By on September 27, 2016

2015 Honda Odyssey speedometer

“How do I name drop, how do I name drop, how do I name drop?”

I couldn’t find the words.

Last Tuesday, I was driving GCBC’s long-term 2015 Honda Odyssey across Halifax, Nova Scotia, (where my best friend Ken is a police officer) to a very expensive dental appointment.

As soon as I noticed flashing lights in my rearview mirror, the first image that flashed into my mind was of Ken’s hairless dome and bearded face.

“Maybe they know each other,” I thought. Maybe this cop and good ol’ Ken had their seatbacks kicked by the same juvenile delinquent. Maybe they share boxes of Tim Hortons donuts while parked side by side in a mall parking lot waiting for crime to happen on cold winter nights.

Maybe, on the merits of Ken’s good name, I’ll be allowed to go free.

Constable Smith approached my window looking about the same age as my buddy Ken and working in the same district as Ken. They probably graduated from police academy together, I thought.

I’m tongue-tied. If I could only find the words, I was convinced that a mention of his co-worker would get me out of a ticket. I furiously racked my brain, this brain that puts thousands of words online every day.

But I can’t find the words. I can’t, as Lucy Maud Montgomery’s Marilla Cuthbert sang, get out all the phrases.

I hand over my license. I pull out an insurance card from 2012. My hand quivers with nerves. I hand over the proper insurance card. Constable Smith walks back to his Crown Vic. And I wait.

Of course I deserved a ticket. Although it felt like I was crawling up steep and winding Larry Uteck Boulevard past a school and countless high-rise condos, my wife confirmed with a degree of tonal condemnation that I was doing over 60 kilometres per hour.

Constable Smith’s radar called it 66 km/h in a 50, roughly 40 miles per hour in a 30 zone, a worse offense if it was determined that children were present in the school zone.

Google Streetview Larry Uteck Blvd

But two-lane Larry Uteck Blvd. is nine miles wide and the sidewalks are far removed from the path traveled by cars. It’s not easy holding your 248-horsepower minivan to 30 mph on a stretch of urban pavement that feels like I-35 in the middle of Oklahoma. Surely I wasn’t speeding. I figured Constable Smith pulled me over for a taillight violation (could it be burned out?), for reports of a navy Odyssey that was driving erratically in Bedford (wasn’t me), or as a prank conducted by Constable Ken (you rascal, you).

66 in a 50? Really?

I know I’m prone to driving quickly. Sometimes, perhaps in a Mazda MX-5 or Volkswagen Golf R or EcoBoost F-150, I may even plant the throttle for more than a few seconds. Wink wink, nudge nudge, no admission of guilt.

But I choose my moments and my places. I have no interest in endangering pedestrians in downtown Halifax, where pedestrians are notoriously crazy enough without adding an aggressive driver into the mix. I don’t get a rush by frightening old ladies in their Venzas by overtaking on the shoulder. I’m not spooking moms in minivans by flashing my high-beams on a rural two-lane. I’m privileged to drive a lot of fun, new, expensive cars every week, and I can enjoy driving those cars by wisely choosing my moments and my places.

The evidence? In nearly 18 years of driving, I’ve only ever been ticketed once; only pulled over twice.

Make that thrice.

We weren’t running late. We left Eastern Passage early enough to show the little one a couple of Royal Canadian Navy frigates sailing close to shore in the Bedford Basin; early enough to account for rush hour traffic. With 15 minutes to spare before the hygienist called my name, I had no reason to rush up Larry Uteck Boulevard. Yet with kids arriving at school, and unbeknownst to me, I was travelling 22 mph faster than the when-children-are-present maximum.

2015 Honda Odyssey EX

I didn’t get a chance to name drop. I watched in my rearview mirror as Constable Smith walked back toward the Odyssey a couple of minutes later with my insurance card and license and, to my relief, no extra paper flapping in the breeze.

Locals are complaining about the speeds with which people are going up Larry Uteck, he said, not so much the going down. It’s a residential street, he said, even if it doesn’t feel like it.

A verbal warning. He told me to slow down.

I did slow down. I will slow down. And not because a police officer raised $291.45 (the bulk of which goes to pay court administrative costs) 15 minutes before I had to spend $900 on a tooth.

“Drivers who receive speeding citations are at increased risk of receiving subsequent speeding citations,” a massive Maryland study of 3.7 million drivers concluded, “suggesting that speeding citations have limited effects on deterrence in the context of the current traffic enforcement system.”

