By on September 7, 2017

Autobahn, Image: Wikimedia

I spent a fair amount of time on the Autobahn this summer, including several hundred miles on the unrestricted sections. I can’t say that I went all that fast — I think I saw 260 km/h once, trying to get to a Pizza Hut near the border with Belgium that was about to close. Other than that I rarely went above 200 km/h. The only excuse I have for this is that I’m old and tired and I had a bunch of broken ribs at the time.

There’s also the inconvenient fact that the freeways are just as crowded over there as they are here, and the lane discipline hasn’t been so good in recent years due to demographic and educational changes in Germany. Still, once in awhile you can find yourself in those oh-so-stereotypically Deutsch situations of which you dreamed as a child. There was a particularly memorable afternoon where I relaxed in the passenger seat of an E43 wagon and watched my co-driver chase a Swiss-plated Phantom for over an hour at sustained triple-digit speeds. I was working my way through a bag of those Babybel cheese things. Good times.

My long-time correspondent and pal Luigi knows all about those kind of good times. He’s been around the world working different gigs. Now he’s considering settling down for a while in der Vaterland and buying a big, thirsty car for big, fast cross-Continental commutes.

Luigi writes:

I’m considering a career change which would require twice-weekly drives of about 600 km each. The fastest route includes long, unrestricted sections of the Autobahn for much of the distance. Fuel would be paid for by my potential employer, but insurance and maintenance would not. Cargo-hauling capacity and more than two seats wouldn’t strictly be required.

Which automobiles should I consider purchasing for this über-commute? I don’t want to spend much over 15,000 Euros.

I’ve put the important section in bold because in Europe that makes a BIG difference. It’s no real trick to spend a dollar a mile on fuel when you are hustling on the Autobahn. In fact, to do any better than fifty cents a mile you’d need something that returns 20 mpg at major throttle openings, which is pretty much nothing outside a 600cc sportbike.

Knowing that the fuel is being covered, we are free to stretch the imagination a bit. I think it would be a real shame to just buy another Me-Too Iguana Benz or Bimmer. No, for this purpose we require a combination of spirit and style, with a dash of reliability thrown in. So, my first suggestion is one of the aluminum-bodied Jaguar XK coupes. They’re gorgeous, the engines run to 200k miles with no trouble, the electronics are actually pretty okay, and they just love running wide-open at high speeds. It would be a miracle to get more than eight miles per gallon above 100 mph, but remember that Luigi doesn’t need to worry about that.

Yes, I think a Jag-you-are is just the ticket. If the XK coupe seems too thrusty and old-man-ish, there’s always the XJ8 sedan. I’d stay away from the supercharged versions because they cost more money to buy and run, but I wouldn’t begrudge any man the pleasure of buying a British Racing Green XKR coupe and blowing by the diesel BMW sedans hard enough to make them wobble in his wake.

What say you, dear readers? How would you live your unrestricted dreams on a relatively restricted budget?

[Image: Wikimedia Commons (CC BY-SA 2.5)]

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87 Comments on “Ask Jack: Buying a Bruiser for the Autobahn?...”


  • avatar
    threeer

    It’s all good fun and games until you run into a big, huge Stau. Then it really doesn’t matter what vehicle you’re in. Or, when you come off the relatively large A-roads and find yourself on a B-motorway, or worse, inside a city with very, very tight roads. Never mind parking! The largest car I drove in Germany was an E-class MB, and there were times and situations where even that felt almost too big!
    But if the commute is primarily “A” routes, then as long as the road remains clear, certainly a bomber such as the Jag would be nice. But, I’m an older Bimmer fan, so I’d probably turn to a well-kept 5-series mit Schaltgetrieb.

  • avatar
    70Cougar

    You provided an excuse for not driving fast. What’s your excuse for eating at Pizza Hut in Germany?

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      this. the first time I was in Japan, our “chaperone” was a German expat who saw us as an opportunity to go places that served non-Japanese/Western food. after enduring Tony Roma’s in Roppongi the first night, the next day we finally said “f*** off, man, we didn’t come to Japan to eat sandwiches.”

