By on April 30, 2018

Yesterday, Matt brought us a story about one Bhavesh Patel, a man who was found was sitting in the passenger seat of his Tesla Model S while his vehicle traveled down the motorway. He pleaded guilty and was slapped with a driving suspension, community service, and monetary fine.

Far from the only individual on this earth to take leave of their most basic common sense when behind the wheel, we’ve all seen people make questionable decisions on the road. Bonehead driving, applying Dame Edna levels of makeup, sketchy securing of a payload … there’s no shortage of road buffoonery.

Sometimes, vehicular hubris takes the simple form of venturing out when conditions are fit for neither man nor beast. A last blast of winter coated Toronto in a fine film of ice earlier this month. Despite local authorities and the constabulary pleading with drivers to stay home, no fewer than 1,600 crashes were reported in a single weekend. The vast majority of them involved people who ignored the warnings and hit the road when they could have stayed home.

Texting and driving is the current offense-du-jour, with estimates kicking around that a driver is 23 times more likely to get in a wreck once they pick up their smartphone. VW recently paired up with a Swedish marketing company to produce iPhone cases made out of sheetmetal from cars damaged in text ‘n drive mishaps. Given the predilection of drivers to continue stabbing their thumbs at a phone screen instead of paying attention to driving, they’ll surely have an inexhaustible supply of raw materials.

Dumb maneuvers, slapdash repairs, apathetic driving — we see it every day. What’s your example of egregious on-road activity?

[Image: Tesla]

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146 Comments on “QOTD: Who Are the Biggest Road Buffoons?...”


  • avatar
    chaparral

    It’s still the drunken drivers. At least a blast of the horn or the whir of the rumble strip can snap a texting or distracted driver out of the trance and back into the real world; a drunk will still be drunk when the adrenaline hits.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      At least in Ontario, that is not quite correct. As per 2017 reports by the Ontario Provincial Police: “inattentive driving is linked to more collisions on OPP-patrolled roads this year than speeding and alcohol or drug-related crashes combined”.

      http://toronto.citynews.ca/2017/08/30/distracting-driving-causing-crashes-speed-impairment-opp/

      Just one reason why autonomous vehicles are inevitable. Since the vast majority of car crashes are caused by human error, compounded by human stupidity and the inability of so many humans to learn from their mistakes or the mistakes of others, whereas software can be reprogrammed.

      The worst drivers for decades were found in Volvos. Being marketed as the safest vehicles, those with a fear of driving were most prone to buying them.

      Followed later by older people in Buicks. Many who could barely see over the steering wheel.

      Now I tend to agree, pick-up trucks. The driver tends to believe that their vehicles are very safe and therefore they can drive aggressively and take more chances. They seem unaware of how physics impacts driving.

      Congratulations on including a Dame Edna reference.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        Those old Buicks (and a lot of other old cars) had a big steering wheel you could look under. I always thought it was some kind of blue hair option, along with the perpetually blinking turn signal… dunno if it was special order from the factory or dealer installed.

    • 0 avatar

      DD is bad, but the “eyes down” I see all day every day is worse, overall. I’ve had to sit through two cycles of a light because each car now has an 8 second delay between “car ahead moves” and “finish texting”.

      When I was a kid, “hat” was the code. Big Buick or Big Caddy, old guy with “hat”, you knew it was 52/55 in a 80/55 zone all day.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    I’ll say most (not all) people driving brodozers.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      Well, those driving brodozers certainly have questionable taste, that is not necessarily buffoonery.

      I see drivers in brodozers as well as just regular pickups/full sized SUVS (that are massive barges in their own right without modification) attempting to push or intimidate traffic out of their way. If you are in a sedan and all you can see is a giant Bowtie, Blue Oval, GMC badge or RAM in your rearview….it can be quite intimidating. This is pretty poor behavior. I see it often and generally from huge vehicles, but certainly not everyone or even most in this vehicle class drives irresponsibly/aggressively.

      I would have to agree that the smartphone is the single biggest threat to road safety second only to a potential zombie apocalypse. Every day most of us get stuck behind someone who is simply too busy/preoccupied to drive. Easily identifiable from the lazy lane keeping, and hanging back from traffic an extra hundred yards.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        One of my coworkers does this. RAM 2500 diesel, lifted. Every time I see him he is tailgating. I drive aggressively as well but for my own sake I leave space… and my brakes work a lot better than his.

      • 0 avatar
        Darkdowgow

        Unsecured loads/distracted driversOnce followed a pickup carrying a bbq grill in the bed. Propane tank was loose. Fell off the back dragged for some time then broke loose. The moron following the pickup was not paying attention ,everyone else in all 3 lanes had slowed. Car following traps the tank under the bumper and drags it another 1/4 mile before it forced under the car enough to impact steering. Car slid off the road as the hwy swpet left. Tank did not blow up. As i could see both drivers at the start of this mess both were carefully watching their laps

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      I’m in FL. It’s ALL, not most.

      Yesterday I had one come up next to me at a light with the subwoofers turned up so loud the inside of MY car was vibrating and rattling. To say nothing of the insides of ME. They are a menace sitting still.

  • avatar
    Astigmatism

    Come on, guys, this is easy. The answer is clearly Nissan drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I was going to say Altima drivers, who are an especially bad breed of Nissan drivers. Unsignaled lane changes, drifting, swaying, braking for no reason; an Altima on the road is basically live action pinball game, and I’m trying to avoid being the bumper.

      Now, some might say these are rentals being driven by people unfamiliar with the car. But Altima chaos happens regardless of model year, and the rattier the car, the worse your odds. And those ratty old Altimas that have lost all their hubcaps surely aren’t rentals.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    There are tons of examples I can point to which I see every day. From people not turning their lights on when the conditions warrant it to people having no idea what high beams are actually for other than an extra set of headlights.

    But the thing that grinds my gears the most are people who are so focused on themselves that they make terrible decisions about when to pull into traffic. Specifically the person who pulls out in front of you at the last moment despite there being absolutely no one behind you.
    I pass the same intersection each morning where I need to be in the right of 3 lanes to make my upcoming turn. And people trying to turn right on red seem to think it’s ok to do so without even pretending to stop or at the very least pull out into a lane without a car approaching at speed. And if they would come to the required stop first, I would pass and they would have the whole road to themselves.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Yes, the needless path crosser is a pet peeve of mine as well. I can respect an aggressive but time saving left turn. But when there is nobody behind me, just wait! Won’t save you much time if you misjudge and we crash.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    In a thread sure to draw out every stereotype, just blame me instead.

