By on September 29, 2017

2018 vw golf family

Keen to improve its image after its diesel emissions fiasco, Volkswagen has decided to provide 2018’s lineup with some of the juiciest, most delectable extended warranties available from an automaker. Better still is that the warranty is transferrable to subsequent owners.

While most manufacturers provide the typical three-year/36,000 mile basic warranty with separate five-year/60,000 mile powertrain warranty on their cars, Volkswagen is tossing 6-year/72,000 mile bumper-to-bumper coverage on practically everything coming out next year. The only exception is the battery-driven e-Golf, which will persist with the industry standard. 

However, averages do have outliers. Among the furthest from the center are Hyundai, Kia, and Mitsubishi — all of which offer 5-year/60,000-mile basic coverage and some of the most extensive powertrain warranties in the industry. But only Mitsubishi allows it to be transferred to secondary owners.

“Volkswagen has always been ‘the people’s car,’ and with the People First Warranty, we’re putting our customers first,” said Hinrich J. Woebcken, CEO of Volkswagen Group of America. “By bringing the right cars, at the right time and making the offer very competitive, we believe we’re in the position to grow in the US market.”

VW is already growing in North America. Despite the diesel drama, the company’s U.S. sales have risen 6.4 percent this year. As the automotive market cools off and consumers turn to crossovers in ever-greater numbers, sales of the VW Golf are stronger than ever.

The improved basic warranty, initially introduced on the Tiguan and Atlas this spring, is part of a clear strategy to avoid losing any recently-taken ground.

“Volkswagen has begun to grow again in America, and buyers have welcomed the Atlas and Tiguan into their homes,” said Derrick Hatami, VW America’s executive vice president of sales and marketing. “Expanding this warranty beyond those two models gives our dealers another compelling argument for the rest of our lineup, and we believe it will lead to a reduced overall cost of ownership for buyers.”

It’s definitely an impressive set of numbers and, with subsequent customers benefiting as well (assuming they buy prior to five years or 60,000 miles), it puts almost every other automaker indirectly on blast.

Automotive News is reporting the expanded coverage has already provided positive results at dealerships. In an interview, Michael DiFeo, chairman of the Volkswagen National Dealer Advisory Council, said it’s helping steer customers into both the Atlas and Tiguan.

“Having a best-in-class warranty is impacting their buying decisions,” DiFeo said. “The perceived cost of ownership of a Volkswagen has always been one of the reasons why people have not considered the brand, and I think having the [six-year/72,000-mile] warranty addresses that concern head-on.”

We’d like to agree, but summer sales of the Tiguan don’t appear to have been all that strong and the Atlas is far too new to make any kind of comparative assessment. Still, adding this new warranty to dealer arsenals couldn’t possibly hurt, and could turn more than a few conflicted heads VW’s way.

[Image: Volkswagen]

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78 Comments on “Duck and Coverage: Volkswagen Extends Factory Warranties to 6 Years/72,000 Miles...”


  • avatar
    IBx1

    If you thought the emissions settlements were pricey, wait until you see how many billions of dollars this warranty plan will cost VW.

    • 0 avatar
      TDIandThen....

      Let me save everyone the bother:

      * “all VWs are awful because I had a 1988 Jetta let me tell yew…!”
      * “You sir are an ignoranus.”
      * “Everything Japanese ist wunderbar und ich am someone German buying only Toyota so I am smarter than you”
      * “It ain’t murkin!!!”
      * “I heard a Porsche looks like a VeeDub her-her-her”
      * “Miata”

      ~ The End ~

      Ps. VW reliability has been middle of the pack for about a decade now and there’s a few reasons they’re offering better warranty now.

      • 0 avatar
        TheDoctorIsOut

        +1

      • 0 avatar
        W210Driver

        +1, TDIandThen. Nicely stated.

        The only Japanese cars which have a sterling reputation for reliability are Toyota and Honda. The other Japanese brands have always been hit and miss. My ’90 Toyota Camry (V20) was a good car but in my case the automatic transmission failed; thrice.

        Both of my Mercedes W210s (fully loaded E420 and 212,000 mile+ E300 Turbodiesel) have been pretty much bulletproof with only minor issues cropping up. These issues are not something I would not consider impacting the reliability of the cars in any way, shape or form.

