By on April 13, 2018

General Motors summoned all 3,000 of its Lordstown Assembly employees to the Ohio plant this afternoon, and half left the meeting with an uncertain future.

The automaker said it plans to cut the second shift at the plant, just a year after GM scrapped the third shift in the face of declining compact car sales. Lordstown, which opened in 1966, builds only the Chevrolet Cruze.

The Youngstown, Ohio newspaper The Vindicator reports that the shift will end on June 15th, leaving 1,500 workers out of a job, though an attrition program offered by the automaker should see some of those workers enter retirement. WFMJ claims the retirement packages are worth $60,000.

Regular production, now on one shift, starts up again on June 18th. GM employs 2,700 hours workers at Lordstown, plus 300 salaried employees.

Congressman Tim Ryan (D-OH), who toured the plant in late March, was quick to issue a statement in the wake of the news. Ryan points the finger at President Trump and the Environmental Protection Agency’s new mandate to roll back fuel economy standards.

“I am deeply disappointed by today’s GM Lordstown announcement,” Ryan stated. “While low gas prices encourages the decline of compact car like the Chevy Cruze, President Trump’s intention to weaken fuel economy standards is putting his thumb on the scale in favor of the larger cars and SUV’s made elsewhere. He claimed he was against the government picking winners and losers, and yet he goes against the very region and state that helped put him in office.”

Corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) targets enacted by the Obama administration did little to stem the surge of buyers away from traditional passenger cars and into commodious trucks and SUVs. The law called for a fleetwide average of 54.5 miles per gallon by the target window of 2022 to 2025, something automakers increasingly rebelled against. EPA administrator Scott Pruitt has not yet stated what the new standard will be.

While overall light-duty vehicle fuel economy has stayed pretty much stagnant over the past few years, it does so with a far greater proportion of light trucks in the mix. Turbocharging, direct injection, multi-cog transmissions and CVTs, and hybrid drivetrains have allowed consumers to purchase a new, larger vehicle with the same fuel economy of a smaller car from a decade ago. That greatly increased the appeal of crossovers and SUVs, but it hasn’t done anything good for cars like the Cruze.

The Cruze launched at a very opportune time. As the economy bounced back from the recession, gas prices soared, making the compact sedan’s 2010 debut a perfect time to tempt car-seeking Americans with a domestic automobile boasting far greater build quality and fuel economy than previous small Chevys. Sales peaked at 273,060 units in 2014, declining each year since.

Sales of the Cruze, now available in hatchback form and with an optional diesel engine, sank 13.4 percent in March. Year-to-date, Cruze sales are off last year’s tally by 26.1 percent.

Last week, GM announced a refreshed 2019 model.

[Images: General Motors]

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62 Comments on “GM Cuts Half of Lordstown Plant’s Workforce as Chevrolet Cruze Sales Slide...”


  • avatar
    MrIcky

    “I am deeply disappointed by today’s GM Lordstown announcement,” Ryan stated. “While low gas prices encourages the decline of compact car like the Chevy Cruze, President Trump’s intention to weaken fuel economy standards is putting his thumb on the scale in favor of the larger cars and SUV’s made elsewhere.”

    —um, I may be misunderstanding the economy of cars right now, but isn’t it kind of the opposite, the small cars are basically made elsewhere and the large cars and trucks are increasingly being made here?

    • 0 avatar
      jeoff

      Yeah, the whole “blame it on Trump” thing is pretty silly—but, Trump does the same thing—taking credit for the sun rising in the morning, and blaming previous administrations for bananas turning brown.

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        I guess Tim Ryan, being the partisan hack that he is, doesn’t want to address the fact that Mexican made Cruzes are still being sold in the US. No, that’s has no impact on the Lordstowon output at all. Nope.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Tips my hat to you.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          As I understand it, it’s only the Cruze hatches – all 18 of them – that are built in Mexico.

          In any case, it’d make more sense to build something truck-ish in Lordstown, and move the Cruze to Mexico.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            ” As I understand it, it’s only the Cruze hatches – all 18 of them – that are built in Mexico.”

