By on February 10, 2017

2015 Chrysler 300S

Update: It was brought to our attention by a spokesperson for FCA that iSeeCars.com’s study includes complaints about parts availability for recall campaigns, which in and of themselves are not necessarily safety issue complaints. These complaints can skew the per-model results in a big way. While iSeeCars works out the data, take the results below with a grain of salt as they will more than likely change. —Mark

Update 2: iSeeCars retabulated the data for the below-mentioned study without recall parts availability complaints and came up with the same top 10 results. Still, the fact remains, not all NHTSA complaints are verified; anyone can submit a complaint, regardless of whether they own said vehicle. In 2010, Toyota ran into problems verifying complaints from NHTSA’s database, and Tesla more recently had issues with one particularly problematic complainer … from Australia.

Safety complaints come in all forms, some of them frivolous, but minor annoyances usually fail to make the attention of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.

When all safety complaints leveled against a model are weighed against the volume of vehicles sold, potential customers are left with a clearer picture of what headaches they might expect after signing on the dotted line. Meanwhile, automakers could realize they have a problem to fix.

In a recent study based on NHTSA complaints, one brand showed why quality control is key to keeping a loyal customer base, and how problems in the past can haunt a company for years.

In creating its ranking, automotive data company iSeeCars.com analyzed half a million NHTSA safety complaints for car models manufactured between 2005 and 2016, leaving out vehicles that were no longer in production in that final year.

The model with the worst rate was the Chrysler 300, logging 66.7 safety complaints per 10,000 vehicles sold, followed close behind by the Jeep Grand Cherokee and now-defunct Chrysler Town & Country. Jeep’s Wrangler and Toyota’s Prius ranked fourth and fifth on the list, with complaints amounting to double the industry average of 26.8.

Of the Chrysler 300’s complaints, 18 percent were related to electrical gremlins. The Prius saw its owners complain about exterior lighting, brake issues and acceleration problems 48 percent of the time. Meanwhile, 17 percent of Wrangler gripes arose from the vehicle’s fuel system, with “gas spraying everywhere during refueling” being a noted complaint.

For Tesla, 18 percent of Model X complaints involved vehicle speed control. Its sedan sibling, the Model S, saw a whopping 42.2 percent of complainants pointing a finger at its suspension. That’s not actually surprising, given a recent controversy.

Even if a manufacturer fixes the issue, a large number of complaints early on in a model’s run can still sink its rating when averaged over time. Statistics, of course, are notoriously cold and uncaring.

Rounding out the top 10 most complained-about models were the Dodge Grand Caravan, Ford Edge, Dodge Charger, Ford Fusion and Nissan Murano. Due to a high number of complaints across multiple models, Jeep ranked first in gripes as a brand, followed by Chrysler in the runner-up position. Technology powerhouse Tesla showed up in the number three spot, while Dodge and Mini came in fourth and fifth.

On the flip side of the coin, a certain Korean company is smiling. The Kia Forte and Soul ranked first and second on the list of best performers, logging just 3.5 and 6.5 safety complaints per 10,000 vehicles sold. The Chevrolet Silverado 1500, GMC Sierra 1500 and Nissan Sentra made up the rest of the top five. Ford’s F-150 came in sixth, tied with the Sentra, with 9.3 complaints per 10,000 vehicle sold.

iSeeCars.com points out the inclusion of three popular full-size pickups on the list could paint an inaccurate picture of the models’ actual complaint rate. Many pickups are bought for fleet use, where a safety complaint will likely end up on the desk of a manager, not the NHTSA. Such vehicles are also more likely to see regular scheduled maintenance.

While those models can boast the most, the Subaru Forester, Lexus RX, Toyota 4Runner and Nissan Rogue each recorded a complaint rate of less than half the industry average. Among brands, Porsche, Subaru, Lexus, Land Rover and Volvo were the least complained-about nameplates.

[Image: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

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63 Comments on “FCA Vehicles Top Safety Complaints Study; Lauded Electrics Don’t Fare Well, Either (UPDATE)...”


  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Of course, sometimes you have to take such data with a grain of salt, too; as one of the most prolific complaints about a certain battery-electric vehicle has also been reported by a single individual using multiple usernames and falsified addresses.

    To more directly respond to one specific complaint listed above, I owned a JKU Wrangler between the years analyzed and never, once, had the fuel spray as claimed by the report–long before the model was recalled to supposedly fix the issue–over my 9 years of ownership.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Yes, the data is flawed since you had no problems with your product.
      Looks like JD Power and Consumer Reports are also wrong.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I haven’t trusted JDPower or CR for years. There’s been far too much obvious bias in their reporting.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “I haven’t trusted JDPower or CR for years. There’s been far too much obvious bias in their reporting.”

          Thanks for explaining how The Great Trumpkin got elected.

          • 0 avatar
            John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

            Thanks for bringing politics into it, that helps a lot.

            But, since you did:
            You guys act as though Hillary wasn’t a terrible person known to have lied, cheated, broken the law and neglected her duties, and thus was a viable alternative.

            If I HAD to vote, and I didn’t this time for the first time since being able to simply because I didnt want to be in anyway responsible for either candidate, I’d vote for Charlie Sheen or the red-shirt guy who always gets killed in every Star Trek episode before I’d vote for corruption incarnate Hellary Clinton.

            You guys (American smug loudmouth liberals) elected Trump. You might as well have begged for him. The more you complain, pi§§ and moan, the more I laugh at you. You got exactly what you deserved and asked for. Not just because of Clinton, for guilting Americans into electing someone even less qualified than Trump who only seemed to be good at tearing the country down rather than building it up. Oh, and vacations. He was AWESOME at vacations.

            Trump talks about little else but doing the opposite, like his ideas or not. What did you expect?

            Did we want ANOTHER corrupt Clinton in the white house and then a just-as-corrupt B.O. as a supreme court judge? Will Bill Ayres be her chief of staff?

            You have nobody else to blame, not even the guy who thinks I should use a Honda Ridgeline for a job pulling a large trailer with heavy cargo that requires a CDL endorsement, and that I should simply keep a farm tractor in my pocket in case I need 4wd for what will clearly be 4wd-requiring excursions outside my job.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            “Thanks for explaining how The Great Trumpkin got elected.”

            You realize this is a automotive site right? And what is a great trumpkin? Is that some sort of gluten free, non gender assuming granola bar?

            Anyway, Vulpine is 100% correct about CR. Their bias is worse than CNN. Giving Toyota a free pass for YEARS just because they’re Toyota removes any credibility they had. They are extremely biased towards the Asian brands despite much better and stronger vehicles being built by Detroit.

          • 0 avatar
            GeneralMalaise

            Lou… Lou… Lou. You should file suit in small claims court for the space Donald Trump occupies in your head.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N – the point I was trying to make is the fact that people will deride any source of information that does not jive with their own beliefs. We don’t seek the truth, we seek validation of our beliefs.

            Oh and I agree 100% that Hillary Clinton is corrupt. She is as much to blame for his ascent to power as the smug Liberals you mentioned.

            @EBFlex – “And what is a great trumpkin?”
            Ever watch The Peanuts? The Great Pumpkin! Just a play on words since both are redheads.

            @GeneralMalaise – nice to see that you are paying attention. On the subject of getting inside of people’s heads….

        • 0 avatar
          GeneralMalaise

          Agree, Vulpine. JD Powers gets paid for use of their seal of approval and I still remember the Union 76 chemist who lived across the street from us when I was a young’un who used to loudly swear at least once a week at the Ford Cortina he’d bought on the CR recommendation.

      • 0 avatar
        Frylock350

        @Lou_BC

        I read actual scientific literature. The methodology used to arrive at the conclusion is always published in any journal. It allows you to review and decide if the results are credible or not. It also tells you how the data was collected and how efforts were made to correct for bias.

        Then there’s CR’s black box that relies on a deliriously unscientific data collection effort (data collection isn’t random; its not based on any verifiable data only based on taking people at their word; its not repeatable). They do not publish their methodology or data set; they generates different results from vehicles that are rebadges; etc. I take CR to be more of a measure of how certain folks (we all know CR has a “type”: a non tech-savvy person who views cars like refrigerators) perceive vehicles to be. CR wants me to take it seriously then they can publish the data collection effort and data itself; publish the methodology; etc.

        I don’t really know enough about JD Power to comment on them.

        @Vulpine,
        CR isn’t biased; they’re just a glorified internet poll; take with a boulder of salt.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Doesn’t mean that the fuel spray can’t happen or there wasn’t an issue. I remember specifically an issue on Ford D and U502 that had a supplier issue pertaining to fuel tanks. Turns out there was an issue the way the tanks were manufactured at the supplier causing fuel to not enter the tank properly or complete refusal to fill.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      @Vulpine: I had forgotten about that incident where one guy chummed the water with dozens of fake complaints about a mythical Model S he didn’t even own.

      Not to say Tesla didn’t/doesn’t have problems, but stunts like that can skew results.

    • 0 avatar
      jeanbaptiste

      I’m pretty sure those 17% were confused about their Jeep Liberty being an actual jeep. I borrowed a liberty once and when i went to fill it up, the autostop clicked on the pump and 1 second later 1/2 liter of fuel sprayed all over from the nozzle.

      See this video. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=E57ThoqKTzw

  • avatar
    Rday

    I can believe that FCA has major problems. I just sold my 2014 RaM Promaster van and it was built very poorly. Don’t believe it would make 100K without serious repair bills. THE 100K extended factory warranty is absolutely worthless. I had a problem with oil pressure and it was not covered under the powertrain warranty. I will never buy another FCA product period. I am surprised about the Prius having so many complaints I have owned 2 Prius hybrids and they have pretty much been bullet proof. My new Rav4 Hybrid is a wonder to drive and just a great vehicle. I have had so much luck with toyota/hybrids that I seldom have had to take them back to the dealer. IF you have to go back to the dealer or get to know their service techs on a first name business [as I did with the Ram PRomasaater] it is time to ditch the product and the manufacturer for good!!!

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Rday – some of the complaints centered on acceleration and braking. If one expects Hellcat acceleration then one is bound to be disappointed.

      Do the brakes on vehicles with “regenerative” braking feel different than standard brakes?

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        The Prius acceleration complaints aren’t about it being too slow. It is about a “jumping” behavior when coming to a stop.

        I’m wondering if the regen effect cycles off or something just as the vehicle comes to stop to give this surging feeling.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          “Do the brakes on vehicles with “regenerative” braking feel different than standard brakes?”
          —- Yes.

          “I’m wondering if the regen effect cycles off or something just as the vehicle comes to stop to give this surging feeling.”
          —- A) I don’t know. But…
          —- B) Probably. At a low enough speed there’s simply not enough drag created to maintain braking, though I would expect it to be a more smooth transition unless the car’s programming turns it off when regenerative power falls below a certain point.

          I believe Tesla’s regenerative braking actually feeds a small amount of reverse power for the final part of the stop when using the more aggressive regenerative braking mode. (IIRC both Tesla and GM currently use two different modes of regenerative braking, one designed to prevent overspeed on downhill runs and the other to handle more dynamic, stop-and-go situations.)

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @Lou_BC: Do the brakes on vehicles with “regenerative” braking feel different than standard brakes?

        They can. In my case in a BEV, I’m used to a certain level of deceleration with regen on max mode. When the car is fully charged, the regen is minimized and the car coasts instead of decelerating making the brakes seem like they’re suddenly less effective. You also have to push the brake pedal further to the point of friction brake engagement rather than slowing the car when you hit the point where regen is engaged. I can see where someone that didn’t understand how the car works would think there is a brake problem.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @mcs – thanks for the information.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          Regen brakes do feel a bit different, but you quickly get used to it. As I slug through hours of traffic every day, I wish my hybrid had more aggressive regen because in traffic I could often have single pedal operation which would negate the need to use the brakes. In addition to saving more fuel, it would save wear on the brakes and wear on me.

          I just read a comparison article between the new Volt and Prius. The Volt has just such a setting – you can adjust the regen effect of the brakes. So you can set the brakes up for “normal” operation or aggressive regen. Sounds like intelligent design to me.

      • 0 avatar
        Frylock350

        @Lou_BC,

        I drove a Volt for a week. The brake feel is identical to any compact sedan I’ve ever driven. If anything the brakes feel more potent. The only way to get a different feel is to drive with the car in L or with use the regen brake paddle manually.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    2 companies dominate the list:
    – a startup still learning to build cars at scale
    – an old company that never did learn to build quality automobiles at scale

  • avatar
    JimZ

    So whatever happened with that Bolt which supposedly “turned itself on, took itself out of Park, and backed itself into a workbench?”

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Seems like these need to be screened further to be useful. Like the “Initial Quality Study.” For example, probably many of the Prius complaints related to the way its drivetrain and braking system work, which is unfamilar to non-hybrid owners. “Acceleration problems” in a Prius? ROTFLMAO! The thing is bog slow to anyone who didn’t own a car in the late 1970s or early 1980s. I guess lots of folks bought one without taking it more than around the block a few times. Prius and its ilk seem fast enough in city driving (0-30) but getting on to a freeway with lots of traffic, or passing on a two-lane highway is a whole ‘nother story.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I checked out some of the Prius complaints on the NHSTA site.

      Issues with the headlights being too dim or burning out and some sort of abrupt “lurching” or jumping forward when coming to a stop or over a bump seems to be the most common.

      I’m guessing that the lurch is the acceleration issue they are referring to.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Pickup trucks have some of the lowest rates of complaints and some wonder why they outsell everything else.

    Using the excuse that fleet vehicles will drop the complaint rate is just that, an excuse. Unless one does not have the data to back a comment, then don’t make it.

    A fleet manager has to comply with Federal rules as well as Worker Place safety rules under Workers’ Compensation Programs. If a fleet vehicle is covered under warranty then a problem will get sent to the dealership for repair.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      “A fleet manager has to comply with Federal rules as well as Worker Place safety rules under Workers’ Compensation Programs. If a fleet vehicle is covered under warranty then a problem will get sent to the dealership for repair.”

      Vehicle warranty repairs/complaints don’t get logged into the NHTSA database. The only way to review the data is for OEM’s to open their data up for warranty repair…..good luck with that!

      A fleet manager isn’t going to go to a website or call a number to complain about one of the trucks, it will get sent to the shop for a fix and that’s it.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Rogue I’m surprised about since the CVT liked to blow up around MY07-10ish.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Anecdotal evidence: 175k miles on my sister in law’s ’10, fluid still has life in it per onboard monitor, no transmissions issues to speak of (mostly rural/highway driving).

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I know for a fact some early examples were on their second and third units by 100K. I also know Nissan offered a free extended warranty on the MY06 Versa to X miles and X years because I saw the letter sent to a friend in 2014 (I wanna say 10 year / 100K).

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          FWIW my first Altima hybrid went 140K before work took it away and replaced it with another one. Zero issues with the CVT, other than I hate CVTs…I do believe the hybrids had Toyota sourced CVTs not Nissan but I have not confirmed that.

  • avatar
    MLS

    For fun, I reviewed some complaints about 2015 and 2016 Chrysler 300s on NHTSA.gov. Let’s just say many of them are questionable:

    “RENTED A CAR FROM FOX CAR RENTAL AND I WAS RENTING 2016 CHRYSLER 300 MY DREAM CAR HAS I WAS DRIVING TURNED RIGHT ON A RESIDENTIAL STREET THE REAR SHIFT BY IT SELF THE NOB TURNED WHEN I PRESSED ON THE BREAKS I GOT REAL SCARED AND I WENT BACK TO THE CAR RENTAL AND TOLD THE MANGER THAT THIS CAR THAT IS A 2016 CAR THEY JUST RECEIVED NEEDED TO BE RETURNED TO THE DEALER CAUSE IT MALFUNCTION WHEN I PRESS THE BREAKS THE NOB OF THE 2016 CHRYSLER 300 GEAR SHIFT CHANGED GEAR ON ITS OWN. I WAS ONLY GOING 5MPH THAT IS VERY DANGEROUS ESPECIALLY IF YOU ARE DRIVING IN A DOWN STIFF ROAD OR STREET I DO NOT THINK THE NOB GEAR DOES NOT LOCK SO IT CHANGED REAR ON ITS OWN WHEN YOU DO A SUDDEN BREAK”

    “THIS CAR HAS THE ROTARY DIAL FOR TRANSMISSION SELECTION. I PULLED THIS CAR HAS A ROTARY DIAL FOR THE SHIFTER. I PUT THE VEHICLE IN PARK AND EXITED THE CAR TO CLOSE A GATE. AS SOON AS I EXITED THE VEHICLE IT BEGAN TO ROLL BACKWARDS. I COULD NOT GET BACK IN THE VEHICLE IN TIME TO STOP IT FROM EXITING THE GARAGE. THE DRIVER’S DOOR CAUGHT ON THE GARAGE DOOR PILLAR TURNING IT 180 DEGREES AND PUSHING IT INTO THE FRONT FENDER. DAMAGE TO THE VEHICLE WAS $3210.05. SINCE THE REPAIRS WERE COMPLETED, THE SAME PROBLEM HAS OCCURRED TWO ADDITIONAL TIMES, FORTUNATELY WITH NO DAMAGE. A FAULTY DESIGN FOR SURE.”

    “RUNNING HEADLIGHTS ARE TOO BRIGHT. SINCE THE PURCHSE OF THIS VEHICLE I AM CONSTANTLY HAVING OTHER DRIVERS FLICK THEIR HEADLIGHTS ON AT ME TO INFORM ME MY BRIGHT LIGHTS ARE ON, WHICH THEY ARE NOT! I JUST HAD AN INCIDENT LAST NIGHT, A DRIVER IN FRONT OF ME THOUGHT I WAS RUNNING MY BRIGHT LIGHTS ON, THE DRIVER PULLED OFF THE ROAD AND GOT BEHIND ME WITH THEIR BRIGHT LIGHTS ON AS A WAY OF LETTING ME KNOW, THIS DRIVER WAS APPROX 10 INCHES OFF OF MY BUMPER DOING 50 MPH. PLEASE OFFER A DIMMER BULB. THIS ISSUE WILL INSUE “ROAD RAGE” FROM OTHER DRIVERS!”

    “THE CONTACT OWNS A 2015 CHRYSLER 300. WHILE REVERSING, THE VEHICLE STALLED. AFTER THE VEHICLE STALLED, IT WAS SHIFTED INTO DRIVE FROM REVERSE AND BACK INTO DRIVE TWICE AND THEN INDEPENDENTLY RESTARTED. THE VEHICLE WAS NOT DIAGNOSED OR REPAIRED. THE MANUFACTURER WAS NOT NOTIFIED OF THE FAILURE. THE FAILURE MILEAGE WAS UNKNOWN.”

    “MY WIFE PULLED OUT OF THE GARAGE, FORGOT HER GLASSES, PULLED HALFWAY BACK INTO THE GARAGE , PUT THE CAR IN PARK. AS SHE WAS EXITING THE CAR, IT LUNGED FORWARD HITTING OUR GARAGE WALL. WE HAVE THE ROTARY DIAL SHIFTER ON THIS CAR. IT REMINDED ME OF THE ACTOR IN LOS ANGELES WHO GOT OUT OF HIS CAR TO GET HIS MAIL AND HIS JEEP WENT OUT OF PARK AND UNFORTUNATELY PINNED HIM AGAINST HIS FENCE AND WAS KILLED. I HAD THE CAR INTO SERVICE AND IT WAS INSPECTED BY THE DEALER AND ALSO AN INDEPENDENT ENGINEERING FIRM. I RECEIVED A LETTER FROM CHRYSLER SAYING THAT NOTHING WAS FOUND TO BE WRONG WITH THE CAR. I DON’T BELIEVE THIS AT ALL. EVERYONE KNOWS THAT CHRYSLER HAS AN ISSUE WITH THEIR ELECTRONIC SHIFTERS.”

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Aye. Questionable. Not too different from Ford in the early ’70s when the shifter would drop to Reverse from Park when you left the engine running. Turned out even then the drivers weren’t fully engaging Park and none were engaging the parking brake.

    • 0 avatar
      GeneralMalaise

      Typical stories usually written by mentally challenged people who spin confused tales of woe. Comedy Gold for teh win!

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Sounds like a lot of rental customers not using the rotary shifter correctly.

      This one stands out though

      “RUNNING HEADLIGHTS ARE TOO BRIGHT. SINCE THE PURCHSE OF THIS VEHICLE I AM CONSTANTLY HAVING OTHER DRIVERS FLICK THEIR HEADLIGHTS ON AT ME TO INFORM ME MY BRIGHT LIGHTS ARE ON, WHICH THEY ARE NOT! I JUST HAD AN INCIDENT LAST NIGHT, A DRIVER IN FRONT OF ME THOUGHT I WAS RUNNING MY BRIGHT LIGHTS ON, THE DRIVER PULLED OFF THE ROAD AND GOT BEHIND ME WITH THEIR BRIGHT LIGHTS ON AS A WAY OF LETTING ME KNOW, THIS DRIVER WAS APPROX 10 INCHES OFF OF MY BUMPER DOING 50 MPH. PLEASE OFFER A DIMMER BULB. THIS ISSUE WILL INSUE “ROAD RAGE” FROM OTHER DRIVERS!”

      This is true. The HIDs are f*cking amazing on these models.

  • avatar
    pwrwrench

    Those, now,old Fords had column shifter trouble. The detent that normally required pulling the lever back towards the steering wheel to shift out of Park would wear over time. Sometimes with the weight of the lever and engine vibration it would drop down into Reverse.
    Leaving a vehicle running in Park without putting the cable operated brake on is definitely a bad idea, but that does not mean that there was not a problem with those Fords.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      That defect was for real. While the use of the parking brake is the correct thing to do, lack of use is not an excuse for a design failure. Those cars were never repaired; a sticker was the fix. The Reagan Administration did not want to bankrupt Ford, so they got off with a sticker campaign instead of a proper repair. Part of the “war” on “unnecessary” regulations back then. Still, that “war” did get rid of 85 MPH speedos so that’s something.

      The more things change, the more they stay the same.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Well, the feds let off GM for it’s breaking engine mounts too. When the driver-side engine mount broke, the V8 engines would lift up, pulling the accelerator linkage out all the way.

        GM not only didn’t have to replace the engine mounts, their dealers were allowed to charge owners $40 to install a clamp that kept the engine from rising up when the engine mount DID break.

        That was the biggest recall at the time, 6.5 million cars. It wouldn’t have bankrupted GM, my mechanic replaced the engine mount on my ’65 Impala and added the clamp for $20 total. I also had one of the Ford shifter cars, a ’68 Montego, and my mechanic fixed that for $10.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    This is easy.. avoid Chrysler. The 200, the fluffed sales numbers, the failure of FCA’s return to the US, celebrity killing cars.. blah blah blah. I commend TTAC for constantly letting us know how bad FCA is. We haven’t heard that story before. Thank you.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      It’s hard to believe after Daimler, then Cerberus, cheapened Chrysler Corporation cars, they were still better-built than what FCA is putting out now. You can make a direct comparison with the 300. Those models made before FCA took over are much more reliable than the models of the last two model years, especially the V8s with the “old” Chrysler-designed transmissions.

      • 0 avatar
        MLS

        The modern-era V8 300 never used a Chrysler-designed transmission. It was launched with the Daimler five-speed and switched to the ZF eight-speed during the second generation. Also, I don’t believe reliability has decreased under FCA ownership.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          If you’re talking about the LX cars, they were available with a Chrysler 42RLE 4 speed on V6 models in the first gen.

          All quality and reliability stats have SIGNIFICANTLY improved since Daimler leadership. Every line is vastly improved since their comparative generations before FCA. It’s not even close.

          • 0 avatar
            MLS

            Right, the lower-end V6 models were initially equipped with Chrysler transmissions. But the higher-trim V6 and all V8 models featured the Benz five-speed from the start.

  • avatar
    GeneralMalaise

    Anecdotal, but I own a 2012 Fiat 500 Abarth, will have owned it for 5 years this May and have had zero issues, nada, none. The car has a little over 36k miles, and has been the cheapest car to maintain that I’ve ever owned. I plan on hanging on to it for the long haul. My wife has been trying to convince me to sell it and buy a 124 Abarth Spider, but so far I’ve successfully held out, even after reading about the Spider placing #1 in a comparison with 5 other way cool cars. If I went for the Spider, I’d sell my cherry ’81 X1/9 and hang on to the 500 Abarth.

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      I almost went for the 500 over the Dart, but– being an almost 40-year old man, just couldn’t do it. It didn’t help that my last car was a PT Cruiser, and the 500 just felt like buying the same thing twice. Dart seemed more mature– like a ‘real’ car. 500 would always be seen as a toy to be run around on by others on the road.

      Its a somewhat regrettable decision. 500 got and will get more support/love from the parent company, and its beginning to show in my ownership experience.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      The 500 Abarth is a hoot to drive. I yet to sample a 124, so take this with a grain of salt, but I believe the 500 would be out and the 124 in.

  • avatar
    zip94513

    I own(ed) two vehicles on the list, and FCA and Ford product, and I can happily say I have yet to have an electrical problem from either.

  • avatar
    midnite_clyde

    Author is same guy who posted non sensical rant last week about Chrysler. He also writes for a GM news site that has GM banner advertising.

    Hidden agenda?

  • avatar
    2012JKU

    Have a 2015 Chrysler 300C Platinum AWD with 46k km on it. Only one minor problem with a faulty shift control module that was replaced under warranty. Had a 12 Wrangler before with only 1 minor issue. Problems with FCA vehicles are overrated IMHO.

  • avatar
    orange260z

    If I remember correctly, the Chrysler 300s (and other Chrysler products) that have been recalled all use the ZF “Monostable” electronic shifter. As an owner, I quickly got used to it and never thought about it again, but I can understand how rental car drivers can struggle with this conventional-looking but unconventional-operating shifter system. I don’t like the Chrysler fix, which I believe will force “Park” if the door is open, and make it impossible to intentionally creep forward or backward with an open door.

    My 2013 300S 3.6L has had only a couple of minor issues, none safety-related. I’ve had the common climate control issue, a failed trunk latch and sensor, and a defective driver’s side window seal. The window seal was frustrating because it took Chrysler nearly six months to get a replacement part during which time I couldn’t operate the window.

    The assembly quality of the car is questionable with panel gaps you can stick a finger through, but overall it has been quite reliable and a great car to own. My friend bought a Honda Accord at the same time and has had more issues. My e90 BMW visited the dealer more times most months than the Chrysler has in 4 years.


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