By on March 12, 2015

2015 Kia Forte 5 SX Turbo whiteKia’s second-generation Forte, a successor to the Spectra and Sephia, spawned coupe and hatchback derivatives just like its predecessor. But in second-gen form, Kia took it a step further by inserting the 1.6L turbocharged four-cylinder from the Hyundai Veloster Turbo into top-spec Forte5 hatchbacks and two-door Koups.

While Forte EX sedans top out with a 173-horsepower, naturally aspirated 2.0L four-cylinder – a 28-horsepower upgrade from the 1.8L in the Forte LX sedan – Forte5s and Koups come standard with the 2.0L and, in SX trim, are fitted with this 201-horsepower, 195 lb-ft 1.6L turbo. With the SX Premium and Technology packages and a 6-speed automatic transmission, the Forte5 SX’s price in the United States rises from $21,715 to $26,915.


• As-Tested USD Price: $26,915

• Horsepower: 201 @ 6000 rpm

• Torque: 195 lb-ft @ 1750 rpm

• Observed Fuel Economy: 26.4 mpg


You’re responsible for rendering the final stylistic verdict, but the Forte5 SX garnered more compliments during its stay with me than the Ford Mustang the week before and the Audi TTS the week before that. I think it looks especially nice from the rear three-quarter, but if we’re honest with ourselves, we’ll all readily acknowledge that its the wheels that set the SX apart.

These 18-inch rims, wearing 225/40R18 Bridgestone Blizzaks this winter, are some of the best currently available OEM alloys, and I’m not just referring to the affordable realm.

The interior is certainly no place for shock and awe, but it’s well built with intuitive controls and terrific space for four occupants, five in a squeeze. From a comfort perspective, the Forte5 is a capable family car. Its dimensions are more like the midsize Optima’s than the subcompact Rio5’s. There’s 11% more passenger volume than in the Rio but only 4% less than in the Optima.

2015 Kia Forte5 SX Turbo sideIt feels much roomier in the back than an Mk7 Golf, a car we’ll talk more about later, and the numbers bear that out. Overall human capacity is 5% better. Official legroom figures, not the most reliable, show only a 0.3” differential in favour of the Kia, but the gap feels more apparent in the real world.

Of course, the true victories in any modern Kia cabin are won by the tech layout and the amount of kit with which the car is equipped. There’s no learning curve for the user interface. More importantly, there’s a pleasing mix of conventional buttons and knobs and touchscreen functions. Most importantly, the level of luxury is genuinely luxurious. This isn’t one of those instances where we talk about the content of premium brand cars from five or ten years ago. No, the Forte5 is equipped like an entry-level luxury car of today. The heated steering wheel remembers its setting from the previous drive. The power driver’s seat offers three stages of heating and cooling (the front passenger seat and outboard rear seats are heated but not cooled) and offers adjustable lumbar support. There’s also a two-setting memory function for the driver’s seat. The kit list is lengthy, from an auto-dimming rearview mirror and auto-folding door mirrors to proximity access, Xenon headlights, dual-zone auto climate control, leather seating, navigation, and a sunroof.

2015 kia forte5 turbo sx white rearBut to be honest, a heavily-equipped Kia is nothing new. With the 2015 Forte5 SX, however, Kia is attempting to play the fun card just as frequently as the value card they’ve long since mastered.

On many counts, the Forte succeeds. The car is more responsive than conventional Fortes thanks to added firmness in the suspension, but Kia struck a decent balance: it doesn’t ride too stiffly for a daily commuter. Brake feel and performance (the ventilated fronts are 11.8 inches, up from 11 in the non-SX Forte5s) is better than I’ve come to expect from Kia. And at 3122 pounds, it’s not so heavy that it fails an agility test, although a Civic Si sedan with 150 fewer pounds feels notably more tossable. A Mazda 3 hatch with the 2.5L powerplant weighs only slightly less than the Kia but both rides more smoothly and responds to directional changes more capably. The Forte5 SX handles nicely, just not memorably.

