By on September 5, 2017

2017 Chevrolet Bolt, Image: General Motors

The full-scale rollout of Chevrolet’s Bolt to all U.S. markets saw its sales reach new heights in August 2017. Not dizzying heights, mind you — with 2,107 vehicles sold last month, the all-electric Bolt’s popularity is about 34,000 units shy of the Honda Civic’s.

Still, many mainstream, gas-powered models would kill for 2,000-plus buyers per month. The Jaguar XE, XF, and XJ, for example. The Toyota 86. Oh, and the Cadillac ATS, CTS, and CT6, along with gobs of other models from various brands. It’s a grim time for cars, but certain electric vehicles find buyers solely because there isn’t much choice when it comes to ditching your fuel tank for good.

The emergence of lower-priced EVs with ranges capable of reaching another city has made the electric car, once an oddity, into something approaching mainstream status. But are you tempted by their gas-free siren song?

The Bolt offers 238 miles of driving range after its turn at the plug. Once production gears up, Tesla’s Model 3 will provide you with a comparatively priced 220-mile sedan or, for an extra pile of cash, a 310-mile long-ranger. Hyundai and Ford and Honda and friends all want in on the game.

Even as a second car, which seems to be the EV’s forte, a plug-in battery electric vehicle seems an ideal choice for commuting and urban driving drudgery. You’ll always have that truck/SUV/crossover/van for family vacays to the seashore. Just think — you’ll be able to ignore pump prices and fuel up at home while asleep. Your neighbours with the Prius will be shamed by your rolling green bonafides. You might even get the best parking spot at certain stores. Even better, your fellow taxpayers will fork over some dough to ensure your purchase doesn’t sting too much.

Right now, the cost of a Model 3 or Bolt undercuts the average transaction price of a midsize crossover, but the next wave of long-range EVs could drop the entry point closer to compact crossovers. Hell, some of those looming EVs are small crossovers.

Has the technology and infrastructure surrounding EVs reached a point where you’re considering going electric with your next vehicle purchase? If not a new car, then perhaps a bargain basement purchase of a used, rapidly depreciating Nissan Leaf?

If so, tell us why. If not, spill your guts as to why the EV plunge will have to wait.

[Image: General Motors]

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123 Comments on “QOTD: Will Your Next New Vehicle Be an Electric Vehicle?...”


  • avatar
    jack4x

    No, but the one after it may be. At this point the range per dollar equation is still changing too quickly to be sure that my car wouldn’t be obsolete in 2-3 years, with corresponding depreciation (see: early Nissan Leaf prices). Once there are several competitors at 300 mile ranges for reasonable $, I think electric makes a lot of sense for me. I have a 100+ mile commute and a convenient place to charge at home. Gas may stay in the $2-$2.50 range for a few more years but I wouldn’t bet on it being there forever.

    • 0 avatar
      Thinkin...

      Depreciation can be as good as it is bad…. for instance, right now well under $10k can get a ~2 year old EV with a range of 80-90 miles, and warranty for another 6-8 years.

      At that price, with zero maintenance aside from tire rotations, there’s serious value there. I cannot think of a cheaper and easier to tackle most normal (up to 50mi, rt) commutes.

      Also – that makes the fun weekend car a much more accessible option for a lot of us!

      • 0 avatar

        @Thinkin.

        Precisely. High depreciation is one mans loss and another mans gain.

        Worth noting that with workplace charging that 50 mile RT commute doubles to a 100 mile rt commute.

      • 0 avatar
        srh

        Yes. This January I bought a 2015 Leaf with all the options (which is relative; it is a Leaf after all) with very low miles and perfect condition for right around $12K. With an optimistic range of 90 miles (I hit about 80 in the summer and closer to 60 in the cold winter), it’s a fine commuter car. Versions without all the options can readily be found for less than $10K.

        In my garage it sits next to a Ford Focus RS and a BMW Gran Coupe, and yet for driving to and from work I prefer the Leaf. That’s not to say I don’t drive the other cars, but the RS has only 4500 miles on it since January and the BMW far less than that.

        Talking about driving past the gas stations feeling smug is a cliche, but it is true. Not that I feel smug per se, but in Oregon where we’re forced to pay someone else to pump our own gas, going to the gas station is an exercise in aggravation that I’m thrilled to partake of as rarely as possible. These days I wind up filling one of the cars perhaps every couple weeks or less.

        My next car? Either a Chevy Bolt (or equivalent; maybe the new Leaf?) or a Ford Raptor. Not sure which. Maybe both.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenn

          I can relate to the reference to Oregon’s requirement for a station attendant to do the filling. Living in Washington state, my occasional detour down I-5 to CA causes me to experience the dread (where I grew up, in Detroit in the ’60s – before the initiation of self-service stations – there was an abundance of cars with damaged paint below their filler caps from repeated, attendant-spilled gasoline).

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        EVs are not zero maintenance, they will still need their brakes replaced, though not as frequently as a pure ICE powered vehicle and they also need their coolant and transaxle fluid replaced on a periodic basis.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Plus all the “car” stuff that is what really causes issues as cars age. HVAC, electric this and that. Wheel bearings, suspension, etc.

          It’s not a smartphone with no user serviceable parts.

          • 0 avatar
            Thinkin...

            You won’t need to touch any of that stuff in an EV for at least the first 100k. Tires and air filters, sure. But not brakes, bearings, suspension, hvac, coolant, etc – all of that will outlast the 100k warranty, and if it doesn’t it’ll be replaced under warranty.

