bank will not even want to repossess and take possession of this boat anchor of a toxic waste dump. This proves that EVs are not even close to being ready for prime time (let's not even talk about electrical infrastructure). EVs only exist in wildly expensive virtue signaling status-mobiles. FAIL! I know this is a Hybrid, but it's a Merc., so it will quickly die after the warranty. Show me a practical EV for the masses and I'll listen. At this time, Hybrids are about the way to go for most needing basic transportation.
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