Straight line performance lacks the always-on punch of the GTI’s 2.0L turbo and its 258 lb-ft of torque. To what degree the 6-speed automatic masks the 1.6L’s urge, I can’t be sure. Car & Driver testing revealed the automatic-equipped car to be significantly quicker from 0-60 than the manual-trans car – 6.4 seconds rather than 7.5 – but it’s certainly no fast-shifting VW DSG. Smoother in everyday driving? Yes. Kia’s 6-speed simply doesn’t make itself known and it is both better and worse as a result. From a powertrain perspective, the final conclusion says that I didn’t need to expect to rev the Forte5 quite this much to access its hot hatch-proving power, and it’s not the sweetest-sounding thing when revved to the limit. It’s powerful, but you won’t go to bed fondly recalling its straight line surge.

2015 kia forte 5 flexsteer buttonIf I was only permitted to point out one Forte5 SX fault, however, it wouldn’t be the real-world handling compromise (which I’m mostly fond of) or the lack of outright Focus ST power (I don’t need to burst past the speed limit in the blink of an eye), but rather the odd steering setup. Kia provides drivers with its FlexSteer system, but after scrolling through three modes I was left seeking a nonexistent fourth mode with progressive weighting and just an ounce or two of feedback. Comfort mode would be fine in a minivan, but it’s much too light for this car. Sport mode is just plain odd, with a stickiness on centre and very little return to centre after turning. Normal is thus the preferred mode, but with such numbness, much of Comfort’s lightness, and some of Sport’s odd behaviour, the steering becomes the car’s key deficiency. This isn’t unique to the SX; I’ve complained similarly after driving other Fortes. But it’s exacerbated in a car that’s intended to offer a high dosage of fun.

And it is fun, albeit dynamically inferior to the Volkswagen Golf GTI. Given the extent to which the two cars are comparable, I’m not sure it matters. Forte5s with the 1.6L turbo start below $22,000, nearly $4500 less than the entry point for the four-door GTI. And if you equip a GTI like this Forte, which you can’t, the price points would be on two different planets. The Forte5 SX isn’t perfect. But as a quick, stylish, and moderately fun family car, it represents tremendous value.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

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69 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2015 Kia Forte5 SX Turbo...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Interesting, I didn’t even know this car existed. I thought all Forte were sub 200 hp econo-boxes.

    Sounds like a nice alternative to a Focus for people who want rear seat room.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    A $27,000 plus TTL Kia Forte!

    Yaaaaay!

    Bring on the $28,000 Scion Tc!

  • avatar
    whynot

    What was the split between highway and city when you had? I looked at and tested the SX when looking for a new car recently, but I just couldn’t get over the horrible mileage (21/29!) as my driving is about 95% city, and I have somewhat of a heavy foot. Although I believe premium fuel is not required for this vehicle like with the GTI. I thought the EX was just meh.

    Ended up getting a Golf. Same price, better interior (infotainment system non withstanding), felt it was more fun to drive/faster despite lower HP and similar torque, and better fuel economy. Didn’t need the extra space of the Forte5, I don’t usually carry passengers in the back, and if I do their crampness is their problem not mine.

  • avatar
    r129

    I’m glad to see that this and the Forte Koup are both available with a manual transmission in the upper trim level. Lately, Kia has only offered a manual on the absolute base model with no options. Such is the case with the Forte sedan, Rio and Soul.

  • avatar
    dwford

    I wish Hyundai offered this engine in the Elantra GT (it would be too much to dream of an Elantra GT 2.0T). As a new car buyer I’d be afraid of the typical Kia depreciation, but as prices for used Veloster Turbos shows, these will make bargain hot rods as used cars.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Great review. The Forte 5 SX is a nice looking car with loads of equipment and for the money nothing realy compares. What other car offers cooling seats in that price point ? There is also the 10y/100k warranty. 6y/60k bumper to.bumper. I have the Hyundai version for now Elanta gt with nothing on it to make it a GT. . I can get 44 mpg hwy at 68 mph. KIA version offers more refinement and equipment.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    OK. Like PrincipalDan I wasn’t really aware of this car.
    And I loved the review.
    And you did a good job of comparing it against the VW. However, how, IYHO, does it compare to the Focus and Mazda3 hatches?
    I would expect t to be faster due to the turbo…but what about the other important specs?
    How was the rear vision? Is the rear window a fake as in many cars today?
    How would it feel inside compared to these two?
    What about fun and around town driving?

    Is it close to a Mazda3 S feel?

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      1: I have personal issues with the way I fit inside the Focus that are difficult for me to overlook despite its pleasing dynamics. The bigger-engined 3 is my answer to most automotive questions, especially now that it’s available with a manual shifter.
      2: Other specs? http://www.kia.com/us/en/vehicle/forte5/2015/features
      3a/3b: Better rear visibility than in the LaCrosse I’m driving this week, not as good as the Jetta I drove last week. Not the dreadful rear window of, say, the Accent hatchback.
      4: Interior material quality and build is excellent.
      5: The review didn’t cover what it was like to drive?
      6: No. (http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2014/05/2014-mazda-3-sport-gs-review-canada.html) It’s a great value, but it’s not a dynamic superstar.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        Sorry, TC. I was referring to how it drove around compared to the 2 I am very familiar with. I love all my Mazdas, especially the way they feel just scooting around town and the mountain curves. this comes as close.
        “A Mazda 3 hatch with the 2.5L powerplant weighs only slightly less than the Kia but both rides more smoothly and responds to directional changes more capably”
        OK…but this is not a true measurement. I mean…how much less capably is it? Would any real Mazda lover feel bothered by the difference? Is this significant? Feel is everything to me.
        Would you say the Mazda3 felt slower?

        And as all of us should, I need to get myself out to see the car. Love reading your reviews but never feel/trust anything until I myself drive them. Cars are truly personal.
        One of those nuts that loves to kill a day test driving cars.
        This is one I look forward t s I am a lover of small hatches and wagons.
        But really thanks for brining this lovely looking option to my attention!!!!!

        • 0 avatar
          TrailerTrash

          On second look…this car does a verrrrry poor job at MPG. I mean, really…such a small car and the average is 25!
          My ’13 Escape ecoboost 2.0 has more power and gets as good or better.
          Walking away….

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      Unless you get the Mazda3 S-GT, every other Mazda3 feels like a stripper compared to the Forte5 SX Turbo. Mazda couldn’t even be bothered to illuminate all the door switches! The ergonomics in the Forte blows away the Mazda’s too.

  • avatar
    omer333

    I completely forgot about these.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    I HATED those wheels on my 2010 Koup! The plastic inserts are outright disgusting, especially when they start to wear. They have to be unscrewed from the inner side of the rim, so I had to take each wheel off and unscrew those things. The improvement without them is remarkable. I am really shocked that Kia brought them back.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      I’ve always thought the Koup was a good-looking car. Other than the wheels, how did you like it?

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        I loved it! I still see it every day; the guy who bought it only lives a mile from my house. I let it go only because, as I’ve mentioned in other threads, we got rid of both car payments last year.

        It was honestly too small to take folks anywhere. We made a road trip with 5 people packed into that car once. Hilarious.

        IMHO the price premium for a Civic Si over a Koup in the used market isn’t worth it. You lose a little power but gain some features Honda doesn’t offer (like heated leather seats), you don’t have to worry about K24 oil consumption issues, and it’ll cost thousands less to purchase.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      This is a totally different wheel design than what was offered in 2010. The pockets are painted on this version, they are not plastic inserts.

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        Thanks! They look the exact same in pictures. I was shocked to think Kia brought them back, because those inserts were met with almost universal disdain. I like the way those look.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      I know what you’re saying about those inserts. But this Forte5 sx does not have those inserts. Go test drive one. You could be surprised.

  • avatar
    Syke

    Is a manual available in that setup?

    The fiancee and I have been really happy with the Spectra and Sedona we currently own, we’re blessed with a local dealer who does service like the neighboring Lexus and Mercedes shops, and the only niggle I’ve currently got with the marque is they’re really trying to shove you into an automatic in anything other than the bottom of the line, available in two shades of gray, stripper.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Yes, you can get the SX 5 door in a manual.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Yes, you can get the turbo with a clutch pedal, for now anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        And worth noting all the option packages with a manual. Many makers take the approach of manual in poverty spec only, or manual in top spec only but only with the smaller motor and forget it if you want creature comforts. Ten years ago you couldn’t get navigation in most Mazdas if you checked off manual on the build sheet. You could get a Mazda 6 with the V6 and a manual either – or a host of other options.