            For example, the Bolt’s first real scheduled maintenance is at 150k, and that’s only to replace the coolant:

            https://www.cnet.com/roadshow/news/chevy-bolt-maintenance-schedule/

    • 0 avatar
      kona71

      I would like to say yes. I’m a Chevy Volt owner and love many aspects of the vehicle… the Chevy side of it is tougher. Was totally ready to trade mine in for new model… and WHAT? Car that started out ahead of its time an no DC fast charging option?
      Then you have the dealers themselves… often not accommodating to EV… somewhat expected when not your brand, but as a Chevy Volt driver being not fully welcomed at a Chevy dealer… uncalled for.
      Transferred to local dealer here, had my service done and got set up and then next week was still asked to move from Charger as they needed to park other (ICE) vehicles and staff vehicles there… seriously?

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    After watching DeMuro’s latest video, it made me consider the Bolt. But for slightly different reasons. A couple years ago I fixed up an IS300 SportCross for my mom to drive around in. And ever since I’ve been searching for one of my own because it was such a pleasure to work on and to drive.

    So I started looking at the Bolt for my mom to do an exchange to get the IS300 back. And at the same time I was thinking it would be a good vehicle for my wife and me to share. She drives to the Metro station twice a week and then I would use it the rest of the week. Combined we wouldn’t drive more than a full charge per week.

    So yeah, I am a good candidate for an EV. But if I could get it out the door for less than $30k and it wouldn’t depreciate like crazy like the Leaf does I’d be more interested and might actually go through with it.

    • 0 avatar
      jh26036

      I fully expect the Bolt should be under $30k OTD before any tax incentives from the feds and state (if it applies to you).

      The Bolt is very much heading down the same path as the Volt. $7-9k off MSRP is normal here in Massachusetts for the Volt. I expect the same for the Bolt eventually.

    • 0 avatar

      WIth just 200 miles per week, take advantage of the LEAF depreciation and pick up a low mile 2-3 year old car for around $11,000 that can do 80 miles on a charge. You might have to charge it 2-3 times per week.

  • avatar
    Eggshen2013

    Sure, if I can convince the people who own my apartment building to install chargers in the parking garage.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    I’ve been kicking around the idea of a PHEV. a Fusion Energi has enough electric range where via charging at home and at work I could run on electric most of the time.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    While I don’t have long commute everyday, there are three months out of the year I need a good hot defroster and heater. Some days I have to let the car run for 5 minutes to get the ice scraped off the windows. Some days you have to run the defroster on high the whole trip to keep the windows clear of ice when it is freezing rain and snow. How much will that kill the range? I am sure a level 2 charging station would be required in the winter months so there is an extra one time expense. We would still have to use a different car for road trips or any trip to the nearest big city so this would be for trips to WalMart and work. If I had a lot of disposable income it may make sense. Then again, if I had that money I would get something fun for my commute.

    • 0 avatar
      jh26036

      You should be looking at a Volt if your commute is less than 50 miles a day. The range during cold weather in my Volt is more like low to mid 40s as oppose to mid 50s to 60 in warm weather. Heat, heated seats, heated steering, this stuff really drains the battery. To maximize range, you’ll want to heat up the car when it is still plugged in.

      Gas economy is mid 40mpg, highway driving can get up to 50mpg but you’ll need to keep it under 65mph.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        @jh26036…Interesting, I live in a cold climate. The Volt is on my “maybe” list.

      • 0 avatar
        Joebaldheadedgranny

        Concur with your commute estimate. 2012-2014 I commuted between Huntington Beach and Gardena in a Volt, roughly 45 miles, and charged up at work (~4 hours on Level 2 Chargepoint unit.) Running on the juice makes for an excellent experience- responsive, low vibration, and fun. It was a 10/10 for me as a commuter. Later my office moved to Orange County, and ample charging stations were supposedly available in the shopping center adjacent to the office. Trouble was every charger was occupied all the time- nurses at a hospital tend to work long shifts. So I ran on the gen set most of the time, and the overall experience fell to a 2/10. I like the idea of keeping a little EV runner around for light duty work, but before I throw down for an EV/PHEV commuter car I’m going to need to see some advancement in charging time and availability.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          ” I like the idea of keeping a little EV runner around for light duty work, but before I throw down for an EV/PHEV commuter car I’m going to need to see some advancement in charging time and availability.”

          … or longer range than a mere 45 miles. A 200-mile-plus BEV would eliminate those worries.

    • 0 avatar

      Early morning defrosting can be done using an automated timer in the vehicle or via a smart phone activation and its done using energy from your home charging station, it won’t impact range a bit. WIth the Bolt the battery will be kept warm if plugged in all night so loss of range due to cold battery shouldn’t be a factor either.

      It’s easy to invent multiple reasons not to own an EV especially if you don’t have the experience of owning one. I find that with conversations with skeptics that each of their concerns are usually handled easily and are not the problem the skeptic fears. The conversation continues until finally the skeptic having been countered every step of the way will say “Well it’s all well and good for you, but I’d forget to plug it in”. At that point I stop countering when the skeptics comments shift focus from the vehicle to themselves. BTW There is an automated reminder system for that eventuality as well, but I don’t bother pointing that out, if someone isn’t ready they aren’t ready.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Thumbs up, JPWhite. Every argument against EVs has been either excuses based on lack of knowledge or intentional efforts by people with an agenda. While I will grant they won’t work for everybody, they will serve the needs of a vast majority, if only given a chance.

        • 0 avatar
          Jonathan Miller

          The biggest argument against EVs is the cost. Tesla folks live to brag about the free charging stations but they pay $100k for that free electricity. Even the $30k Bolt is too expensive for my taste. I can nearly buy 3 Sparks for that price with similar operating costs at $2 a gallon gasoline and 40 mpg.