            GM lied, it was all over the news last year. CNN money found Mexican built sedans for sale in Lordstown GM dealership

            http://money.cnn.com/2017/01/19/news/economy/donald-trump-chevy-cruze-mexico/index.html

            ” Right now in the United States, there are Chevy Cruze sedans for sale at GM dealerships that were made in Mexico.

            In fact, CNNMoney even found a Mexican-made Cruze sedan for sale at a GM dealership in Lordstown, Ohio. “

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Interesting, I thought they were just making the hatchbacks down there.

            Still think it’d be a better place to make ’em all, if you think about it. Let Lordstown make a higher-profit vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          TwoBelugas,
          We had a similar issue in Australia with Cruze production by Holden.

          The fact was they were half the price from Korea.

          Why would you want GM customers to pay more for a vehicle, which will make it overly expensive or the taxpayers will need to subisidise inefficient UAW workers in the US?

          The US has a protected large vehicle market because it’s uncompetitive at vehicle production, like many other countries. The sooner we realise we are not industrial nations first the better we will be.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            “Why would you want GM customers to pay more for a vehicle, which will make it overly expensive or the taxpayers will need to subisidise inefficient UAW workers in the US?”

            So at the end we all reach the same conclusion that it’s an issue of the product not being competitive, not the CAFE MPG rollback BS that the hyper partisan Tim Ryan is trying to blame, that is the cause of the slow sales.

            Cool.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            TwoBelugas,
            The product might be uncompetitive because of price. If it was priced right maybe someone would buy them.

            The Cruze in Australia wasn’t nowhere near the success of the Camry or Mondeo (Fusion). Even the Accord is not a big seller here.

            CUVs and SUVs are more competitive, but, everyone in the world is making them as well. And I do believe GMs lineup of small to midsize SUVs and CUVs are not as competitive as they could be. They are boring and bland overall compared to competitors and overpriced.

            I envisage GM competing more with FCA in the future. GM has been making more poor decisions since the GFC then even FCA.

            Here’s what happens when you are not competitive and handouts/protection is not the answer. Producing the right product at the right price is.

            https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/motoring/national-icon-driven-around-the-bend/ar-AAvQudQ?ocid=spartandhp

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            “The product might be uncompetitive because of price. If it was priced right maybe someone would buy them.”

            You have no idea how cheaply you can get Cruzes.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Plus, isn’t the existence of strict fuel economy standards already “putting your thumb on the scale” and “picking winners & losers”?

      Depite CARB’s and the Sierra Club’s claims, Rep. Ryan is basically admitting that Americans don’t have much interest in purchasing smalller, more fuel-efficient vehicles without major government intervention.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        It’s all window dressing and bulls**t, which no one understands better than Ryan himself. Of course he’s gonna “go to bat” for the constituents.

    • 0 avatar
      Acd

      Congressman Ryan prefers putting a thumb on the scale so that it favors cars built in his district.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Well, this is what congressmen do. The entire congressional delegation from the Denver area is probably all over Amazon to do HQ2 here. Makes sense.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          @Freed

          This whole Amazon HQ thing is so ridiculous, the whole purpose of a HQ is to be the central point of dissemination of corporate policy, strategy, communication etc. Yet the gov’t fifedoms show up and prostitute themselves with tax monies to woo a company with more money that it knows what to do with. It feels like there’s something else going on with this, at least to me. Aside from something off the wall, the only thing which makes sense to me is to set up another large office should or if the company were to split into separate components.

  • avatar
    ajla

    My mother would have bought a new Cruze hatch to replace her Matrix if it wasn’t for the agressive and undefeatable stop/start system.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I have a ’16 Cruze Premier with the RS package. Yes, the start/stop has started to get annoying. Fortunately, if you let your foot off the brake, it will turn the engine back on and keep it on until the next stop at least, but it’s still annoying. I do average 35 MPG, but I don’t think the start/stop plays a major factor in that.

      • 0 avatar
        bullnuke

        I’m surprised that no one seems to have figured out how to hack the ECU through the OBDII port to turn the start/stop off. I haven’t looked into the programming for a Cruz but if I can change the injector timing in my car through OBDII there must be a way to kill the start/stop.

