By on May 10, 2016

2016 Honda Civic Coupe

Remember when Every. Single. Car. Model. came in a two-door version?

Sure, the days of luxurious and lengthy Olds 98 two-doors and Lincoln Town Coupes are long gone, but it wasn’t long ago that coupe offerings stretched from one end of the compact car market to the other.

A buyer was once able to choose between the forgettable Ford Escort and equally forgettable but nicer-looking ZX2. You could get the bland Nissan Sentra or the slightly less bland 200SX. And so on and so forth.

Two door vehicles that aren’t dedicated sportscars or pickups are growing fewer, especially at the lower end of the market where volume is king. It’s gotten so bad that we’ve taken to calling four-door SUVs “coupes,” like we’re in some sort of bizarro world where up is really down and humans breathe underwater.

At least one automaker is holding out against the trend.

Honda is planning a marketing blitz for its 2016 Civic Coupe that features a commercial titled “Square,” where a sleek Civic two-door rolls past a landscape filled with square people, square pets, and square kids riding square skateboards with square wheels.

Honda Civic Coupe ad

The ad aims to draw attention to the Civic’s rakish flanks and sleek profile at the expense of its competitors, but it may as well be talking about the vehicle’s door count.

Looking for another C-segment offering with two doors and no hatchback? Your choices are, in a word, limited. The previous-generation Hyundai Elantra offered one, but it was dropped. Chevrolet Cruze? Nope. Maybe a Sentra, Focus, Mazda3 or Corolla? Try again. Impreza? Get out of here.

The Kia Forte Koup soldiers on for now. We’ll see if the bodystyle survives the model’s eventual redesign.

The cheerleaders for low-end coupes are few as automakers scramble to meet insatiable demand for family-oriented crossovers and SUVs.

Range Rover at least offers a two-door version of its sporty Evoque SUV, something Mercedes-Benz and BMW clearly see as a bastardization of the traditional four-door wagon definition of “coupe.” That said, the only sales success among two-door SUVs in recent years is the Jeep Wrangler.

Cadillac should be commended for wading back into the personal luxury coupe category with its two-door ATS, regardless of what you think of the brand or the model. It didn’t help overall sales, though, as buyers vacated the ATS lineup altogether.

Car buyers had cash, kids, property and pets in the ’70s, but bloated luxo-coupes still sold as fast as wide lapels and Bee Gees tickets. Outside of Germany, it seems consumer tastes moved on to other flavors, and automakers were quick to follow.

As a former owner of a (beige) two-door 1994 Toyota Camry with gloriously long doors (and, obviously, windows), this writer wonders if coupes are doomed to amount to an ever-shrinking niche market populated mostly with high-end offerings and low-slung rocket sleds.

You’d think that with crossovers and SUVs parked in every driveway, a family’s second car could stand to be a little less utilitarian.

It will be interesting to watch consumer demand for the Civic Coupe. As a rarity in the automotive landscape, it could serve as a litmus test for other automakers. Who knows, consumers might show they’re not as allergic to two-doors as we believed.

Or, to Honda’s chagrin, they’ll confirm it.

[Image: Honda Motor Company]

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128 Comments on “Honda Calls Civic Rivals ‘Square,’ Makes Some Ask ‘Where Are the Coupes?’...”


  • avatar
    JimZ

    “Some Ask ‘Where Are the Coupes?”

    Sitting on dealer lots for months on end.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      While the CUVs fly off the lots.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      who needs two less doors when you can buy a hot hatch that makes the Si its b1tch (and have value added functionality).

      • 0 avatar
        alexndr333

        Why buy any two-door when you can have a two-door with two side-doors to the “inner trunk”. I don’t carry passengers in my sedan, but it’s sure easier to buckle a bag of groceries in the back seat than hear them spill and slide around in the trunk.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      I’ve never seen the point, myself.

      The only coupe I can really stand is the C209 body CLK of the early 2000s.

      “Oh, it has too few doors and they’re too long. Lovely.”

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        Those long doors, on smaller cars, move the b-pillar out of your peripheral vision. makes the car feel twice the size and more open. And makes getting your briefcase out from behind the drivers seat a nonevent.

        The current Civic isn’t far from the E90/92 size wise, and driving the latter two back to back, the 92 had far and away the more comfortable and well sorted interior, unless you’re often hauling kids or passengers.

        The obsession some people have with optimizing everything from a compact car to a pickup truck, for rarely existing rear seat passengers, does neither them nor their chosen vehicles any favors.

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          Those long doors also make it a pain to get in/out in tight parking lots/garages.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            Especially the aforementioned GM C-body coupes, and FoMoCo full-sized coupes, both of which had doors spanning ZIP Codes! (Though they could have been interchanged, the B-body doors looked slightly less ponderous, especially the Chevvies.)