      • 0 avatar
        Flipper35

        It is when leaving work that I need the defroster. It would be in a garage all nice and warm in the morning. I have no where to plug it in at work.

        JH, my commute is 52 miles round trip if I don’t make any other stops.

        I have looked at EVs as they come out, but right now I would look at a REV for our current situation.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Yeah, mine is about 60 round trip. I’m thinking that a small ICE car will serve my needs just fine (eg Civic, Cruze, which are my top two picks).

          I’m also just as likely to buy another gas hog. What I will not put up with, though, is not knowing whether or not my car will make it home, or spending a lot of money and only getting to use the electric range a bit of the time, and then dealing with heavy depreciation on top of that.

          I’ll go EV next time. By then, there should be a number of entries with 200+ miles.

          • 0 avatar
            jh26036

            The heavy depreciation is a bit misunderstood in my opinion. My Volt, with a $35,455 MSRP was discounted over $9k with a purchase price of $26,305. After federal tax credit of $7,500 and another Massachusetts state rebate of $2,500. This car was $16,305 plus TTL.

            I am seeing 3 year old Volts for $13-15k with 40k miles.

            Am I really being hit that hard with depreciation if I decide to eject from my 2017? I personally don’t think it is any worse than an ICE car. End of the day, to me, this was a $16k car. The most it’ll depreciate is that. If this can give me 100k miles of care free driving, I’d be thrilled.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            The heavy depreciation is a bit misunderstood in my opinion.

            You are right in that car depreciation is terrible in general, pretty much at the bottom of all vehicle classes. Most cars are not a good buy new given how much cheaper they are even lightly used.

            BOF SUVs and trucks on the other hand depreciate so little you’d be stupid to buy lightly used.

          • 0 avatar
            Wheatridger

            Don’t forget plug-in hybrids, KW. For me, they’re the alternative powerplant for all purposes: EV for the first 20-30 miles of the day, then a range-unlimited hybrid for wherever you may want to drive next.

            Like you, I’m a former TDI owner. I find the closest contemporary equivalent is the Ford C-Max: a roomy hatchback with almost 200 hp, an 8-second) 0-60 time, and gas mileage in the mid-40s, boosted to the mid-60s with electric running. The chassis may not be VW-firm, but it has good basic design, with a heritage as European as any Golf.

            I didn’t come to this choice by reading reviews, but by actually driving the car, which I helped my daughter purchase as a first car. After a week in it, I wanted one for myself. Check it out, if you haven’t already.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “It’s easy to invent multiple reasons not to own an EV especially if you don’t have the experience of owning one.”

        With all due respect, No one makes a pickup EV that can carry 2k and yield a range of 320 km.

  • avatar
    hamish42

    Not a chance. I live in a high-rise condominium in Toronto. There is absolutely no possibility that there will be charging provided in any way for the hundreds of cars that park in this building, nor do they allow 21-story extension cords. There is also zero infrastructure in downtown Toronto. So, while I might like the idea, the fact of the matter is that for the foreseeable such a car does not fit into the way I live, or will live for a long time to come. The only electrics for me are my daily rides on the subway and street cars. AT least there’s that.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      You know, you could start a petition with your fellow condo residents demanding charging stations in your parking garage. Just point out that they’ll have to do it eventually or lose their property value.

      • 0 avatar
        hamish42

        Hello. Thanks for the comment. The problem isn’t the condominium corporations, which we hold and administer among ourselves, it’s getting the infrastructure into several hundred multi-story underground garages for really rather light usage. There is no way the power corporations are in any way interested – major output for limited return.

        • 0 avatar
          darex

          You allegedly drive a 1960s-era MINI. What do you care?

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Would it not be smarter, if, admittedly, more expensive, if the condo corps fronted the money? Now, before you say no, consider this: In time, those chargers will be necessary. If your garages have reserved parking for the residents (two spots each? Three?) then each one can have its own meter account-linked to the resident of record. It wouldn’t have to be done all in one go (cheaper in the long run but perhaps more convenient in the short) where the up front cost to each resident is split among all for each installation.

          A brief example. Let’s say YOU buy an EV (doesn’t matter what brand.) The corp pays for the installation of a charger to accommodate that vehicle. The owner pays for the power used. Later, someone else buys an EV and again the corp pays for the charger and install. Cost to individuals would be probably $10. Over time, every unit has at least one charger and nobody paid the whole install up front. The value of the condos so linked has gone up BECAUSE of the charger in place. Simple, convenient and only paid when a resident needs one installed, meaning even at $1K each, the cost would be so spread out that nobody would feel any pain.

          Now, obviously having them all installed in one go would have a lower per-unit cost… maybe 50% cheaper if you’re lucky. But by spreading the payments out in an on-demand basis, the cost is spread so widely that the per-install price would be painless. That’s now an HOA or Condo Corp is supposed to work.

    • 0 avatar
      Scott_314

      Pretty negative perspective, why jump to the conclusion that it isn’t worth it until “hundreds” of EV stations are installed in your one building? Many buildings might work with their tenants to get a couple of chargers installed, or at least 120V power, which should be enough for downtown users.

      Not only that, but Toronto has many, many public chargers available all over the place.

      Not only that, but the City now requires new buildings to rough-in electricity supply to parking spaces – 100% of parking spaces in some parts of the city, and 2% of parking spaces to have chargers actually installed.

      Personally I’ll consider it, tough to make it worthwhile on a dollar basis at the current time, but as a car guy, the new technology seems promising.