    I’ve been in plenty of accidents, and ~90% of them have been my fault.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    “… was not wearing a seatbelt.” To me, it’s sorta like not putting your pants on before you leave the house. Apparently that’s not a universal sentiment.

    The iPhone case idea is a nice one, but I think it will be about as effective as the warnings and pictures on tobacco packaging.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    1. as someone who’s 51% of the time in the far right lane, bad lane discipline!

    2. People who **fly** down a lane that’s ending due to a merge and then can’t merge into traffic correctly.

    Saw an accident this weekend where a car speeding (+15mph faster than flow of traffic) down a merging lane clipped a car that was pulling into traffic. Oops.

    (no problem with drivers using every inch of pavement, just don’t be an idiot or jerk about it)

  • avatar
    Booick

    People who don’t keep up with traffic and people who dont know how to step on the gas when passing or merging onto the freeway.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      YES YES YES. Been noticing lots of people slowing down on the on ramps.

      HIT THE GAS YOU MORON! There’s a gap right there!

      • 0 avatar
        Alfisti

        There’s a million things I could add to this list but by far my biggest peeve are the slow on ramp drivers. It’s absolutely insane, they enter at 70 on a freeway doing 120 and you’re just gritting your teeth half expecting to be hit up the arse.

      • 0 avatar
        nlinesk8s

        +1. This one does seem to be primarily older drivers, who for some reason either have lost peripheral vision or gotten sloppy. I’ve twice seen people get within inches of a semi truck before noticing the 40FT TRAILER they had almost driven into. Geez.

      • 0 avatar

        the RIGHT….its the one on the RIGHT

    • 0 avatar
      sutherland555

      This! How on Earth do you expect to merge safely if you’re doing half the highway speed when you hit the end of the on-ramp merge lane. That’s just asking for an accident to happen.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I have this problem when I use radar cruise control. Sometimes it takes a while to “speed up” therefor my car blocks other people.

      Drives me nuts, but if I try to “overpower” it by hitting the gas, the car does this awful brake/gas/brake/gas lurching thing where it both puts on the brakes and brake lights and accelerates in spurts. That causes people behind me to slam on their brakes because they think I’m trying to slam on my brakes when really I’m just fighting the automatic brakes on my car…

      urgh…

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Oh you mean the “The speed limit is just a suggestion feel free to go slower” crowd.

      Yeah not a fan but at least in VA your allowed 10 mph under the posted limit so I just have to grit my teeth. Although I’ve clocked people going slower than 10 under and outside of the interstate it doesnt amount to much attention from the police.

      That said they are nuisance at best and a danger at worst, especially when you have traffic moving the speed limit or faster in the other lanes and the people stuck behind the slow moving vehicle and pull out into oncoming traffic in aggrevation.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Eight cars making a left turn after their light turns red, when only the first two cars were in the intersection.

  • avatar
    Tummy

    Driving while human is the problem. Eliminate human drivers for commutes/work and only allow engaged human drivers for pleasure on a closed course. Human error accounts for over 90% of collisions. Based on data from NHTSA people using the older Autopilot 1.0 are 40% less likely to get in a collision and the crash rate is only improving as the software and hardware improves.

    • 0 avatar
      mmreeses

      -Based on data from NHTSA people using the older Autopilot 1.0 are 40% less likely to get in a collision –

      Those drivers are older and wealthier and the average driver. How much of the safety gain is Autopilot and how much of it is not having a 17 y.o. with a 300 hp motor or undocumented driver or 85 year old?

      I’d bet road safety has a power-law, long tail distribution. The worst 10%-15% of drivers cause disproportionate amounts of DUIs, running reds, and unsafe driving.

      banning human drivers is throwing the baby out

  • avatar
    JimC2

    Soooo, perfect example of not looking up the road more than two seconds in front of you. It’s a small example but it’s symptomatic of a greater problem.

    This morning, on a lightly traveled, four lane, 40mph road, there were three vehicles in front of me for the next half-mile: a garbage truck, with bright flashing lights, making its rounds in the right lane, start/stop/start/stop, the way every garbage truck in the free world does every morning. Following the truck were two cars about 100-500′ in trail, and then finally me. The first car slowed to a crawl, right signal on, and made a right turn into a driveway. The second car slowed to a crawl behind the first one and after the first car had competed its turn, abruptly pulled into the left lane, hit its hazard blinkers, and moderately accelerated.

    Clearly, the second car wasn’t even aware of the garbage truck until the one car in front of him had turned. I’m sure the driver was convinced that using his/her hazards in that situation made him/her a safe, better than average driver. Never mind there was all kinds of time and space to just pass the right turning car *and* garbage truck.

    Seriously- two vehicles in front of you, one of them a big garbage truck with bright flashing lights, and your situational awareness is so crappy that you miss the garbage truck until the last second.

    These are the same kinds of people who need the yellow warning signs with the kid chasing the ball into the road… because it shouldn’t take and automotive Sherlock Holmes to figure out that neighborhoods with houses = kids in front yards doing kid things. People like this are the reason that school buses and fire trucks are lit up like a rave party.

    The police/state troopers/public safety people need to have one of their self-righteous safety blitzes when they pull over people doing things like this. Just give them a friendly written warning stating,

    “Hey you probably don’t know this but you are hereby notified that you are a road buffoon. Smarten up.”

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      Wait, he/she turned on their hazards to pass? So much fail.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        Yep, and pass slowly at that. I can just imagine the buffonlogic ™, “Oooh, that big garbage truck came out of nowhere, I’ll just pull out heeere, and I’ll hit my hazards because I’m a SAFE driver!! Dum dee dum dee dum.”

        All the situational awareness of Ferris Bueller’s parents on their drives home from work.

      • 0 avatar

        I’ll see you and raise. Turning on your Hazards when it is snowing very hard. WTF ?

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          lol I appreciated that a somewhat when I was in my last nighttime snow storm on I-40. With the changes in altitude you can go from “nothing” to “holy $hit” in a very short time span.

          The 4 ways helped me to know that this was the guy I needed to be passing cautiously but resolutely as I let my ground clearance/4wd/right tires do their thing.