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        it’s a hold-over from my dad’s generation. back then (“then” being the 1960s) a 4-door sedan was what your dad and your grandpa drove. They drove 4-door Belvederes, *you* wanted a 2-door Roadrunner or GTX. I remember when my dad bought his Spirit R/T in 1991; even though he wanted the car he still bitched about how it looked like a “goddamned taxicab.”

        we’re at least a few generations past the time when a 4-door sedan was what your lame parents drove, so it no longer has the stigma.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          Exactly. And it wasn’t until the mid-late 80s when the market was producing decent handling sedans, helping erase the ‘sedan-stigma’ as well…

  • avatar
    SC5door

    Uh, Forte Koup?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Good point, he mustve forgotten about that one. Ive never seen an Elantra coupe, maybe he was thinking of the Kia instead?

      I was behind one at a light the other day, when traffic started moving again, the little punk racer-wannabe was driving it like an idiot. Had tinted rear lights, which I think should be illegal since you can barely see them.

    • 0 avatar
      Steph Willems

      Right you are, SC5door. The copy’s been updated as a result. A person gets the sense that the Koup is living on borrowed time.

  • avatar
    S197GT

    saw a new civic 2-dr on the road just the other day. caught my eye because even though it looked handsome enough i was more surprised anyone still bought those.

    not saying they shouldn’t, you just don’t see them much anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      jimbo1126

      For drivers of a certain umm, size, like myself, smaller sedans are hell to get in and out of, so a coupe is a must. Civic Coupe is top of my list for my next car. I would guess the Forte is seriously uncompetitive compared to it.

  • avatar
    jimble

    Lots of us don’t have two cars in our driveways, or any driveways at all. Thus the popularity of compromise vehicles like CUVs that may not do any one thing especially well but do most things well enough.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Customers may look at the roofline and ask, “Where’s the rear seat headroom?”

    Will the Si version be a coupe?

  • avatar
    kefkafloyd

    Methinks Honda doth protest too much given how much of the vehicles they sell are shoe-looking creatures.

    Also, the rear of the new Civic Coupe is fugly.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      +1 on that. All I see from that picture is strange, awkward lines. Something really bad happened to that back end. Who cares if it’s a coupe.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      I find nearly all non-sports car coupes to be ugly. Their lines/proportions look off, and I doubt I’m alone in that view, meaning that’s another nail in their coffin.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        1983 Mercedes-Benz 380SEC
        1992 BMW 325is
        1986 Chrysler LeBaron
        2004 Honda Accord

        A far higher percentage of hatchbacks look like nobody had a clue what to make them look like, and plenty of sedans, pickups, CUVs, SUVs, and sports cars don’t cause the pulse to race on sight either.

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          1983 Mercedes-Benz 380SEC – ugly with an unpleasant blob of sheet metal behind the door
          1992 BMW 325is – no real complaints
          1986 Chrysler LeBaron – ugly, in large part because it has those old car lines & style
          2004 Honda Accord – ugly, especially compared to the sedan, for the same reason as the Mercedes

  • avatar
    gasser

    Last coupe we had in our family was a 2005 Honda Acccord EX-L. Very nice car, well equipped, comfortable, reliable. When he sold it in 2010, it was like trying to give poison away, even though it was in great shape. Between the smaller back seat, doors that are too long to open in narrow parking spaces and difficult resale, I’ll stick to 4 doors.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      I had the exact opposite experience with my 3 series. The coupes retained their value better and thee was never any shortage of buyers.

      • 0 avatar
        CarnotCycle

        As article alludes, German rides and their buyers are a different bunch. BMW swapping coupes to even numbers was only smart thing they’ve done regarding any kind of lineup coherence in some time IMO.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          I think the 2-series and 4-series coupes will be the death of BMW’s role as an aspirational car for signalers. Driving a 3-series made a specific statement. Whatever a 2 or 4 costs, it has the gravitas of one of those alphabet soup Nissan-based Benzes now.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        The Accord is large enough to not have scrunched together munchkin doors and windows in Sedan trim. The 3 series is not. And neither is the Civic.

        The Civic’s narrower body, also renders the “long doors hard to open in tight spots” objection at least somewhat more moot than for a wider car.

    • 0 avatar
      Sketch

      You may be on to something. I’ve been looking at used civics recently. Every time I see one advertised for a lower than average price, it’s either a coupe, stick, or both.

    • 0 avatar
      Giltibo

      I will stick to my gorgeous San Marino Red’08 Accord Coupe with Manual Trans. After 8 1/2 years, I’m still in love!

  • avatar
    legacygt

    Coupes really don’t do anything for me. Not now. Not in the 70s. But I’m just as surprised that there aren’t more of them out there now. While developing a platform is ridiculously expensive, it has been been easier for automakers to leverage a car into multiple bodystyles. Just look at all the versions of a car that used to be a BMW 3-series. Look at minis lineup. If BMW can crank out a 3, 4, 4GC wagon, 3GT, etc. version of same car, why can’t more manufacturers coupe-ify theirs?

