By on October 7, 2017

tesla model 3

It’s been of week of bad PR and reports that should have Tesla investors tugging their collars and thinking twice, though in Teslaland these well-publicised issues only propel the automaker’s stock even higher.

The company’s electric big rig (aka the Tesla Semi), rumored to have a range of 200 to 300 miles, won’t see the light of day until November 16th, CEO Elon Musk claims. That’s two months after the initial reveal date, which was subsequently pushed back until late October.

The larger problem facing the company is the slow ramp-up of Model 3 production, which kicked off in July, but only resulted in only 220 deliveries by the end of September. The company forecasted 1,500 Model 3s in the month of September, with an expected production rate of 5,000 vehicles per week by the end of the year. Blame the slow trickle of cars on a “manufacturing bottleneck issue,” the company said in a statement.

As Musk attempts to soothe fears, a new report claims the automaker was hand-building parts away from the assembly line even as the high-tech facility was supposed to be cranking out Model 3s at a steady clip. Tesla is not happy about this report.

The Wall Street Journal claimed yesterday that as late as early September, workers were assembling major portions of the Model 3 by hand, away from the Fremont, California plant’s automated assembly line.

The unnamed sources told the WSJ that because the assembly line wasn’t ready, Tesla created a special area in the plant for the low-tech builds, leading to far fewer completed vehicles. Customers, of which hundreds of thousands already exist, and investors were not made aware of this.

Adding to the controversy are production discrepancies discovered this week by the Daily Kanban. Musk told the media, and thus potential investors, that production would reach 500,000 vehicles a year in 2018. However, in a January application for sales tax exemption from California’s CAEATFA program, the company claims a Model 3 production capacity of 226,563 units per year over a five-year span. Combine that figure with the predicted production of the Model S and X (195,000) and the total tally falls far short of the half-million mark.

In response to queries from the WSJ, a Tesla spokeswoman refused to answer questions, the publication claims. Instead, the spokeswoman attacked the WSJ, stating, “For over a decade, the WSJ has relentlessly attacked Tesla with misleading articles that, with few exceptions, push or exceed the boundaries of journalistic integrity. While it is possible that this article could be an exception, that is extremely unlikely.”

The word “defensive” doesn’t even begin to capture the fury of that statement — a response that isn’t likely to make Tesla any friends in the journalism sphere. Well, maybe there’s one exception.

In response to yesterday’s tweet, Musk referenced an earlier statement by saying, “We are deep in production hell.” One commenter asked when those on the Model 3 waiting list can expect official information as to delivery dates, to which Musk responded, “You’ll know as soon as we do.”

The CEO said he expects the online configurator (aka “design studio”) to appear for non-employee Model 3 reservation holders in six to eight weeks. As of now, Tesla is only making one configuration of the electric sedan (the pricier Long Range model), with the only option being paint color.

The upswing in bad PR for Tesla corresponds with a rise in defensiveness from Musk’s most ardent supporters, sending the car company even closer to becoming a de-facto political affiliation or religion. Some would say it’s already reached that point. One thing not impacted by the troubling reports or the fanatical fanboyism, however, is the company’s stock.

Tesla shares began the week trading at $342.52, and ended the week at $356.88. Earlier this week, one Wall Street firm predicted the stock hitting the $500-a-share mark within a year.

[Image: Tesla]

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80 Comments on “Tesla Delays Big Rig, Tries to Ramp Up Model 3 Production As Report of Hand-built Parts Surfaces...”


  • avatar
    JimZ

    I almost feel sorry for anyone getting an early “production” Model 3.

    and did their reps attend the Sean Spicer School for Public Relations or something?

  • avatar
    RHD

    It would be interesting to know which parts are being built by hand.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      Given the high profile of Tesla and interest therein, I’m really surprised there’s no “deep throat” employee blogger providing frequent anonymous updates.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        They’re too busy playing Tetris with a never ending stream of incoming crises….

        This isn’t that different from most launches in the software business. Nothing ever works right, everything around you is collapsing, and there is an almost constant fight just to stay above water. So everyone is improvising, putting in short term hacks, staving off customer complaints just long enough to fix the most pressing issues for those who scream the loudest, rinse repeat…….

        Until, slowly but surely, the mountain of short term hacks starts to cover enough problems that new ones become rarer, and you can start refactoring the hack jungle into something more coherent, maintainable, permanent and solid to build on for the future.