        • 0 avatar
          SaulTigh

          I think there are some circumstances where turning on the hazards is warranted, and I believe it has saved my bacon a time or too. Heavy, driving rain on the interstate that slowed even the buffoons in dually diesel pickups down to 35 mph comes to mind. Also when traffic suddenly goes form 75 to 20. I don’t care if people think I’m silly, if the extra flashing gets there attention. Some trucker near my hometown killed several people in several vehicles when he spaced on noticing stopped traffic a few years ago.

  • avatar
    Peter Gazis

    ALL DRIVERS!
    If someone wants to pass you. Let them.
    Its the slow drivers causing the traffic jams. Not the fast ones.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It’s not just about them being asses. Too many drivers never check their mirrors on a continuous basis. I could come up to these road blockers at 100 mph, ram them into Tomorrowland and they’d never see it coming.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        That’s true. For better or for worse, the only way they notice traffic in the rear view mirror is when the mirror is filled with bumper and grill- that’s when their peripheral vision notices something different and their subconscious brain makes their eyeballs turn and look at the mirror… “Ohhh, that car just came out of NOWHERE!!”

        If you hang out 5-10 car lengths behind, you could stay there for an hour and they won’t notice or think to move over.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      This is my biggie. Lane discipline in general is a problem in America. The highway on my commute is 2 lanes for about ~75% of the way due to construction (opening up the lanes, thank God). Probably 3-4x/week I will pass a train of cars in the left lane.

      A lot of it just comes down to incompetence. Americans are deathly afraid of merging and letting others merge. Makes sense as from what I remember merging is not something checked for in our driver’s tests. Drive around the block, make a u-turn, here is your license. What a joke.

      • 0 avatar
        Zarba

        This.

        Lack of Lane Discipline is a hazard. I regularly run I-85 from South Carolina into Atlanta, and this causes massive delays.

        Everyone thinks they need to be in the “fast lane” and so I regularly see 1/2 mile long lines of cars in the left lane with an open right lane.

        This DOES allow me to jump past long lines of cars, but passing on the right is dangerous in itself.

        KEEP RIGHT EXCEPT TO PASS! How freaking hard is this?

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        @sportyaccordy

        I couldn’t reply in other post… Must be youtube reviewers also buying Mazda BS. Or even TTAC. Remember when new Civic came out, what they said? – “I would put my money into Mazda”

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          If you need reviews to convince yourself that Mazdas are great, maybe they aren’t so great. Like I said, I had the 3i for a week or so… as a general mainstream compact it was nice, but as a driver’s car it kind of sucked. I’m not going to second guess myself because some reviewers felt otherwise; I know what I experienced and am secure in my assessment.

          Admittedly I am biased towards straight line speed, and I find the whole “slow car fast” thing to be stupid. In that regard, a Golf TSI or Civic 1.5T are a better match for me, as they give up nothing dynamically to a 3i while having much better straight line speed. They might not be the contrarian media driver’s car underdogs the 3 is, but that’s a burden I can live with.

          That is the piece you are missing- different people like different things. Mazda3 might be perfect for you; it was not for me. That’s OK. Your desperation in defending Mazda here speaks to some kind of insecurity over it.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            “Admittedly I am biased towards straight line speed”

            I am also generally in this camp, but in defense of the 3’s acceleration, the 2.5L holds up well against the VW and Honda and that’s now the standard engine on the mid-level “Touring” trim.

            caranddriver.com/comparisons/2016-mazda-3-s-grand-touring-vs-2015-volkswagen-golf-tsi-performance-data-and-complete-specs-page-4

            And then there is all the hopes that the Mazda6 2.5T will match the abilities of the Camry V6 and Accord 2.0T. No numbers on it yet though.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Look, if you re-read, you will see that talk was about Mazda drivers and you turned it into Mazda cars.

            Yea, one time I had light to light race against Civic hatch for about 7 miles. He beat me off line every time. 1.5T vs 2.0. But I drove that hatch, I drove Si too. I don’t like Honda brakes. While steering/clutch and gear shifter feel not as nice as Mazda. Although, you see, new Mazda might feel closer. Because my Mazda3 has electric-hydraulic setup and sweetest gearbox of all. The new ones are not that. But when I tested in 2010 ‘3 of that era to Civic of that era, Civic was a joke vs serious car – the ‘3.

            So, to me, most important is how car listens to your input. And how it stays planted to the road.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I’ve never, ever gotten the media lovefest for the Mazda3. Driven plenty of them, loved exactly none of them. Adequate at best. Not even remotely comparable to a Golf, IMHO.

      • 0 avatar
        joeaverage

        “A lot of it just comes down to incompetence. Americans are deathly afraid of merging and letting others merge. Makes sense as from what I remember merging is not something checked for in our driver’s tests. Drive around the block, make a u-turn, here is your license. What a joke.”

        HEAR! HEAR!

        I’d love it if the USA made the driving exam much more comprehensive. About 20 years ago I went for my motorcycle license and there was a teenager that was taking the test for the TWELFTH time…

        I live in one of the states you mentioned – easy multiple question/answer test, drive the car around the block and here is a license that enables the new driver to operate most anything without air brakes.

        I swear new drivers ought to be limited to 100 HP and 3000lbs.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        At least your locale makes people drive around the block. Some places don’t even make them leave the DMV parking lot.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Even with all the issues mentioned here, I still love driving my car on public roads every day and hope I’ll always be allowed to do so.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I could honestly take it or leave it, and I have a pretty decent commute. I do live near a few race tracks and karting facilities and I have a sim racing rig. For the average American sitting in traffic 10 hours a week I don’t see what pleasure can be derived from car ownership. Something has to change.

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    Corolla drivers are probably the most dangerous on the road. It could the low cost of the vehicle or average age of the Corolla driver. They just seem to be the most dangerous on the road. Could also be so many are rental cars too.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Corolla drivers are a menace, but mostly because they’re going 5-10 mph under the speed limit, regardless of what’s going on around them. They also tend to just plod along in their own lane, no matter what. Annoying, but at least predictable. I still dread Corollas, and try to avoid getting in the same lane as one, but they’re nothing compared to Altima drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      If you drive Corolla, you have no soul

      • 0 avatar
        VW4motion

        Sorry, You could also add Mazda 3 to that Corolla list.

        • 0 avatar
          vvk

          > Sorry, You could also add Mazda 3 to that Corolla list.