      • 0 avatar
        hamish42

        Hello. Our condo is at Yonge and Dundas. so you’ll obviously know my neighborhood. I’m on the Board of Directors and we have been fielding our members’ enquiries over the last 2 or 3 years. A couple of folks even went down to City Hall for a mini-meeting with the Planning Department. You’re perfectly right about the new buildings, and that’s a good thing for them. We were told emphatically, however, that retrofitting existing buildings was a huge infrastructure issue involving tearing up streets and garages and that it would never be approved, no way. Next, we were given a very stern lecture that one of the prime priorities of the City of Toronto is getting cars off the streets and they would not be interested in doing anything that might facilitate the use of more of them. The only electric vehicles they were interested in talking to us about were subways and street cars. So, we got shot down big time on our first round of enquiries and we’ll wait a couple of years and see what happens.

        • 0 avatar
          MBella

          Why would you have to rear up streets? I’m assuming a large condo building has been connected to a decent power source. In your garage, it would probably involve exposed conduit instead of the wiring being internal inside the walls.

          • 0 avatar
            Stevo

            You are correct MBella, it shouldn’t involve tearing up the street, as most condo towers, esp if built more than 10 years ago will have more than adequate capacity as normal electrical equipment upgrades are completed over time. The barrier is code regarding circuit capacity for each charger. Say you can only put 8 in per panel with 200A service, based on max anticipated draw, you run out of capacity pretty quick – on paper. I have experience with this as a prop mgr with a condo/office tower in my portfolio.

  • avatar
    jeoff

    Maybe a depreciated Leaf or one of the Ford Plug-ins.
    Or, if they start discounting Hybrid Pacificas in a couple of years–I might do that. But, it looks like my Quest will never die, and even though it looks like junk inside and out, the air stll blows cold, the seats are comfortable, and it gets me to work.

  • avatar
    ash78

    Every day when my wife pulls the 17mpg* minivan into our garage, just 6′ away from the dryer’s 220V outlet, I think a plug-in hybrid would be ideal.

    I highly doubt I will go “full electric” for a long time because I just need the flexibility to do everything in either car.

    *2015 Odyssey…while 25mpg on the highway is achievable, the practicality of dragging a 5,000 van around town–on constant hills–means 17mpg (combined) is the reality.

  • avatar
    ajla

    My next new vehicle won’t be an EV, but I would buy an electric car before I get something with a forced induction 4-cylinder.

    • 0 avatar
      SlowMyke

      Ha, i like your principals. Having driven the Cadillac 2.0t (loaners while my POS cts was in the shop every other month) in the ats, cts, and xts, i fully agree that these little turbo 4 cylinders are being asked to do too much in these larger vehicles. It was fine in the ats, tolerable as a loaner in the cts, and overworked in the xts. I imagine it only gets worse in crossovers and other tall vehicles. If I’m using my money and my long term use, I’m not putting up with a tiny turbo engine in a big vehicle either.

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        Are you sure it was an XTS you had? In North America, those only come with the 3.6 (N/A or turbo) – if you found that overworked, that’s hardly a ringing endorsement of the beloved V6.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    To make it simple, No. Why? Because they don’t make what I want as an EV yet and probably won’t for at least 5 more years. Granted, Tesla’s Model Y might be tempting, but I’m after something with more carrying ability.

  • avatar

    Yes. My next car will be electric. Hopefully I’ll get my M3 in Q1 2018 if the estimator on Tesla’s website is to be trusted.

  • avatar
    anomaly149

    Maybe. My family historically tends to keep cars for a decade, and assuming this mustang doesn’t get replaced before that, I might be in the market for an electric kid-mover. (Assuming getting married seems like a good plan in post-truth America)

    Ran the numbers on a Bolt, with the savings from gas it’s already pretty much competitive with normal cars over 150k miles. In ten years, they should be downright normal.

  • avatar
    SlowMyke

    Nope. My wife is up for a new car next and she wants/needs something big. We’ve got twins that are rapidly requiring more space (about to be out of the infant car seats and into the giant convertible ones…). We can’t afford an x and something bolt size isn’t going to allow 6’3″ me to sit in front of one of the kids. As it is i can barely drive our mkz and liberty with just the infant car seats. We could go the hybrid pacifica route, but she’s in the “i won’t own a van” club. So crossover-ville, here we come.

    • 0 avatar
      PhilMills

      Subaru Outback. I don’t think I’ve sat in anything with more combined legroom. Handles kid seats (baby basket, rear-facing convertible, front-facing convertible and booster) with aplomb. At 6′ tall, I can drive comfortably and my 6’3″ buddy still has about 4″ between his knees and the back of my seat.

      • 0 avatar
        SlowMyke

        I’ll look into it, but add in the giant stroller, plethora of other kid-crap we “need” and 2 dogs… I’m thinking we aren’t getting away with a car seating less than 6.

    • 0 avatar
      rocketrodeo

      You want a Flex. Incredibly roomy second row, huge wayback, decent to very decent (w/ turbo) driving dynamics. Those are usually a tough sell to the distaff side, though.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Given my short six mile commute I really should lease a Bolt or something similar. I would just need to have the 240V charging station added to the garage.

    There’s even a charging station here at my job, located at the corporate headquarters a few buildings away, but I’m sure the owner would get a bit angry to see me parked in his spot ;)

    There is also a nearby Tesla charging kiosk – 11 chargers! – that would give me a quick charge if I went that route.