      • 0 avatar
        ash78

        Years ago, during the Fast Casual restaurant boom, our town finally got an Outback Steakhouse. Just a few weeks later, my dad was entertaining a trio of Australian businessmen. You can guess where he took them.

        My mom gave him a hard time, but he genuinely thought it was a good idea. I was 10 or 12 years old and even I knew better.

    • 0 avatar
      ash78

      Maybe it’s for hipster irony, sort of like how Americans shop at Aldi :D

      • 0 avatar

        I own and wear fedoras and have facial hair but nobody’s ever accused me of being a hipster. A hippie, perhaps, but never a hipster.

        I shop at Aldi because there’s one around the corner from here, less than a 10 minute walk, the prices are low, and many of the house brands are kosher.

        I’ll never pay a grocery store for a bag, though, and the quarter deposit for the grocery cart is annoying.

        BTW, the grocery cart was invented by a guy named Abe Goldman.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Let assume that you were the writer for a feature that involved three days on a racetrack and twelve days overseas. Let’s further say that a half-million dollars’ worth of cars and a half-dozen support people had been flown and shipped to make this happen. Finally, let’s say that you’ve been grotesquely injured in so many ways over the past two decades that you can barely digest anything at all.

      Would you eat a franchised known quantity, or would you turn the whole thing into a foodie adventure?

      Truth be told, most of the time when I travel to do car work I simply fast from beginning to end. There’s no sense in accidentally getting sick and wasting everybody’s time. But in this case I *had* to eat something because I was overseas for so long.

      Sorry for the extremely earnest and detailed response to what was probably supposed to be a throwaway LOL U EAT PROLE FOODZ comment.

      • 0 avatar
        AKM

        Jack, are you seriously saying that you trust a Pizza Hut over a German brewery to not make your stomach sick? oO
        I can understand the fasting thing if you have a bit of padding, but pizza hut is one of those franchises that, in EUrope at least, pretty much guarantee stomach churn. Their cooking procedures are a long way off mcDonalds, which has become obssesively compulsive.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Actually, I think your mention of Pizza Hut and their responses revealed who has traveled extensively and who experiences life mostly in their minds. German food is pretty much garbage anyway, as is British food. Austrian, Italian, and French food has potential, but those are almost exceptions to the mystery fried leftovers of the Netherlands and proto-ketchups of Germany. There are reasons that curries are now the staple of English cuisine, and it isn’t because of Islamification. In the US, I could probably happily go the rest of my life without eating at Pizza Hut. If I saw one while traveling in Germany? It’s not like I’d be eating anything authentically German anyway.

        • 0 avatar
          PenguinBoy

          “German food is pretty much garbage anyway, as is British food.”
          Where are you eating in Britain? These days, I find the food in London and the South to be a bit better than what we get in North America on average, and the good food is really, really good. That doesn’t just apply to eating out, mainstream UK grocery stores like Waitrose offer great quality comparable North American “Foodie Adventure” stores.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I can’t vouch for German restaurants in Germany but Haus Murphys in Phoenix was awesome back when I visited in 2014.

            http://www.hausmurphys.com/

            I certain it would have brought a tear to the eye of my born-in-Germany great-grandmother, rest her soul.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        How did the bag of Babybel cheese wheels sit :)?

      • 0 avatar
        mrwiizrd

        “LOL U EAT PROLE FOODZ”

        outstanding.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        C’mon, man, there’s always a handful of us who pick up on a barely consequential thing in an article and run with it. It’s not like we’re being entirely SRS BSNS about it.

      • 0 avatar
        PenguinBoy

        “Would you eat a franchised known quantity, or would you turn the whole thing into a foodie adventure?”
        Personally, I would go for the “foodie adventure”, although I can appreciate that not everyone thinks the same way.

        My employer has several operations near a resort town that features a wide variety of interesting locally owned independent restaurants. It always amazes me how many of my coworkers will skip these in favour of the “Boston Pizza” store on the highway…

      • 0 avatar
        70Cougar

        Not a troll. Just making a joke. “Pizza Hut serves beer in Germany” would have been a valid excuse too.