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      So what exactly is so awful about the engine shutting down when you’re not going anywhere? Does it take too long or make too much a ruckus when refiring? do you lose A/C or heat? Otherwise i’m fine not burning up fuel at a red light.

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      So what exactly is so awful about the engine shutting down when you’re not going anywhere? Does it take too long or make too much a ruckus when refiring? do you lose A/C or heat? Otherwise i’m fine not burning up fuel at a red light.

      • 0 avatar
        ernest

        1. It’s friggin’ annoying.

        2. Before start/stop, starter failures were usually confined to your own garage, or at least a parking lot where you could deal with it rationally.

        NOW… when the starter fails (and it will) it’ll happen during the commute home… on the Interstate… in the middle of a blizzard or a heat wave… because these things always happen that way.

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          Start/stop systems don’t shut down on the highway. They shutdown when the car comes to a complete stop.

          Hybrids are different.

          The starter on my Prius never failed, because MG1 is a core part of the drive train and is roughly 17HP:
          https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hybrid_Synergy_Drive

          The gas engine is the slaved peripheral in this system. The system is built around Toyota’s magic transmission, which is really a bigass differential with MG2 on one side and MG1+ICE on the other. It shifts by balancing the power electrically. It replaces mechanical complexity with software. I like thr HSD system a lot.

          V8s are thirsty, and boring old-tech, and they’re no simpler than properly engineered hybrids (just more familiar), because planetary gear automatic transmissions are complex beasts. Unlike the MAGAs, I have no interest in going back to the past.

          My next car will probably be a Tesla Model 3. Teslas are even more elegant under the hood than HSD cars:
          https://hsrmotors.com/hsr/products

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Most of my V8s did not have the complex transmission you described but rather this Uber simple arrangement where my foot actuated a clutch and my hand and arm selected an appropriate gear ratio for the direction of travel and speed. It was both reliable and engaging to drive and as such had the added benefit of reminding the driver that they were in fact driving so that should they find a guardrail coming at them they would remember to you know, steer. But yay technology.

            Honestly I had changed my trucks stereo to an android auto touchscreen interface and just this weekend I went back because knobs are so much easier to deal with while driving.

          • 0 avatar
            b534202

            So nice that you think completely stopped due to traffic on highway is not a real thing.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Even assuming this feature has perfect long-term reliability, the stop/start function is noticeable from an NVH perspective and they are programmed to be very aggressive.

        The ones I’ve dealt with shut down at *every* stop. So you’re dealing with the on-off annoyance at things like stop signs and quick traffic lights. It really needs to either be defeatable or driver adjustable (say to 50 seconds of idle time before turning off or something like that).

        Imagine someone cracking their knuckles or doing a short whistle every time you came to a complete stop. That’s what living with these systems is like.

        I’ve also read some forum accounts of people forgetting to put their vehicles into park or forgetting to turn the ignition off due to this feature.

    • 0 avatar
      Guitar man

      …which wouldn’t have helped anyone at Lordstown. The hatchback is made in Mexico.

  • avatar
    St.George

    Weren’t small car sales cratering well before any recent EPA talk? Historically, low gas prices have led to declining economy car sales. Low gas prices are caused by the low price of crude, along with whatever taxation regime the country/state in question has.

    Seems a bit of a reach to blame the President on this one!!

  • avatar

    how about an effective plan to sell these goods?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Effective Cruze Marketing Plan:
      1) Recession
      2) Gas price increase

      Otherwise, expect sales to continue to dwindle.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        Trump’s trade war is likely to create a recession.

        Taxing international trade means less buying and selling which is, by definition, a recession.

        So, I wouldn’t take the cheap cars off the market just yet.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          ” I wouldn’t take the cheap cars off the market just yet.”

          Neither would I.

          I see sales opportunities for cheap Chinese-made and cheap India-made cars and small pickup trucks here.

          Trade war driven recession? Maybe. But it was high time that someone leveled the playing field.

          I hope that NAFTA gets renegotiated to where there will not be any deficits and imbalances, even if that means that the US buys/imports less.