          Nah, it takes a special kind of masochist to drive the Mazda3 :)

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Many people who drives Mazda, drive it because it can be driven. So, they are good drivers because they like to drive. When you like to do something, usually you get good at it.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            Why are you so breathlessly defensive over everything Mazda related lol….

            Mazda’s marketing is brilliant; they really have convinced their customers that slow open differential economy cars are “drivers cars”. Stop it!!! The 3i rental I had was every bit as anodyne and front heavy as the Golf TSI rental I had around the same time, only with what felt like half the horsepower. Whenever I encounter a new CX-5 it’s being driven aggressively; I’m guessing because Mazda marketing convinced the owner that aggressive driving is what “drivers” do lol.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            @sportyaccordy

            Must be youtube reviewers also buying Mazda BS. Or even TTAC. Remember when new Civic came out, what they said? – “I would put my money into Mazda”

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            So driver’s drive Mazda because they’re driven to drive? What?

            I’ll just re word that to something like your typical comments:

            “This car sucks, buy a Mazda”

          • 0 avatar
            VW4motion

            YouTube reviewers? Dude, Mazda 3 is no better or worse over a Corolla. Basically the same car, different manufacturer. I bought a Mazda 3 a few years back. After driving iit for 2 days I returned the car for a full refund. The driver ergonomics was so awful with the manual transmission my shoulder still hurts just thinking about it. It was a true pos.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Vw,
          I drove Protege for nearly 17 years. And nothing hurts. My teammate dumped his Jetta after driving my 13yo Protege. He couldn’t believe how well it held even with 150K on it. His Jetta was all rattles. Especially I liked to watch his gear shifter “dancing”. Right now on my 2 ‘3s about 210K combined. No issues. Fun to drive, reliable, efficient cars that cost nearly nothing and provide features one needs all included. Corolla? you wish. I will blast any Corolla in the nice curve with double of speed in comfort while they will be in fear for their life ready to overturn at any minute.

  • avatar
    civicjohn

    I’m sorry, but I don’t think I’ve really seen this spelled out:

    Soccer moms, armed with Denali Tahoes (or whatever the soon to be ex-husband can afford), Starbucks in one hand and Facebook in the other.

    Oblivious to traffic, traffic lights, me (the last person she cut off), and everything and everybody else.

    • 0 avatar
      paxman356

      In the Netherlands, the big joke is a mother will have groceries, a couple kids, an umbrella (because it’s always raining) and Facebook going on at once! But she isn’t a harm to herself or others because she’s always in control. (I’ve seen this, minus the Facebook, though).

      Why is it these rolling distraction chambers are so hard for some US divers to work out?

  • avatar
    vvk

    People who don’t bother to turn on their headlights in the rain or at dusk. I see grey color cars driving with their lights off in the rain, completely invisible against wet grey pavement. Morons!

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      One side benefit of LED DRLs is that this issue is slowly becoming less egregious (at least I can see them when they’re coming at me).

      MY DRLs are the old kind (running the low beams at low power) and I keep them in the off position because I hate how fast it kills headlight bulbs. However because I don’t keep the switch in the “AUTO” position I try to be very courteous about when I’m turning them on.

      • 0 avatar
        paxman356

        One minus to that is the fact that because your DRLs are on, you forget to turn on your lights, and thus don’t have any lights on in the rear.

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        Why not just have your headlights on at all times? I have never understood why people don’t do this. Better visibility never hurt anyone. I like other people to see me. I can understand not using the DRLs, since some manufactures do dumb things with the voltage that shortens bulb life. But having headlights on does not.

        • 0 avatar
          JimC2

          Some manufacturers, not all. I have a ten year old Toyota with 225,000 miles. The DRLs are the high beam bulbs in a series circuit (relays make the magic happen, high beams are those bulbs in parallel, the way all high beams work). I’ve replaced two high beam bulbs. That’s it, just those two, not a single bulb has burned out anywhere else on the car.

        • 0 avatar
          operagost

          Where can I buy these mythical headlights that don’t burn out when you have them on in the daytime?

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        DRL IS THE ISSUE!!! It is still dark in the back. And if your DRL is in high-beam lights you still get blinded in the dark even if this is low intensity. People think they have auto-lights because they have this “AUTO” written there

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        On the flip side, when I drive my wifes car, sometimes I don’t realize the lights aren’t on because the DRLs are so bright. Problem is, I have no rear lights!

        My car has auto lights and hers doesn’t, so if you can see in front of you fine you don’t realize the lights are off. I sometimes wonder if DRLs are MORE DANGEROUS.

        • 0 avatar
          operagost

          No, DRLs without automatic headlights are dangerous. I don’t know what genius thought of that terrible combination. And with digital dashes that are lit all the time, I see people driving with only dim DRLs in COMPLETE DARKNESS.

          • 0 avatar

            The thing I don’t understand in that scenario is why the driver cannot see that the road ahead is not as well lit as it would be with the headlights on. Inattention to their surroundings??

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “The thing I don’t understand in that scenario is why the driver cannot see that the road ahead is not as well lit as it would be with the headlights on. Inattention to their surroundings??”

            @THX1136, that’s precisely it. See my comment about the buffoon missing the garbage truck when it was one of only two vehicles in front of him/her? If your attention only goes as far ahead as a few car lengths, then your DRLs are plenty bright at night.

            It’s not that the driver doesn’t believe they are “watching the road” like any “safe driver” should, it’s the mental fallacy of “I don’t see anything therefore nothing is there.” These are the same people whose accident report statements include the phrase, “… came out of nowhere.” Yep, that motorcycle came out of nowhere when you pulled out from the stop sign, that tree you hit came out of nowhere too, and so on.

            Putting it kindly, it’s a lack of mental capacity.

  • avatar
    kefkafloyd

    This one’s kind of vague, but I will say the most common example of buffoonery is tailgating. Right below that is people who cross multiple lanes when changing lanes. Below that is people who don’t know how to zipper merge (and don’t know how to space themsevles out near an incoming merge).

    Signifiers of potential buffoonery is a different thing. I will say that my current #1 signal of potential stupid drivers are offset front license plates (e.g. someone who bought a tow hook license plate frame). The people that do that often have an overinflated sense of car and are more likely to make self-centered moves at the expense of other drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      What’s wrong with crossing multiple lanes in one go?