        I know Kia does the same with the Soul – you can get a manual but forget if you want an Acclaim!

        They have stupid cheap almost no money down lease deals in place for this car right now.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Kia has been really good at designing wheels in the past couple of years…

    The chrome wheels on my neighbor’s Optima Turbo are fantastic.

  • avatar
    wmba

    As a reflex action, I always check the IIHS tests to see what happens when the vehicle hits a telephone pole – small offset crash.

    The Golf, Civic, Sentra and Mazda3 all rate a good. The Forte 5 is Marginal as is the Corolla, one below Acceptable, which is where the Focus is.

    Why consider the car at all? There are better alternatives unless pushing buttons on the cheap versions of luxury electronics is your over-riding concern, along with an appreciation of rubber-band steering. Also, like the Acura TLX, I think you’ll find Kia describes the front seats as air-cooled, the current euphemism for ventilated, while implying actual A/C.

    The Corolla is even more worrying. They sell hundreds of thousands each year of this putative tin can, which Toyota could make class-competitive in the small-offset crash test but apparently doesn’t care to spend the money.

    • 0 avatar
      superchan7

      We are in a market where there is no real “bad new car” anymore. Crash protection is worlds away from what it was 20 years ago, and the IIHS Small-overlap test is a very particular scenario of limited value.

      Basically, the test is to see if the car has a backup crumple zone in case the first crumple zone was missed.

      If you’re looking for a no-nonsense appliance to commute with, and don’t really care about how it looks or what funny features it has, then by all means shop based on crash test ratings.

      Now if a car has a lower rating on some arbitrarily defined crash test that represents some obscure subset of real-world crashes, but has some other positive traits that I want in a car, such as the Corolla’s reliability or the Mazda3’s athletic driving feel, I can feel safe in shopping based on the things I really want in my car.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        The small-overlap test is not a “very particular scenario of limited value” representing “some obscure subset of real-world crashes.” It is actually a fairly common occurrence in the real world.

        Most people instinctively try to avoid head on collisions (whether that be with other cars or things like utility poles). Small-overlap accidents are what happen when you are not 100% successful at that. In fact at higher speeds small overlap accidents probably occur more often then full head on impacts.

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    That’s a nice looking car, inside and out. The moto-journos go gaga over the Focus, but there’s no way I could live with that alien pod dashboard for anything longer than a weekend rental.

    Kia has come a long way. It deserves its own cigarette now, baby.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      KIA and Hyundai is a place now where Honda and Toyota was 20+ years ago. Having to try and prove themselves to compete with the competition. Those other brands have toooo many bean counters making decisions equals a cheap product.

  • avatar
    turf3

    Bad visibility to the rear and rear sides.

    Still looks like a doorstop.

    Wheels too tall, tires too short, looks like rice boy. Gonna be lots of fun in the real world (there are these things called potholes, you know).

    Nothing to see here, move on.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Unfortunately for me, Kia dealers within a 200-mile radius do not sell manual transmission vehicles, except for one Soul so they can advertise the low price.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Obviously a Google search would yield the same info, but a picture of the interior would be nice. I really adore the Optima’s interior, particularly in top trim with all the bells and whistles. Really beautiful car. Hope they bring that wagon over. This is cool too but Hyundai/Kia have a long way to go dynamically. Truthfully this thing deserves the 2.0T too.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Apologies, I remembered to link to another image (http://preview.netcarshow.com/Kia-Forte_5-door-2014-1024-09.jpg) for the interior when I published the review on GoodCarBadCar but it slipped my mind here. I’ll add it. I did shoot the interior, but there were some distasteful reflections I didn’t see until the last minute and I thus garbaged them.

  • avatar
    juicy sushi

    This is an odd car. Although a “c” class car, it packs the hot-hatch motor more commonly found in “b” class entries, like the Fiesta ST. Why hobble it against its erstwhile rivals (the Golf GTI and Focus ST) like that when they have a 2.0 litre turbo readily available?

    This seems like an odd decision to me.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    It’s really not a hot-hatch as such; the 1.6T is a replacement for the n/a 2.4L that used to be the upgrade engine.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    This would seem to compete w/ golf/jetta w/ the new 1.8T, worth a look in 6MT form. At 22-3k transaction price range, it’s a steal.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Wow, was looking up the specs – so it’s an affordable four seater hatch that you row your own in any trim level – no option is of the sheet if you go manual versus automatic.

    Now if it was only diesel and brown…

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    This car is slower to 60 on paper than I expected considering the power claims. Is it geared too short to get to 60 in 2nd gear? C&Ds top gear acceleration from 30-50 and 50-70 is faster than even a GTI, which really makes me suspect the gearing is too short.

    Any experience with the manual? Are the revs way too high for peaceful daily driving? You make it sound like an engine where you want to keep the revs down.

    How’s the road noise and overall refinement, especially compared to the Mazda3 and Golf? You say the Mazda drives better, but you typically pay for that with NVH.

    Too bad about the steering. I won’t pretend I need to have conversations with the road through the steering wheel or whatever other cliches you can think of, but steering that feels like a bad video game wheel is not something I could put up with.

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    I just took a look at Kia’s website, and at least in the US, options bundling is pretty frustrating. HIDs are grouped with the nav in a tech package that also requires the premium package. HIDs basically cost $4200.

    If you like the toys it is still a great value, but unfortunate that you can’t pick and choose a little bit. I guess this is nothing unique to Kia, and making the options list and all or nothing proposition is probably how they can profitably give you so much for so little anyway.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      If the stock version has projectors an HID kit will yield 95% of the output quality.

    • 0 avatar
      darex

      H/K does electronics very well, and their Nav system is quite good — easy to use and very communicative.

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      I agree with your complaint about the Forte’s option packaging. I guess that’s the drawback to getting these from Korea. OTOH, a lot of the stuff I could easily live without. So long as I can get the turbo motor with the six speed manual, everything else is gravy.

  • avatar
    Pete Kohalmi

    I first heard of these a year ago. I was in the market for a new hot hatch so I went to a Kia dealership. After the usual question and answer session “Why do you HAVE to have a manual?” it turned out they hadn’t come out yet. I ended up getting a used Cooper S which I somewhat regret. This Kia has everything I lack with the Mini (rear seat space, decent ride, rear doors) but it may not have some of the Mini’s best assets (fun to drive, great steering). If my patience with the Mini runs out, I may be back to the Kia dealer.

  • avatar
    joeveto3

    That was a nicely written review.

    And you summed up Kia’s and Hyundai’s steering perfectly. Their steering, more than anything else, keeps me away from the the Koreans.

    The three mode steering is admirable in concept. I so wish it worked.

    My wife has a Sante Fe Sport with the 3 mode steering, and it’s 3 modes of awful, joined by vagueness and drift that, for me at least, renders the car impossible to drive. Hate is not a strong enough word. Which is sad because the Sante Fe Sport excels at most everything else.

    I rented a new Sonata for a couple hundred mile road trip through the south. I had read about Hyundai’s efforts at better steering. I was so hopeful, because I want to put Hyundai and Kia back on my list. Sadly, the Sonata wasn’t much better. The steering was lifeless.

    When Hyundai figures this piece out, and I believe they will, they will be one of the strongest entries out there.

    Hey Hyundai, copy old BMW and call it a day.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      While the Forte5 steering sounds particularly bad, H-K isn’t alone in their struggles with decent steering. Even BMW hasn’t been able to copy old BMW!

      It sounds like some BMWs are getting better, and Mazda did well with the 3. Other than that, I’m not sure who sets the bar for steering these days.

      • 0 avatar
        darex

        The steering in the F56 MINI Cooper is pretty darn good, if you ask me. I’d say BMW has now found the right balance in electric steering feel/sensitivity/effort.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      It’s really too bad that Kia adopted Hyundai’s Flex-steer system, but there are still Kia models without it.

      Also, different markets have done a much better job (Australia) when it comes to steering calibration for Kia/Hyundai.

      Supposedly, Hyundai has improved the Flex-steer system in the refreshed Santa Fe Sport where it is decent and unintrusive, so that bodes better for future models.