    What’s stopping me? I mostly buy used cars in the $10k range and would like a little more range than a used Leaf would give. Also I will admit some fear of range anxiety even though I drive 99% of the time in the city. But time will tell to see if I can overcome this unwarranted fear. I want to replace my current car by next year…

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      If you have a 6 mile commute there is no need for a 240v charging station or a charging station at all. Just plug the convenience cord into the 15a/20a 120v outlet you likely already have in your garage. Plug in every night and you’ll always have a full charge if all you did was commute. Then if you go somewhere further on the weekend and use more than you can replace overnight, no big deal you still will have enough to make it to and from work on Mon. Then Tue night you get closer to full and by Sat morning you are at 100% again.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Absolutely not. I’m not going to waste that much money on something that is half baked and a severe compromise to even the worst gasoline powered vehicles out there.

  • avatar
    Dan

    Not a chance.

    I like big cars. Something like a Tesla S is that big car and, ignoring for the moment that I’d want to punch myself in the face for owning one, it costs as much as a King Ranch with a new quad in the bed and a new jet ski behind it, feels as special as an Accord inside, and I can’t take it on road trips? YGTBSM.

    The real world attainable EVs are depressing little economy cars at a 30-50% markup over the gas edition that only a moron or a blue state fleet manager would buy new.

    • 0 avatar
      Mandalorian

      This. All of the vehicles I’ve ever owned have either been trucks or medium/large SUVs. A little plastic paperweight just doesn’t do anything for me. Even a nice one like the Tesla Model S is just small.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Yes if it meets these criteria:

    Accommodates our family of 6
    Performs well in Quebec winters (good range despite heating)
    Can be bought used for 15k to 20k

    An ICE minivan does all this so an EV must do it too.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    200 miles is enough range to be usable for me, but I’m also a selective cheapskate. I might get one off-lease for $10k or something, or I might grind through the fleet of beaters already in my yard.

  • avatar
    kwong

    Yes. I’m waiting for the Tesla Model 3, or any other 200 mile range EV, to prove itself to be a reliable and affordable option. My last car is an EV that we bought used for $7,300 out the door. It has a 1.3 year payback period when you factor fuel costs and toll fees. We still have our 01 VW Golf TDI, 06 GM Duramax 2500HD, and 07 Lexus Rx400h. Adding the EV for a 90-mile roundtrip commute has us using the EV 24K miles a year and reducing our fossil fuel demand by 1,000 gallons of 87 octane, and 250 gallons of D2.

  • avatar
    Geekcarlover

    Hybrid, maybe. Pure electric, no. Street parking, especially in my neighborhood means no home charging.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    My next vehicle will likely be V8 on purpose while I can still get one before their relegated to the rarefied air of vehicles far beyond my price range.

  • avatar
    mikey

    If and when I decide to dump my EB Mustang I will consider the Volt, or similar size Hybrid. I have 220 wiring within 10 inches of my garage. I’m retired, and in two years of driving have accumulated under 14,000 miles on my Mustang.

    I live in the heart of suburbia . Charging stations are going in on a fairly steady basis. If I move to condo it would need to be new, or real close to new.

    I’m a little concerned about Southern Ontario winters, but I can see a hybrid in the future.

  • avatar
    karlbonde

    I think so. I am going to go test drive a 2014 Fiat 500e to see if it is fun enough to drive. If it is, I am going to sell my 2005 E55 AMG – no more 13mpg city driving/commuting. What is the point of 469HP if I’m stuck in stop and go traffic?

  • avatar
    MBella

    If I didn’t have company cars on a regular basis, I would buy a depreciated Leaf. For how cheap some of the early ones have become, I could pay for it with less than the fuel savings.My daily commute is less than 12 miles round-trip. Perfect for even a heavily range reduced Leaf in the winter.

  • avatar
    volvo

    Surprised no one has mentioned the Prius Prime. Pure EV for the first 40 miles, no range anxiety, proven Toyota technology and reliability.

    In California it is classified as an EV for commuter lanes and EV parking.

    Available now and if I were in the market for a new car it would be very high on my list.

    • 0 avatar
      jh26036

      Unfortunately, the battery range for the Prius Prime is only 25 miles…hence why the federal tax credit is only $4,500 because the battery size is smaller than other PHEV (Volt or BMW i3).

      Unless 2018 is coming out with bigger battery, that’s my bad.

  • avatar
    vvk

    Absolutely! My Tesla Model S is wonderful. I cannot imagine buying another ICE car. I like driving my V-8 sedan with manual transmission for fun sometimes but I hate taking the time to get gas for it. My Tesla is full and ready to go every morning.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      “I hate taking the time to get gas for it”

      Give it to me then

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        It is not a Mazda and does not have a J-vin, so you would not like it :-))

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          You’re good record keeper. And you’re right. J-vin. Getting another j-vin mazda in… 4 days. But I still take it as long as it doesn’t require Premium. I hate paying for premium. Every luxo brand wants Premium, even j-vins

          • 0 avatar
            vvk

            What model?

            I test drove a friend’s CX-5 with manual transmission a few days ago. It suits my driving style. All the power down low, no reason to rev the engine. Shift at 2k rpm. Really reminds me of the old OHV Subaru Leone/Loyale.

            Of course my large German V-8 sedan requires premium. Frankly, I don’t understand why people don’t like Premium. I understand when gas was under $1/gal and Premium was like 30% more expensive than Regular. Nowadays you pay 10-15% more for Premium, hardly a big deal.

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          Where I live, Premium is at least 50c more or 20%. As far as big deal or not, for one car family – no, but I support 3-4 cars. Thankfully, my older son uses his gas$$ now but he still drives my car.