Constable Smith could have ticketed me. But from the standpoint of the public good, it may not have done any good. Instead, a courteous officer pulled me over with the implied threat of a fine and quickly convinced me that I need to pay closer attention to my speedometer in residential environments.

Seems fair enough.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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71 Comments on “Ticketed Or Warned? I Was Pulled Over For Speeding In Our Long-Term 2015 Honda Odyssey...”


  • avatar

    A heads up display in cars like the Odyssey would not be remiss. It can be hard to enjoy the scenery of a trip, keep an eye out for pedestrian and other obstacles, and constant check of speed. 60kph in most modern vehicles can feel very slow, 40 even more so. I’d really like to see HUD get rolled out into a wider variety of vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      statikboy

      Playin’ Devil’s Advocate here. Technically, when driving, one has a great many responsibilities and very few rights. Two of the responsibilities are to pay attention to the posted speed limits and one’s indicated speed. Sightseeing is NOT one of the rights.

      In the real world, however, looking around oneself while driving is necessary both for awareness and alertness. Might as well enjoy it.

      • 0 avatar
        Nick_515

        This is a true problem though – one could argue that looking down often can be distracting. One of the biggest positives of driving a stickshift in my past car was to control speed via gear selection. I didn’t need to look to the speedo… certain areas in town were third gear, and others fourth.

        It’s hard to do this with my current automatic. i do select manual mode sometimes, not to shift but to limit shifting to a certain gear. I also use sport mode to similar effect – it won’t upshift when driven gently.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      A HUD doesn’t magically make you pay attention.

      It’s perfectly possible to look right at something and not see it.

      For example:
      https://youtu.be/vJG698U2Mvo

      I test drove one of the 4th geberatiob Prii with a HUD, and found the HUD to be exactly like the non-HUD digital display in my 2004 Prius as far as my interaction with it and my ability of see two things at once — I was either looking at the HUD’s projected image, or the road. The reason for this is that you have to focus your attention on the HUD in order to read the number — and just having your eyes pointed in a certain direction doesn’t necessarily help you pay attention to what’s going on around you.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I put Tim Horton’s donuts in the same league with Dunkin’ Donuts – minor league. Any real bakery donut is far better.

    The rest of the article? I don’t care. I do care about a good donut, though (when I’m allowed to have one).

    • 0 avatar
      klossfam

      Agreed on the donuts and I live in Buffalo – the center of the universe for Tims in the States (250 Tims in a metro area of 1.2 miilion).

      It went downhill years ago when they started shipping them in frozen form to the stores. I’m sure the same applies to DD.

      A quality local bakery (like Paula’s here in BUF) has AWESOME donuts…

      Oh yeah, and Timothy – Slow the HELL down in the Ody…

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Sorry, I’ve got a Tim Horton’s weakness. I’m happy that I can find one in Ohio when I occasionally return to see the old folks.

    • 0 avatar
      Felix Hoenikker

      I’ve had donuts from both Tim Horton’s (Montreal) and DD (just about every else).
      They are way too sweet for my tastes. One bite into a DD glazed donut makes my pancreas quiver. Same goes for Horton’s. Agree that the local bakeries make better donuts, but I’be taken them off the training menu too. Glycemic index reduction !

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        If your pancreas is going to quiver on a DD glazed donut, then you certainly don’t want to try a Krispy Kreme glazed donut. Personally the KK donuts are far, far lighter in texture while gloriously bathed in a sugar waterfall while still hot out of the oil.

        Definitely not for the pancreatically-challenged.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I agree with ya. Tim’s is nothing special, and their coffee is only alright. It was a fun novelty when I went to Canada – but since it’s been in Ohio I have not had it.

      *I did get a Coke Zero or whatever at one in May, but I think it was the only restaurant I could see in Portsmouth, Ohio.*

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    30 KPH is your school zone speed limit? Another reason to avoid the metric system.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Hey! It’s faster than most American school systems with 15mph. Another reason to choose the metric system.

      • 0 avatar
        Nick_515

        Do you guys have different speed limits when school zone lights are blinking? For example, you can keep driving town limit of 30 mph even through a school zone if the 20 mph lights are not blinking.

        (It is obvious from the article that you do have a responsibility to slow more when ‘children in sight’).