  • avatar
    darex

    I came extremely close to getting a Forte5 SX Turbo and would have done so, had it not been for the fact that it was 6 months late to arrive, plus 3 more months until they finally shipped it with both packages AND manual transmission. I had already chosen it over the Mazda3, after 3 test drives of the latter. The content and ergonomics were simply much better on the Forte5, but after getting sick of waiting for KIA to deliver the car as promised (fully-loaded with manual), I test-drove the F56 MINI Cooper, and that’s the car I bought. I love my MINI, but I would have liked some of the features I lack that the Forte5 has (e.g. Memory Seats, and heated steering wheel, to name a few). On the other hand, the MINI has some features the KIA lacks. The Golf Mark VII wasn’t out yet. As stated in the article, pitted against the Golf, on price and features, the Golf clearly loses. At least for me, the Golf loses against the MINI, because MINI let me build my car exactly the way I wanted it; whereas, VW forces me to get the GTI AUTOBAHN in order to get some of the things I want, and even then, compromises still are required, like that crappy. 5″ laggy infootainment system they are foisting upon us.

    The Forte5 SX Turbo is essentially the KIA Pro_Cee’d in a different skin, with the Pro_Cee’d GT’s engine.

  • avatar
    darex

    Link to the interior:

    http://i.ytimg.com/vi/2ZTEvoWaB40/maxresdefault.jpg

  • avatar
    mechaman

    Had a chance to drive a regular Forte sedan last year. Was VERY impressed by it .. did not expect it to sound and feel so solid, and agree on the includeds … I WAS supposed to have gotten a Focus, and even though I’ve driven one since, the Kia is still on my list of possibles – it even pulls off that gap-mouth grille better than the Corolla, and I just came around to grudgingly liking that. Not the model with the Pep Boys chrome around the mouth, though.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    interdasting car

    never known this turbo motor was available in it

    where I am this motor is only in the Veloster and the 3 door Pro_Ceed (dumb name, under_score) – both cars slightly on the impractical side i guess

    the 1.6 turbo’s party trick is that its one of the few turbos to run on plain 91 RON or your 87 MON regular, how that does it, i guess but being low comp. and low powered for a turbo

    but still, sounds like a great combo for the Forte chassis… be nice city car with the 6 spd. man.

    I dont expect world class handling from Kia or Hundai or a legion of 2nd tier japanese cars. This Kia though is good enough and with a 7yr warranty, worry free.

    Also Kia is unpopular enough that you dont see them that often unlike the huge tide of Cruze, Civics and such. So if you like individuality…

    Hate those snowflake wheels though.

  • avatar
    darex

    Agree! I hate 18″ wheels with flush, low-profile tires (VW does this too). They’re completely impractical in the city where parallel parking is required, and also harsh-riding. It’s the one truly bad thing I can say against this car.

  • avatar

    I wouldn’t eat Kimchee on a bet. Same goes for Kia, Hundai and Samdung

  • avatar
    DownUnder2014

    I wish we got this trim where I am. The Cerato Hatch (Forte5) has manual in only the base trim and there’s no sporty hatchback version, but at least it’s possible to get a Cerato Koup Turbo (which has 150kW (201hp)) in manual with Touring Pack where I am which costs A$30690 (US$23500). The Automatic costs A$32890 (US$25185).

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      You guys get it much better in that you get the superior Pro_cee’d GT.

      If passers-by were complimenting the Forte5 (which is OK), they would have done so even more for the Pro_cee’d GT.

      And not only does the Pro_cee’d GT look better than the Forte5, it has a better looking/higher grade interior (with the upcoming refresh, the interior should get even nicer than the Forte) and better handlimg/steering feel (in particular, the Aussie tuned version).

      The Pro_cee’d GT is more the competitor to the GTI (albeit still a “warm”, rather than a hot hatch) than the Forte5 SX.

      Australian review of the Pro_cee’d GT.

      http://www.caradvice.com.au/278468/kia-pro_ceed-gt-review-2/

      Should be even better with the refresh which gets the 7 spd DCT.

  • avatar
    rpn453

    I must be deceiving myself because, while I think the car looks pretty good, the wheels look structurally retarded and overly feminine for my tastes. Feminine, in that they look flowery, and structurally retarded, in that they have unnecessary kinks, bends, and sharp transitions. Too much flair. I’d never survive at Tchotchke’s.

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