By on November 25, 2016

Porsche cayenne diesel

There are currently over one thousand 2014 through 2016 model year Cayenne TDIs in the United States that Porsche cannot sell, all thanks to VW Group’s ongoing emissions fiasco. You might be wondering what Porsche plans to do with its stop-sale utility vehicles. Recycle them? Ship them all to Germany? Burn them on the world’s largest-ever funeral pyre?

If things go according to plan, there will be good news for anyone in the market for a used Porsche Cayenne with a diesel motor and extremely low miles.

Once Porsche has an approved emissions fix for the 3.0-liter diesel-powered crossover, it plans to sell the almost 1,500 vehicles as used cars. Beyond the subversive software used to cheat emissions testing, there is nothing technically wrong with the Cayennes. However, they’ve remained struck on dealership lots for over a year because of a stop-sale order. While Volkswagen Group has reportedly reached an agreement with U.S. regulators on how to fix its 3.0-liter diesels, Porsche still has to await final approval from the courts on how to proceed.

Automotive News caught Porsche Cars North America CEO Klaus Zellmer discussing the matter at the Los Angeles Auto Show. Zellmer said that the company will repair the 10,000 affected diesel Cayennes with owners and then fix the nearly 1,500 sitting on dealer lots.

“Then they’re going to be sold as used cars,” Zellmer explained during an interview. “They will be low-mileage, very attractive used cars, based on the age of the car. There’s always a market for any car. You just have to get the price right.”

If you want to lay your hands on a Porsche diesel, this may be your last opportunity to do so. While Volkswagen is abandoning the TDI powerplant in North America entirely, Audi of America’s Scott Keogh suggested that the Q7 TDI could come back eventually. While that means the Cayenne Diesel might return too, the prospects have settled in some extremely murky waters. However, it can be said with some degree of certainty that this is the last diesel Porsche we’re likely to see in the U.S. for a while.

As for the remaining diesel crossovers allocated to the U.S.?

“They stayed in Germany,” Zellmer said. “We don’t have to take care of those. So we’re actually in pretty good shape. Once we have the tactical fix, we’re rather confident.”

[Image: Porsche]

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29 Comments on “Porsche Has a Plan for its Idled Diesel Inventory...”


  • avatar
    heavy handle

    re: “As for the remaining diesel crossovers allocated to the U.S.? They stayed in Germany,” Zellmer said. “We don’t have to take care of those.”

    Doesn’t matter. Volvo Trucks (not affiliated with Volvo Cars, btw) got hit with a fine for selling a small number of non-compliant trucks with EPA labeling, outside of the US.

    Porsche will need to fix these, or re-VIN them, if they want to sell them anywhere in the world.

    The logic behind that decision is that the trucks could make their way back into the US, and that Volvo was essentially counterfeiting the US certification, which made their US arm liable even if the mis-representation was done outside of the US.

  • avatar
    mason

    So why not do the same for the VW with the same engines? There has to be a boat load of them (get it?)somewhere at port.

    • 0 avatar
      1998redwagon

      that was my initial thought about the vw tdis too, why not buy back the used ones and take all the new unsold ones and sell them elsewhere in the world where there are fewer regulations about exhaust emissions.

      clearly cars constructed for the us market have some of the most stringent exhaust emissions in the world. a us destined vehicle – even if it did not technically meet us standards – could meet standards elsewhere and therefore should be a legal sale.

      however, if you read the agreement between vw and the us justice dept (or epa i cannot recall) it specifies that each returned vehicle must be cut in half and scrapped. there will be no resale of these vehicles. in fact i doubt there will be much in the way of used parts available. pity as i am sure it would be nice to have additional sheet metal and wheels and interior pieces available at the local yard.

      • 0 avatar
        1998redwagon

        i should add that i like the porsche idea. once fixed and documented these should be able to be sold in the us market. i like the idea of fixing the customers vehicles first but i wonder what the monetary hit will be for owners of diesel cayennes – esp once the market is flooded with low mileage versions of the same car they have been driving for a few years.

        with luck porsche finds a way to keep them happy and sell some vehicles at the same time.

      • 0 avatar
        mason

        What is mind boggling is why they chose to fix these and not the other SCR equipped vehicles, regardless of wether or not they continue to manufacture them. I get that the Porsches are considerably more per unit than a VW or even an Audi, but one would think fixing and selling whatever new inventory has been held up at port would be less costly than scrapping new vehicles. Especially when you consider the volume of VW’s and Audi’s compared to the very small number of Porsches. If a fix is possible for the 3.0 then certainly a fix is possible for the 2.0.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          I’m sure there’s more to it than that, but since we aren’t VW engineers and don’t know the technical constraints of these powertrains, it’s hard to say. My guess is that there *is* an economical fix for the SCR-equipped 2.0-liter TDI vehicles (which would include my ’15 Golf SportWagen)…but it’s probably to the significant detriment of one of the desirable features of the car (range, fuel-economy, durability, etc), and so VW is working on optimizing the fix before it publicly announces it.

          Which is why they violated emissions regulations in the first place.

          • 0 avatar
            mason

            “Well, the only Volkswagen with the same engine as the Audis and Porsches is the 3.0-liter turbodiesel V6 in the Touareg SUV. The other Volkswagens are from the 2.0-liter turbodiesel I4 families.”

            I understand the 3.0 is exclusive to Porsche/Audi. I do not buy for one minute they can make the 3.0 perform satisfactorily but not the 2.0. Being compliant in 2016 with SCR is not unrealistic in any stretch of the imagination. Its old news. SCR has been successfully implemented for going on 7 years now with a steady increase in reliability and performance. I know I’ll be rediculed for saying this on such a liberal website but I suspect dirty politics pushing passenger diesel vehicles out the door more than anything. They just can’t stand to see it succeed.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            It’s not exclusive to Porsche / Audi. As I just said, the Touareg TDI had this same engine. It also made its way into the Phaeton, although by then VW had stopped selling it here.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Well, the only Volkswagen with the same engine as the Audis and Porsches is the 3.0-liter turbodiesel V6 in the Touareg SUV. The other Volkswagens are from the 2.0-liter turbodiesel I4 families.

        And no, Volkswagen cannot export them. They may indeed have a specific agreement on how to destroy the vehicles with the EPA in this scenario…but even if they didn’t, they wouldn’t be able to export the cars. Current regulations are such that companies cannot export cars that aren’t emissions-compliant, probably just to maximize the penalty on an automaker for selling those cars here in the first place. If Volkswagen could just purchase all of the defective wares back and then sell them for most or even half of the original prices overseas, it would be more alluring to skirt emissions regulations. They would have had no choice but to destroy them, or at least dismantle them and destroy all powertrain and emissions components.

        • 0 avatar
          notwhoithink

          “They may indeed have a specific agreement on how to destroy the vehicles with the EPA in this scenario…”

          They do. If they cannot be fixed then they’ll have to remove the engine, ECU, and emissions control system and destroy all three (official wording is basically “drill a giant hole in them”). The rest of the car can be recycled or parted out.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        So stupid. Almost certainly more pollution was made building, then scrapping these cars than the excess they will emit during their lifespan on the road.

        • 0 avatar
          notwhoithink

          Maybe, maybe not. But if VW had followed regulations in the first place then it wouldn’t have been an issue, would it? You can’t just make laws, then when you catch someone breaking them decide to give them a pass just because you don’t like the punishment.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            KRhodes is probably right. This was about you didn’t jump through our 10,000 hoops no matter how ridiculous they are, and you must be made an example of, not the rule of law. Dozens of laws have been broken by politicians we know of and not a finger lifted.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            28,

            Are you arguing that VW should be excused because “making cars is hard”?

            Sure, there are a lot of regulations, but each one is there for a reason, and there’s not so many that a company with 100,000+ employees can’t keep up.
            plus, it’s been established that what VW did was deliberate deception, not incompetence.

      • 0 avatar
        notwhoithink

        ” that was my initial thought about the vw tdis too, why not buy back the used ones and take all the new unsold ones and sell them elsewhere in the world where there are fewer regulations about exhaust emissions.”

        By the terms of the court settlement VW/Audi/Porsche are not permitted to export the cars from the US unless a) the EPA approves a fix for them and b) the fix is applied to the cars before export. Otherwise they stay here and get scrapped.

        Porsche’s situation with cars that have not yet been shipped to the US is clearly different, as they are currently (and never have been) within the jurisdiction of the EPA or CARB. They can just get them re-certified for the EU or wherever they intend to ship them and they’re good.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          @28-Cars-Later, listen to yourself. You’re actually asking for an *exception* to the rule of law.

        • 0 avatar
          Ol Shel

          So, in other words, so long as the pollution ends up somewhere else, it’s cool. Well, the flaw in that logic is that we all share the same atmosphere.

          I guess a proper punishment for an industrial polluter would be to force them to carry their PCBs 25 miles up river before dumping them in, eh?

          It’s the folks who have either forgotten or never experienced pre-emissions controls air quality who are always warning of vast conspiracies to destroy the joy of motoring and eliminate freedom. Regulations exist because they address problems. Not all are perfect, and you’ll never love all of them, but it’s time to drop the simplistic, ignorant view that regulations exist for the sole reason of restrictin’ yer liberty.

          Quit making excuses for the Capitalists who cheat and rig the game.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        These are not “returned vehicles” though.

      • 0 avatar
        415s30

        A lot of those places the steering wheel is on the wrong side. I was just in India, everything is diesel and CNG, there are VWs but mostly Maruti Suzukis.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    Tempting. I wonder how many are left in Canada?

  • avatar
    zip94513

    Price it right and I’ll buy one.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Maybe they can fix these few cars, but no word on what the results will be. Surely they’ll be down on fuel economy, driveability, reliability, or something people care about.

    So your discounted 2016 Porsche diesel will always have an asterisk next to it, sort of like the ‘roided Soviet-bloc Olympic athletes of the 70s.

    No thanks.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Who the holy f**k wants a Porsche diesel anyway?

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