      • 0 avatar
        kefkafloyd

        You don’t see a problem with someone cutting from the middle lane to an exit ramp (which would be two lanes) without pausing inbetween to re-check his blind spot? Or from someone getting on the highway and immediately going to the middle lane instead of the first lane from their on ramp? Or someone cutting from the rightmost lane to the leftmost lane in one move? What if someone’s speeding in that left lane and they don’t see them when they start making the change?

        These examples are all on three-lane carriageways, but you get the drift.

        Even with properly adjusted mirrors (and most people don’t) there’s still going to be a decently sized chunk that you can’t see when you make those moves. They’re a hell of a lot riskier to the driver and other traffic than making two sequential lane changes.

        Now, if there’s absolutely no traffic on the road, and you have a vehicle with extremely good visibility and bigger mirrors than usual, go ahead and do it. But that’s a rarity these days.

        (Also, are you the same sportyaccordy that posts on the DPR forums?)

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          Hahahaha, yes I do post on DPR.

          I think it can look like someone hasn’t checked their blind spot, but odds are someone crossing multiple lanes has. Just today I crossed 4 lanes and had to pass around the right to get past a cluster of trucks. Had they been exercising proper lane discipline, I would have been in the second to inner lane and just had made a normal pass. But it’s often the lack of lane discipline in others that prompts such extreme maneuvers, at least for me.

          When I was vacationing in Europe I almost shed a tear over the level of lane discipline exercised. That, along with traffic speeds beyond my comfort level had me riding with traffic rather than scrambling to get past it. Lane discipline is a virtuous cycle.

          • 0 avatar
            kefkafloyd

            (Roger that, I also post in the Sony forums)

            I mean, you may do it expertly, but my experience here is that most people who do that always come very close to accidents and always cut people off and it’s seen as a jerk thing to do. From my POV, I’m not expecting someone in the middle lane to try to exit the highway, because that’s not what the middle lane is for. If they wanted to do it, they should have been in the right lane.

            Like, I’m not saying it’s a problem to go from the fourth to first lane, because sometimes you have to do it. It’s more that it’s more courteous to go 4-to-1 via sequential lane changes instead of one sudden 4-to-1, because someone in that first lane doesn’t know you’re going to change one lane or multiple lanes when you put on your blinker, if they happen to see you at all.

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    Priuses and camarollas. Camrys and corollas are usually beat to shit as of day two…I figure that’s a result of them being the non car persons car. Priuses are worse , they’re ALWAYS wheezing away in the left lane 10-15 mph under the limit. It seems like blue hairs in buicks got replaced by blue hairs in priuses overnight. Nissan leafs are nearly as bad. I make sure all of these rolling rest homes safely shrink away in my rear view PRONTO.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    I have to drive through Maryland 1 or 2 times a month. Shoulder passing, right turn lane passing, quadruple lane changes, motorcycle wheelies, the list is too long. VA doesn’t tolerate that crap. That said, with warmer weather approaching, young women with their feet on the dash, and young men with their feet out the window really bugs me for some reason. I hope they all get broken hips, legs, and faces when an airbag goes off. Idiots all.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      This. Virginia cops don’t mess around and never have. Northern pettiness enforced with Southern enthusiasm.

      On the Maryland side traffic enforcement had always been pretty lax away from a handful of highway corridors and since the cameras went up everywhere that lax enforcement has dwindled away to almost nothing at all. The suburban counties have the money for truly massive numbers of police (as every other variety of municipal employee), and you’ll pass a dozen or two marked cruisers every single trip, but they’ll ignore almost any display of bad driving short of actually ramming one of them.

      And as you’ve noted, those displays are bad indeed.

  • avatar
    sutherland555

    Drivers who tailgate in busy but moving traffic. Bonus shout out to drivers in the same situation who tailgate any vehicle they can’t see past. Idiots.

    Also, drivers that weave in and out of rush hour traffic without signalling. They inevitably end up taking almost the same amount of time to get where they’re going as drivers who choose to drive like a normal sane person.

    • 0 avatar
      paxman356

      Tailgaters are bad, people who justify tailgating because “you are going to slow, I need to get by” on forums like these are even worse.

      One thing I hate about people who weave in and out of traffic, they are actually slowing everyone in their wake, because when you make a move that causes someone to brake, the cascade of people behind them that also has to brake can cause a slowdown/stop of traffic. Oh, but you got a couple more cars ahead! Yay on you!

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      > Drivers who tailgate in busy but moving traffic. Bonus shout out to drivers
      > in the same situation who tailgate any vehicle they can’t see past. Idiots

      Which is pretty much everybody in certain cities. Like Toronto. When I drive there, people constantly tailgate, overtake me (keeping my usual 150-200 ft to the car in front at 80 mph) and park themselves 20 feet in front of my bumper, forcing me to to slow down.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        150-200 feet… you might be part of the problem. Feel free to do that in the right lane. ;)

        • 0 avatar
          vvk

          > 150-200 feet… you might be part of the problem. Feel free to do that in the right lane. ;)

          The right lane is always faster in Toronto. Left lane is were the slow drivers are camped. QEW right lane is where you can go fast.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            It pains me to read that. I thought the lane protocol reversal on the QEW was just a thing on the Niagara stretch. I haven’t driven in the Big Smoke in a long time.

          • 0 avatar
            sutherland555

            I drive primarily on the Gardiner & DVP. QEW & 401 only when I have to. GTA drivers and traffic patterns drive me crazy. Half the time I just get off the highway and take a parallel street instead. Pretty sure it doesn’t save me any time but it sure does save my sanity.

          • 0 avatar
            Nick_515

            yeppers. occasional Toronto-Rochester driver here. I camp at 80 mph on the left lane, but when there’s too much traffic to maintain pace… right lane is where you smoke ’em. Just keep an eye on the access roads over your right shoulder… that’s where the P71s sit and watch.

        • 0 avatar
          vvk

          > 150-200 feet… you might be part of the problem.

          Actually, 200 feet is too short for 85 mph. That is the very minimum I would be comfortable with. The car is travelling 125 ft/sec at 85 mph. So 150-200 ft is less than 2 seconds. Many states have the three second rule, which is well over 300 ft at 85 mph.

  • avatar
    06M3S54B32

    Anyone driving a Dodge Ram.

