By on October 13, 2016

2017 Honda Accord Coupe

When planning the ninth-generation Accord, Honda knew it pushed the boundaries of size and good taste a little too far. The eighth-generation Accord became a caricature of its former self, scampering as it did into full-size territory by swelling to 195 inches in length.

This particular Ace of Base candidate reminds me of Mitsubishi. Why, you might ask? Well …

Honda affords Accord Coupe buyers a single $0 hue not found on the grayscale; Still Night sounds like it should be a shade of black, but it’s a very nice shade of deep blue. This misdirection no doubt causes headaches for harried sales managers who are furtively filling out inventory order forms while swilling a cup of rancid coffee from the half-broken machine in the service department. It’s at this juncture that Mitsubishi comes into play.

Long-time TTAC readers may recall my sojourn into auto sales, holding court about a dozen or so years ago at the smaller of two Ford stores in my former town. What I haven’t mentioned (I’m not even sure our managing ed. knows about this) is, for a short time prior to my tenure at Ford, I was one of two salesmen at a brand new Mitsubishi store, circa 2003.

Yes, dear reader, I joyfully convinced many people to sign five- and six-year notes on Diamond-Star wheels. 

One customer brokered a deal for a special-order Eclipse GT, replete with its 3.0-liter V6 engine and all the toys. It would take weeks for it to arrive at our far-flung dealership, which was physically closer to Ireland than to the Mitsubishi plant in Normal, Illinois. Unbeknownst to all, the hapless sales manager, when placing the order, selected Steel Blue Pearl instead of Torch Steel Blue Pearl. Go ahead, click on the link to see the vast gulf between the two colors. I’ll wait. 

I know, right? It beggars belief that the marketing mavens at Mitsubishi would stick two extremely similar names on two wholly different colors.

When the Eclipse finally arrived on the back of a car carrier, the sales manager’s jaw dropped like a barometer on a stormy Sunday. The customer was understandably outraged, yet inexplicably re-ordered his Eclipse in the proper shade, standing over the sales manager’s shoulder while he punched in the data (and trust me, he was punching stuff by this time). This left us with an Eclipse featuring a sky-high MSRP draped in a weird color, completely unsaleable, essentially welded to the showroom floor for the rest of its mechanical life. This, naturally, was the salesman’s problem.

But I digress. Honda has managed to stuff its base model Accord Coupe with content. A steering wheel that adjusts for reach and rake, snazzy 17-inch alloys, and marriage-saving dual climate control are all along for the ride. Six airbags keep all hands safe in the event of a vehicular calamity.

Base-model shoppers again find themselves benefitting from economies of scale, as it’s no doubt cheaper for the good folks at Honda to equip every Accord Coupe with power options and cruise control and not design and manufacture distinct door cards and steering wheels for different models. The sound system is good, packed as it is with six speakers and Bluetooth. Mercifully, Honda’s current predilection with maddeningly invisible-to-the-touch sliders for volume control does not appear here.

At a price of $24,025, shoppers can expect to find a tasty six-speed manual transmission and the well liked but unfortunately named Earth Dreams inline-four making a respectable 185 horsepower. Skip the optional CVT — it’s an $850 ticket to Mediocrity, with overnight stops in Boringtown and NoFunsVille. 

Everyone knows the coupe is available with a silky V6, but the larger gas-burner adds a lot of heft, most of it placed squarely over the front wheels. A full 63 percent of the V6 model’s 3,500 pounds bears down on the two front rollers, while the four-cylinder six-speed manual weighs in at under 3,200 pounds with a better 60/40 weight distribution. The Earth Dreams four-pot swills regular fuel at an EPA measured rate of 32 miles per gallon on the highway.

Ninety-five cubic feet of passenger volume ensures there’s plenty of room up front for two Large Persons and enough space in the back for three people to sit and complain. Drivers who are long of beam will appreciate the lack of sunroof in the LX-S, freeing up two inches of headroom and adding two cubic feet of passenger volume compared to its glass-topped EX and Touring brethren. Confounding, the LX-S has a bigger trunk (by nearly a third of a cubic foot) than its better-equipped brothers. Use the extra space to store all the dollar bills you saved by buying the base model.

Color names be damned, a manual shift, four-cylinder Accord Coupe meets my criteria for Ace of Base. It should meet yours, too.

Not every vehicle at the Mr. Noodles end of the price spectrum has aced it. The ones which have? They help make our automotive landscape a lot better. Naturally, feel free to roast our selection and let us know if there are other models you’d like included in this series.