    • 0 avatar

      We have a rule when we travel. Unless we’re under time duress and can’t find anything that meets the rule, or have no other reasonable options, we always eat at places we don’t have at home.

      Then again, we have Pizza Hut at home, and the local pizza is so much better, so I don’t have a reason to eat at Pizza Hut here, either.

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        The last time I ate at Pizza Hut was on vacation, during a blizzard in Buffalo. The place was the only restaurant open, and despite it being the first day of a multi-day blizzard, the place was out of many menu items, including coffee. (And despite the fact that the place was almost deserted.) The food was as bad as I remembered it, with the only positive being you could order accurately to not overstuff yourself – unlike the grossly oversized portions of most American restaurants.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Man could be nostalgia but Pizza Hut used to be good back in the 80’s right up until they introdiced the personal pan pizza then it took a turn for the worst.

        I wonder if that coincides with Yum Brands acquiring Pizza Hut and KFC and well I’d include Toxic Hell but they weren’t that great to begin with so they can only go up.

        Anyways it always seems to me that once a chain is acquired by Yum Brands they cost control the hell out of it.

        Then again pizza chains in general have taken a turn for the worst and adding insult to injury a pizza isnt all that expensive to make.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        Do you remember the Priazzo? I hated the commercials, but actually liked the product. It’s all I remember of pre-Personal-Pan-Pizza Hut.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Jack is very, very much not a food enthusiast.

  • avatar
    gsf12man

    Couldn’t agree more on the Jaguar notion(s). I’m a bit biased since I used to work for the company, but what the hell? A good idea is a good idea. The n/a 5.0L was perhaps their best-ever engine.

  • avatar
    dima

    Not sure if I would go with a large car. Where I live, I drive to Germany, and right after boarder crossing boarder between Basel and Weil am Rhein, there is a stretch of A5 without speed limit. I am seldom can go full throttle. There are always someone go nice and easy on a left, and always traffic. Big car in Europe, is a handicap, too narrow parking spaces, gas cost too much, just no fun as in US.

  • avatar
    JimC2

    There’s plenty of money to be made in penalties for poor lane discipline. I wish the traffic cops in the new world would exercise more prejudice and less discretion in this regard.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    If this was ‘MERICA I’d just say get a Serria 1500 or an F150 Supercrew 4×4 with roughly 6ft bed. Slap a hard toneau on it and viola, greatest sedan since a late 60s Impala. ;-)

    • 0 avatar
      ChesterChi

      Yeah I’m sure an F150 handles awesome at 120mph, which is what the guy is looking for.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      A Unimog would be what he needs since that is the closest German equivalent to a pickup and we all know pickups are the answer to all of our prayers ;)

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The pickup is indeed a false god.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          @28-Cars – (Listen to the Bishop for a moment)

          I wouldn’t go that far. What were the traditionally appreciated virtues of the sedan since the birth of the American OHV V8?

          Available under-stressed engines with good torque curves, wide open bench seats front and rear, quiet isolated ride (partially from their long wheelbases), column shifts to further utilize that space, gigantic trunks that had easy access openings, and the ability to spec one from quite utilitarian to quite luxurious while also having a very wide freedom of options.

          Where else in the current, on sale right now, American automotive landscape is there that freedom except for THE TRUCK?

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “The pickup is indeed a false god.”

          O_o

          Blasphemy.

          Ezekiel 23:24
          ‘They will come against you with weapons, chariots and wagons’

          No mention of sedans or sports cars. A lot of talk of horses, so a Mustang might be divine!

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      LOL, imagine showing up at a European customer site with a F150 for a business meeting. I’m not sure if his employer has that kind of impression in mind when he ask him to do the travel and reimburse for the fuel.

      A Crown Vic maybe, but still, no.

  • avatar
    Scott_314

    I don’t know. Running a Jaguar flat out will shake something loose. Each time.

    A new Civic will run at 180km/h for five hours straight. Every day for three years.