  • avatar
    nlinesk8s

    With an hour commute for years, I had a lot of time to think about this. My personal classifications of buffoonery comes in thee flavors:

    1) Clueless. Cell phone texting, driving looking at the cell phone map, talking to someone in the front seat. Never checking the rear view mirror. Most common problem

    2) Classless. The trolls. Intentional left-lane banditry, and generally trying to make traffic hell for everyone else, or trying to be the traffic cop. Most often practiced by elderly guys in pickup trucks wearing military caps, and the bro-dozers.

    3) Gutless. The driver who is terrified of being in traffic. Too scared to pull into traffic, so they spend time getting their courage up, just in time to pull directly in front of you, cutting you off. Their fear affects their perception. Also most likely to be in the left lane as they have a left turn to make in five miles, and don’t trust themselves to make a lane change. These are the people who could really use the driver training missing in the U.S.

  • avatar
    MeJ

    1. Anyone on a cell. If you make any excuse for using it you’re the problem.

    2. Anyone driving a big Ram truck. Eff off and stop tailgating everyone.

    3. Most guys in VW Gti’s or similar. Why do they all think they’re race car drivers?

    4. Everyone who refuses to use their turn signal. This one boggles my mind the most. Use them, make it a habit whether there are cars around or not, and soon the entire driving population becomes one degree happier.

    • 0 avatar
      random1

      #4 – I do this sometimes, intentionally. Because of another type of buffoon. The guy who will stomp on the gas at the thought of somebody going faster than him actually passing/getting in front of him. I do not understand this at all, but happens all the time.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I had yet another 6hr drive yesterday. What do I see? Visibility 200 yards but only half cars have the lights on. Biggest group of buffoons is Indian and Chinese women. They see nothing out of their cars. And their cars often have damage at one or more corners. Every time I see a car with such damage I am staying away. Other group of buffoons are [some] minivan drivers. They drive like it is sports sedan. Yea, minivans got better but they are not sport sedans. Other group is related – box truck renters. They really don’t understand that their truck will not stop as quick as their daily small car. And of course, those who “writes their own rules”. Situation, I turn left, someone in opposite lane turns right. So, I time my turn so they go through while I also make it before bunch of cars comes closer. Instead of going through, this person stops but I need to clear the road (cars are coming). Or just any time when 3-4 cars stop at stop sign and everyone start waving their hands instead of just first person go.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      No headlights is one of my peeves. Overcast, raining, evening coming on, but so many geniuses don’t see any point in turning their headlights on.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        I was driving yesterday and thinking… why MA State police needs to hide behind the tree and point the radar and wait for the “big one”?
        Just one day, put few cops at each exit ramp and show no-light drivers to the side of the road where tickets will be written already, only need to entry license plate and driver license #. I saw something like this one time. Only that was for stop sign, seat-belts and inspection stickers. On the 25mph street, right behind the turn, a cop was standing in the middle and showing some drivers to the side where other cops just served the tickets.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Even worse are the anti-headlight inclement weather ding-dongs that will on a heavily overcast day in pouring rain go down the road with headlights off but emergency flashers blinking away. I’ve been told that bit of lunacy sprang from Florida.

        Although still not as bad as the bastard in the grey car with absolutely no headlights or flashers on in a damn downpour and you dont see them until your right on top of them.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    OK, just reading posts and thought of the hands down biggest dumb A$$ buffoon type of driver there is.

    Im sure you all see this if you live in any sort of sizeable city. During rush hour, traffic will typically back up on to off ramps. Invariably, there are drivers who for whatever reason, decide they need to get off the highway right now, couldn’t plan ahead, somehow didn’t see the line forming at the exit or just think they are special and will literally STOP a lane of swiftly flowing traffic moving at 60-80mpg in order to merge onto the backed up off ramp at turtle speed.

    Short of hitting someone on purpose, this has to be a behavior most calculated to cause an accident somewhere downstream. If you stop abruptly, unexpectedly and intentionally on a quickly moving highway for no reason other than selfish desire to save a minute or two …YOU ARE A MORON…PERIOD…EXCLAMATION POINT. That is almost intentionally causing an accident in my book. This is the type of self absorbed person who should never be allowed to drive again…ever ….in my opinion.

    Nobody is so special that they should be allowed inconvenience/endanger so many other drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      I admit doing this all the time, especially when I ride bike. I never suddenly stop in the left lane. I might slow down a bit [usually, this is already slow] and I just find someone on cellphone [or not paying attention] who is letting big gap. Or I will go all the way to split where I can exit without slowing down. But I do it when on the long trips or on bike. It is getting hot on the bike to stand and breathe the fumes. It is easy to squeeze little bike harmlessly into exit ramp.

      • 0 avatar
        thegamper

        That is not great, but it is not exactly the same thing as a car coming to a complete stop in a lane of travel on the highway in order to bypass the line in a backed up exit ramp.

    • 0 avatar
      sutherland555

      I hate those drivers with a burning passion. Sadly, most of the time their strategy works as someone almost always let’s them in.

      There’s an on-ramp that’s always so busy I usually avoid it and just move on the next one (that’s much further away). It usually takes 3-4 traffic light cycles to get through it and there’s ALWAYS a few drivers trying to pulling this stunt. This one glorious time, in a unicorn rare moment of collective resolve, EVERYONE already waiting in the line absolutely refused to let any of these drivers in. It was so immensely satisfying to see them all give up.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    Tailgaters. The ones who have to be right on the bumper of the car in front of them, even if there’s no other cars around for 10 miles. Used to be married to one, after a few years I stopped calling her out on it, because it never did any good. She’d back off for 10 minutes or so, then get right on their ass again. Not because they were too slow and she wanted to pass, that’s just how she drives. Unfortunately, that’s not unique to her.

    Conversely, people who dawdle along leaving a huge gap in front of themselves while driving through downtown, causing everyone behind them to get stuck at the light that’s going to turn red in a few seconds.

    • 0 avatar
      Booick

      I prefer the tailgaters to be honest. California light patterns are ridiculously short causing cumalative backuos. Everyone is forced to ride each others rear to get decent flow through before light cuts off half the backup.

      I recently moved states, i have to retrain myself to not stress out about sitting at the intersection for 3 to 5 light cycles…its, nice. California drivers and california roadways will make anyone hate driving, its probably agenda driven.