The model above is shown with American options and is priced in Freedom Dollars.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

64 Comments on “Ace of Base: 2017 Honda Accord Coupe LX-S...”


  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    “Color names be damned, a manual shift, four-cylinder Accord Coupe meets my criteria for Ace of Base. It should meet yours, too”

    It would, were there not an Accord Sedan does so just as well, while not requiring rear passengers to do the twist.

    The sole reason for the coupe seems to be for people who want a V6 and a manual, and I’m not sure that if Honda offered a V6 and a stick in the sedan that the coupe wouldn’t be completely irrelevant.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      Not everyone has a need to carry more than one passenger. And, since they’re passengers and they don’t own the car, who cares if they have to do the twist to get into a car? So they don’t like getting into the car? They can always walk.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “who cares if they have to do the twist to get into a car? So they don’t like getting into the car? They can always walk.”

        Two frequent sets of passengers for me are my parents (~60 YO) and grandparents (over 80 YO).

        I’m not going to make them climb in the back of a coupe and tell them to walk home if they don’t like it.

        • 0 avatar
          Zarf

          While I agree with your sentiment my 72 year old mother climbs in the back of my 911….She actually suggests taking that car instead of something larger. Yes, she is crazy.

        • 0 avatar
          duffman13

          It’s almost as if they’re offering different body styles for buyers who have different wants and needs. Who would have thought?

          Nobody is forcing someone to buy the coupe if they don’t want it.

          • 0 avatar
            psarhjinian

            It’s not so much forcing people _not_ to buy coupes, it’s that you can’t get the big engine and the stick with four doors.

            This seems a little odd as, just about everywhere else, the two-door is the minority choice.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            “you can’t get the big engine and the stick with four doors.”

            It isn’t particularly nice to rear seat passengers, to operate in the part of the V6’s dynamic repertoire that the 4 is shut out of…. As opposed to many others, Honda can afford to not hustle for every single short term buck. Instead opting to subtly keep reinforcing the added sport-, and specialness of the model targeted to those for whom those traits matter the most. Porsche is leaving sales of certain desirable Cayman models on the table, by not offering an (nowadays faster) auto, for similar reasons.

        • 0 avatar
          Steve Biro

          I’m glad the Accord sedan is there for people who need four doors. Me? I think Accord sedans look like 1980’s Buicks and, even at age 59, require a bit more style in my ride. So I’m even more pleased the Accord Coupe is there – for now anyway – for me and others like me.

          • 0 avatar
            Higheriq

            Amen – I’m 55, no wife, no kids at home, no parents, and no dog, so anything with four doors (trucks included) = automatic disqualification from shopping contention. It saddens me whenever a two-door anything gets axed from a manufacturer’s lineup. But I do see the need for other people to have four doors.

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        There’s a chance you may grow up and learn the value of compassion, but … Nah, I’m not liking your chances. Want me to hold your beer while we watch you do something “no one else thought of”?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      “The sole reason for the coupe seems to be for people who want a V6 and a manual,”

      That’s not the sole reason I like the Accord coupe, and I would not buy a V-6, nor a sedan. If I were to go that route, I’d spring for a Ford Fusion Sport.

  • avatar
    CaptainObvious

    Cool story – but what I want to know is what happened to the wrong color Eclipse.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    A two door manual transmission mid size car is kind of a double anachronism, and the available inventory reflects this. Of the 670 new Accords that Cars.com shows in the local area, nine have a manual transmission. Of those nine, four have two doors and two are in the LX-S trim, both are a lovely shade of white. You want a blue one? There are six within a 500 mile radius.

  • avatar
    dougjp

    Can’t read this, trying too hard in the add-words for the sake of it dep’t. Sorry, but had to be said.

  • avatar
    Daniel J

    It looks terrible without fog lights.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I can’t get all that excited about a 4 cyl midsize coupe. That’s like doing an “Ace of Base” on an inline 6 powered late 60s Impala coupe.

    • 0 avatar
      Frank Galvin

      Right? Honda manual non-withstanding, can you see yourself or anybody else getting excited over a FWD 4 cyl midsize to the point of signing a 60 month note?

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        While I would prefer the sedan, the Accord is one of those cars where there’s quite literally nothing you would _need_ to step up to the upper-level trims to get.

        Granted, this is a more frequent occurrence than it used to be: in the case of most OEMs, it’s rare that you need to, eg, get a moonroof or leather in order to get, eg, stability control.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        If my primary reason for taking the car, instead of the bike, was something other than picking people up at the airport and take them to lunch, I’d be all over this. The 2.4/Manual drivetrain is pretty much perfection for driving (as opposed to gratuitous hooning) in any speed limit enforced area of the country. The long coupe doors is preferable for getting in and out of anywhere but in tight spots (and tight spots means bike…), as well as open far enough that the briefcase/man purse slips behind the driver seat without having to open another bloody door. Cloth is fine unless you wear fragile cashmere or fur..