        • 0 avatar
          statikboy

          @ Nick_515

          In BC, typically school zones are 50kph anytime, 30kph during school days (8AM to 5PM). Occasionally there is reference to “When Children Are Present.” As this was the case, he likely could have been ticketed for going 36kph over, more than twice the limit. As children are unpredictable and, apparently, the future, $300 does not seem unreasonable.

          As a means of encouraging active safety, it is very cheap compared to the thousands of dollars of passive safety equipment that are “fined” onto every new vehicle. Equipment that makes cars heavier, less agile, less efficient, harder to see out of, ugly and, of course, more expensive to purchase.

      • 0 avatar
        Zackman

        20 mph. in Ohio where I live when the lights are flashing.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Which is torture personified; in any modern car, on a street like that pictured, anything below 30mph feels like you’re not even moving! (Goodness knows how a 15mph limit would feel; I think I’d just get out and push!)

          The behavior that REALLY grinds my gears is when some goody-two-shoes decides to GRENADE THEIR BRAKES to get down to the underposted limit, just as the idiot did this morning in front of me — after school had already started (not around any school, just a busier thouroughfare), no kids present, no crossing guards, just a blinking light! I was nearly rear-ended, to add to the insult!

          As I always say, if the sign said “Jump Off This Bridge,” would you do it??!!

      • 0 avatar
        Blackcloud_9

        In California (at least where I live in California) it’s 25 mph. The cops in my town are almost salivating on the first day school with Moto-cops and LIDAR at the ready.

    • 0 avatar
      NickS

      There are no good reasons to avoid the metric system.

      Fair warning: the next couple of decades will not be kind to this mentality. The younger generation has none of this emotional baggage and are moving headlong into the modern world.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        Go metric! No more frikken 11/32 sh*t. Plus, I’m used to kilos, centimeters and Celsius from NHK’s sumo coverage.

        Sumo: The Art of Keep Face Off Sand!

        • 0 avatar
          Mandalorian

          Metric system has its pros, but the one place it majorly falls short is in the kitchen. It’s a lot easier to visualize “1 cup” “2 Tablespoons” “1 Pint” than 525mg or 350mL.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Personally I wish we’d all go metric and you’d only test students on one of the systems. It would eliminate half the teachers work in the area of “Measurement” and free up teaching time for other standards.

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            The US should have gone entirely metric (at gunpoint if necessary) generations ago.

            The additional costs and friction and trade barriers associated with out continued use of customary units are tremendous, and there no compelling reason to stick with them besides inertia.

          • 0 avatar
            whitworth

            Couldn’t you make the same point about every other country adopting English as their language and ditching their native tongue? Would sure make life easier.

            I say this as a fan of the metric system.

          • 0 avatar
            NickS

            @mandalorian. Actually most recipes should list quantities of most solid ingredients as weight measures, not volume. It will require a small scale, about $10.

            And if you are going to do that it might as well be grams.

          • 0 avatar
            bikegoesbaa

            “Couldn’t you make the same point about every other country adopting English as their language and ditching their native tongue? Would sure make life easier.”

            I could (and would) if every country on the planet except for 3 had fully standardized on one language; and that language was also integrated into standards for things like threaded fasteners, pipe sizes, and conductor diameters.

            I’m a native English speaker, but if the whole world decided to switch to Esperanto I’d be happy to get onboard with that.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            And the reason that 1 cup ect is easier for you to visualize is because that is what you grew up with. Ask someone who grew up with the metric system to visualize what 1 pint is and they will have problems.

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            @NickS

            Pausing to weigh everything out while cooking would be ridiculous. That’s the whole point of why the conventional system is better in that application- cooking isn’t a super-exact thing generally. It’s not a chemical titration. The visually named conventional units are easier to conceptualize.

          • 0 avatar
            NickS

            There are two issues: metric v. Imperial, and cooking by weight v. by volume (which is really an issue of accuracy). They are orthogonal, you can’t conflate the two.

            I don’t see where metric fails in your example. 1 cup or 1 tsp are NOT units in the imperial system, but a convention for a specific volume. You can still have 1 cup under the metric system.

            My point about the other issue is that where accuracy matters professionals use weight rather than volume, but obviously for most recipes it doesn’t much matter so they are in volume units.