    • 0 avatar
      jbartolomero

      A new Civic will cost you a lot more than 15.000 Euro en Europe these days. Even with the tiny 1.0 129HP the cheapest Civic costs around 21.000 Euro out the door in Spain or Germany.

      You may get an older generation Civic (2015, maybe) but that will stick you with the 1,8 engine and its 140HP. Those cars aren’t specially good for high speed stints on the freeway.

      • 0 avatar
        Zykotec

        You could theoretically get an older Civic 2.2 diesel , massive torque ,does more than 200km/h. Fuel economy would be brilliant, but I’m not sure how noisy they get at those speeds.

    • 0 avatar
      PenguinBoy

      You would seriously suggest a Civic over a XK8 for high speed cruising when someone else is paying for fuel??

  • avatar
    ciscokidinsf

    C’mon Jack, you know deep in your heart that if MPG’s are of no importance, and you want to travel on style on an engine that could have some brute force, that the correct answer is a VW Phaeton. And in Europe you can get them as lat as MY 2016 – But get a nice V8 from 96-99 and enjoy it as no other.

  • avatar
    Eggshen2013

    260 km/h…ohhh so continental Jack, but then later in the post you slip back into mph and mpg. What happened?

  • avatar

    You don’t need exotic, I think. I saw 140 mph in a rented BMW 320d…..

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I was gonna say get a Hellcat, but then I saw 15,000 Euro at the end. Womp Womp.

    These guys import, sell and warranty them in Europe:

    https://aeceurope DOT com/en/cars/challenger-srt-hellcat/

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      Yeah, you would probably need to add another zero to the number to get any newer American V8’s.
      And while even US inline 4’s and V6’s can outaccellerate most of the traffic in Europe, that doesn’t help much at the Autobahn.

  • avatar

    Do they sell a version of the Holden Commodore/Chevy SS over there?

  • avatar
    RHD

    Miata with an aftermarket supercharger.

    • 0 avatar
      JuniperBug

      High speed comfort and stability are two things for which Miata is not the answer. And a supercharger won’t do anything to cure the short gearing; my ’99 would hit redline by about 125 MPH.

  • avatar
    W.Minter

    XK8 is a great idea, but half-way nice ones start at 19,000 Euro in Germany, and don’t expect a babied first owner car for that money.
    XJs can be had cheap (if you accept 250,000 kilometers on the ODO), but insurance is more expensive than for the XK8.
    From time to time cheap (16k) Jag XFs pop up, but insurance is even more expensive, and at that price expect US imports (salvage title), welded together in Lithuania.

    15k Euro is not very much money if you are looking for something fast AND dependable (sort of CPO or warranty). A 6 year old A4 265hp V6 sedan retails for 19k.
    For 15k, you can have a 4 year old Citroen C5 204hp Diesel, the last fancy suspension unicorn.
    Opel Insignia Turbo is an option, 6 years old. V6, turbo, fits the budget.
    Or a Skoda Superb limo, NA V6 with 260hp, 4×4. 3 years old, 88,000 km, warranty, 19k Euro. Seen on mobile.de

  • avatar
    ajla

    I would get a V6 version of an Alfa 159 or Brera.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Trying to commute at 250 km/h will get old quickly. There’s zero room for error at that speed (or higher) and driving becomes an exercise in hyper-concentration.

    By contrast, on highways as well-built as most Autobahns, 180 km/h (~115 mph) is a pretty relaxing experience. I expect that’s around the speed where Luigi will end up spending most of his commute time. And almost any bigger European car is happy at that sort of speed. I’d recommend buying European, ideally German, and focusing on seat comfort and the radio first.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      A 15,000 Euro big German car is just as much of a POS there as it is here. Read the TUV road worthiness reports. The best made cars there are the same ones that are the best made cars here. The only Germans that hold up are two seaters that aren’t driven much in the first place.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    C4 or C5 Corvette could be had in the US for that kind of money, but perhaps they are much higher in Germany. I suspect you might find the odd used Chrysler 300 with Hemi that would fall into that budget, although most you would find in Europe probably have some sort of diesel or V-6 gasoline.