        Unless the clients/market/regulators pull the plug on you before yo get that far…… It’s always a gamble. But one that has a remarkable tendency to sorta-kinda work out in the end, as long as you have bright, competent people working with you.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      Click through on the WSJ article link, it describes what is being done in the back room. The article talks about one worker holding pieces in place while another worker welds them together by hand.

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    Tesla is the forest, production issues are the trees. I’ve been buying TSLA for a year and it has been very profitable. I always buy the dips, when people freak because of some minor nonsense.

    You think Ford got the assembly line right the first time? You think Toyota’s first cars had no issues? Yeah there will be delays, there will be snags, there will be bad PR weeks. But long term you will kick yourself for not having bought at $350 a share.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “Tesla is the forest, production issues are the trees.”

      Nonsense. Every other car company out there has stopped building hand-built prototypes at least a year before they start mass production.

      “I always buy the dips, when people freak because of some minor nonsense.”

      hand-building customer cars because your assembly line isn’t ready is not “minor nonsense.”

      “You think Ford got the assembly line right the first time? You think Toyota’s first cars had no issues?”

      What? No, seriously, WHAT? Tesla has been mass producing cars for 4 years now. It’s inexcusable that they’re running around in panic mode like they just all of a sudden forgot how cars are built.

      Oh, and I like how you took a page out of the Apple Fanboy playbook. “If I can’t come up with a reasonable point, then I’ll brag about the price of my AAPL/TSLA shares.”

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        My FCA stock doubled since I bought it recently, doesn’t mean FCA is on the path to glory.

      • 0 avatar
        thegamper

        I think so much of today’s current stock market, at least with regard to tech companies, Apple, Tesla, Facebook, Amazon…..is driven by an irrational exuberance. The thought that these companies will take over the world. It’s understandable with the speed at which tech is moving and the fact that these companies seem to gobble up competitors. But fundamentals of investing are being thrown out the window to reach these valuations. Alot of people in the financial industry will readily admit it can’t continue and the bubble, like those before it, will pop.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      I_like_stuff, Tesla is supposed to be in the business of manufacturing cars with sufficient volume and profit margins to make the value of your piece of the company, TSLA stock, go up. Not being able to manufacture cars at the volume previously promised should be a huge red flag that maybe Tesla can’t meet their revenue projections. What would happen to the value of F stock if there had been news that Ford was hand building the aluminum body F-150 because the assembly line wasn’t ready? The selloff of F would be huge even though Ford has other high volume models in production and a century of experience. Tesla doesn’t have any high volume manufacturing history to give one confidence that manufacturing problems will be corrected soon.

    • 0 avatar
      anomaly149

      “Tesla is the forest, production issues are the trees.”

      Stock is the tail, production is the dog.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      “You think Ford got the assembly line right the first time?”

      Because this is 1903 and they’ve never built a car before?

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Even in 1903, Henry Ford was on his second car company. His first one became Cadillac.

        • 0 avatar
          WildcatMatt

          Actually, Henry’s first car company was the Detroit Automobile Company, founded in 1899.

          His second car company, the Henry Ford Company, was founded in 1901. That’s the one Henry Leland turned into Cadillac.

          The Ford Motor Company was his third attempt, which was founded in 1903 and definitely did not use an assembly line that year.

          However, the folks over in Lansing were using assembly lines to assemble the Curved Dash Oldsmobile in 1903.

    • 0 avatar
      jpolicke

      Ol’ Henry also didn’t talk half a million people into giving him an interest-free loan in the form of deposits on the Model T.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    That’s one way to look at it-“I like stuff”. Another way is to look at the automotive manufacturing business and see the 100’s of manufacturers that went out of business-either outright or that were acquired by the bigger companies. MUSK is finding out building cars in not easy-IMHO his company is not long for this world-in it’s present form.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      the comparison to Ford in the early 1900s was particularly eyeroll-worthy.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        No kidding. The only possible extrapolation from such a statement is that Tesla has no idea what in the hell they’re doing, so its perfectly acceptable for them to promise thousands of cars and deliver a couple hundred.

