By on August 23, 2017

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio - Image: FCAMSRPs aren’t meaningless.

Okay, sometimes they’re meaningless. The manufacturer’s suggested retail price — dealer may sell for less, or more — is just one element of a new vehicle acquisition’s true cost. For most vehicles, the MSRP is just the starting point for negotiations, which won’t truly begin until you have a clear idea of the automaker’s incentive load. Employee pricing. Anniversary bonus. Labor Day credits. Red tag deals. Summer clear out. Memorial Day rebates. July 4th blowouts.

Then there’s the interest rate equation, which will change based on credit, term, and numerous other factors. Next, apply unappetizing dealer fees. And now, if you’re considering leasing, throw another whole set of numbers into this kettle of fish.

Out comes a lease payment for the $73,595 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio that’s nearly double the cost of a BMW M3; a lease payment 77-percent higher than on the Cadillac CTS-V, even though the CTS-V’s MSRP is 17-percent higher.

We urge you: please do not lease an Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio until terms change. 

According to CarsDirect, including the $4,299 due at signing, a 24-month lease (with a 10,000-mile annual allotment) of a 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio has an effective monthly payment of $1,690. CarsDirect’s Alex Bernstein calls this “one of the worst leases imaginable for a non-supercar.”

Considering how much less expensive it can be to lease a more expensive sports sedan, it’s hard to argue with them. The $85,995 Cadillac CTS-V, on similar terms, has an effective monthly lease payment that’s $733 less than the payment on the Giulia Quadrifoglio. Even the $102,000 Mercedes-Benz S550 is $245 less per month to lease.CTS-V M3 S550 collage - Images: GM/BMW/Mercedes-BenzFortunately for potential Giulia owners, this is a Quadrifoglio-specific problem. The basic Giulia, CarsDirect says, can be leased over two years with effective monthly payments of $436, very near the lease cost of a Mercedes-Benz CLA250.

But nearly doubling the MSRP from basic Giulia to Giulia Quadrifoglio very nearly quadruples the lease payment. That’s the kind of silliness that gives leasing a bad name, the sort of fuzzy math that will send lease-intending high-performance sedan customers to M and AMG.

The list of reasons to avoid a Giulia Quadrifoglio acquisition was already long enough.

[Images: FCA, Cadillac, BMW, Mercedes-Benz]

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

30 Comments on “We Beseech You: Do Not Lease an Alfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio, at Least Not Yet...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    That’s rough.

    Even in FCA land, a Quattroporte GTS or GranTurismo is effectively a little under $1700/month. So basically the same as the Alfa.

    A RWD Q-Porte S is about $1250 and the RWD Ghibli S is $890.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Yep, methinks Ally is anticipating these will have residual percentages roughly equivalent to those of a half-empty can of Coke Zero.

      Still…if I could afford an installment buy, or a cash deal, I’d love one of these, assuming I had a Camry to get back and forth to work in.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Back and forth to work and everywhere else a combined six or more months a year.

        It’s a shame reliability is so bad on the Alfa. It would probably make a great daily driver.

        Here is hoping they get the alpha testing all sorted out.

      • 0 avatar
        Generaljimt

        Freed Mike…My M 3 was the worse car I ever owned…from sub frame cracks to catching on fire….it SUCKED !!!

  • avatar

    $1690 ? Does that include airfare, factory tour, and a week on the coast ?

    I’ve learned over time that the Factory can be very cheap, but is rarely stupid.

    Couldn’t I get a real Ferrari, prancing horse and all for this money ? OK, the cheap one maybe…

  • avatar
    ash78

    I assume this is because the 3-year residual value on this car is about tree fiddy, right?

    There are plenty of nonsensical price structures in the world. Just look at rentals: A $25k minivan is $400/week, while a $35k luxury sedan is $300/week (give or take). A 4-cylinder base model Escape is a lot pricier than a 6-cylinder Dodge Charger. To me this gap in utility vs cost means something is awry. I wonder if the pent-up demand for Alfas is just so big, they can charge this.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Maybe, but I cited the comparable Maserati numbers in my earlier comment and the depreciation on those makes a Cadenza look like a 4Runner.

    • 0 avatar

      Capitalism can be weird. I include a Switchcraft 332AX adapter for a 1/4″ guitar cable with the Harmonicaster. DigiKey wants $28.32 each. I pay another electronics supply house $5.82.

    • 0 avatar
      SunnyvaleCA

      I think the issue with Minivans is that they are mostly used for family vacations in the summer. That means they get “hard use” when full of vacationing families and they are seasonal so that prices vary greatly by the time of year. Here in the crazy-priced silicon valley I have seen minivans going for well north of $500/week in the summer (even rented a month in advance). Also, I’ve had the option of a cheap “upgrade” from my usual compact to a minivan that would have cost only $250/week total (that was off season).

      In a similar vein AWD SUVs have a price premium during ski season.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        “I think the issue with Minivans is that they are mostly used for family vacations in the summer.”

