By on June 1, 2017

2018 Toyota C-HR, Image: © Timothy Cain

People want to talk to me about the 2018 Toyota C-HR.

Since I took possession of a Toyota Canada-supplied C-HR last Friday, more people have approached me to discuss the C-HR than any other car I’ve ever had the pleasure or displeasure of testing.

Naturally, I assume they’re not going to have kind things to say. Let’s be honest: the Toyota C-HR is not a conventional beauty. “It’s not mine,” I quickly declare to a couple examining the C-HR in the grocery store parking lot as I approach it, bags in hand. “You can say whatever you think.”

And then they do. But the words they speak are not in keeping with my expectations.

“I love it.”

“I want one.”

“We’ve already gone to the dealer to see what colors they have.”

“My husband wants to wait until we can get the teal one with the white roof.”

“It’s like the CRX we used to own.”

Huh? CRX?

Then they ask me what I think. Given that every one of these C-HR adorers is well into retirement age, I mention the treacherous visibility and the backup camera that resides in a corner of the rearview mirror.

Two of the couples who wish to discuss the 2018 C-HR hopped out of older Corollas to come talk to me. There’s no mention in any case of the Honda HR-V or Buick Encore or Mazda CX-3 or Subaru Crosstrek or Jeep Renegade. The 2018 Toyota C-HR is the car they want.

2018 Toyota C-HR, Image: © Timothy Cain

Front-wheel drive. 144 horsepower. 3,300 pounds. Continuously variable transmission. Enough unique design elements — love it or hate it — to get noticed in a parking lot full of exotics.

Intended to be a part of the youth-oriented Scion brand before Toyota discontinued Scion, the 2018 Toyota C-HR is a $23,495 subcompact with mountains of appeal (apparently, anecdotally) to an older generation.

Toyota wants to sell 30,000 C-HRs in the United States this year; 60,000 annually. That would put the front-wheel-drive-only C-HR well back of the front-wheel-drive-only Kia Soul; behind the Jeep Renegade, Subaru Crosstrek, Honda HR-V, Chevrolet Trax, and Buick Encore, too.

Reasonable expectations? That depends how the C-HR makes you feel. Would you jump out of your car to talk to me about the 2018 Toyota C-HR in the parking lot of a grocery store? And if so, what would you want to tell me?

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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140 Comments on “QOTD: How Does The Toyota C-HR Make You Feel?...”


  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Not well.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      > Front-wheel drive. 144 horsepower. 3,300 pounds. Continuously variable transmission.

      There is nothing about this description that makes me feel good inside. Plus it’s ugly, I bet it looks like Batman’s Tumbler in black.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Makes me wish they had built the useful and rugged-looking box version first.

      I really hope that one (assuming its coming) has decent off road capabilities for what it is. I never thought I’d be considering a new Toyota, but they threw out something I like. I just hope they don’t drop the ball by failing to build it at all, or only making it as capable as this abortion.

      • 0 avatar

        Yes, JohnTaurus–Box–among other things for good visibility. I’d hate to have to try to see out of the slit windows on ***THAT*** thing. What WERE they thinking when they designed it???!

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          You mean the concept? Remember, a concept is usually toned down for production, but the trend is smaller windows. Even still, should be a far better use of space inside than this thing.

          I wonder if the removable solid panels that expose a window from a 1983 Tercel wagon will make it to production? I might would leave mine in. Ha

          Small and boxy works, to me anyway. Seems the best way to use what space you have with a small footprint.

          What is a CUV or SUV with no “U” (as in utility)? In this case, not even four wheel traction can be used as an excuse for its existence.

      • 0 avatar
        ranny

        Toyota already made the small, boxy ute you’re looking for. It was called the original RAV 4 from the mid-90s. But like every other car, it has gotten huge over the years. And in the Rav’s case as dull as … any other Toyota that’s been in production for 20+ years. I actually like the styling better than most of toyota’s current fish mouthed monstrosities. But the, I’m in the demographic mention by Mr. Cain – ”boomer”.

        And finally, people make too big a deal about all wheel drive. A good set of winter tires is all I’ve ever needed. How many people go bouncing along rutted back roads? Very very few I’d venture to guess. My 2200 lb rattle trap of a car zoomed around many an all wheel drive, Jeeps included, during the snow storms we’ve had the last couple of winters with nothing more than a set of blizzaks.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          I happen to think people make too big a deal about how nobody needs AWD and how winter tires work for me so it MUST work for everyone in every situation, everywhere.

          My comment wasn’t about “needing” AWD, it was about this vehicle pretending to be a “utility” without anything that makes it useful, like a large cargo area or the option of having all four wheels powered.

          But, all you need is winter tires, so that means nobody should have any thought whatsoever about having more than two driving wheels.

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Well Tim. If I knew what you looked like and saw you in North FL then yeah I would since the chance of you being in Jax FL is rather low.

    The car doesn’t look fast or quiet so it make me feel no kinda way at all.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    Similar to the feeling I get when I see a new Civic hatch.

    (gtemnykh beat me to it.)

  • avatar
    JimZ

    It kind of like a vacation in Limbo. It’s not bad. It’s not that good, but it’s not that bad. It’s so-so.

    More or less.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Well, it’s definitely got style, whether you consider its looks good or bad. To me it looks absurdly tall and chunky in the photos but I’d have to see one in person to know for certain. Also not a fan of the driveline, though I’m sure one could get used to it.

    Can’t say I’m a fan, though.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    It doesn’t.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Hmmm… reminds me of a Veloster. All it need is one less door on the driver’s side.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Canada would be a better place if you just put it in neutral and pushed it back down that ramp.

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    I detest it , but I’m practical enough to expect Toyota will have a waiting list on the thing before the year’s out.

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      It’s hard to argue with success. I do notice the “Neo Tokyo” styling, it doesnt work for me but it works extremely well for Toyota since they are backordered to next year.

      From what I’ve seen, the value proposition isnt there… this CUV just isnt practical as a CUV and what the article doesnt say is that the “144 horsepower” is delivered by a 1.2 turbo petrol four… driving 3,300lb?

      Every road test says that it has issues given its price. If it was a Kia with a 75% price cut and a 7yr warranty then that’s another thing but this… very underdone but well done to Toyota for making styling work for some people over everything else.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Can I see the before picture of the crash?

    I guess it has the benefit of making the Prius look almost tolerable.

  • avatar
    Sgt Beavis

    This is a nice progression for Toyota’s styling. It’s not bland but it’s not trying too hard like many other Toyota designs (looking at you Camry)

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      A nice progression from bad to immensely bad with this, and the latest Prius as well as the face they plastered to Mazda’s little 2 sedan before it.

  • avatar
    2drsedanman

    Admittedly, I’m one of the biggest Toyota homers on this site. But damn! It looks like it used to be a foot longer before the wreck. And that crazy, smashed face cat look on the ass end of this and the Civic is a deal breaker. The whole thing just looks disjointed.

    I’m sure it will sell well though. Marketing it as a young person’s car is a sure fire way to sell it to the older folks. Besides, that’s who has the money to buy. Pretty good marketing strategy really.

  • avatar
    John R

    Before knowing what I know now about the powertrain I’d feel like it would have a turbo 4-cyl with anti-lag, AWD and “PARIS-DAKAR” emblazoned on the side-skirts.

    Now? Meh.

    • 0 avatar
      Eddie_B

      You just made a compelling case for a non-compelling product!

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Imagine this product as exciting!

        Now remove all that.

        Presenting the Toyota C-HR!

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          The target market isn’t “people who want a zomg offroad rally car” (per above and top-of-thread), though.

          (Which is good, since all ten of the people who might *actually buy* such a car aren’t a big enough market.)

          They’ll sell, if not like hotcakes, then pretty well.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Nailed it.
      From the rear it looks like the new Civic -this is not a good thing.
      From the front it looks like a too tall Prius -once again not good.
      From the side I see the Dakar rally car -which is awesome.

      Overall feeling: slight stomach ache and mild headache.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Apart from the car itself, the name is obviously a cheap trick to confuse you with the similarities to C-RV and H-RV. Why not RAV-2? (That was the name my wife and I both thought of when told it was coming.)

    Now, about the car… I don’t like it, but I suppose if you are the sort that might buy a Juke or Crosstrek, but really want a Toyota, (and don’t care about the lack of CarPlay or Android Auto) it’ll do ok. Personally, I don’t like the rear door handle at the roof, and instead of a C pillar, that thing might as well be a coupe with a rear DLO, for all the good it’ll do your claustrophobic rear passengers.

  • avatar
    RS

    Makes me want the Juke’s the driver viability.

  • avatar
    Lovelockguy

    I have no interest in this car, but I can see why typical US car buyers are interested.

    And not Toyota’s fault, but I use a website all the time called ALLMUSIC.com which helps me with discographies and track listings etc, of almost any album you would ever want to own. (I have lots of music saved to my storage)

    In the last 48 hours, a full size ad for this car has taken up the whole top half of ALLMUSIC.com on my 22 inch monitor. I HATE IT.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Complain loudly to the site about how the ad covers so much of the page.

      Hey, if you don’t like ‘targeted advertising’ or ‘half-page ads’, then complain and complain loudly. Email them, call them, do anything and everything you can to let them know you are NOT happy with how you’re viewing ads.

      If you want MY opinion, targeted ads in general are an incredible annoyance. Just because I follow the motoring world doesn’t mean I want to see incessant ads for cars… ESPECIALLY after I’ve just purchased one! And this is true for far too many of these targeted ads; I receive them even AFTER I’ve made a purchase while something remarkable may be hitting the market in a totally different product that has nothing to do with what they think I want to see.

      So far, I’ve not seen an ad for this thing and honestly I’m happy I haven’t; I really wish we had some way to tell the ad agency when we don’t want to see a specific ad any more.

  • avatar
    GermanReliabilityMyth

    It makes feel as though it has absolutely no redeeming qualities. Let’s see…

    – it’s grossly under powered by modern standards (~22.9 lbs per horsepower)…at least with the Juke you got some sporty driving characteristics to go with the offbeat styling
    – speaking of which, it has style, though that doesn’t mean it’s GOOD style. If anything it’s writing rubber checks with its appearance
    – the starting price is incongruous with every single attribute it possesses (or doesn’t)
    – it has all the DLO of a submarine (when did glass become more expensive than sheetmetal…I kid, of course)
    – it isn’t gifted with even the most basic of pseudo-braking-biased AWD systems

    So, in summation, it’s utterly lacking in taste, a poor value and is all but assured to become the next popular whip for the geriatric crowd. Nice.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    So what you’re saying is that it’s basically going to cannibalize Corolla sales? That’s a shame, as it’s best to keep Corolla drivers in Corollas so they can be easily identified and avoided on the road.
    (Apologies in advance to the <5% of Corolla owners who are actually aware of their surroundings and the location of the accelerator pedal.)

    • 0 avatar
      WallMeerkat

      Same thing happened in the UK.

      The people who used to drive small Nissans – Micras and Almeras – suddenly found themselves in a Rogue Sport SUV/CUV (Qashqai).

      So the equivalent of “Corolla driver” suddenly found themselves in a huge (by European standards) SUV with blind spots, a car they have no chance in hell of being able to park without either taking up 2 spaces or hitting another car, looking like an urban assault vehicle it also gives them confidence to pull off idiotic manoeuvrers safe in the knowledge that they’ll likely just damage their horrible plastic cladding and total the other normal car.

      An absolute menace on the roads.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        I drove a Qashqai the length of the Welsh coast and on to London. For such a small car, it was comically large on those roads. Ours came equipped with beepers to warn you when you were about to take a mirror off on a stone wall (answer: often!), and birds-eye-view so you could maneuver it between overgrown hedgerows and creatively parked cars on tiny side streets. It was a nice enough car but yeah, a supermini of some kind would have been more sensible.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Thank you. I’m glad to know I’m not the only one who sees Cockroach Corollas as an absolute menace. Driving near one of those cars always makes me tense, because you never know what the driver is going to do (other than drive 5mph under the limit). I always scan the horizon for Corollas, so I can make sure I’m in the other lane.

  • avatar
    Fordson

    Padded carriage roof and gold kit and they’ll sell a million of ’em to the Geritol set.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Claustrophobic

  • avatar
    scott25

    I’ve seen a few in person, it looks good other than that awful blunt pedestrian-ized front end, it doesn’t go with the rest of the design whatsoever. If they either lowered it (both physically and price-wise) and got rid of the cladding, or gave it AWD and more power for the same price I’d be interested. The interior is nice, especially compared to the Juke. I haven’t sat in one to see if it’s as space-inefficient as the Juke though.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    With 4 vehicles currently in the stable, we are starting to look for something to replace the MT Sonata. This could be ‘it’.

    ‘Her Indoors’ and the daughters like our new small CUV/SUV thingy but find it a little ‘too big’ for trips into the ‘city’.

    Needs are good visibility (and having spent 20+ years in mini-vans they like a higher ride height), easy egress/ingress, minimum of 4 passengers plus some cargo/the dog, good ‘crash tests’ and unfortunately heated seats. Zero need for AWD/4WD as good winter tires are quite sufficient in Southern Ontario.

    So they are now asking about a Soul or Trax. Remember that I am ‘careful with my money’ and have a limited budget. Also I would much prefer to purchase a new vehicle and finance it through the manufacturer at 6 to 8 years with zero or a very low interest rate. Would keep it for 7 to 10 years, at about 20,000kms per year. Krowned annually and maintained at an independent shop once the warranty expired.

    Another vehicle of interest is the Nio, particularly since everyone in the household has been so pleased with our Kia.

    Personally would prefer an HR-V, ‘because Honda’. But found the interior at my price point incredibly chintzy and Honda historically does not offer much in the way of deals.

    So this C-HR makes a good deal of sense for us ( Toyota ! ), except for that hideous rear window treatment. Everyone (nearly) hated the Aztec for this, yet now many designers are copying it. Since when is a back-up camera, which may break or become obscured, considered an adequate replacement for a real rear window?

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      Much better visibility out of the Soul though. I’d be interested in the interior volume comparison as well.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Yes, the Soul seems to be a much better car in every respect, it’s tried and tested, and it’s cheaper to boot. Oh, and the better warranty.

        However, interest rates tend to go up the longer you stretch out the financing.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        I actually scrolled this far down to see if the Soul was mentioned.

        I have been considering what new cars are suitable for Uber, but cheap and pretty much disposable. Easy financing doesn’t hurt.

        I was leaning towards a 5 speed 2017 Mirage hatch, base, for about $13k.

        Then I thought: well, let me price a Soul, I always said it was the Kia I’d have if I had a new Kia. I found a base 2017 6MT for $15k.

        For an extra two grand, I get 16″ wheels instead of 14s (they’re aluminum alloy but I’d probably swap to some steelies given this car’s purpose in life), 6 speeds instead of 5, 4 cylinders (130 hp) instead of 3 (78 hp), lots of connectivity, tilt/telescoping wheel, etc, not to mention a lot more room.

        The only advantage (other than price, which disappears when you consider the features it lacks) the Mirage has is MPG, but I don’t think that will be priority when I have a car full of riders and need to merge safely into freeway traffic. Not only will the Soul be more comfortable for everyone, it won’t be embarrassingly slow and tiny. Gas is usually cheap around here, I filled up my Taurus from nearly empty yesterday for $23. The Soul will be acceptable as far as MPG,I think.

        I haven’t driven a Soul or a Mirage yet, but I’m betting the Soul will win that comparison. I may not even go look at the Mirage, since is out of the way, and the Soul seems better suited to my intentions.

        I had actually hoped to run into Kyree here because I believe a friend or family member of his has a Soul, I wanted his input.

        I subscribed to this thread so anyone with experience and knowledge (advice) on the current gen Soul is appreciated.

        If uber doesn’t work out, I will likely use the vehicle for a courier or delivery job. If its like a Soul, Fit, Mirage or similar, I would want a manual.

        • 0 avatar
          kvndoom

          We have a 2012 Plus 6MT that I got January 2016. It’s a joy to drive. I can’t tell you how jealous I am of my stepdaughter. :P That car oozes personality. I can’t imagine you driving it and not loving it, unless you find the 1.6L lacking. I’ve never driven the 1.6 personally but guys on the forums do seem happy with it.

          I haven’t explored the current gen because you can no longer get the 2.0L with a manual (unless you live outside of North America, OF COURSE).

          They are super reliable cars though, and you wouldn’t regret getting a well-kept 2012 or 2013 (the 2010-11’s had a much cheaper interior), especially for the price they go for.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Thanks, I really appreciate that!

            I was trying to go new so I can maintain it from the start and know it wasn’t driven by some teenager who was bitter he didn’t get the Camaro he wanted. LOL, and because of other reasons to do with financing and such as that.

            Its my pick among its price level, at least as of now. I almost went by a Kia dealer today. They don’t have a 6MT, but they have a base automatic that I could at least see how it feels to sit in and drive, even with a missing 3rd pedal.

            To be honest, if I was to go used, it would probably be a Ford C-Max. Heavy depreciation puts it in a decent price range, and it also seems ideal for the job in its own way. I hear tell it isn’t a half bad drive itself. I liked driving a late model Focus I put a decent amount of miles on, DCT excepted of course. The C-Max is similar, with a Hybrid/CVT drivetrain that eliminates the buzzy idle and the DCT horror show.

            Also thought about a traditional sedan, like an Accord I-4 6MT, or even a 3.5L Taurus (2008-2012 would be my pick, I have driven a 2012 SEL a lot and don’t mind spending hours in it).

            The TJ Cruiser (well, the concept) looks awesome. Maybe if I grow tired of the Soul, I could trade it in on one in a few years. Ha so long as they build a manual/4wd. I know I don’t need 4wd for Uber, but it would be worth keeping after that part of its life is over if it has 4wd and had been a loyal partner lol. I could see it living out its days as a fishing/camp buggie.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          FWIW, I think your used Ford C-Max Hybrid idea is solid for this purpose. It is the class of its class: spacious interior made of premium materials, supple ride and precise handling, and an improbable combination of torquey power, solid fuel economy, and peaceful quiet. Pricey to buy new but its epic depreciation puts it in your price range used (leasing one new is another option but your market may or may not have the insanely attractive lease deal that mine currently does).

          If it’s a 2013, its transmission will fail at some point, so either make sure it’s got warranty left, find one that’s already received its new trans, or buy a 2014+ (that also gets you some aero improvements).

          The only thing that sucks about this car is the hooptie-like creaking from the doors under the slightest torsional load: slathering silicon lube on the rubber seals should quiet that.

          If there are any used ones young enough to Uber, consider also the last-gen Scion xB: that thing makes an absolutely awesome taxi, with hugely spacious accommodations for rear passengers and their bags and drunk-proof easy entry and exit. MPG isn’t hybrid-worthy, but you have Toyota reliability to make up for it.

          I’m sure a brand-new Kia Soul with its long warranty is a solid choice too. Just throwing out some others that might work.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            @hot potato

            I appreciate that advice! I will only look at 2014+ C-Max if I go that route. Very helpful info!

            I can’t lease because I will be putting way too many miles on it. My “commute” from my place in the country to a populated area ranges from 45 minutes to 1.5 hours. That alone would kill me on a lease.

            The year requirement in my area is way older than most areas. The reason being there is a demand for drivers but few to fill it.

            I had thought about buying a used car for cash for this job, and I had settled on the Kia Amanti. Its very roomy, comfortable and cheap. Yes, I know Hyundai-Kia products, especially from that era, have a huge question mark under “reliability”.

            As my name implies, I like the Taurus, and at first glance, the 2004-2007 cars seem ideal (cheap, roomy, comfortable, great engine). Problem is, weak toque converters. Not if, when. And when it does happen (stripped converter), you’re not going anywhere.

            My (1995) car uses the same transaxle (AX4N), but the torque converter splines must be stronger. Its still going at 234k, shifting well, with no rebuild having been done.

            Anyway, so if its a Taurus, it will have to be from 2008-present.

            Well, I lined up the money for that cash car, then family emergency wiped it out. Oh well.

            This is why I’m thinking that financing a new(er) car is better. I won’t be surprised with any repair bills, not for a while anyway, and I can maintain the vehicle properly from the start.

            Every Amanti I looked at needed some level of reconditioning. Which, for me, is fine. That’s what I do. But being able to start work and get paid from the day (thereabouts) I buy it is also appealing. Driving a brand new car, even if it is small and weird! Ha

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Hot potato,

            I hope you’re subscribed to this thread.

            Other than the color, which is okay for a “work” vehicle anyway, I really like this:

            https://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/detail/698281523/overview/

            Same price as the new Soul, but its a nicely equipped C-Max SEL. It has 30k which is a lot for a 1-2 year old car, but it has a 100k powertrain warranty. I like it.

            What do you (or anyone else) think of it?

    • 0 avatar
      beacio_mo

      You need to sit in the backseat for the true tiny window experience.

  • avatar
    maxxcool7421

    Sad, it is a honda-fied JUKE … and JUKES are hideous ..

  • avatar
    npaladin2000

    I actually get it. I don’t LIKE it, but I get it. This and the Soul. Upright position, large opening trunk. They’re about as much like the cars of the 50s that you can get these days.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    It’s not that bad; however, it’s not something I’d buy.

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      You’d get better service at the Toyota dealer.

      But you’d never have to go there to fix it, so the point is moot!

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Ironically, the Lexus dealer is next door to the Lincoln dealer (and not part of the same dealer group), and since a current-model GS might be my next move, I’m not too worried about service.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Kyree,

      New Soul for possible uber (or courier/small delivery) vehicle. Discuss.

      I wrote above my reasoning behind it, I wanted your thoughts.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Soul
        https://www.peckkia.com/new/Kia/2017-Kia-Soul-Gulfport-babe146d0a0e0a6b0cf40ddb50346fda.htm

        Mirage
        http://www.kobymitsubishi.com/new/Mitsubishi/2017-Mitsubishi-Mirage-6ca7e9450a0e0ae75af8e0843196324f.htm

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    Like taking off my glasses so all I can see is a blur.

  • avatar
    Strippo

    There is a quirky runabout market for empty nesters who might be happier in a Buick Encore but wouldn’t be caught dead in one. They want to feel young at heart, but they also want the vehicle to be stylistically fresh inside and out. As a former Veloster owner I get it, but in this market I’d be waiting for the 2018 Crosstrek over this.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      These sound like Venza shoppers.

      • 0 avatar
        Strippo

        They are the opposite of Venza shoppers. They may be Venza buyers in your eyes, but they aren’t hauling sprog. They’re looking for a small, short wheelbase runabout, not an Avalon. This is especially true if there is already an Avalon in the family fleet.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        “Venza shoppers”

        All 8 of them? I’m not sure Gertrude McHeartStint IV is still with us…

        The kids who inherit it may trade it in on this, so you might have something.

        “More fun than a Corolla!” Just don’t hold your breath until they’re able to explain how, other than “it looks cool!”

  • avatar
    TMA1

    Conservative, in that it copies popular vehicles by looking like a Juke from the side, a tall Prius from the front, and a Civic hatchback from the rear. Daring, in that Toyota chose to copy three of the ugliest cars on the market when designing this thing.

  • avatar
    Coolcar2

    I have seen a few now on the road and I think they visually look interesting and appear much more expensive than the price tag suggests. What I don’t like is that with all of those vents, creases and scoops, there is no performance to back that up! Kudos to them for being daring and creating something that does not blend in with the masses, but throw the enthusiast a bone with a peppier engine option. This class of vehicle seems to just cater to the A to B crowd who want something different but don’t care how it drives.

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    I like how low and hunkered it is, were quickly getting to the point where crossover turn back into station wagons.

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    Those people want to talk to -you- Tim, the car is just the coleslaw.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    What an ugly POS which unfortunately will run much longer than any of us hoped.

    Here’s to this being the next Yaris.

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    Agree with most of the negative comments.
    It’s so ugly it could make a freight train take a dirt road.
    Slashes, gashes, irrelevant nooks and crannies everywhere, a real hot mess. How could anyone older, with the flexibility limitations that afflict us, think that the rearward visibility is more than compensated by the ‘style’ is beyond me.

  • avatar
    phila_DLJ

    Like I’m looking at a car designed by Michael Bay.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    Those rear side windows are so small they might as well just put bars on them and call it done.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    That car looks pre-wrecked.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    How does it make me feel?

    Nostalgic for the Daihatsu Charade featured here earlier. For a time when cars looked like cars.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    What is going on with the rear door handles?

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      That’s the idea they stole from the Chevy Sonic. Toyota pilfered from everyone to design this car.

      • 0 avatar
        MRF 95 T-Bird

        The first and second generation Nissan Pathfinder had a similar rear door handle. Kind of innovative for its time.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          Indeed. I believe Honda, Hyundai, now Toyota, GM, and even a Pathfinder-related Infiniti had it. I think that’s all of them, aside from the first (Pathfinder) as you pointed out.

          Btw, found a 1996 4.6L ‘Bird the other day, needed some touch ups here and there but wasn’t bad for $1200. I’m not in the rust belt, so that isn’t a factor. I miss my 1994 LX V-8.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Ambivalent. It also shows again, how out of touch I am with the mainstream consumer.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Between this and $70,000 pickups, I have no idea about consumers’ desires anymore.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I feel like I’ve been raped by Toyota…again. A great looking car that promises a lot of fun and… a dud. No power, no manual, lousy steering, etc.

  • avatar
    427Cobra

    if it came with a manual trans & a little more power, I’d consider it. As is, I’d rather have a HRV… (manual trans, of course) or a Juke Nismo.

  • avatar
    Thorshammer_gp

    It looks like it started out as a more-or-less normal take on the Encore, which was then attacked by six very uncoordinated people wielding katanas.

  • avatar
    maui_zaui

    Looks like a repeat of the original Scion xB. Aimed at people in their 20’s, but purchased mostly by people over 40.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Except the xB was incredibly roomy and practical, the exact opposite of this.

      Maybe an xB that was left in the sun too long?

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        It’s a shame how they abandoned the xB. Damn car saw almost no change from 2008 till its death in 2015. 8 model years? That’s something old GM would have done!

        We had a Gen2 for 6 months, but nobody wanted to drive it. :( I’d consider it again except for the fact that I’d have to put a small fortune into sound deadener because it truly sounds and feels like you’re inside a soda can. Rubbermaid was at least 2 grades above the plastic Toyota made that interior out of.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus

          But! That’s just how I like my Toyotas. Simple, cheap, functional, unpretentious, basic, plainly styled (but with some Japanese quirkiness) and of course reliability.

          Power, comfort, quietness, soft touch materials…meh. I’d rather have someone else’s version 99/100 times. They ruined the xB with all that. I think they should have introduced a redesigned second gen xB based like the first on the JDM bB. Maybe what we got as the bloated second gen would have worked as a seperare model for those who found the smaller one too basic and small.

          An example of my kinda Toyota is a 90s Tercel coupe with vinyl seats and a 4apd manual haha. Basic, honest, plain and simple.

          Here’s hoping for a 6spd manual, rubber floor, vinyl seat, selectable 4wd TJ Cruiser. Painted metal surfaces! Hard durable plastic! “Styled” steel wheels with no plastic covers! Okay I’ll stop.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Nearly pulled the trigger on a 2nd generation xB. However it seemed to have very low ground clearance (not good in the Toronto area) and Toyota at the time offered no ‘deals’ regarding financing.

            So went to get my other choice a Hyundai Elantra Touring (manual and a demo!) only to end up instead with a new MT Sonata at 0% for 7 years.

            We went Hyundai partially due to financing and because we are so pleased with our Kia. Unfortunately the Hyundai has not been as happy an ownership experience.

            Would however go back to Kia without hesitation. Soul or Niro or perhaps another Rondo would be our choices. Many 1st generation Rondos are still tooling around smaller Ontario cities as taxis.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Thanks for the advice, Arthur.

            It seems the Kia and Hyundai models I find most with major issues at lower age/mileage than expected are Optima/Sonata. Sometimes another model with a broken timing belt (usually the result of not changing it when recommended) but if its “runs but knocks”, “needs work” or “needs engine”, its a 4 cylinder midsize.

            I liked the styling of the Sonata from 04-09, but they steadily show up needing major repairs. I drove one (a rental back when they were current), some things annoyed me, but it was fine overall. Now that they have some numbers on each space of their odometer, their true colors are bleeding through.

            I hope a well-maintained 1.6L 6MT Soul will be good to me.

            Ironicly, if this was late 90s/early 00s, I’d really consider the trucky first gen Sportage 5spd 4wd. Similar size, shape, and both it and the Soul have 130 HP 4 cylinders with manuals.

            I always liked those, and still do.

  • avatar
    Chan

    I feel indifferent. This so much less functional than the Honda HR-V it’s not even funny.

    Looks great from the outside, but that’s not exactly the right selling point for Toyota.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    What happened to ‘Old Man Pants’? Haven’t seen any comments from him in a few weeks.

  • avatar
    Verbal

    My first question to the driver of a C-HR would be, “What happened, did you lose a bet?”

  • avatar
    SteveMar

    It’s a mess, just like the Civic and Prius are messes. Too much going on – a crease here, a bulbous wheel arch there, a rear window the size of a postage stamp. Trying WAY too hard to look cool and “with it”.

    I actually think aging Boomers are their market because (a) they think it looks young and cool (but it isn’t and they aren’t, but can’t accept it); (2) sort of tries to be “useful” by having a slightly higher ride height and having a hatch (so their aging joints and backs can get in and out more easily); and (3) doesn’t cost a ton, so it won’t drain the retirement savings too quickly to either buy or finance. I can envision some “hip” 65 year old thinking that this is the “fun” car they always wanted and would now buy before they got too old. I DON’T see many Millenials falling for it — way too obvious for them.

  • avatar
    carve

    I kind of like the styling- nice that Toyota is taking some risks.

    However…this thing weighs as much as the much bigger CRV, isn’t much cheaper, and is down 45 hp…at sea level! Up at your local ski area you’d be down more like 75 hp. Awful. I’ll pass.

  • avatar
    Boff

    It’s ugly AF. It makes me feel nauseous. I saw one on the road and wondered if Ssongyang had made their long-awaited (by no-one, ever) foray into the Canadian market.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Uh, like throwing up?

  • avatar
    bartonlong

    I like quirky, weird, nerdy cars (this also puts me way, way out of the bell curve for mass market appeal). One of my all my time favorite cars I owned was Subaru brat. I bought a Juke (in 2012) and is still very happy with it. I Like the weird, unique styling and the (for the time) small, advanced engine technology. I did insist on getting the 2wd manual and after driving a AWD CVT model for about week while they fixed a manufacturing defect I made they right decision. While this has the weird, stand out styling it lacks the technological nerd appeal of the Juke when it was launched. It is utterly conventional in technology, under-powered and old people will buy it by the shiploads.

  • avatar
    Marko

    Yucky. I hope Mitsuoka gets a hold of it, and I very rarely say that…

  • avatar
    mchan1

    Looks cramped as heck.
    Typical J carmakers in making their newer vehicles small as heck.

    On its appearance esp. the rear, Vomit!

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    Mazda should rebadge it as the CX-2.

    Then it can sell in Prizm numbers while this sells in Corolla numbers, and be an out-of-left-field recommendation in the future from the B&B to high school/college girls.

    Lexus can rebadge it, and with its predator treatment, it might end up the best looking of the bunch. No doubt the most profitable one. Call it the Lexus FU-350.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    I feel almost totally indifferent.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    Had one for a couple days recently – liked it more than I’d expect. It’s no where near thrilling, but it’s not grossly incompetent to drive, the interior materials are great for the price, and the styling is at least interesting. Ultimately not something I’d buy (it’s not for the claustrophobic), but it makes me wish Toyota’s engineers could be let loose on a few more interesting cars (or even just get a shot at another Corolla XRS). Or that the TJ Cruiser or whatever the Toyota Renegade concept will be called (if it makes it to production), would be similarly decent.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      “Or that the TJ Cruiser or whatever the Toyota Renegade concept will be called (if it makes it to production), would be similarly decent.”

      I hope its decent, and not a CVT only disappointment. I’m sure it’ll offer some sort of 4wd, unless it really is a new xB.

      I would like to see the Toyota Tank here. Talk about Uber-rific! Ha

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    This will be a huge hit for Toyota and will haunt our nightmares for years. Seriously, this is the future.

  • avatar
    Moparmann

    It makes me feel as though I DID inhale!! :-)

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Every time I did visit the local Toyota Scion dealership, the customers that had pen in hand at the F&I office were the 50 and over crowd. Toyota still ignores this older group for whatever their reason and still try to focus their energies on the millennials still. No different with their C-HR model, only they brought “only” the most basic entry level model of the C-HR this time around to the U.S. that Toyota usually sell in the developing countries! LOL!

  • avatar
    analoggrotto

    “There is nothing about this description that makes me feel good inside. Plus it’s ugly, I bet it looks like Batman’s Tumbler in black.”

    Great. Now I want one.

  • avatar
    chiefmonkey

    The side profile of a Veloster meets the rear of a Juke. lol

  • avatar
    bluespruce786

    I sell Toyota’s in central VT, 2 C-HR’s so far this year. Both clients no kids at home and in their 50’s.

    The interior fit and finish is very high. “Really well built and solid.” is some of the feedback I am hearing.

    The suspension is impressive, for a short wheelbase it handles the bumps and corners well. Something about the TNGA c frame and dual wishbone rear as opposed to the torsion bar on the honda.

    As far as visibility;

    The “a” columns are raked back enough that you can see that forward dead spot pretty well looking under the columns (I’m 6′ with average torso and I don’t need to crane my neck to look under them.

    The rear windows actually look right into the blind spot if you turn your head. If head checks are at all a problem (neck or back issues) then the sensor suite is more important than the windows. The C-HR XLE premium has Blind spot monitoring with rear cross traffic, which is very nice, especially at night or in rain.

    IDK, I always like the feel of the 68-69 Camaro, like you are inside of a machine. The C-HR kind of reminds me of that.

    I like the C-HR both personally and professionally. Toyota’s safety sense P, 10 airbags, dual zone climate, a functional back seat, and a great height for entrance/egress and bad roads.

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