          And I’m all for bi-lateral deal making with other trading partners along those same lines where there is no trade imbalance or trade deficit.

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-X

      An effective plan? It takes an effective team to do that. Forward thinking, non-reactionary, long term. Plan for several possible futures, just not the single-minded one that Cruzes will sell hot forever.

      A third shift was added at Lordstown, then the capacity at the plant in Mexico, and as soon as those workers got trained (“made less mistakes”), Mexico remains, and TWO shifts at Lordstown die.

      If the Auto Media, including TTAC, would do their job, they would point out this:

      June 10, 2016: General Motors released a statement: Lordstown Complex is currently running THREE shifts to produce the 2016 Chevrolet Cruze, which is of to a strong start. In an effort to meet customer demand for the Chevrolet Cruze, GM will be utilizing existing production capacity in Ramos Arizpe, Mexico, to supplement production at its plant in Lordstown, Ohio. Cruze vehicles are continuing to arrive in dealers across the U.S. and Canada, and we expect that dealer inventories will increase this month. In May, Cruze retail share was up 2 percentage points and its average transaction price was up substantially from last fall. The all-new Cruze accounted for 85 percent of Cruze retail sales in May compared to 53 percent in April.

  • avatar
    dwford

    GM is literally giving these cars away. It doesn’t take too exotic a combination of incentives and discounts to get nearly $10k off one of these. It may not be at the top of it’s class, but getting a new $23k car in the $13-15k range is pretty attractive.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Cruze LT2 with RS package always seemed like a pretty nice ride for the class of vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      Might want to look up the definition of literally.

      Otherwise, I agree. It’s a fantastically practical vehicle, for an amazing price.

    • 0 avatar
      tekdemon

      I remember when GM was subsidizing the leases so heavily you could drive one for a year for $400 in total annual payments if you qualified for enough incentives lol. Some people did even better if they owned a Volt since GM gave them even more money towards the lease.
      Even now I’m not sure buying it is the better deal is the funny thing.

      Anyways, the real problem with the Cruze is that when it came out it was clearly the nicer car versus the competition. Had a much nicer interior than the bungled 2012 Civic with the prison sentence interior and had a much better powertrain option in the Turbo motor than any Corolla (as well as a nicer interior in my opinion).

      But now the Civic is back the way it should be and Toyota has thrown adaptive cruise control into even the cheapest Corolla and the Cruze no longer seems like a class leader but is instead a has been. Aside from price there’s no way anybody in their right mind would buy a Cruze over a Civic.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        It is amazing how fast the market moves. The Cruze is only 3 model years old, and it is now considered behind the times.

        Still, for the price after discounts you are getting a fully modern car. It’s not like 20 years ago when a dirt cheap Cavalier was lightyears behind a Civic.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The current Honda Civic is a smoking deal in this segment. That probably isn’t helping Cruze sales any.

      When we bought ours (as a placeholder for my wife’s 100+ mile commute until our Model 3 comes), it came with adaptive cruise and self-steering for $20k (a little over $22k out the door).

      The Civic has every characteristic that I want from a luxury car, except the panel gaps weren’t perfect.

      We really wanted adaptive cruise control and AEB, and the Cruze didn’t have anything remotely close to Honda Sensing at any price. Most of the cars we looked at were teice the price. Civic wins.

      And, like the Accords and Civics of the 1990s, it’s always just a little bit nicer than I expect when I start it up.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “Sales peaked at 273,060 units in 2014, declining each year since.”

    Mr Trump has only been in office since January 2017, so he can’t be blamed… at least for this one.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      But he promised lots of manufacturing jobs as soon as he took office.

      Of course, anyone with a descerning ear could easily see that he was just making things up. But lots of people believed him.

      Will those who believed him hold him accountable? Probably not.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    I do feel sorry for the workers being laid off. Past 1970 GM; not the workers, mind you! made Lordstown the assembly plant for rolling piles of “meh”. The new millennium gave us more “meh”; Cavalier, Sunfire, Cobalt, yo! The Gs! 4/5 and currently the Cruze. Now, I’d say some GM white collar management lifers need to make a trip to Marysville. It is in the same state, not the same stat of mind.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “I do feel sorry for the workers being laid off.”