    • 0 avatar
      Mirko Reinhardt

      Chrysler 300C Hemi for 15k?
      Would be pretty easy to get two for that kind of cash.
      https://www.autoscout24.de/angebote/chrysler-300c-touring-5-7-v8-hemi-awd-automatik-benzin-schwarz-4e241b58-e2a7-6548-e053-e350040a473d?cldtidx=3

      Or a SRT for 21k…
      https://www.autoscout24.de/angebote/chrysler-300c-touring-srt8-6-1-automatik-teileder-navi-xe-benzin-5b6f66f5-0839-4222-af62-ddee11128cb6?cldtidx=4

      For fast autobahn driving, you want wheelbase:
      https://www.autoscout24.de/angebote/chrysler-300c-limousine-benzin-schwarz-01d55f43-4101-113c-e053-e350040aca8c?cldtidx=12

      Completely different idea:
      What’s wrong with the Passat R36?
      https://www.autoscout24.de/angebote/volkswagen-passat-variant-v6-fsi-4motion-dsg-r36-benzin-schwarz-8e5d9c58-0196-fd51-e053-e350040aee70?cldtidx=3

  • avatar
    NeilM

    dal20402 writes:
    ‘Trying to commute at 250 km/h will get old quickly. There’s zero room for error at that speed (or higher) and driving becomes an exercise in hyper-concentration.

    By contrast, on highways as well-built as most Autobahns, 180 km/h (~115 mph) is a pretty relaxing experience.’

    Nailed it.

    At 250 km/h it’s just a question of time before you run out of talent, luck or both. Sh!t happens, and with a couple of 600 km commutes a week the odds of it happening to you increase.

    • 0 avatar

      If we had unlimited speed on the Interstates, I’d probably cruise at 90-100. At triple digits the closing speeds start getting dramatic. At a buck twenty five or more, the cars going 70mph that you are overtaking start looking like they’re traveling in the other direction.

  • avatar
    Carzzi

    The correct pronunciation is Jag-you-WERE.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    Maybe Jaguar isn’t the answer. Maybe he needs another big cat. A quick search on ‘mobile.de’ tells me there are quite a few Panthers in Germany.
    Which model years/engines can do 120+mph safely for some hours though?

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Tough one… 15000 EUR is not a lot to get something still new-ish, and German cars are expensive to repair there too.

    As someone who lived in Germany 5 years and commuted daily in the car (though not much unlimited in the Cologne-Duesseldorf area), I thoroughly loved my Inline 6 diesel E90 3 Series. Big enough for comfort, great cruiser, small enough to park, good MPG, and the 6 cylinder diesel gave plenty of grunt while still pulling good fuel economy. Big step up from the 4 cylinder diesel BMWs in my opinion. But it had a few issues that cost me a couple grand in repairs over those years.

    So…. I’d say with a commute like that, probably I’d recommend diesel, though employer pays fuel, so maybe if I could get a FUN gas engine car I’d go that way. Meaning a straight 6 or turbo 6 or bigger gas engine. No 4 cylinders.

    I agree with the comment on E Classes being borderline too big. I could do it, but many parking garages were not fun. I’d stick to 3/C/A4 size stuff.

    My only other thoughts might be something like the S3, Golf R, or one of the plethora of excellent Fords in Europe. The Fords will give you a smaller engine, and won’t reach those high speeds quite as quickly/easily as the bigger engine German cars, but the Fords do have excellent suspension tuning and settle into high speed cruise very well.

    What else did I like over the years? A3 hatch. Passat Wagon. Mondeo, Focus, GTI. Opel Insignia was solid. Never driven one, but apparently some of the Skodas are excellent. Superb if you like space, the Octavia can be had in some gussied up models with good power.

    At end of the day though, for Bahn burning….still nothing is as good as the German sedans in my opinion. Probably worth the additional cost if you can afford it and with a big engine.

    Note, for some reason VWs have a massive premium on them there. The Golf is apparently made of gold in Germany. Couldn’t believe the asking prices on those things. Any other brand is a better buy.