        And unlike popular opinion, if you know where to get the correct spares and install them yourself then you can save a lot of money while still enjoying a German luxury car. MercedesSource on Youtube is a great DIY Bible for classic and modern Benz owners.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          “The only Japanese cars which have a sterling reputation for reliability are Toyota and Honda.”

          The key word here is “reputation”.

          Toyota backs it up with its products, every day. But since MY1998, Honda has been building junk and hoping the people who notice–like me–are fewer than the people who simply lease for 3 years and move on.

          The ONLY car American Honda offers today that I would buy, if I indeed were ever to give American Honda my money (which won’t happen), is the Accord Hybrid. Everything else is engineering junk.

          First it was the transmissions hooked to V6 engines. Pure junk. They managed to fix those so they don’t make Chrysler trannies look bulletproof; but simultaneously, they started making their V6 engines with the horrible and engine and engine mount destroying Variable Cylinder Management. (If you have one of these, run–do not walk–to buy a VCMTuner, if it’s not too late.)

          The early CVTs could have been built better with rubber bands.

          The only cars worth having were their legacy 4 cylinder, manual transmission cars. That’s their sweet spot.

          But now those are gone. The manual trans is going away, moving to CVT that no one should trust–and that 4 cylinder engine? It’s now turbocharged, something Honda will no doubt screw up worse than the VCM V6 as they strive to cut costs/increase profits.

          All of this is driven by the 3 year lease.

          Honda’s engineering “reputation” nowadays is that of a crack whore.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I tend to agree with this assessment of Honda, but in general Japanese marques have effectively operated in a tiered system since probably the mid 90s

            Tier I: Toyota/Lexus, Honda/Acura through MY16, Nissan/Infiniti pre-MY01.
            Tier II: Nissan/Infiniti post-MY01, Subaru, Mazda.
            Tier III: Suzuki, Mitsubishi.

            In the future I would move Subaru up to Tier I and possibly Honda to Tier II if what you say comes to pass.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            My direct and reasonably personal experience with Toyota is that their reputation is better than their reality.

            The reality is somewhere in the middle. Toyotas are not as good as you think, and VWs are not as bad. On average, statistically today a Toyota is a little better than a VW, but it really makes no difference. Remember that most of the statistical reliability analysis shows that the difference between the very BEST car you can buy and the very WORST is less than one unscheduled repair a year.

            Personally, I don’t really care that much how long the warranty is. Even after at 6 years, if I keep it that long, my GTI will likely have less than 30K miles on it. Probably MUCH less – I’m Ubering to the airport more and more. Warranty service means having to deal with taking the thing to the dealer. Easier to fix it myself in the comfort of my own garage. I realize my ability to do this is unusual.

          • 0 avatar
            Offbeat Oddity

            While I agree that Honda’s reliability has slipped a bit as of late, I’d say from 1998-2015 or so, Honda and Toyota were probably about equal. Honda V6s had their transmission issues, Toyota V6s had their sludge issues, and both have had 4 cylinders that may have been subject to excessive oil consumption.

            Toyota itself hit a low point between 2007-2010 (I remember the 2007 V6 Camry not being recommended by Consumer Reports), but by all accounts they’ve gotten their act together. They’re using trusted and proven components, which I really appreciate.

            Honda’s move toward turbocharging and CVTs isn’t my favorite, but I’ll admit the CVTs have held up pretty well. Still, I hope Honda focuses more on quality and less on turbocharging and the newest tech. Hopefully they’ll learn the same lesson Toyota did a decade ago.

          • 0 avatar
            DearS

            My 14 year old Honda with $300 of unexpected maintenance costs over those 145,000 miles says to me Honda is awesome.

            Our other 3 Honda in the family have needed a bit more maintenance but those are into 15+ years, 175k+ mile range, which I think is normal for most cars.

            I like that VW is now offering this warranty, I will consider a used one if they extend it to the second owners.

          • 0 avatar
            jalop1991

            DearS:

            “My 14 year old Honda with $300 of unexpected maintenance costs over those 145,000 miles says to me Honda is awesome. ”

            You mean, your four cylinder Honda with a planetary gear automatic transmission–or else a manual transmission–is fine.

            I agree.

            Let’s see, 14 years ago…2003?

            Do you have a V6? The automatic transmissions on those were ALL problems. It’s not if, it’s when they need replaced. And generally it’s within 7 years and 80K miles.

            So there’s no way you have a 2003 V6 Honda with automatic transmission.

            Next time read what people are writing.