        If this was their first car ever, and this wasn’t a consistent pattern (over promising while under delivering), then maybe cutting them some slack would be prudent. As it is, they’ve been building cars for a while now, and they’ve steadily promised what they can’t deliver.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    If Tesla EVER hits one of their deadlines I would expect the stock will triple overnight – perhaps the stock exchange activities will even need to be suspended due to the market shock from such a 1 in a billion event.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      In some organizations, part of their culture is to set unrealistic deadlines. If you give them a realistic schedule, they’re going to push you to pull it in. They give you a date and you have to make everything fit. You start adjusting numbers until some parts of the schedule rely on everything going perfectly. Some even believe that even if you set a realistic deadline, it will be missed anyway. I’ve never found that to be true, but I’m sure it happens and if it does, the schedule slip isn’t nearly as bad. Unrealistic deadlines are a great way to burn people out.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        that might work for software dev (though devs who have been through more than one round of “crunch” time would probably disagree) but it’s nothing but a recipe for pain and failure in manufacturing hard goods.

        It’s one thing to have an optimistic schedule. But what Tesla is doing is akin to saying “I need a baby in one month. Get me 9 women!”

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @jimz: You’re right. I’ve worked in pure software and in robotics. Funny things happen to hardware in the real world. Test something in the lab and it works fine. Move it outdoors in familiar surroundings and it works fine. Take it into the field for testing and everything goes wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            Which is why bypassing the whole lab and familiar surroundings stages, is not necessarily as bad as it may initially seem. This does seem to be what Tesla is attempting to do. Despite it being quite unusual in the automotive sector.

            Just spike up something with enough “vision” and excitement to motivate people with it’s “insane greatness”, then frantically get busy knocking down genuinely real world problems as they prop up. Cross your fingers and hope you can knock enough of them down, before you yourself run out of resources, and end up being the one knocked down….

            At the very least, you aren’t wasting your time and resources on non problems, that only seemed like they were going to be real world problems, back when you were still in the lab phase.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “Which is why bypassing the whole lab and familiar surroundings stages, is not necessarily as bad as it may initially seem.”

            you don’t have the faintest idea what you’re talking about.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            I haven’t launched a mass produced production car, nor even tried to, so I ultimately may not have much of an idea….

            I’ve been in on plenty of other launches across multiple fields, and you’d be surprised at the extent to which being under a real gun, cuts through the fog and straightens out priorities. Making the end to end process more efficient once the dust has settled.

            Even within the automotive sector, race teams tend to work directly on the prototype. “Open heart surgery on the patient while he’s running a marathon” style. Ditto for so called “experimental” aircraft. And at the launch, the Stoner designed M16/AR15 was very much in at best an advanced beta stage. Yet, by way of decades of real world feedback and refinement, it has now displaced virtually all the once thought to be better initially designed alternatives.

            Tose businesses work that way for the same reason software businesses do: The real world is a very different place than what you can possibly hope to imagine in a lab. So it can be much more efficient to have your priorities scheduled by actual real world events, rather than by what you imagine will be important problems in a lab setting.

            There is an infinite number of things that could pose a problem during a car launch. And an even infiniter number of permutations of how those problems rank order in importance. The only list of problems, and their only ranking, that are ultimately “correct”, is the one the customers provide you with. You can try reasoning your way to this rank ordering a priori in a lab. Or you can let the customer tell you directly. In reality, it will be a bit of both: Even Tesla launched something resembling a functional car with the Model 3….. It is not inconceivable that leaning more towards the latter, iow spending less resources pre launch when priority ranking is more speculative, while getting quicker to the direct customer feedback stage, is always the wrong way to go.

            The fact that most/all other successful automakers don’t do things the “Tesla” way, certainly is a strong indication that doing things this way is not well suited for car production. But otoh, trying to outdo Toyota at being Toyota from a startup in the Bay Area, is a losing proposition to begin with. Attempting to make an end run around their whole process, at least theoretically gives you a shot at beating them.

      • 0 avatar
        WheelMcCoy

        All too true. The typical meeting goes “We’re late! Move this process here and that process there and we can save 2 weeks.”

        Two weeks later, “Oops, now we have to make these parts by hand.”

        But we’re talking as the cognoscenti. The outside world sees the accomplishments of TESLA, which are real — supercharger network, power wall, and that the Model S is an electric car that’s really fast and fun.

        Bonus: in light of the recent post of sudden unintended acceleration, in a Tesla, you just lift off and braking will engage. Not confusing the pedals has a real world benefit.

        So while this news is bad, and irritating, TESLA will just keep… uh… plugging away.

    • 0 avatar
      jpolicke

      If Tesla ever hits one of their deadlines energy stocks will triple, because it’ll take a lot of fuel to relight the fires after hell froze over.

  • avatar
    arthurk45

    A should be obvious from some of the remarks here defending Tesla, Tesla fans are members of a cult – it should surprise no one when facts such as “120 EV models coming in next 2 years from automakers” is taken a GOOD news. Then,
    when some few half-awake stock analysts realize that Tesla’s govt tax credit subsidies are about to be cut in half and then eliminated within 4 quarters,
    meaning that Tesla will be marketing vehicles that have a price disadvantage of $7500 against almost all of their two dozen competitors. Knowing the cheapskate a-hole Musk. this will occasion a grand gesture on his part that amounts to an argument that “electric cars no longer need any ovt subsidies.” Tough , Elon: he who lives by the govt handout, dies by the govt handout.
    But the biggest news by far with respect to the future of electric cars
    had nothing to do with Tesla Motors. It was the announcement from Toshiba Corp of a revolutionary battery – it is due to commercialize in 2019 and will render every electric car on the road immediately more or less obsolete, and likely destroy its resale value. For this reason I would advise anyone thinking about buying an electric car to adopt a wait and see attitude. These new batteries have already been subjected to thorough testing and are not
    merely “estimates” of some future value.

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      Toshiba (Westinghouse in the US) has about the same level of credibility as Musk and Tesla. I worked with Westinghouse and its engineers for a number of years.The” Circle Bar W Boys” we called ’em. Turn their trademark upside down and you “You can tell it’s Mattel…It’s swell!”.

    • 0 avatar
      tekdemon

      You do realize that the only other manufacturer that have sold any real EV volume in the US are also about to run out of credits? GM and Nissan are the only real competition in the EV space. GM has about 50,000 credits remaining so at current sales rates they’ll likely run out in the first half of next year, either in the same quarter as Tesla or maybe one quarter later. Nissan has a little over 80,000 credits remaining, but they’re trying to increase volumes on their next gen Leaf that’s coming out next year so it’s likely they’d phase out within 2 years or so unless they just don’t sell any (in which case they lose economies of scale).

      Newcomers may have a real advantage, but at least right now the major competitors in the EV race will all phase out within a year of each other and Tesla’s closest competition right now is GM and they’re basically neck and neck on the phase out.

  • avatar
    anomaly149

    Man, I wish production delays at my company increased our stock value like that.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    Checking out further Daily Kanban updates, it seems that there is still more news on the Model 3, with an article titled`

    Source: Tesla’s “Pilot” Model 3 Body Line Still In Development Near Detroit

    Oh yus. Thai Summit America is the supplier. here’s a sample.

    “According to this source familiar with Thai Summit America’s business with Tesla, the supplier has been developing a pilot body panel line for Tesla. This highly-automated body line will reportedly operate for 18-24 months, and then be shipped to Tesla’s Fremont, CA production plant if all goes well. According to the same source, Five Lakes Automation, an assembly automation firm specializing in body stamping and welding lines, is also collaborating on the pilot line.”

    Meanwhile, get a hand-built Model 3 while the going’s bad. Elon Musk is an angry gadfly to me – how dare you doubt me you peons! Mercurial and full of self-righteous bluster. An ideas man with a capability of making some untechnical people go cross-eyed in rapt admiration while their hands gladly remove money from their personal pockets to laud him. He’s managed to cajole people with less “vision” than he has to do the detail work on his designs and get things into production in a half-a**ed way making just super-quality vehicles like that Model S with a ridiculously awful split A-pillar.

    Working for Musk must be a nightmare as be brooks no criticism. Still if all the true believers can overlook a $10 billion debt, some canny risk takers can make money off the stock, and the rest of the glassy-eyed donate a grand each to the cause, why should I care? I don’t. It’s just fascinating to watch this leader and self-appointed apostles repel all boarders as if it would be the end of the world if they don’t.

    Some rapt journo will no doubt write a eulogizing book and make more money than Tesla has generated in net profit over the past decade. Hell, I’ve got more loose pocket change than that, and two cents beats Tesla’s results.

  • avatar

    Production delays mean they take quality seriously – therefore stock price increase. And high end luxury cars are handbuilt.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      High end luxury car? this is a [email protected] electric Honda Civic!

      Hilarious.