    Don’t forget insurance. This definitely was expensive, especially as the miles driven went up. Also check the taxes. Mine pushed I think 450EUR a year just for registration.

    Also agreed 180km/h is about the sweet spot. 200+ and you just can’t focus for a really long period of time. It is fun for 5 minutes and then you just want to back down. 180 you can cruise all day long.

    And prepare to be stuck in 6 hour traffic jams sometimes. I was amazed to be in the middle of nowhere in Germany and you just come to a complete stop. The run from Stuttgart to Munich was always particularly bad. If you’re in East Germany tho…have fun. Way less traffic outside Berlin, and brand new Autobahns with lots of lanes. Absolute blast.

  • avatar
    Manic

    Audi S5 4.2 (or A5 Quattro 3.2 or 3.0d)
    ALPINA D3 Biturbo: suchen.mobile.de/fahrzeuge/details.html?id=249897056
    MB C/E/SLK350: suchen.mobile.de/fahrzeuge/details.html?id=250036182
    BMW 330xdA: suchen.mobile.de/fahrzeuge/details.html?id=247761846
    BMW 335dA: suchen.mobile.de/fahrzeuge/details.html?id=249519625
    Porsche Boxter?

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    Do they sell the equivalent of S2000 in Europe? That’s pretty reliable and tuned for high speed (need to really rev however).

  • avatar
    Tosh

    I would pick a large cushy Citroen for its superior aerodynamics, floating carpet suspension, and superb steering and brakes. Do they still make those? Maybe a used Citroen C6 then…

  • avatar
    rushn

    Diesel. Big Diesel.

    So I live here, drive fast here and looking for a new car to enjoy the autobahn. For the life of me, cannot convince myself to buy a gasoline car even with fuel all paid for. I’ve gone from Berlin to Munich in under 5 hours, with snack breaks, construction and… a refill at the pump, because once you get to 240+, even the 3.0 diesel Audi drinks so fast, you can see the fuel gauge move. If I was doing that speed in the S4, I’d probably have to stop twice. If you think range anxiety is an issue with EVs, going fast in any 95+ powered vehicle will give you something to be anxious about.

    So, get the 335d, or the A4/A5/A6 with the 3.0. If you really want to, get them chipped. Or get the D3 Alpina. Still absurd acceleration, still topping out above reasonable fast speeds and still get to thumb your nose at the gas engines.

    For the record, my A4 3.0 was running ~32-36 MPG cruising at 100 mph.

  • avatar
    DangerDave77

    Love the ” Me Too” Iguana reference. Had those books as a child too!

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    This summer we drove over 4000km with our ’02 Camry, German Autobahn among it. At 140kph, the Camry has the same rpm as our Honda at 90kph. We drove it with cruise control at 180kph for a while, too. It had the typical issues of an underused Scandinavian car; the battery died, the throttle body got dirty. As a matter of fact, on a map of Germany, the most cars need road assistance relative to traffic density around Kiel, which is a typical arrival harbour for Scandinavian ferries.

    The big ol’ Camry was a good Autobahn car. It’s probably nothing too exciting for someone who has lived in America though. A Jaguar or Mercedes might be a more obvious choice. What I’d check out, too, would be older Renault, Citroën and Peugeot of size. Their used car value in Germany is dismal, and they are rare and interesting enough to give them a try. Comfy, too, for those long rides.

  • avatar
    Shortest Circuit

    I was going to suggest a Z4 but the budget does not allow for a Coupe, and it isn’t all that good at cruising, with the short ratio box they have. sooo…
    Volvo C70 T5. Glorious sound, quiet and comfy. Easily in budget.

  • avatar
    mechimike

    You need something from the sweet spot of American cars. When engines were big but the safety nannies were beginning to creep in. I recommend a Chrysler product from about 1968. A big 440 V8, front disc brakes, shoulder belts, collapsible steering column…and surprisingly composed above 160 km/hr. With Germany’s strict inspections, any you’re likely to find over there have been well maintained.

    Or go for something like a Jensen Interceptor.