            So I don’t see where metric fails here.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    My wife wonders why I use cruise control on so many secondary roads, no matter what car I drive (unfortunately I can’t with the Ranger… none installed.) The reason is that it is FAR too easy for me to drive the road/conditions and very difficult for me to hold my speed down to a crawl, especially when the road is as bare of traffic as the Google Street View image shows above. Fortunately, most cruise controls let me set it at 25-30mph and as a result I haven’t received a speeding ticket or even a warning since I started using cruise control over 30 years ago.

    I remain constantly wary of police vehicles however, especially since I don’t have the advantage of an automatic speed control in my pickup truck. And that little Fiat 500 of my wife’s just loves to pass slower cars on I-95. (Ever notice how so many drivers panic when they see a Trooper sitting in the median of the freeway? They hit their brakes so hard to get down to the speed limit that they cause insanity behind them! In I-95’s heavy traffic, you can imagine what happens.)

    • 0 avatar
      dividebytube

      My suburb, that wishes it was a city, is mostly posted for 25mph – and anyone who speeds above this eventually get pulled over.

      A co-worker got pulled over for going 27mph. They only got a warning though.

      My friend, like you, will put his cruise on when coming to visit me.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      I live on cruise control – that – and in my car, too, on my long commute. Set around 63 mph, and I’m good – in the right lane, of course.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Of course.

        • 0 avatar
          Mandalorian

          27 in a 25 zone is ridiculous- sounds like the cop just wanted to check him for outstanding warrants or something.

          Local police chief here is a family friend, he once stated that their radar guns have a margin of error of 5mph- meaning they will never stop anyone for 5 over. Although that was a couple years ago, technology could have changed.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            My best friend in high school got pulled over for 38 in a 35. She was driving a battered Taurus wagon missing a wheel cover through a very exclusive suburb and I’m sure the motive for the stop was not speeding enforcement. Also had a black acquaintance that got pulled over in the same spot, although I don’t know for what.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Id say in the case of that Taurus is was definitely profiling. I was once a victim of profiling while driving my beater 69 LeSabre Convertible through Samamish. I was pulled over for one of the 3 taillights per side being burnt out. You could see the shock on the officers face when she got to the car and saw my son strapped in the car seat and my wife along. I’m certain that if I had been a 20 something (instead of 30 something) by myself or with some other young males she would have continued on her fishing expedition and would have found some reason to give me a ticket. Instead she didn’t even ask me for my license and insurance.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            It won’t surprise you to learn that the street involved was 84th Ave NE on the Medina/Clyde Hill border, with Medina police doing the honors.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      The Adaptive Cruise Control in my Accord is a Godsend for crawling along behind someone in a 25 (I set it to around 32, and never have a problem). School zones are another matter, as I don’t have low-speed follow, so it cuts out at 22mph.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      I use cruise control in the same way. Pretty much any time I reach my intended speed, it goes on. I probably activate it once a minute during city driving.

      My Mazda3 has an excellent cruise control system for my purposes. It’s available at 30 km/hr or higher, it stays on when I turn the car off and on, it has easily accessible buttons that I can use without removing my hands from the 9-3 position, and it has a cancel button. So many systems fail in one or more of those areas.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    $291 – I always think the punishment should fit the crime… and close to $300 for 16 over is ridiculous.

    I remember being let off more than once with the message being that a fine really does nothing good because I would just pay it and get on with life and just speed…. as they perused my colorful record.

    More than once I sat by the side of the road getting an earful… I think even some cops realise that fining people when they can afford the occasional fine reinforces that the system is unfair people will just get on with life.

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-Iron

      16 commie units is only 10 freedom units. $300, even in Canadian funny money is crazy.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      Some Scandinavian countries solve this problem by indexing the cost of the ticket to your income. So Mother Teresa gets a very small fine and Donald Trump gets a very big one, but they’re both exactly the same size relative to the speeder’s income. Finland’s five-and six-figure speeding ticket club includes a telecom exec and an NHL player.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      The cost of the ticket is nothing. Where I am, any minor traffic ticket will typically end up costing over $1000 in increased insurance costs over the following years.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    Thank you Mr Cain for showing respect for this officer who was just doing his job. Hopefully your tone would have been the same had he given you the ticket. I have hated it every time I have gotten a ticket. But deserved every one.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Car and Driver once claimed that the perfect vehicle for speeding (from standpoint of being almost invisible) was a light grey minivan with a thin coating of dust.