  • avatar
    john66ny

    I’d say there’s two categories:

    1) Intentional a$$-hats:

    Around here (Toronto area) it used to be BMW drivers but more and more if I had to stereotype I’d say Audi…

    2) ZSAS (Zero Situational Awareness Syndrome) (C)

    The inability to process what’s going on around oneself and to quickly make appropriate adjustments to behaviours based on these observations. Closely related to BIOS (Basic Inability to Observe Syndrome).

    Pretty much what everyone above has listed; not specific to any make or model.

    • 0 avatar
      turf3

      I hate riding with someone who can only look at the bumper of the car immediately ahead. Hint: When you come over a hill at 70, and you see nothing but bright red brake lights on the upcoming hill, you don’t have to stay six feet behind the car in front of you until you see their brake lights come on. LET OFF THE DAMN GAS, NOW!

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        One of my standard defense driving strategies has always been to NOT react to the car immediately in front, but instead focus on the car(s) that are 2 or 3 vehicles ahead. Basically look THRU the car in your path because you have to assume they are not paying attention and instead react to the car ahead of them. This increases your reaction time by at least one car length. However these days with crossovers and pickups dominating the roads that is becoming increasing difficult, if not impossible, in my low sports car.

        • 0 avatar
          JimC2

          Yep- that and when you’re in heavy stop and go traffic, if the second or third car in front of you is tall and the sun angle is right, you can watch its shadow- even if you can’t see the vehicle. That makes my driving a lot smoother and I need to use the brakes a lot less.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Sideshow drivers? All black clothed rainy night no-look jaywalkers? Critical Mass-holes? Bicycle sideswiping coal-rolling lifted bro-dozers? Too drunk to figure out the lights are off at night frequent shoulder drifting half conscious drunk drivers? Hit and run pedestrian killers?

  • avatar
    turf3

    Two particular ones:

    1) People who drive around with their high beams on all the time, even in a residential neighborhood with a 25 mph speed limit and a streetlight every 200 feet. It’s just a city neighborhood, not the Paris-Dakar rally, bud. And haven’t you ever wondered why EVERY SINGLE CAR approaching you flashes their lights at you?

    2) People who, when turning from a minor street onto a major one, don’t think to look for crossing traffic till they’re halfway through the turn. “Oh! My goodness! Who would ever have thought there might be 100 tons of steel barrelling down on me at 35 mph in this six lane road I’m going to turn onto?”

    • 0 avatar
      Booick

      This is a major failure of usa road ways. I see it all the time…major road ways should not allow turning left from a minor side road onto a major road. Should always have to turn right and then do a u turn at a light with a turn lane to reverse direction, it greatly improves traffic flow.

  • avatar
    ptschett

    Drivers blindly following navigation or habit without consideration for changed circumstances.
    The off-ramp that I take daily on my way home from work used to be set up for the left lane to turn left, and the right lane to turn right. Then the interchange was reconfigured last year so that the old setup’s left-turners keep going under the bridge and take a new cloverleaf, and right-turners got both lanes of the old ramp turning onto 3 westbound lanes of road. I turn right and then turn left at the 2nd intersection so I take the left-hand right-turn lane.
    Invariably I’ll see someone, usually driving a semi truck, take the right lane of the current setup of the right-turn ramp then immediately cut across the left-lane traffic because they want to turn left at the 1st intersection downstream and actually needed to be in the left lane… but they stayed in the right lane presumably from either habit or from the navigation still having the old layout programmed in. I’ve had several times I had to choose between a) stopping or b) letting the left tires of the semi trailer roll over the right front corner of my car.

  • avatar
    JMII

    Brake tappers! Yesterday I was behind FOUR different drivers who seemed to just randomly tap their brakes. As I passed one of them I counted 6 car lengths to the next vehicle. I have no idea why there would be braking. This was on a straight road, with 3 travel lanes, speed limit 35 MPH, in the middle of the day with perfect weather. There was absolutely no reason what-so-ever to apply the brakes! Its almost like they only way people can regulate their speed is mashing the gas OR the brake, the concept of coasting or light acceleration seems completely foreign to such drivers.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      What about brake riders? Ones that rest left foot on brake?

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Brake tappers help me keep my windshield clean. When I come up on a brake tapper (especially one who taps their brakes on a perfectly straight stretch with nothing in front of them), I get around in front of the irrational buggers and then I hose ’em off with my windshield washers. A nice benefit to this is I use the RainX stuff, and I go so much of it that I don’t need my wipers in the rain much at all.

      #sorrynotsorry

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      Could this be a popular strategy to disengage cruise?

    • 0 avatar
      joeaverage

      They are driving with two feet on the two pedals. The left foot is activating the brake lights on every bump. That’s what makes them really scary – something happens and they can’t sort out their feet and they either accelerate into an accident or fail to stop.

  • avatar
    Frylock350

    1) Taxis. I have never seen a display of poor driving quite like Chicago’s taxi fleet. Driving 10 under straddling the white line, passing in parking lanes, using turn only lanes to go straight, turning out of non-turnings lanes double parking like asshats when curb parking is readily available, etc. Let Uber kill their business, good riddance.

    2) Toyota sedans. 85% of the time of there’s a vehicle driving 10 under in the fast lane its a Corolla, Camry or Avalon. Move over Buick, Toyota sedans are the new blue-hair special. The Rav-4 often gets an honorable mention here too. Other characteristics include pulling out into traffic and accelerating at a glacial pace, coming to a complete stop before right turns (with no traffic controls present), braking hard at first sight of yellow regardless of distance to light, etc

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    Cars with handicapped license plates seem to always be going under the speed limit, not signaling, not letting people in. It’s a symbol to avoid.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Anyone driving in a lane with is NOT the rightmost lane, appropriate to their speed, which seems to be about 90% of drivers on the road.

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    In NYC it used to be minivan drivers……………now it’s cuv private cab drivers. also i totally hate drivers that dont use their signal lights. also those that drive with their foot on the brake and those that stay 2 miles behind the car in front of them.

  • avatar
    Steve Lynch

    Here in Tucson we are home to the worst drivers in America (I believe we are statistically number 2 in the nation for bicyclists being killed by cars), because our streets are clogged with the trifecta of vehicles owned by idiot drivers:

    1. Priuses
    2. Beige Buicks
    3. Vehicles with Sonora, MX license plates.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    The old….they are crippled physically and really don’t have much to live for.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Parking lot warriors, you pull in but then some speedy CUV races between the lots at 40mph.