          Now, you’re right. I WOULD get CX5 manual but all ’16s are sold and they don’t make them manual anymore. I could still get one in April but it was too early. I’ve got Mazda6 for more comfort vs 3. Now I own 2×3, 1×6. But I guess it makes sense since one neighbor owns 2 black SUVs and another 3 titanium VWs. Another dude around the corner has 3 compact hatchbacks… Obviously, we have a neighborhood full of people fixated on some ideas of what car should be.

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    In California you can now lease some EVs for $0/mo and even make a profit, given all the federal, state and even local incentives. I don’t really want an EV, but if I were able to get one for free, sure why not?

  • avatar
    HahnZahn

    Hope so. I just bought a 2017 Impreza assuming it’ll be my last ICE, and I’m going to guess that various circumstances in my life and with the technology will make it an obvious solution in 5 or 10 years when I buy a different car.

    I live in SoCal, so if any region is going to improve the infrastructure necessary for electrics, it’s here. But electric cars really necessitate home ownership if you want to avoid all sorts of anxiety about charging. We rent a house with a garage now, but I don’t know for sure if there’ll be another rental between this and home ownership. It’ll also be interesting to see where the technology stands in another 5 years.

  • avatar
    TTCat

    No, and likely never. No interest, nothing even comes close to being appealing, and my location is not conducive to owing or operating a “golf cart”.

  • avatar
    a5ehren

    No, they’re too expensive and look to remain so through the next time I will be in the market (MY2020).

    And the ones that aren’t expensive do not meet my needs for size, range, etc.

    My wife’s next car will likely be electric, but that will be something like MY2025 and she prefers small cars to begin with.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Next vehicle maybe a Fusion Energi, but most likely just a Fusion Hybrid.

    Unfortunately my Garage is detached and is currently serviced by a single 120v 2a circuit that also powers the lights in and on it. So putting a charging station means digging and running new wire. If I dig then the garage will be getting a 100a sub-panel. But it is the digging under a sidewalk that is the stopper at this point.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      I’m recharging my C-Max Energi from a 110v wall outlet, using the convenience cord included with the car. Capital cost= zero! With the Fords’ small batteries, a full charge takes about five hours, while I sleep. Before I got the car, I stressed over the cost and feasibility of a charging station, but I never think about that now.

  • avatar
    Goatshadow

    Hopefully in 5 years there will more variety in the EV market. More ground-up EV designs and fewer FWD econoboxes converted to EV.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Probably my second next vehicle. Likely getting a C-Max next year (non-Energi due to how much space the battery pack takes).

    If I keep the C-Max 5-10 years, I’m thinking that EVs will have pretty good range by 2023 to 2028 and charging infrastructure should also be much more common.

    Who knows, maybe in 10 years fuel stations will even have EV charging “pumps”.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    No, cost needs to come down much further and range needs to go up along with them not looking like crap.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    nein, nein, nein. Without gasolina car is not a car.

  • avatar
    BryanC

    Our family has two plug-ins – a Chevy Volt and a Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid.
    We do all our around-town driving in pure electric mode. But when we need to go on long trips – we just go on gas. During the past 3300 miles with the Pacifica, we’ve averaged 50 MPG (several long trips are in there), and over the past 11000 miles with the Volt, I’m averaging 180 MPG. Electricity is essentially free because I have a big solar array on the roof.

    Electric drivetrains are so much more fun to drive – quiet, smooth, torquey. I’ve surprised quite a few cars while driving my Volt. We’re not going back.

    The Volt will be replaced with a Model 3 in a year or two. =)

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    A solid and resounding NO. Why? I do not want to become annoying. How do you know if someone drives an electric car? They’ll tell you. Multiple times. Honestly, these people make televangelists seem uninvolved.

  • avatar
    ilkhan

    I just leased an F-150. If finances allow I’ll add a model 3 next year, and another Mustang GT the year after that. Though I doubt finances will allow for the ‘stang. :(

    I already miss my Coyote. :(

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    I’m seeing a surge in excitement in EVs now. Two of my facebook friends are giddy about their new Tesla and Bolt. Good for them, but nobody should presume the benefits of electrical propulsion. No maintenance? Pollution free? I very much doubt that.

    At current energy prices, the only way I benefit from the plug-in side of my new C-Max Energi will be on tax day, when I claim hefty federal and state credits that should pay for a third of the car. My EV battery costs about a buck for 7 kwh of electricity, and takes me 20 miles…but so would a half-tank of two-buck gas. Or maybe you’re concerned about CO2; I certainly am. According to the Union of Concerned Scientists, my regional power grid is the highest-carbon in the country, so a gas car getting 38 mpg is at par with a grid-powered EV.

    I love many things about my new car, like the regenerative braking that recaptures wasted energy from that incessant chore. I love turning on the AC remotely on a hot day, and getting into a cool car minutes later. I love the flexibility of choosing which power source to use in shorter trips, gas for the highway, EV for the city. But I don’t fool myself into thinking I’ve scored a free lunch. Kinetics still demand combustion, under your own hood or elsewhere.

    • 0 avatar
      markogts

      You can’t expect to go to zero pollution overnight. It will take many years to replace all the existing cars. In the same way, it will take many years to have zero-CO2 electricity generation. But the trends are clear, and EVs become cleaner every year, contrary to what happens to ICEVs.

  • avatar
    Felix Hoenikker

    My wife is due for a new car. An electric would be perfect for her since she only drives 4 miles each way to work. The trouble is that she is used to sitting up high in a minivan and wants said high seating in her next car. Aside from the Chevy Bolt, are they any other electric cars with CUV ride height coming out in the next year? The Tesla X is not an option due to cost.