      • 0 avatar

        DId you see or drive one? It beats German competition by mile. Stock price reflects that like you it or not. Gas engine is the thing of past already.

        • 0 avatar
          darex

          It’s kind of funny how various knobs, buttons, and other hardware are stolen right out of the Mercedes parts bin.

          • 0 avatar

            Mercedes which is running around like a headless chicken in a panic and declaring new electrification program every week? I wonder what Daimler Benz is scared of and why all those stupid plans?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Maybe Daimler has to remain profitable to survive and its competition does not have this liability? Tesla is TBTF, maybe Daimler thinks it may not be?

          • 0 avatar

            Daimler-Benz needs to move HQ to Siliccon Valley to remain relevant.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Hahaha. Daimler should probably find the ear of one of the world’s Olympians and also seek TBTF status.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Tesla isn’t “TBTF.” The difference that if Daimler releases a product which is a dud, or fumbles a launch, they’ve got their other product lines as a buffer. Tesla doesn’t have that luxury.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Seen and crawled all over a Model 3 – that is NOT a luxury car. Driven a Model S owned by one of my closest friends quite a bit _ that IS a luxury car, but an overpriced one. They are not the second coming, and once it is actually possible to make a profit selling electric cars, Tesla is DONE. Because the real car companies that actually know what they are doing will drive them into the ground.

        The stock price is fantasyland.

        But if you buy into the cult of Elon, by all means continue to worship.

        • 0 avatar
          WheelMcCoy

          [ raising arm in “get off my lawn” fashion but saying… ] Blaspheemer!

          Keynes put the stock market in perspective, comparing it to a beauty contest. The winner is not who you think is the most beautiful, but who you think the judges think is the most beautiful.

          That said, TSLA is not exactly a retirement stock. Stick with index funds and boring companies with good dividends. Invest in TSLA if you have some money to burn, but also if you like the company, believe in its message, or believe others believe in the company.

      • 0 avatar

        Daimler Benz invented ICE and Tesla invented electric car. Daimler Benz approaching its sunset while Tesla is the future of transportation and not only on Earth. Thats why Tesla valued much more than DB. DB is the thing of past.

        • 0 avatar
          WheelMcCoy

          This is probably the key sentiment. While Mercedes is the marquee in luxury, many carmakers can make a pretty good luxury car. For EVs, it’s Tesla, Chevy Bolt, and Nissan Leaf. There are others in the works, but making an ICE into an EV is not as easy as doing an engine swap.

          Going really long and looking at Mars, EV cars will arrive there first. You can charge with solar power much more readily than digging for and processing oil. Why do you think Musk is working on SpaceX? :)

        • 0 avatar
          VoGhost

          Daimler Benz market cap: $73B
          Tesla market cap: $58B

        • 0 avatar
          SPPPP

          “Inside Looking Out”, it’s humorous that both halves of your first sentence are false. Benz didn’t invent the ICE, and Tesla didn’t invent the electric car. Though, Benz was selling electric or hybrid-electric cars way back in 1906, apparently based on Porsche electric powertrain modules.

          • 0 avatar

            @spppp And how much progress “Benz” made since 1906? How about “zero”? And according to you they did not even invent ICE car. Why DB is in state of panic if they are valued more than Tesla? Why all those talks about some other automaker buying DM and why they did merge with Chrysler Corp if they are doing so well? And why they need that CLA if they were doing so well? I am sure Tesla will not buy DM because they have nothing to offer – they are desperately trying to catch up with Tesla right now.

    • 0 avatar
      slowcanuck

      Production delays mean that they are still immature when it comes to manufacturing. They are not embarking on a worlds-first here – this is their third mass-production model.

      This is comparable to Ford, GM, Honda… hand-building components and grossly under-delivering completed units when releasing a new model into their lineup.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        production delays aren’t uncommon across the industry, but they’re more along the lines of “oops, we found a showstopper software bug in this module) or “supplier sent a run of incorrect parts and we need to quarantine.”

        if any existing automaker was delaying the start of mass production because people were still hand-assembling major portions of the car, heads would be rolling.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    I hate to say it, but Elon Musk is looking like the reincarnation of Nicola Tesla himself. Tesla was a real smart fella, but he was a self-promoter who made grandiose claims and predictions that didn’t pan out, just like Musk. Every visionary is part huckster, it’s just a problem figuring out the proportions.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Hand-building is exactly what I suspected when the Q3 Model 3 volume was reported.