        Economics teaches us that minivans are generally a product with no good substitutes (except by three-row SUVs with similar rental pricing). If you need a minivan, you NEED a minivan, probably because you have more than 4-5 people to haul around. There are no other options.

        A luxury car is nice, but it can easily be substituted for with a cheaper car, few need to rent a Caddy or Audi or MB or whatever. A Dodge Dart or Nissan Altima does basically the same thing, so only vanity is driving the upgrade price, and vanity will only pay so much.

        You have to charge the people who NEED to rent your product differently than you charge the people you are merely trying to get to rent your upscale product.

    • 0 avatar
      Car Ramrod

      The rental market is pure supply and demand. I’m renting a C-class to drive the pacific coast highway next month because a Mustang convertible (or, as they say, similar) would cost almost 2x as much. Infuriating but logical.

      • 0 avatar

        What I reserve and get are often different….sometimes you get an FX35, a 320d with sport pack, a nice 2017 Mustang Turbo or a Q50. Even an E class, when you asked for a 316i, because the nice German rental lady doesn’t believe an American can drive a manual….

        Other times you get a battered Durango, an Impala with mis aimed lights (you are VERY unpopular in farm country with no overhead lights..I’m still seeing dots from the extra driving lights on the farmer’s pickups), a Ford Taurus with no power over the Continental Divide, or a manual diesel minivan when you asked for a Golf.

        I always have an open mind, and have done better by being nice, than by being a nasty customer….

      • 0 avatar

        What I reserve and get are often different….sometimes you get an FX35, a 320d with sport pack, a nice 2017 Mustang Turbo or a Q50. Even an E class, when you asked for a 316i.

        Other times you get a battered Durango, an Impala with mis aimed lights (you are VERY unpopular in farm country with no overhead lights..I’m still seeing dots from the extra driving lights on the farmer’s pickups), a Ford Taurus with no power over the Continental Divide, or a manual diesel minivan when you asked for a Golf.

        I always have an open mind, and have done better by being nice, than by being a nasty customer….

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    So they estimate these things will lose $40K in value in the first 2 years?

    Jalops rejoice!

    Perhaps FCA’s future Chinese overlords can apply some state supplied loans to subsidize these leases.

  • avatar

    I suspect the high lease price has to do with the fact that it’s a new limited edition vehicle that has no record for residual value.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Is johan de nysschen doing some consulting work on the side for FCA? That might explain the laughable pricing for the QF.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    If my local dealership is anything to go by, there should be some sweet incentives on these cars any day now.

    The Giulias are absolutely piling up on their lot. I can’t believe how many are in inventory for such a small area of population, not particularly wealthy, and then its an Alfa and not a BMW/Audi/Lexus/Mercedes.

    The Maseratis are getting stacked pretty high too.

    $0 down $99/month coming on the Quadrifoglios!

    • 0 avatar

      In the over-moneyed green leafy burbs, around NYC, I’ve seen Cadillac levels of penetration (stop giggling, DW)

      Really. I’ve seen two on the road…and neither one was the hi-po Quad version…now that summer is here, the toys are out…Audi R10, Ferraris of all sorts, Porsche of all sorts, occasional McLaren…Alfa, nope.

      Like the VW Atlas, this car is good (looking) but about six years too late.

  • avatar
    Commando

    The Actuarialists at the Finance division are predicting a zero resale value at the end of the lease.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Does Johann moonlight at Alfa Romeo?

  • avatar
    Car Ramrod

    There must be a few people that just have to have this car– and are willing to pay silly money to limit their potential downside–or they wouldn’t even bother to make this embarrassing offer. This is 250% of my M3 lease payment for less miles. Even with a zero interest rate, the bank is saying the residual value on this two year old car with 20,000 miles is the same as a value of a new Camry XLE

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Sometimes companies signal by pricing that they really don’t want to make a deal. This is one such case.

    Factor in completely unknown resale, demonstrated poor build quality for early examples, type of car with high risk of catastrophic loss, and high initial price, and it’s easy to see why the deal is unattractive.

  • avatar
    EspritdeFacelVega

    Having worked at Avis as a student, I can assure you it pays to be nice to the rental rep….As for Alfa, wasn’t there an earlier post that FCA wasn’t looking to discount the Giulia as they wanted margin & exclusivity instead of volume, hence no lease deals. Of course, many start out that way and given FCA’s woes and Alfa’s inventory I can’t see that lasting long….

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    If you have to pay more to get the lfa Romeo Giulia Quadrifoglio, just adds to the prestige factor! I sure all will be leases since the reliability factor is unknown!

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • slavuta: Next time I go Crocodile Dundee on my doc. To make sure she is a girl
  • DenverMike: It would be insane not to but the twin turbo 2.7 V6 (optional) in it (as rumored), and it may not happen...
  • MRF 95 T-Bird: Gee it could also be Michael Medved the conservative talk show host based in Seattle. /s
  • lstanley: If this big model is successful maybe they can make a little smaller version, I don’t know base it...
  • lstanley: I enjoy the idea that there are probably a fair number of people’s resumes out there with all the...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber