By on April 11, 2017

Audi Q8 Concept Front 3/4, Image: © 2017 Jeff Wilson/The Truth About Cars

Audi issued a press release today to remind the world that it’s going to be Germany’s preeminent source for sport utility vehicles. While every major automaker is making a push into the segment, Volkswagen Group has assigned Audi with one of the largest.

Today, the company outlined its production strategy for the forthcoming Q4 and Q8 models, reaffirming its claim that crossovers could account for half of its global sales in the very near future. By 2019, Audi will have expanded its SUV lineup to include seven individual models and increased its overall production volume to meet the growing demand.

“We will integrate two completely new Q‑models into the existing production network and will thus increase our competitiveness in an extremely important segment,” said Audi management board member Dr. Hubert Waltl in an official statement.

Both of the new vehicles will have a similar, bulbous “coupe styling” and ride much higher than traditional sedans. Audi will begin production of the Q4 at Audi Hungaria in Győr in 2019, while the hulking Q8 starts assembly early next year in Bratislava — alongside the Audi Q7, Volkswagen Touareg, Bentley Bentayga, and Porsche Cayenne.

The Q8 will take the reigns as Audi’s new flagship SUV and should look almost identical to the Q8 Sport Concept that appeared at the North American International Auto Show in January. It’ll place an emphasis on luxury, include the company’s best bits of tech, and come in well over the Q7’s $49,000 base price tag.

Meanwhile, the Q4 will be positioned between the Q3 and Q5 in both size and price. While Audi has time to change its mind, early accounts indicate it is most likely to resemble the TT Offroad concept from the 2014 Beijing Motor Show and focus more on performance than prestige.

[Image: © 2017 Jeff Wilson/The Truth About Cars]

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20 Comments on “Audi Doesn’t Want Anyone to Forget That it’s Germany’s Next SUV Brand...”


  • avatar
    threeer

    Every time I read something like this, a little piece of the auto enthusiast in me dies…

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      While I get the sentiment, threeer, it’s also a good reminder why automakers should pay little attention to auto enthusiasts when it comes to plotting strategic moves.

      BMW received the equivalent of death threats when it first released the X5 and X3 years ago, and yet without those models the company would likely be dead. Same goes for Porsche, whose Cayenne, while not my cup of tea, has helped the company stay wildly profitable. The new Macan is really slick, CUV that it is.

      Modern SUVs and CUVs aren’t necessarily the body on frame dogs of their forefathers, and the insane profits from these vehicles helps make things like the Ms, AMGs, RSes, 911s and 918s of the world possible.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        Hreardon, I get it…really. Without the Cayenne and (now) Macan, Porsche might not even be today, let alone be able to still offer such treats as the new Boxter and Cayman. And yet, the mad rush to “SUV ueber alles” leaves me more than just a little cold. Freude am fahren will soon go the way of the dodo, right before we all start commuting in our self-driving living rooms on wheels. Sigh…I need to find me a small, fun stick shift to drive just because…

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    Excuse me but SUV brand is Jeep. Thank-you

  • avatar
    Tstag

    Make mine a Land Rover

  • avatar
    BlueEr03

    How does Audi have so many SUVs and VW has so few?

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    “Audi Doesn’t Want Anyone to Forget That it’s Germany’s Next SUV Brand”

    Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz…

    From the Quattro Sport and the great rallying heritage, to this? Sounds like the brand deserves the Old Yeller treatment.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I can’t wait for longer, lower, wider to come around again. I figure 10 more years. Jacked up blobs will go out of fashion eventually.

    • 0 avatar
      OldManPants

      Yabbut they’ll come back around as AVs.

      neener

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        By then I will be too old to care.

        Ultimately, the proliferation of cars I don’t like simply saves me money. I already have a 40 year old car in my garage, not buying new doesn’t bother me in the slightest.

        • 0 avatar
          OldManPants

          That’s been my default option, too, since 2011.

          Only a significant schitz & giggles factor like an EV is ever going to get me off the schneid.

          More likely some kid grand niece or nephew is going to inherit a really clean, really old CR-V that they can trade for a used VR setup.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            There are still a few new cars I would buy. I just bought a ’17 GTI after all. I’d buy another 2-series BMW. But the pickings are mighty slim.

          • 0 avatar
            OldManPants

            “I just bought a ’17 GTI after all.”

            Then you’re not that bummed out!

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            The pickings are mighty slim. Had I been in a position to buy a new car 25 years ago I don’t know how I would have made up my mind – sooo many choices! Today, maybe 5-6 cars I would buy new.

          • 0 avatar
            OldManPants

            One interesting aspect of today’s auto scene is that two guys as far apart on the preference spectrum as we probably are can be equally disappointed!

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            True dat, my friend!

            I really think modern cars are fantastic in general, but very few of them appeal to my admittedly oddball tastes and requirements, at least in the US. Still an embarrassment of riches in Europe.

  • avatar
    Click REPLY to reload page

    That slit-windowed station wagon isn’t in the least bit interesting, especially at fifty something grand plus tax and fees.

    I would like to know more about that red convertible in the background.

  • avatar
    empathogen

    If this is true, why does the VW Atlas exist? And look so much better?

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    My sister ordered a Q7 several years ago. When it arrived there was a wee champagne ceremony at the dealership for the key fobs handover. My brother-in-law said, “That’s not the car we ordered.” After an hour of confusion, during which my sister reminded the dealership of an impending road trip, they gave my sister the keys to the incorrect Q7 and said they’d be in touch when they found her car.

    They loved the Q7. Tons of power but a little thirsty for a Diesel, apparently.

    The dealership called in a panic two weeks later. My sisters’ car had arrived, which was great, but the one that was delivered by accident wasn’t actually allowed to be in Canada – never mind on the road.

    They’d somehow given her a V12 TDI-powered Q7. Suffice to say my brother-in-law was quite disappointed with the power of the 3.0L compared to the 6.0L.

  • avatar
    The Heisenberg Cartel

    I get the angry sentiment too but in my own personal life I can understand the draw. Two kids with a third in the future, two dogs, and frequent 400+ mile road trips would be massively impractical in a sedan, even an S-class, and having the Americans and Toyota as the only options for spacious three-rows kind of sucks to be honest. That’s why I shopped for a Q7 and ended up with a GL450.

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