    It is a maximum I’ve considered testing…

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      Hmmm… I suppose your F-150 – slightly dirty – wouldn’t work just as good?

    • 0 avatar
      gearhead77

      If you can blend into traffic, yes. If you are alone (at night for example) or ahead of traffic and the cop has radar or laser, nope. Especially in a speed trap where it drops from 55-40, but no one is doing under 60 (thanks Winchester VA).

      But yes, no one expects a minivan to be competently driven.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    One thing I’ve learned over the years is speeding just isn’t worth it. You end up getting to your destination 5 minutes faster at best, really just better to go at the speed of traffic or set the cruise to 5 over the limit.

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      On longer trips it’s absolutely worth it.

      I recently did a ~500 mile drive on a lightly-trafficked route that was predominantly signed at 55 MPH.

      Running it at 80 instead of 60 saved more than 2 hours; and given the conditions, lack of traffic, and good visibility it really didn’t seem at all unsafe.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        I’m with you 100% about going fast in safe conditions, but unfortunately the donut-squad is not.

        80 in a 60 around here would have been pushing a misdemeanor if caught, if not at least very expensive ticket. Are those two hours worth $300 (best case)? There are plenty of things I’d rather do with $300 than flush it down the drain.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Just returned from a Toledo-Minneapolis round-trip a week ago. *** 10.5 hours *** one-way, with one 45-minute stop for gas and dinner!

        What a breath of fresh driving air west of Indiana!! 80mph in the left lane is simply moving with the traffic flow, and few left-lane dawdlers! (Heck, even Indiana was better than Ohio, which seems to have INVENTED nothing-short-of-a-Sidewinder-up-the-tailpipe-will-stop-me-from-enforcing-the-SPEED-limit driving practices in left-lanes far-and-wide across the state!)

        I expected this in Illinois, but not in Wisconsin, and certainly not in Minnesota!

        • 0 avatar
          gearhead77

          Ohio might have the worst left-lane hogging drivers of anywhere I’m familiar with. Those folks DO NOT move over at all. When I’m in a clump of cars alternately going 65-75 mph, when I pass the offending vehicle, I’m never shocked to see Ohio tags (or Indiana)

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      15000 miles per year is 300 to 500 hours in the car. Driving just 10% faster adds up to a meaningful amount of time over the course of the year. Getting hit with the $200 driving tax still feels like highway robbery at the time, because it is, but amortized out it’s nothing to get excited about.

      The reason that I don’t speed anymore isn’t the tickets, it’s the utter frustration of driving like I’m awake while behind people who aren’t. Crawling at 65 in the right lane and just watching the scenery is boring but it doesn’t get the urge to kill rising and the right vehicle – one big and floaty enough to not reward pushing it – can make it genuinely tolerable.

  • avatar
    whitworth

    I would love it if all GPS had a current speed limit on the screen. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been on an unfamiliar road and no idea the last speed limit sign.

    Also, the idea that the road you have pictured would get a speeding ticket for doing 40 mph is absurd. That’s just a money grab, it has nothing to do with safety.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      1. Waze
      2. School children

      • 0 avatar
        whitworth

        Where’s the school? once you pass a school, the school zone is over and the speed limit returns to a normal limit.

        In most places, the speed limit would be 45mph all day long for a road like that.

    • 0 avatar
      Jagboi

      The Jaguar XF’s I have rented in the UK have a speed limit display on the screen between the speedo and tach. It’s configurable, so different information can be displayed, but it works off the navigation system and always told me the limit at any given place. Not sure if that was a European/UK feature and if it’s available in North America.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    “It’s not easy holding your 248-horsepower minivan to 30 mph on a stretch of urban pavement that feels like I-35 in the middle of Oklahoma.”

    Speed limits in the absence of appropriate road design are both ineffective and a cop-out at the same time. If the municipality wanted people to drive 50 kph through there, they should have narrowed both the street and the lanes within the street, installed raised crosswalks, and squared up intersections. People will slow down without heavy enforcement if the appropriate speed feels slower.

    This led to a Catch-22 in my own city. The city just today lowered its default speed limits by 5 mph (30->25 arterial, 25->20 residential) without any design or engineering changes to most roads, and for now I don’t expect most drivers to comply with the lower limits. But the city justified the move by saying that it frees their engineering staff up to design new and redesigned streets appropriately for the lower limits, which staff were not allowed to do with the old limits in place.