  • avatar
    newenthusiast

    For me, the answer is no. I currently need to be able to move a minimum of 4 people (including myself) up to as many as 7 several times a week (youth soccer, gymnastics, and volleyball), plus need a roof long enough and towing capacity for some combination of paddle boards, bikes, a roof box, and either a smaller trailer with other toys or a larger trailer for a small boat (mind you, I don’t use or haul all of these at the same time).

    And usually weekends involve a long drive one way with stuff. We like to get out and got to places we haven’t been before when we can. The extra weight decreases range, as far as I know.

    As far as I know, there is currently no EV on the market (or in development)that offers the seating capacity and can meet my range requirements while loaded. And I don’t need or want to have a 3rd, smaller car for use as a daily commuter, because I have the good fortune of working from home almost all of the time. And renting a van or SUV 25+ times a year is more expensive than just buying a used EV or sticking with what I have over my expected vehicles life (10-15 years).

    I would be more than happy to drive an EV when the tech gets to where I need it, especially the range thing. Not every campground or beach parking lot has electrical plug in capability unless you are in the RV parking area. Some places have less restrictions, but others only rent or permit towed campers or motor-homes to park in.

    I do think a hybrid makes more sense for me. The Pacifica Hybrid (or any hybrid minivan or CUV/SUV) is intriguing from a practical standpoint as the next thing for me. But I haven’t looked closely to see if it tows well or how the battery placement affects cargo.

    I think my wife would benefit from an EV, as her daily driver is mostly used to travel to and from work. But she can make her own decision on that.

  • avatar
    62Continental

    My commute is too long for me to be comfortable with the range of the latest crop of EV’s, as work does not and is not likely to have a charger. Plus, I have to go offroad on occasion to get to jobsites, so I’ll stick with my truck.

    As for my wife, she should be the right customer for an EV. Short commute to the kids schools and work. But her next ride will be a SRT8 Grand Cherokee. Why? Because fun. There’s no EV on the market that comes close.

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    I have nothing against EV’s as vehicles as these fulfill the needs and expectations of appliance drivers in urban settings. I don’t really consider them as proper for my garage. However, some day the other shoe will drop on EV’s. Soon that can being kicked down the road will flatten into a trip hazard for EV’s. Subsidies will disappear as we are already seeing. Governments (federal, state, local) will see “opportunities” to “regulate” and ensure “safe operation and care” of charging stations/facilities. These “opportunities” will include, of course, fees for regular inspections and even licenses for operation of these charging stations/facilities. Don’t laugh at this – my state and county charge and require regular inspection with fees and an annual licensing fee for operation of household of septic systems as a result of fairly recent “green” initiative rule changes. Multi-unit apartment operators/condo owners associations/et al will gladly pass along these fees as not insignificant costs to their residents. EV’s as vehicles upon the highways will also cease to be a much more affordable alternative to ICE vehicles – fuel taxes will morph into something “equivalent” (yeah, I’ll bet!) to continue to recover or even increase revenues. Prices for on-road charging stations will rise to a level of pain just below excruciating and level off; free “complimentary” charging will disappear. End of life disposal – that $50 or $100 we get at the junkyard for the old Cavalier currently. Stand by for a disposal fee much as that for old tires at the tire store but a much more “robust” amount because of the composition/chemistry of an EV power source – I can almost see this being rolled into the purchase price when new to ensure proper recycling. Nope, not for me.

  • avatar
    phreshone

    Only if I fracture my hip and need a hoveround…

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Unlikely. But other than owning a Camry, I never say never. But given I have no commute other than to the airport and back (20 miles in Maine, but 100 in Florida), I drive relatively little, and my car usage is wildly variable, I can’t see putting up with any level of inconvenience.

    If you want to save money commuting, buy a well-used Prius and drive slowly.

  • avatar
    Nedmundo

    Yes, ideally one of our next two cars will be a pure electric. We live in downtown Philly, and almost never need two long range cars at the same time. A pure electric would be great for local driving, and even some weekend trips to the NYC metro area, provided we could recharge while there. The Chevy Bolt is getting close to something I’d consider. I’d also consider rooftop solar panels to contribute to the charging.

    But we do some true long-distance driving, and I like sport sedans and hot hatches with manual transmissions, so I’d want something like a Civic Si alongside the electric.

  • avatar
    NetGenHoon

    Current Leaf owner, here. I’m in Arizona, so full electric gives me HOV lane access. So yes, next car will still be electric. That said, I’d prefer a PHEV and the wife would prefer a Crossover.

  • avatar
    Jonathan Miller

    I personally will not be buying an electric vehicle until the economics make sense compared to a gas vehicle. It makes no sense to me to pay double or triple the price to save operating costs on the back end. The payback period is infinitely long for me. Maybe it works right now for some people but not for me. This fact is not negotiable no matter how others feel about electric vehicles.

  • avatar
    z9

    Test drove a Bolt recently. It is fun to drive, vaguely practical for its size, and the lease deals are very attractive right now ($6000 + $99 a month for 36 months for example). If your idea of the EV “driving experience” is a Leaf you may be very pleasantly surprised.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    Not as a primary vehicle if you live in earthquake or hurricane country.

    a full gas tank and 20 extra gallons can take you out of any immediate clusterf______ and give you lots of idling time and a big cushion for the unexpected.

    Ain’t as easy in an EV.

    making reasonably prudent contingencies for long shot disasters is smart for everyone. not just preppers.