            Since MY1998, American Honda has destroyed its reputation, one model at a time. And they are continuing to do so.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Honestly I’d put older (1990s decade) Mitsus and Mazdas and Suzukis right up there in tier I.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            “The automatic transmissions on those were ALL problems. It’s not if, it’s when they need replaced. And generally it’s within 7 years and 80K miles.”

            I know of multiple people with ’99-’04 Odysseys that made it to over 200k on original transmissions, yes they were whining pretty good by the end, but still kept trucking along. My ’03 Pilot with 175k has its original trans, and while I am very conscious of their troublesome reputation, with regular fluid changes and a soon to be installed external cooler, it should last a long while yet.

            The actual failure rate of the Honda V6 autos past the first few years of issues (say, ’98-00) was much less than the internet makes them, I think in reality it is somewhere in the average range of most domestic autos (think 4L60Es and 5R55Es and such).

      • 0 avatar
        kc1980

        +2

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        You are preaching to a group of people for whom GM still sucks because X body so it may take more than a few years of average reliability to sway them.

    • 0 avatar
      broISbest

      I think it’s reasonable to assume that VW used data to come up with 6 years rather than throwing out some arbitrary number. They know what it will cost them. I think this is the best move they could have come up with at this time. They should have done this in 2012 when they came up with their crazy sales goals at the time.

      • 0 avatar
        carguy67

        “I think it’s reasonable to assume that VW used data to come up with 6 years rather than throwing out some arbitrary number.”

        Where’s the ‘data’ coming from? Is post-warranty period work reported to VW HQ by dealers? What about the people that go to independent shops after the warranty has expired? Are they extrapolating under-warranty repair costs? Checking pick-and-pull junkers for inventory? Reading TTAC and Jalopnik long-term owner comments?

  • avatar
    TDIandThen....

    Count me among the suddenly conflicted.

    Given your liberal mixing of US and ‘North America’ in the text may I assume this also will cover the Canadian market?

    A Golf R or the new Mx-5 RF, a Golf R or the new MX-5…only one year left to decide.

  • avatar
    ash78

    This is definitely encouraging as a shopper, both for new and lightly used models.

    And a far cry from my first VW 20 years ago, which had a whopping 2-year, 24,000-mile warranty on it.

    However, it schizophrenically had a 100k powertrain warranty long before anyone else. Basically they were saying “This car will fall apart, except for the engine and tranny.”

    Which was accurate.

  • avatar
    whitworth

    That’s actually a pretty shrewd move on their part that could move the needle.

    The biggest thing that held me back from buying a VW was the quality control is in the toilet and having a car I had to dump before the warranty ran out.

  • avatar
    notwhoithink

    This was a very smart move on their part. One of the top criticisms was the cost of ownership that comes with German cars, and they’re taking it out of the equation for everyone. Nowdays, most cars are reliable enough that 5 years/60k miles should be standard, and I was honestly surprised when I bought my last two cars that they were still at 3 years/36,000 miles.

    Of course scheduled maintenance is a whole other issue.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Yup it’s time for the 3 year/36,000 mile standard to go away and be replaced by something better.

      (Toyota, GM, Ford, Chrysler – I’m looking at you.)

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        I suspect lease terms are governing warranties these days, since leases are rising so fast.

        3/36 is sufficient to coax someone into a 3-year lease, but short enough to ignore subsequent problems for 2nd owners.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        And Honda. 4/50 over 3/36 is one reason to go for a low-end Acura over a higher-end Honda (plus guaranteed loaners for Acura).

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Toyota gives the Lexus customer a longer original warranty but then makes the CPO warranty on a Lexus the same as any Toyota.

          GM gives Buick and Cadillac better original warranties than Chevy and GMC but that makes me laugh as well. Like your Encore is better built than a Trax… lol.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        I think Ford is 7/70 on the power train now.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          @Big Al, then why not just do 5 year/60,000 bumper to bumper as an industry standard?

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            I don’t know…it wasn’t my idea. Truthfully I haven’t had any warranty work done on a car going all the way back to the 2003 Saturn Ion I purchased. Cars are pretty good now. Course I don’t buy VWs so…

  • avatar
    sirwired

    I think this is a wise move, and something VW should have done years ago to rehabilitate the brand’s reputation for unreliability.

    The next step is going ahead and slapping 10/100k on the powertrain. (Really, that shouldn’t be a high bar to cross for any automaker these days, and they should all do it.)