  • avatar

    Count your blessings, you were pulled over given a verbal admonition, and that’s it. Imagine if instead of a mini van it was a German Luxury car, chances are the outcome would have been different. Driving a luxury car…you can afford to pay a ticket.

    Now when they are hiding in an entrance, or a snowbank with a radar it gets more interesting.

    Most police vehicles have a radar on the dash, and one on the rear parcel shelf, they get you coming and going.

    When they are on the other side of the highway and cross over the median to come get you they are really motivated. When they do a U turn to come get you they are really motivated too.

  • avatar
    scottcom36

    In an urban area with light traffic I use the cruise control to keep my speed where I want it.

  • avatar
    PolestarBlueCobalt

    Spooky. I got pulled over last night for speeding-first time in my life.

    California finally decided to get cold at night (Boost season!), perfect huge, smooth, empty road. Downshifted into third-rolled into it-turbo spooled up and before I could fully crack a smile those damn lights came on. Feels bad man.

  • avatar
    MartyToo

    I have a general question about speeding in Canada. Last week my wife and I enjoyed time in Prince Edward Island, Nova Scotia and New Brunswick. We had a very relaxing vacation with one minor exception. I was uncomfortable on the road. Specifically I was uncomfortable driving at the posted limits of 90, 100, and 110 kph with my wife’s 2015 CR-V.

    So what’s the deal? Is it the width of the driving land, the pitch of the pavement, the tight nature of the curves, the smoothness of the pavement or all of these. We had friends who drove the same roads as we from Halifax to Stellarton on a very wet evening last week after we had shared dinner with them. When I asked the driver he said he thought his new Ford Explorer felt like he was hydroplaning at times.

    I’m the wrong type of engineer – chemical not civil – but my background makes me believe there is a simple answer as to why I felt completely in control driving 80 on the 70 mph roads after our return to Maine but felt as though I was on an amusement park ride whenever I exceeded the limit on Canadian highways.

    • 0 avatar
      RedRocket

      Simply put, the rural Interstates are designed better. In Eastern Canada the divided multi-lane highways are in many cases the same routing as the original 1930s 2-lane blacktop. Or the 1960s 2-lane blacktop-with-occasional-passing-lane limited access Trans Canada Highway. So you get sharper curves, poor sightlines, paved-over hills, and dangerous interchanges, bridge abutments and merge lanes. It is an attitude of “good enough” combined with a Canadian enviro mindset that improving roads is bad. Plus not enough public money because every spare dime goes to health care sinkhole.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    I drive quickly and I’m getting less apologetic about it. Except in neighborhoods and parking lots, where slow and cautious are necessary, I’m usually 10 over the limit or maybe just ahead of traffic flow. I’m not darting in and out of lanes or using my pedals like switches either. I mean, sometimes, but rarely.

    Speed limits are just revenue makers Every modern car (last decade especially) is capable of exceeding the speed limits in multiples and most are extremely capable of triple digit speeds. It’s the drivers who are lax. Distracted driving has made it worse and another reason I like to be away from the traffic.

    I believe in peoples minds, that the moment a multi-lane road appears, it’s highway speed time. A busy main artery I travel on is marked for 35 mph. Yet doing under 45 is hazardous since you’re getting run over. This is made even worse since most cars are so isolated now, even the cheap ones. My Cruze at 80 mph is tomb compared to my Mazda 5. Same class of car really, but 8 years is a long time in NVH development.

    I tend to cruise quickly to avoid the “60-80 Club” too. Those who have no idea what cruise control is or don’t have it and can’t keep a constant pedal pressure. So one minute you’re passing them at 60 and then they’re on your bumper at 80. Even worse when the flatlanders find their way onto the PA turnpike as it cuts through the hills in the middle of the state.

    I did my trek from DC to Pittsburgh in 4 hours yesterday, mostly at 85+. I-68 has a 70 mph limit and is lightly traveled (and patrolled) compared to the PA turnpike. The hills are a killer, but it just means working the manual function on the Mazdas transmission more. Going faster in the Mazda isn’t really an option, but in a faster, more capable car, you could safely travel 90-95 most of the time, any faster and the curves would be more of a factor.

    I’m a law abiding citizen who does most everything else by the book, but I have a hard time with highway speed limits.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’ve been pulled over four or five times, and got two tickets. Both ticket times, I was in an Audi (different ones).

    Cops don’t like em.


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  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States