      You know, that’s life. Can happen to anyone, in any job, no matter how wisely they chose their career and life’s work. Even in top government secure-positions it can be “Here Today, Gone Tomorrow.”

      While GM was already double-crossed prior to its demise in 2009 because of its bad products, it became cursed after being resurrected from the dead with taxpayer-funded handouts, bailouts and nationalization and forced to lumber on like a Zombie.

      GM products do not offer the value for the money that Ford and Toyota products offer to buyers, many who once drove GM but since voted with their feet and their wallets.

    • 0 avatar
      TwoBelugas

      I was surprised they didn’t raze the Lordstown plant flat as Carthage after the Vega.

      Consider that Corolla and Civic sales are at all time highs, the argument that, people are not buying small cars because Trump is making noise about CAFE, is just stupid beyond description.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        The Civic’s the one that’s at an all time high. Corolla is down substantially.

        • 0 avatar
          TwoBelugas

          “The Civic’s the one that’s at an all time high. Corolla is down substantially.”

          Corolla sold 363k in 2016 and 308k in 2017. Sure it’s down if you only use two data points, but in the past 17 years Corollas sold less than 308k in 2000,2001,2002,2009,2010,2011,2012 and 2013. On average they sell about the same annual volume in the last 4 years as they did around 2007, hardly “down substantially”.

      • 0 avatar
        Peter Gazis

        TwoBelugas

        I think you meant to say Corolla fleet sales are at all time highs. Total Corolla sales have fallen 20% in the last 2 years.

        Honda Accord sales are tanking, but the Civic is doing well.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      el scotto,
      I fell sorry for the workers as well. It’s a pity more effort was not put into re-education of these guys, we (including Australia) had years of notice of our uncompetitive areas of industry where we could of been better prepared.

      But we seem to kick the tin (can) down the road, then blame others for our own shortcomings. As is seen here the worker suffers because of poor decision making.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      A large percentage of those may still be temporary workers. That is how Toyota and Honda do it.

  • avatar
    2doorpost

    So you overprice a car, advertise incentives that nobody cares about (foreign makes, leased owners etc) and then wonder why the car isn’t selling?
    The bean counters forgot about trade assist and loyalty rebates for Chevy owners.
    Its a $13500 car in LS form, $15000 in LT trim.
    Period.

    Mary Barra, You’ve let the plant twist in the wind hoping it dies. You put a 3 or a K on the front of the VIN- nobody will buy your cars .
    Guaranteed.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    It amuses me, sort of, that GM is acting like any other company does when demand for it’s product softens, workers get laid off. This is considered a bad thing. Up until recently though, GM would have kept on making cars and selling them at a huge loss. This is considered a bad thing, also.

    So which is the bad thing? Adjusting to market demands like so many people harped about, or keep the factory humming, damn the torpedos?

    Cruze production has gone up and down to meet demand the entire time it’s been in production. Every other automaker does this, but I think it’s being politicized this time. When the other shifts were added/eliminated, there wasn’t this much attention paid to it, other than local media.

    All sedans are taking it in the shorts right now, look at the proposals by Ford and GM to cut both large and small sedans in the US market. Nothing new under the sun, but I would agree that USDM production costs better suit higher margin vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Well, yeah, it is a bad thing – it’s an economic setback to an area that sure as hell doesn’t need any more economic setbacks.

    • 0 avatar
      Trucky McTruckface

      Nobody’s suggesting that GM should just keep pumping out cars at a loss. What’s galling about this is that they’re still building the car in Mexico, too…why not cut that shift before you cut jobs in the country that bailed your a$$ out?

      Of course not, because GM only gives a sh!t North America when they need a handout or in order to protect Buick’s brand equity in China.

      I love how your knee-jerk GM fanboyism extends to defending North American job cuts. I thought the whole point in supporting the Big Three was to support jobs here? Or is it because buying a Korean-engineered, Mexican-built car with a bowtie on the hood so the company invest all the profits into autonomous nonsense and more new models for China is really that important to you?