    Now if only they can fix VW’s US product mix, which seems perpetually five years late and billions short.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    If this warranty had covered my 02 Passat, I probably would have kept it longer than 18 seconds after the 3/36 warranty expired. I knew I couldn’t afford the endless repairs that car required.

    I haven’t driven or sat in an Atlas (having only seen one up close), but it holds a lot of promise IMO. Nice looking inside and out, and a decent value.

    • 0 avatar
      ash78

      I’m still DD’ing a 2001.5 Passat to this day :D

      Yeah, a lot of minor crap is broken and leaking, but nothing serious. I wish the current crop of cars were as nice (given their more modern context) as the B5.5 cars…they were so nice when they worked.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        As much as I get down on this era of trouble-prone Germans, I am very attracted to the B5 Passat/A4. Very rational design, I love the aesthetics, I love the bomb-proof corrosion engineering on them. One definitely has to have a reasonably priced indie (or be their own mechanic) to reasonably own one at this age. A coworker bought a cheap used one for his daughter and it’s been really eating him alive with repair costs, and issues that take the car fully out of commission for a week or more at a time. At almost the same time he bought a used ’03 Civic for his other daughter and that one has never seen a day of down time to date. So for the casual owner, a B5 Passat is probably a poor fit. For someone who can appreciate what the car is all about and is willing to make the effort to maintain it, it can be a rewarding ownership experience.

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          The stuff that broke on my B5 Passat was not maintenance related. Mechanically the car was fine, no slug or coil pack issues. Now it did have a coolant leak that the dealership could never track down. however I just kept some coolant in the trunk and topped off occasionally. The real problems were that almost everything else broke: antenna, seats, headlights, glove box handle, multiple power windows, sunroof switch, headliner, door card fabric, LCD dash display and so on. Back in 2000 VW used this weird rubberized texture on interior plastics, I guess it was in attempts to create the much desired “soft touch” interior. However whatever that stuff was it peeled and flaked off like a sunburned tourist. Contrast this with my ’03 Nissan and ’02 Dodge – both get dinged constantly for cheap interiors with rock hard plastics. Well guess what… both are in perfect condition even after years in the harsh FL sun.

          This new warranty is a big deal because everyone is scared of long term European car costs. I had a used Volvo and it was crazy expensive to fix anything on that car so this is not just a German thing. Being able to transfer the warranty to the future owner’s is HUGE for resale. It is also a really good way to convert used owners into new owners. If they have a good experience in the repair bay they might considering a new car of the same brand at their local dealership.

  • avatar
    brettc

    This is surprising, I thought they were just going to do it to the new SUVs.

    Makes me consider buying another VW. I emailed a VW sales guy earlier this week to let me know when the 2018 Golf wagons are on the lot. So I’ll wait and see I guess.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    1. Bold move
    2. Bravo
    3. Bring production from Mexico to US if you want my business. Or, at least make it in Germany
    4. “Volkswagen has always been ‘the people’s car,’” – don’t know about that because original VW was total boondoggle as people’s car. Hitler needed tanks not cars. People paid for them upfront and never got even one. But VW is great at using slave labor. First from concentration camps and now in Mexico. Why pay Germans if Mexican slave can do it for 1/5th?

  • avatar
    Rengaw

    Recently test drove a 2017 VW Golf and enjoyed all aspects of the car which surprised me as I am one of those “analysis paralysis ” kind of guys. My hesitation with the Golf was the less than stellar reputation it’s reliability has which was reinforced by Consumer Reports and comments here at TTAC.
    This new warranty has me strongly reconsidering buying one. I think this was a wise move by VW and could result in others on the fence over the company’s reliability reputation getting in line to buy one. And, it may just result in VW making a more concerted effort to improve their reliabilty.

  • avatar
    johnny_5.0

    The refreshed 2018 GTI just got a lot more tempting for the hot hatch shoppers.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    Let me guess: the required service schedule has coincidentally become a lot more frequent and stringent. They’ve got to pay for this coverage somehow! And God help you if you forget to have the dealer change the blinker fluid every 3000 miles…you’ll be on your own.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      My 17′ GTI has the pretty standard one year or 10K service interval – I doubt that will change. Being a manual, I don’t have the spendy DSG service to deal with every 40K. It doesn’t have a timing belt, so that is out. Pretty standard intervals for the rest of the fluids, filters, plugs, etc.

      So for me, once a year, and I will DIY all of it anyway. Unless something breaks under warranty, I doubt it will ever darken the dealer’s door again.

      I suspect the main change will be all the under-the-table money on the hood they were heaping on the dealers will be long gone. No more $6K+ discounts on GTIs. Glad I got mine while the getting was great!

  • avatar
    Pricha33

    Typical we in Canada get screwed as automakers think we are too unimportant to deserve the better warranties and other fare they push in the ole USA to entice buyers. It is especially frustrating as huge portion of our population resides within an hours drive of America and we see and hear the adds promoting these features. You go to your local dealer , and they look at you like you have two heads when you mention USA promotions.

    Rant over, now VW do right by Canucks and I might just buy a new VW SUV.. if not well lots of others to choose from.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Exactly what Hyundai did to convince buyers there cars were reliable. Personally I prefer a 3 year bumper to bumper guarantee, as it’s usually small things that fail on a car.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Hopefully they don’t do as Hyundai-Kia dealers often do, as in try their best to weasel out of a repair they damn-well know is a factory defect.

      • 0 avatar
        xtoyota

        Owned several Hyundai’s since 2004 and NEVER had a warranty problem
        Dropped Japanese cars in 2003 after many warranty problems I had to take one company to arbitration to get them to fix their problem…they lost once fixed sold that looser

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        Yep…we are on our second and I can’t speak to warranty repairs…I never had to use it. Timing belt, replaced the hoses at 70k and brakes. That’s all I did in 130k.

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    This can only be a great move on VW’s part. The bad news maybe that this may actually cause their cars to hold value noticeably better, which is great news for new owners, but less so for people like me who are second or more typically third owners (i buy cars anywhere between 50-70 thousand miles, and put another that many before selling them).

    This gave me an idea for a QOTD article. Many people believe that once a lemon, a car will always be a lemon. But my experience has been that many cars have teething problems, but they can settle into a period of reliability once those teething problems, no matter how serious, have been addresses. Would love to hear B&B stories regarding this.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      It could still have a positive effect on the cars you buy. Say the car has a fairly serious issue later in its life, which would otherwise be out of warranty. This way, the car is (hopefully) repaired correctly by VW instead of some hack job that blows up in your face later on. A new factory engine or transmission at 50k essentially extends the life of the car by a fair amount.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      I’ve long thought that “lemon lawed” BMWs were a pretty good deal. Lots of them out there due to the rampant fuel pump issues with the early twin turbo motors. But BMW eventually figured out the fix and extended the warranty to 120K. But those branded title cars sell for much less, even though they have now been fixed.

      I also think that there really aren’t that many bad cars, but there are a TON of utterly terrible dealer service departments. At most dealerships, the techs are kids fresh out of school, the pressure to turn over cars quickly is extreme, and anybody who is actually good gets out and goes to an indy or becomes one. So if you get a car with an oddball problem that actually takes some diagnostic talent to fix, you are in for a bumpy ride.

    • 0 avatar
      KevinC

      I’ll bite on the lemon vs teething problems question. Our company bought a new stripper Aerostar van back in late ’80s. It was a true “loss leader” for the weekly ad, truly bare bones, including 2.3L Pinto motor, 4-speed manual, no windows, “turd brown” color, completely unfinished interior, and some massive discount to lure marks to the lot. Might have had an AM radio. The thing was a disaster, constantly in the shop for a couple of years. The stock shocks were effectively shot when it was driven off the lot, incapable of properly dampening, even when empty. But after a couple of years of constant repairs, the thing became rock solid, We went on to own it for many more virtually trouble-free years. Once it had competent shocks & tires on it, it even drove somewhat nicely.

      Back to the original topic – I think this is a VERY smart move by VWoA. Lots of people still think VWs have reliability issues, and doubling the factory b2b warranty should soothe a lot of those fears and bring people into showrooms. Once there, they’ll finally get to realize firsthand what incredibly nice vehicles the current lineup at, particularly the Golf family (I have a ’16 Golf R, and we previously also had a ’15 TDI that went back with the scandal buyback). They need to quit screwing around and get the new MQB-based Jetta into showrooms too, then they really will have a competitive lineup across the board.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        “Back to the original topic – I think this is a VERY smart move by VWoA. Lots of people still think VWs have reliability issues, and doubling the factory b2b warranty should soothe a lot of those fears and bring people into showrooms. Once there, they’ll finally get to realize firsthand what incredibly nice vehicles the current lineup at, particularly the Golf family”

        But why should I choose to give $35K of my VERY hard earned money to a company that has demonstrated its willingness to lie to, cheat, and steal from the American public?