    It can and will be fixed, but it will take a couple months. Until then, Tesla will sustain a lot of public whippings.

    As for the capacity vs volume projections, TTAC is grossly misrepresenting important details to suit its narrative.

    • 0 avatar
      slowcanuck

      Tesla leverages their brand to operate well into the goodwill range of their investors. Moving downrange with the Model 3, competing with an increasing number of major players, the reduction of gov’t subsidies and the aging of their debts makes them an exciting but unstable company.

      A less perilous strategy (little to no debt) has kept Apple at the top of the heap for a long time. A major difference between the two companies is that Apple knows how to bring products to market on a regular schedule.

      The public whippings Tesla is sustaining will actually start to leave permanent marks if they don’t start delivering real products to customers on a consistent basis.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        The biggest difference is that Apple operates in a high margin industry while Tesla is trying to make claims of comparable margin potential in an industry that has never produced that kind of margin.

  • avatar
    derekson

    So now in addition to beta testing the car’s software, now “customers” (though we know it’s actually all Tesla employees so they haven’t actually made a customer delivery) are beta testing seats, batteries, and headlights.

    https://electrek.co/2017/10/06/tesla-model-3-headlights-battery-seats/

    I love that the fanboy writing the article thinks this is perfectly normal for production of a new vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      People like Fred Lambert know nothing about the auto industry apart from Tesla.

    • 0 avatar
      anomaly149

      In fairness, this isn’t super uncommon during prototype and preproduction builds. You find issues, you swap parts and move on. Everyone has a little bit of this, the difference is most OEMs have an idea of how much “oh [email protected]#$” time they need to bake into a program, so you never see a production delay.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “In fairness, this isn’t super uncommon during prototype and preproduction builds.”

        yes, but with everyone else those things are going on a year before launch.

        Not on cars meant to be sold to customers.

        • 0 avatar
          anomaly149

          Customer-bound cars get refitted if issues are identified. Just because mass production (which starts 2-3 months before a car goes on sale) has started doesn’t mean that an OEM won’t tear vehicles apart and rebuild them to fix issues. (and definitely doesn’t mean issues won’t crop up. Never underestimate a supplier’s ability to screw you at the worst possible time!) Seats and lamps are fairly self-contained, so the adverse impact to the car by this replacement is probably minimal in this case.

          It sucks, but those issues aren’t unheard of.

  • avatar
    Ermel

    Tesla should ditch the ridiculous semi idea and focus on getting Model 3s out the door. Really, WTF: take on the one segment of transportation where unladen weight is a huge problem due to relementation, and attack it with battery-electric vehicles?

  • avatar
    vvk

    There is no such thing as bad publicity. Keep up the good work.

    • 0 avatar
      hamish42

      Yeah, there is such a thing as bad publicity. It took Tesla out of the conversation for our new car, as much as my wife wanted one. I think, to purchase a Tesla, you have to believe. And we couldn’t bring ourselves to do that.

  • avatar

    If nothing else, we have proven that going to Space is easier (!) than building a mass market car.

  • avatar
    Synchromesh

    Heh, this is funny, finally saw a model 3 in person today on the road in San Francisco. It was nothing special, looked like a squashed Model S. Red in color with some hipster driving. Really, I don’t remember such a yawn-inspiring new car-seeing experience.

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      If I lived in the US, I wouldnt bother with a Model 3 what with $3 a gallon gasoline.

      I just filled up today and in the other parts of the world where its $6 to $12 a gallon then it makes a difference.

      Do I want a Model 3? Yeah I do. At $3 a gallon I wouldnt.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        It’s not about saving money or even the environment. Many auto enthusiasts, including myself, happen to like the performance characteristics of EVs over ICE powered cars. Test drive a Model S Performance version and you’ll see what we mean.

        • 0 avatar
          TonyJZX

          as an enthusiast i have three kinds of ‘bents’ as far as enjoyment goes

          the v8 6 spd manual

          the turbo six cylinder w/ 7 spd dual clutch

          and the Model 3 ev

          they are all different and all to be enjoyed

          i could not see a world with only an EV and the 220 miles and no fossil fuels is just more bonuses

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    I’m waiting for the first real review of a Model 3. Deliveries to employees and other friendly customers don’t count.
    .
    .


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