    Then you have people that blare their awful music super loudly, at 2am, then you their key fob 3 times at 2am.

  • avatar
    PentastarPride

    It grates my nerves when people keep their brights on and without stopping to think that it effects opposing traffic. I used to flick my high beams on/off quickly but figured it’s not worth wearing out my headlamp switch and bulbs to educate some idiot that got their license at Kmart.

    Improper/excessive lane changing and passing is another thing that irritates me. No turn signal, very abrupt at the last minute, very reckless. This is such a basic skill and so many people can’t get it right or just don’t care to do it right. The excessive lane changing: why? There is no point. Is it like a real life video game or something? Do you get bored easily?

    Emergency vehicle LED lights are so bright that they ought to be illegal. Bring back the 1980s incandescent lightbars. These LEDs are way too bright and you have to look away if they are on the roadside, which is dangerous. If you look at them, you get momentary blindness, which is dangerous too.

    Then there are cars I call “rolling Xeroxes”. They’ve got super high intensity aftermarket headlights with a very blue hue. They usually zoom by 10 miles over the speed limit, making the effect much like an exposure lamp in a photocopier.

    One more thing: tailgaters. I’m a right lane driver and I usually set my cruise control to the speed limit, or if cruise is not feasible, I drive the speed limit, decelerating when approaching traffic like you are supposed to. Then inevitably someone decides that I’m going too slow even though I’m doing the lawful limit. They get mad/antsy, within a foot of my bumper, then they swerve off in the next lane. No turn signal. Sometimes they swerve right back into your lane inches ahead of you, all with no turn signal or proper passing procedure. I’m like, the cameras are rolling and I’ve got your plates and your vehicle description to go along with your eventual reckless driving charge.

  • avatar
    Boff

    Young men in fast cars.

  • avatar
    Dan

    I’ve lost count of the times that this one has happened.

    Me: in the right lane approaching an intersection where I’m going to turn right. I see the light ahead just turned red, so I put my turn signal on and let off the gas to coast the remaining 30 seconds to the stop line.

    Buffoon behind me: “He’s slowing down? WTF! There’s nobody in front of him. There’s nowhere here to even turn. Now he’s not even going the speed limit? Screw that. Stupid old man. Let’s pass him!”

    Buffoon jumps into the left lane and flies past me at 10 over.

    Buffoon: “That’s better. But now this other guy in front of me is slowing down too? JFC people, learn to drive!” … “Oh it’s a red light.”

    “But at least I can jump back into the right lane and be first in line to take off when it changes again.”

  • avatar
    ernest

    I tend to exercise caution whenever I’m close to a high-end Euro brand. The more expensive (and German) the brand, the higher the odds something ridiculous is about to happen.

  • avatar
    Erikstrawn

    One evening I was driving home and I saw sparks from a trailer ahead of me. Dude had a trashed car and a bunch of junk on his trailer and his truck bed full of scrap. Something on the back end of the trailer was hanging over and digging gouges in the asphalt. He didn’t care. The 911 dispatcher cared.

    Other than that, my biggest pet-peeve is people who stop at the end of an entrance ramp because merging makes them nervous.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      I saw some rube towing a car down the freeway, front end raised for the towing and the rear wheels on the road… fair enough, right? No, really, the rear wheels were on the road- no tires. Lots of sparks though. I give them credit for exercising good risk management. It was raining and the rain cut down on most of the sparks. I really wanted to see the gas tank catch on something and the whole rig go up in flames.

      A few years ago when gas was really cheap, I smelled a faint whiff of burning rubber one day on the freeway. A bit later and waaaay ahead, I thought I saw a puff of smoke. A bit after that another puff of smoke. Way ahead there was an 18 wheeler making these puffs of smoke. *I* was making good time but it took me a good while to catch up- it was a truck doing 80-90, saving time (cheap fuel) and saving brakes too apparently. He must have dialed in his brake bias to be all trailer and no cab, and every time he’d run up on slower traffic slower he’d hit his brakes and the trailer wheels would lock up for a couple seconds. Heh.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        Speaking of trucks, one rainy night I thought my headlights were playing reflections off of chrome mudflaps. Nope, it was a tire carcass on wheel number 14 or 15 on the back of a semi-trailer, flopping around and the steel bands making a glorious light show grinding against the pavement.

        Another time the guy in front of me was hauling an ill-secured load of large chunks of ground up rubber- think solid football sized chunks but irregular shapes. One of these jumped out of the trailer and bounced along the freeway, at freeway speeds, in random directions, kinda like a fumbled football. It hit my front end with a solid hit and damaged a headlight. I called the state troopers but they didn’t care…

        Thanks for keeping our roads safe and economy going, professional truckers. And as for the rest of you truckers and your companies that roll with crappy rigs and loads, thanks for nothing.

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    Drivers who “act” like they’re fast but aren’t, like when someone desperately changes lanes so they can pass the slow car, only to then NOT SPEED UP AND PASS THE SLOW CAR. Related issues include “wants to be in front but doesn’t have the balls to lead” and those who know how to START a pass but never get around to FINISHING the pass.
    But the most annoying…major traffic, cars stacked up at a red light, light turns green, cars go, but not the one in front of you. He accelerates so slowly that you, and the cars behind you, miss the light.
    How exactly is it less safe to not keep up with traffic?

  • avatar
    jmo2

    What’s the deal with no reason highway brakers? You’re driving down the highway with nary a car in site and…tap….tap…tap tap. What’s going on?

  • avatar
    TheBlueSoap

    How about the people that brake check you when you flash to pass in the passing lane? Has happened to me too many t times to count.

    What about the people that think when they are in a merge lane, that means they continue on into the through lane (while not signalling) while you have to wait for them. They have right of way after all in their minds. Has happened so many times to me.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    This sounds like all you Mazda/Golf/Civic guys need to settle this once and for all. Meet at the Sonic parking lot on Friday night and race for pink slips. Heh heh…

  • avatar

    One instance I witnessed: It was snowing and the road surfaces, while slick, could be navigated with care – reduced speed and allowing for longer than normal braking distances. I watched as the driver of a 4X4 with oversize tires decided he/she did not need to reduce speed to be able to make the right turn they desired. The brake lights came on at a point, if on a normal dry road surface, that would have worked. Not this time. Instead of turning the vehicle proceeded in the direction it was currently going, the 4X4 sliding past the intersection fortunately not involving another motorist. Physics!


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