        It doesn’t matter how good the product may be in the market. Others are just as good, and more importantly have earned my business–or at the very least, not earned my total and utter contempt.

        VW will remain in business for all the same reasons people still do business with the likes of Wells Fargo and JP Morgan Chase–but that only reinforces for me that I really, really don’t want to face a jury of my “peers”. They’re all idiots.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    We will see. On the surface I like it. At least an owner will have some more piece of mind.

    But if those cars keep having to go to the shop, even if paid for, who wants that hassle?

    Hopefully VW combined this warranty with some better engineering. That I will applaud. If its just slapping a warranty on the same old shoddy stuff, no thanks.

  • avatar
    Jacob

    It’s a pretty smart move. I recall how 15 years ago most people were saying, regardless of all the possible deals on Hyundai cars, that they won’t buy a Hyundai because of poor reliability record. Hyundai recognized this as a problem and came up with what was at time the best warranty in business. Right now, I personally also belong to the camp that isn’t specially excited about _any_ VAG vehicles because of poor reliability record. This warranty offer can certainly make us a little less nervous about those cars.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    The used VW’s at the 6 year mark will be fantastic buys. That will most likely help residuals, thus lowering leasing rates, increasing sales. Good move VW. Now bring it to Canada!

  • avatar
    stingray65

    For all of you that constantly state that German cars are designed to fall apart the moment the 3 year lease (and warranty) expire, you need to brush up on your financial knowledge. If expensive problems are likely to occur in year 4 or 5, then the resale value will drop to reflect that higher cost of ownership. If resale values slip, then lease payments will also rise because payments reflect the predicted depreciation during the lease term, and if lease payments rise then nobody will lease that particular vehicle. Thus when BMW or Audi or MB offer much more enticing leases offers than Cadillac, Lincoln, Alfa, or Jaguar, it means the market believes those are reasonably reliable vehicles that will still be attractive to used car buyers off-lease. No matter how attractive the “brand” is, very few consumers are going to want a 3 year old German car that is almost certain to need thousands of dollars in repairs during years 4,5,6,7. Similarly, if expensive problems are common in year 4, 5, or 6 VW will go bankrupt honoring their longer warranty, which means they feel reasonably confident few big problems will occur during the extended period. Their lack of warranty extension on the e-Golf, however, would suggest they don’t feel very confident about the long-term reliability of that model and/or it is already such a money loser they don’t want any added costs.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      My one and only VW was in the shop 12 times in 3 years (not a lease), and the last straw was when it was burning a quart of oil every 1000 miles at 30k miles. Every repair was covered.

      But after:
      4 new brake rotors (when it was new)
      non-start at 4 months left me stranded
      failed A/C
      twice burned out headlights
      twice failed electrics in the left rear door
      sluggish e-throttle
      inaccurate fuel gauge
      burning oil

      I decided enough was enough. VW fans say “they make them better now, so you can’t base your opinions on a car built 15 years ago”, but why should I continue sampling from the poisoned well to see if the water is improving?

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Because 15 years is an eternity in the automotive world? YMMV – I’ve owned six VWs from ’84 to ’17 and none of them had any particular issues that weren’t consistent with age and use. And I had most of them into ripe old age. Two bought new. But I didn’t own the one you owned, and I’m not you, so who knows?

        Ultimately, you roll the dice every time. My Mother has a Prius V that certainly has not lived up to the Toyota reputation, though it has not had any issues since the warranty expired a number of years ago. But the first couple years were surprisingly painful, mostly software related, though a couple mechanical things too.

      • 0 avatar
        jalop1991

        “VW fans say “they make them better now, so you can’t base your opinions on a car built 15 years ago” ”

        They may make them better now. So instead, you’ll only experience:

        2 new brake rotors
        non-start at 4 months that doesn’t leave you stranded
        weak A/C
        once burned out headlights
        once failed electrics in the left rear door
        more accurate, but still not accurate, fuel gauge
        burning a quart of oil every 2000 miles

        See? They make them better now!

        The Germans really, truly don’t understand why anyone sees any of that as being a problem. It’s how things work, ja?