  • avatar

    In all the years of reading articles on car sites, this is the first time that someone has recommended my beloved XK.

    Thanks for making my day Jack.

  • avatar
    vaujot

    I live in Germany and have a few comments and suggestions:
    1. DO NOT BUY AN OLD DIESEL IN GERMANY! Many German cities are under serious pressure to improve air quality and banning old diesel cars is the obvious thing to do to show you’re doing “something”. Those who suggest an old Diesel just show they don’t know what is goin on, here.
    2. Consider ADAC PLUS membership. This will get you roadside assistance. If they can’t get you going, they will tow your car home and give you a rental car to continue your trip.
    3. When in Rome, do as the Romans do. This is in response to people worrying about the reliability of older German cars. The idea of owning an older German car in Germany is much more reasonable here than it would be in the US. Much easier to find competent mechanics and spare parts here than stateside. There are decent bargains to be had when looking for a lowing mileage pampered sedan from pensioners. S-Class Benzes, 7-series BMW and Audi A8s and especially VW Phaetons depreciate heavily and there should be plenty of choices that fit the criteria to find. I wouldn’t limit the search to online sources like eBay Kleinanzeigen or mobile.de but also look in the local papers.
    4. That being said, Luigi is probably Italian. Big Alfas and Lancias depreciate even more than big German cars. I’d look for something with the Busso V6. The budget would probably allow for two of those so he’ have a spare if one of them breaks down.
    5. If Luigi has an appetite for risk, there are a few Maserati Quattroporte on mobile.de that would fit the budget.
    6. If Jack can recommend the Audi A5, there are plenty above 250 horsepower in budget on mobile.de.

    • 0 avatar
      rushn

      Sure, make it sound like others are the fools and you are the smart one :)

      Whenever the big city ban does happen, it’s certainly not tomorrow and certainly does not affect the cross continental drives (see the request in original post). Oh, and as you mentioned yourself, it’s the old diesels. If you try hard, you might even snag a Euro 6 diesel for around the asking price.

      And if you do live in Germany, you are hopefully smart enough to stay hell out of the city with a car and do the reasonable thing: live just outside the city center and use public transportation. Works for me, works for many others.

  • avatar
    W210Driver

    If he is doing over 600 kilometers then logic (based on fuel pricing there) would suggest he needs a diesel-powered vehicle. At sustained highspeeds they still deliver impressive fuel economy.

    I own two W210s, among them an E300 Turbodiesel which is my cross-country driver. Relaxing, comfortable and fuel efficient.

  • avatar
    Mirko Reinhardt

    How good are these at burning fuel?
    https://www.autoscout24.de/angebote/cadillac-sts-automatik-leder-d3-26-000-km-benzin-gold-f8b0fc4d-49dd-7b16-e053-e250040a76a2?cldtidx=15

    Just kidding, why not a sensible Civic (Type-R with aftermarket supercharger)
    https://www.autoscout24.de/angebote/honda-civic-2-0-i-vtec-type-r-kompressor-wenig-km-benzin-rot-041c0b58-9ff9-217b-e053-e350040aa611?cldtidx=15

    Or a stealthy old-man Benz?
    https://www.autoscout24.de/angebote/mercedes-benz-e-500-benzin-silber-f83dea4d-efeb-8464-e053-e250040a1c4f?cldtidx=18

    Sensible Focus station wagon?
    https://www.autoscout24.de/angebote/ford-focus-turnier-2-0-ecoboost-st-benzin-schwarz-7d923128-ced9-4d6d-8385-5cf025ab2068?cldtidx=8

    Jaaaag?
    https://www.autoscout24.de/angebote/jaguar-xf-4-2-super-v8-benzin-grau-362f148c-ad35-4301-88a0-5a0dda80c624?cldtidx=1

    Lincoln…?
    https://www.autoscout24.de/angebote/lincoln-mark-lt-crew-cab-4×4-v8-pickup-automatik-ahk-benzin-silber-c08eac64-57e5-46fc-99ee-1c046a249d5e?cldtidx=12

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