  • avatar
    Stevo

    I hope to. Hopefully there are a few more decent options in a year or so. Would really love an EV equivalent to our Golf wagon. I’m a homeowner with a short commute into city parking situations, so that would check all the boxes. Have gas cars in household if needed. I would love to never have the “inopportune gas light” again. Always happens as you are dropping one kid off, ready to go beat against traffic to make practice for kid 2, then somewhere else for kid 3. Hate that.

  • avatar
    Sgt Beavis

    I just bought a Jaguar F-Pace last month, so I won’t be looking again until my lease ends in 35 more months.

    However, by then I think I’ll seriously consider electric. My wife already has the hots for the VW Microbus, but that won’t be here until 2022. When my lease is up, I’ll look at a Tesla and the Jag I-Pace. I think three more years is just about the right time to start seriously looking at EVs. There is a crap ton of development underway by the major OEMs now. Battery development is just going to get better from here on out. IMO, electrics are here to stay and the ICE is eventually going to die out. I’ll miss those lovely V8s (and my supercharged v6) but I think I’ll fall in love with all that instant torque.

  • avatar
    Boff

    My wife was given a ride recently in a colleagues Tesla…this is a woman who usually doesn’t notice much about cars, and she was quite blown away. I could see her clamoring for one. I’d never get one for myself, mind you.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    For practical purposes, absolutely – EVs take care of most of my objections about most 2-pedal vehicles (engine braking and responsiveness, mostly), which is useful in a single vehicle household. And range is hardly a concern (I’m down to about 7500 miles a year right now), although I’m not sure selling my condo board on getting a charger installed is a fight I’m prepared to battle (might as well save their good will for something else).

    That said, because I drive so little as to make an EV unquestionably feasible, I’m also tempted to get some stupid used gas guzzler for my next vehicle, just because I can. Even at half the mileage of my current econobox, and switching to premium, I’d spend about $35/week extra. I’m still sure there’s an EV in my future, but what good is a short commute if I can’t use it to enjoy some otherwise bad ideas?

  • avatar
    markogts

    Already owning the Outlander PHEV. Looking forward to replace it either with model Y or a new Outlander (as per the GT-Phev concept with twice the battery). Pity for the Model 3, the lack of a hatch was a deal breaker for me.

    Currently living in town, in case I move to the countryside, the second car will be pure EV for sure, something cheap used, like the i-MiEV or so.

  • avatar
    raph

    Probably, I really want to retire to a nice socialist hell hole and since it looks like they are going green over in that part of the world it makes sense. I’ll still have the Shelby if at all possible so there will be that

  • avatar
    Steve Jacobs

    Almost certainly for a long range electric. We have a RAV4 for long distance work. 200-300 miles and I’m all in.

  • avatar
    mchan1

    The answer is currently no.

    Today’s EVs cost too much, many are small sized vehicles that taller people can’t comfortable fit into and it’s impractical when it comes to range and refueling.

    On Average, I’m not the target buyer as I drive lots of miles beyond the range of the current EVs and rent so I can’t install a charger at my always temporary residence until I own. Also, since I live in the upper New England area, the cold weather would affect the batteries so mileage would drop and the EV probably won’t handle well in the snow.

    If I was in the market for a newer vehicle, I’d consider a hybrid vehicle, possibly a CUV like the Toyota Rav4 or Nissan Rogue but that will likely change in the future in the model, but I’d seriously consider a hybrid, considering I keep my vehicles for ~10 years or so and hybrid prices would probably drop more by then.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      What I see, mchan1, are a lot of assumptions and excuses, based on almost no valid data. While I understand your concerns, the Tesla Model X seems like it would be a good match for you. With AWD you wouldn’t have to worry about the weather that much and its size should be sufficient even if you’re 6′ tall. Your other issues of lack of charging at least somewhat depends on whether you’re renting a house or an apartment–you don’t say. 220V at 40 or 50Amps from a dryer connection would serve most of your daily needs on an overnight charge and/or keep the batteries warm in cold weather once the charge is complete (the charging process would keep them warm in the meantime.)

      Your driving habits are of question now, since you say you regularly travel beyond the range of any EVs. Can you tell us just how far you drive that frequently? I do find it hard to believe your daily driving would exceed 250 miles but if you visit family every weekend or so in another state then I could see the problem.

      Simply put, you make statements but you don’t explain them sufficiently to state categorically that no current EV could meet your needs.

  • avatar
    MoparRocker74

    Over my rotting corpse. I’m a gearhead and a die hard enthusiast…not a little old lady who only goes to church and the local piggly wiggly. Electric cars literally have NOTHING to offer me. I don’t care that the mainline Tesla looks decent and that it can actually be fast. The fact is, its an appliance and a status symbol for far left types. No electric car will EVER have the tactile feel and sound of a healthy uncorked V8 driving the rear wheels thru a manual transmission, and it sure as hell wont lend itself to those of us who like to do our own wrenching and modifications. That stuff is fine for people who aren’t into cars but such tripe will NEVER defile my driveway.

  • avatar
    chaparral

    Yes.

    Tesla Model 3.

    It has the hardware necessary to be the best-handling sedan ever: lots of tire area per lb, long wheelbase and short overhangs, extremely low center of gravity, wishbone/multilink suspension. In addition, the power control on corner exit can be very precisely controlled.

    I take a lot of 100-200 mile road trips, so provided it can recharge at the other end it’ll make up most of the difference against a less expensive car on fuel alone.

  • avatar
    tekdemon

    Yep, getting a Model 3 to replace my Passat. Will also be selling my Cayman S though the Model 3 isn’t a replacement for that…not sure what I’m replacing the Cayman with yet.

  • avatar

    until our home owners ass allows the provision of proper power outlets in the carports, no electric cars for bloodnok.

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