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        This reality started long before 2008. The Trump-era reality really has accelerated the concept of bringing jobs back to the US.

        The reason that they’re still making them in Old Mexico is because it is cheaper to do so and leaves a wider margin of profit for GM.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        It’s not exactly as simple as cutting the Mexican plant vs cutting a shift at Lordstown. The Cruze Hatch only comes from Mexico, so to drop the Mexican plant, GM would have to move the tooling etc.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          And you can bet that there is violent opposition to moving the plants out of Mexico to the US, and it is an integral part of NAFTA renegotiations.

          Clearly, there will be restructuring in the US auto industry. At least while Trump is in office. And the big losers will be Canada, Mexico and South Korea.

          The only way a happy medium can be reached is if Trump gets the deal he wants. If not, it is all over but the crying.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        Sorry, Trucky, I’m not defending any job cuts. I’ve been on the receiving end of them several times in my career. It’s way less than fun. I’m from the Youngstown Ohio steel country near Lordstown. I know what it’s like to see a complete industry crater. You should live through it sometime, it’s quite instructive. I now live in a city in Western Michigan that has two GMCH plants. The company I work for is a supplier to GM (plus others) and also it’s suppliers. I want the company to do well, as it will materially affect my living conditions.

        This is the hypocrisy of GM haters that dispute their actions no matter what actions they take.

        They have supported the jobs here. In the immediate aftermath of the GFC, GM invested heavily in plants here in Michigan and other parts of the upper midwest. Lansing (x2), Hamtramck, Lake Orion, Lordstown, plus parts plants they purchased back from Delphi. Granted, they cut a lot of dead wood during that time too. Only plants that were profitable were going to be kept open. But I’m sure that would be wrong, to you.

        Oh yeah, I guess that’s not as much fun as ridiculing them for adapting to global market conditions. China is a big market, bigger than ours. Has been for a while now. But according to you we shouldn’t sell popular Buicks there. Because this nation would want them to remain profitable and not need another set of loan guarantees. But I’m sure that would be wrong, to you.

        But I don’t have unrealistic ideas about how much production should be increased. Nor do I have a problem with them utilizing their global resources like other manufacturers do. Here’s how you help out. Go and buy a couple of domestically produced Chevys. If we get enough people to do the same, maybe they can move more production here to the US. But I’m sure buying a domestically made Chevy would be wrong, to you.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    on top of changing tastes, Tim Ryan needs to blame student edu debt.

    Cruze, Focus, Civic, etc. the stereotypical first new car purchase by a 20-something finally settled in her/his post-college life.

    now those buyers are deferring new car buys or and/or using Uber

  • avatar
    geo

    I’m a little surprised that sales are falling so much.

    Could it be the 2016 redesign causing the sales decline? I thought it was pretty decent…

    Year sales
    2010 24,495
    2011 231,732
    2012 237,758
    2013 248,224
    2014 273,060
    2015 226,602
    2016 188,876
    2017 184,751

  • avatar
    sketch447

    What a darned waste. A great compact sedan. But how can Honda sell every Civic they can make, with minimal discounting? How can Toyota sell the stodgy Corolla in high numbers, with not much money on the hood?

    The Cruze was dying before Trump ever took office. The large SUV mutated into endless compact variations with comparable fuel economy to sedans. And people will keep buying SUVs even up to 4 buck gas.

    Higher fuel economy standards and gas taxes? It’s all an elitist plot to maintain power.

    The elitists drive the desirable vehicles and the rest of us end up with donkey carts. You “save” the planet, but they OWN the planet. Maybe people would have more sympathy for higher fuel economy standards if if the Obamas and Hillarys drove Chevy Sparks instead of taxpayer-subsidized stretch limos. (Are you aware that HRC hasn’t driven a car for decades b/c of that handy limo outside her door at all times?)

    I drive a 4cyl sedan with a stick. Not looking for any SUV. But I’ll always want that choice and I don’t need Obama telling me I can’t have that choice. And by the way, Trump rocks!!!!!

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