  • avatar
    Joss

    e-Golf doesn’t need extended warranty because it’s got the fewest mechanical parts of any VW produced. Read extended range…

  • avatar
    mchan1

    The extended warranty was most likely done for PR marketing/sales purposes to cover VW’s butt for its diesel crisis.

    German auto reliability has not been good as proven over the years, though each vehicle will differ as some will be better or worse than others.

    Recently, a relative bought a YE 2017 close out Tiguan Autobahn edition at a nice price. While it’s the older model, it’s still good and hopefully it’ll last a few years, as the relative generally takes good care of the vehicle.

  • avatar
    nels0300

    Nice, this would’ve made a Jetta or Golf a much stronger contender for me when I was shopping this spring.t

    To echo what others have said, VW should have done this a long time ago AND hopefully they fixed some of their engineering issues, like water pumps made out of cardboard. A good warranty is great, but it’s still a pain in the rear to have a car always in the shop.

    • 0 avatar
      TwoBelugas

      Yep. I will look at the Jetta in a few years and see how the reliability is after the new warranty policy is in place.

      I drove a 2000 Jetta for a while, I liked its handling, and some of the small things like how well its headlights worked shows its German DNA even though it was assembled in Mexico. I wouldn’t mind having one if I am reasonably confident it is not going die at 100k like the 2000.

  • avatar
    Null Set

    VW has a long history in the US of its dealers doing anything to not actually honoring its warranties. That’s because, since forever, VW has used warranty costs as their key success metric. So dealers do whatever they can to keep this number as low as possible. I’ve heard this from every VW owner I’ve ever known, and from more than a few VW service managers. So, as Lot’s wife would say, for defs take this with a pillar of salt.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Meh, I had a few warranty issues with my ’02 Golf TDI. Never a quibble from the dealer. Though I did make a mechanic puke once demonstrating the minor wheel bearing noise I was hearing on hard cornering. They replaced it.

      So far, not a thing on my ’17 Golf GTI.

    • 0 avatar
      KevinC

      I lived through exactly what you’re describing with several VWs over the years. But my recent experience has been completely the opposite. I’ve had a few minor warranty issues handled quickly and efficiently, with zero pushback. My local dealership has provided an incredible level of customer service that exceeds my experiences with the local BMW dealership, which isn’t bad at all.

      Recently I had them replaced a warped A-pillar cover. I made an appointment for 9am once the part was in, and said “I’d wait” (after being offered to wait – in the past, I wouldn’t have dared wait for anything at a VW dealership). At 9:40, the car was done, and had even been washed in that very short time window. Yes, that’s a very simple “repair”, but just getting it done so quickly was amazing. I looked into the garage and they have a crapload of service bays, with cars in almost every one, and lots of activity going on – so it’s not as if they had nothing better to do. Just good old fashioned customer service, delivered at a high level. I was super-impressed.

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        Isn’t the A pillar cover the one by the drivers head, where in most cars you can pop off with your fingers, or at most use a plastic lever to pry a few places to loosen it up?

      • 0 avatar
        turbo_awd

        @KevinC – any consideration that they’re acting extra nice to smooth over Dieselgate, and in a year or two, back to the same old ways?

  • avatar
    ravenchris

    This warranty will make me look at VW more closely next purchase, service requirements too. I see a 2018 Golf TDI advertised at Fitzmall.

    • 0 avatar
      jalop1991

      Why would you give a thieving, lying, cheating company your hard earned cash?

      They’ve done it once. They WILL do it again. And they don’t care about you one bit.

      • 0 avatar
        ravenchris

        It is a decision made because we live in a chronically juvenile society.
        You are accurately describing all car makers.
        I know you are angry about the situation because I am too.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          There’s a difference between “yeah, they’re probably doing it, we don’t know” and “oh look, they’ve done it egregiously and shoved it in our faces and don’t regret it one bit”.

      • 0 avatar
        Fighter835

        People forget, and quickly. I realize none of the automakers are perfect, but some are definitely more ethical than others. Carmakers like GM (with their ignitions, for example) or VW, with the unbelievable diesel cheating that went on for too many years, will never see a penny from me, no matter the warranty.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          “Carmakers like GM (with their ignitions, for example) or VW, with the unbelievable diesel cheating that went on for too many years, will never see a penny from me, no matter the warranty.”

          Hear hear. GM is the other one on my mind, for the same reasons.

          And then there’s American Honda Motor Manufacturing, who will equally never get another dime of my money.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    Now if Audi would follow suit…


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