        It’s just a great coupe, and a good example of why coupes (used to) exist and be popular. Most people still drive around solo or duo, but buy a sedan, now CUV, or SUV, or truck, or class 8 rig with a crane to hoist the Smart Car into its cross frame slot, for “all those” times when they “need” the added “hauling” capability.

        • 0 avatar
          Frank Galvin

          I’d be all over a used 4cyl if I still had my 120 mile daily commute. A coupe is a self centered purchase, and if I’m laying out 24k plus interest, taxes, and fees, I want to maximize the pleasure derived. As noted by Jerry Seinfeld, the 2.4 is the type of car that won’t let you down, but it won’t lift you up either.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            When did he say that? Before or after Acura was the sponsor of his Comedians In Cars show?

          • 0 avatar
            Frank Galvin

            Corey – Jerry didn’t state that about Honda, he was looking at Judd Apatow’s dirty Lexus GS hybrid when he made the remark. I meant to say that in line with Seinfeld’s reasoning, then the 4 pot is that “type” of car.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ah. That was an LS600HL, by the way.

      • 0 avatar
        TomHend

        You were a bag man for the boys downtown and you still are, I know about you.

  • avatar
    Adam Tonge

    This does not rustle my jimmies

  • avatar
    brettc

    Wake me up when there’s an ace of base Accord wagon option.

    • 0 avatar
      Der_Kommissar

      The current Ace of Base wagon is likely the Golf Sportwagen S with the manual transmission. They can’t completely decontent it, even if a 5 speed manual and 15 inch wheels feels like they are trying.

      • 0 avatar
        brettc

        Yep, unfortunately that’s pretty much the only base wagon option in the U.S. I’m fine with 15″ rims but would prefer a 6 speed manual. And I don’t prefer owning another VW after I dump mine. Oh well. Every time I see an old Accord wagon (or even a modern TSX wagon) I sigh at what could have been.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I would gladly put up with the extra 3% up front for the V6. I haven’t driven a new 4 pot in a couple years, but I can’t imagine they have improved that much in the last couple years in NVH compared to an inline 6, V6, V8…

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Yeah the complaining about the weight distribution made me think of all the front engine rear drive sedans of my youth that were probably 70/30 in the weight distribution department.

      • 0 avatar
        285exp

        I think you’re misremembering the weight distribution of those front-engine rear-drive cars, they were more like 55-45. Instead of the transmission, drive shaft, and diff being shoehorned into the engine compartment, they were located behind it.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          According to Motor Trend’s Car of the Year issue. The 1991 Chevrolet Caprice LTZ was 70/30 weight distribution.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            And once it lost the fender skirts, that probably changed to 75/25!

          • 0 avatar
            285exp

            That’s what you get for referencing Motor Trend. According to page 25 of this, it was 56-44 for the Caprice Classic.

            https://www.gmheritagecenter.com/docs/gm-heritage-archive/vehicle-information-kits/Caprice/1991-Chevrolet-Caprice.pdf

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The 4 is good when mated to the manual. It gets suitably mechanical and gruff at lower speeds than the V6. Kind of like I’d imagine an S2000 engine would feel after downing an entire pharmacy worth of sedatives and chasing them with a franchise’s entire daily output of Big Macs.

      To make it doubly attractive nowadays, at least it’s NA. Meaning it has some sort of mechanical personality. And a personality (and torque and, at least as important, back torque) that varies across the rev band. Perfect for a manual, particularly one as slick as Honda’s. And an infinite step up from the anodyne turbo 4s that otherwise clutter up the segment.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick 2012

      If I got two identical 4-cyl Accords and weighed the front of one down to match the V6’s weight, I would bet real money that no one would be able to tell the difference.

      I know I couldn’t do it.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I’m a bit over 4 bangers too. It’s nice to not have to thrash an engine to get respectable thrust. I could short shift my 350Z at 3-4K and still outpace most traffic. With these mainstreamers it’s not like the V6 comes with a huge fuel mileage penalty either.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Medium crampy car. But at least it’s a Honda.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Where do we have to go to see a base to base level shootout between the midsize sedans? I’m tired of seeing base prices in the headline and then a comparison of top level trims.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      To large, well stocked dealers in exurbia……

      Honda may realistically make 50 times as much from a top line car, as from a base. I know BMW used to, and the truck makers still do. Profit wise, the base models are largely there to add enough volume to smooth out demand fluctuations, and to bring unit cost down.

      The dealers, OTOH, can make good money off of tossing the increasingly typical base buyer to the loan sharks. Kind of a “downsell”; taking some of the available monthly payment from the car, and adding it back to more profitable financing costs.

      • 0 avatar
        thattruthguy

        The base model doesn’t cost much less to make, but it’s good for advertising and captures a few price-sensitive buyers without giving everyone a big discount.

      • 0 avatar
        bikegoesbaa

        A clever cash buyer can turn this to their advantage.

        Play the turkey and negotiate a low purchase price along with usurious interest rate and extended loan term; let the seller think they’ll make up for the low price on financing. Just make sure there isn’t a pre-payment penalty on the loan.

        Then pay the whole thing off with the second payment.

        It works great. Almost makes me wish I had a terrible credit rating to make it more effective.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          But then you have a Honda Accord worth of cash tied up in a depreciating asset in a climate of cheap cash and decent returns. Dealers can be pretty scummy but missing out on what could potentially be thousands of dollars for the false sensation of “getting one over” on dealers/lenders seems a bit short sighted

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’ve noticed some not-so-old Accords around here with paint issues, on silver and white cars – clearcoat gone and/or big patches of paint missing. Has Honda fixed this issue?

    • 0 avatar
      Nick 2012

      I had a ’13 Medium Silver Metallic Accord. The paint looked terrible after 40k, particularly in the front.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The problem areas are weird when I see them: rear edge of roof, c-pillar, on the trunk. All really non-wear areas from a road debris and contact sense.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        “I had a ’13 Medium Silver Metallic Accord. The paint looked terrible after 40k”

        I’d say the terrible started way sooner, like when it first came off the paint line.

        -Survivor of the Ubiquitous Silver Era

        (hates silver worse than stink, even worse than rap)

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Here in Florida I’ve noticed many relatively newer Hondas, Nissans, and Mitsubishis with badly fading paint and clear coat failures. Even Acuras and Infinitis don’t seem immune.

      Granted, I’m guessing many of these cars are outside 100% of the time and never waxed. But still, I don’t see it as much on other brands.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I got a free paint job on my Civic through a recall. It’s been about a year and the paint is already starting to fade again

  • avatar
    SunnyvaleCA

    Even if there were no back-seat passengers, I prefer having the smaller doors found on the 4-door version. Those huge doors can be tricky in tight perpendicular parking situations.

    That said, when choosing 2 out of these 3 {stick shift, V6, sedan}, I’ll settle for taking the first 2 options over the doors. Without the first 2 options, I don’t think the Accord stands out.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    Wow, you picked the first car (likely only) that I would pick if buying a new car now. I love the color, I drove a 2016 LX coupe CVT and I love the way the car drives, except of course I’d get the 6MT. The I-4 is so smooth, it makes a Nissan 2.5L sound like a Duramax by comparison.

  • avatar

    The back seat in the coupe is surprisingly usuable. My kids don’t have a problem with it and I’ve even sat back there a couple times (6′ 230). It’s not bad.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      As you mention, the rear seat in the coupe isn’t bad. My issue with it is that it’s a relative pain to have passengers climbing in and out of the back on any sort of regular basis. That, and opening relatively long door in tight parking lots is a PITA. Seems like you always come out of a store to find some chucklehead in a Canyonero parked 3 inches from your car on the driver’s side.

  • avatar
    357

    I’ll plug the Mini Cooper for the next installment of Ace of Base. The turbo 3/stick shift combo is unequivocally the powerplant to have. The base seats are arguably better in a car of such a narrow width than the sport units (albeit the lack of a cloth option on the base seats is lamentable). The sunroof option is equally inappropriate in a car of this width (the left and right edges of the glass are centered over the respective seats meaning one eyeball sees sky and the other headliner when you look upwards). The suspension is already stiff enough and the wheelbase short enough that punishing yourself with low-profile tires makes zero sense, and its just delightfully retro to have a car running around on 175s in today’s world.

  • avatar
    chiefmonkey

    This is cheaper than the Accord Coupe, and has the same stylish wheels:

    https://img123.s3.amazonaws.com/2015/06/03/fd/d3d9c0969fe0a160_e9d5690b1b567b.jpg

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • sgeffe: I click the date string on the comment to bookmark it again in the browser on a refresh. That “go to”...
  • -Nate: Sprites were sort of go karts with more power, not really fast but oh so fun to drive quickly until they broke...
  • syncro87: @PrincipalDan: You can probably wrap that plastic trim you find annoying cheaply. You probably have a shop...
  • thornmark: people? or fleets?
  • krhodes1: Mandatory AWD ensures I have zero interest in it. I have zero use for more than two driven wheels on a...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States