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Return on investment. No, it’s not expensive to do, especially compared to building LHD/RHD variants, but if they only sell a few thousand a year, they will get better returns from spending that money elsewhere, such as building an SUV on the same platform.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Nissan couldn’t sell the Altima coupe. So I doubt there will be a 2 dr Sentra. They could do with an engine option on the Sentra line. The Juke’s turbo would be a match for the Civic 1.5. If it can be weened off premium.

  • avatar
    infinitiandbeyond

    Does the new roomier Civic coupe share the same pool of buyers with 4 cyl Accord coupe?

  • avatar
    Russycle

    Why the heck does VW make a Golf coupe? Exact same shape as the 4-door, but fewer doors. What’s the point? At least the Civic coupe has a profile different from the sedan.

  • avatar
    threeer

    Three little letters (well, maybe four): S…U…V (or it’s variant, CUV).

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    The only reason I could think of to buy a coupe would be to get a performance engine/package that isn’t available in the sedan. As the

    Civic Si
    WRX
    Mazdaspeed 3
    SRT-4
    FiST/FoST
    BMW 335i/340i/M3
    Infiniti G
    IS350/IS-F
    GTI/Golf R
    S60R

    Etc. etc… there is no rational point in getting a performance car with less than the max # of doors available. Hell, IMO a lot of times the sedans look better than the coupes. Definitely the case for the Civic & previous Elantra for example. If I’m getting something with 2 doors it’s gotta be a zero compromise sports car or a pillarless grand tourer that makes you ache when you see it… not an economy car with the back doors welded shut.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Well, in the good old days the automakers made actual FWD sports coupes like the Ford Probe, Mitsubishi Eclipse (before it got fat and ugly), Toyota Celica, Acura Integra/RSX, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        I have a strong hunch they went with coupe bodies for those cars in part because they couldn’t get the chassis rigidity they needed from a sedan for sporty handling. Cars from that era were wet noodles.

        Even still though, there were cars like the Lancer EVO, WRX, Sierra Cosworth, Audi RS2, Bluebird SSS, Integra Type-R sedan etc. They weren’t as popular but they were around.

        Now that they can make rigid 4 door cars and safety regs have killed car design there is really no point to “sporty” coupes. Coupes these days have to justify their sacrifice in ways economy car based coupes can’t.

      • 0 avatar
        iantg

        My first car was an Acura Integra 3 door with the pop up headlights. I remember aspiring to own a Ford Focus ZX3… I ended up owning two. I loved the shape of the car and the practicality. Sure, the SVT had more power, but as long as you had the manual transmission variant – you were set. I still think of those cars fondly despite how many issues I had with them. To this day, I still don’t trust Ford with anything electrical.

        When I decided to replace the last one, I tried the new focus and decided that if I’m going to do a five door that isn’t as much fun, I might as well get an SUV. So I traded the last one I had on a used BMW X3. (it was cheaper than the base model focus) That car served me very well and was incredibly comfortable, but good god was it BORING. I ended up trading it on a 1 series cabrio. I intended on a coupe, but a convertible in the colors I want appeared in my price range. I enjoy it immensely.

        An R56 era Mini is as close as you’re going to get to a modern equivelent to the old fwd coupes and hot hatches in terms of size and driving dynamics. My wife’s mini is a blast.

        • 0 avatar
          onyxtape

          I’ve never driven an Integra, but just the other day, I sold my 61″ DLP TV (10yo vintage) on Craigslist and the guy just slipped it in the back like it was nothing and was able to shut the hatch completely. I was impressed.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I drive a coupe now and my previous car was a BMW 335i coupe, which I ordered. The coupe had a lower center of gravity, lower roofline, and in my opinion, a better looking profile view over the sedan.

      It was personal preference and some very minor performance changes. Getting more doors than needed in my opinion seems just as much a personal choice. Not trying to poke, just to point out that I see it as preference.

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      Excluding a couple of classic Luxury cars, the ’56 and ’57 Chevrolet 4 door hardtop sport sedans market the one time in history where a car manufacturer made a 4 door car that looked as good as, or possibly even better than its 2 door counterpart. There are some other 4 door pillarless hardtop cars that can be considered good looking too, but only because the lack of pillars made them look like 2 door cars. Other than that, 4 door cars practically scream ‘practicality’ and ‘responsibility’ and other boring grown up things.
      Admittedly there are some modern examples where the base car is so hideous or boring that removing or adding a couple of doors don’t really do much to improve it.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      I’m not a coupe guy, but the Mustang makes the price/performance case for the coupe work.

      This might be less so if they made a Fusion with a fast engine that wasn’t a lux’d out Titanium trim.

    • 0 avatar
      Snooder

      There’s a perfectly rational reason.

      If you want to send a clear and unequivocal message that you ain’t carting around a bunch of rug rats any time soon, getting the two door is a must.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Way back when, Honda was really hip.
    Now they’re kind of like a high quality Oldsmobile.

    So I assume most of the sales persons are used to selling Oldsmobile type cars and look at you funny if you want a cool model.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Having been to a Honda dealer recently, they salesfolk were busy filling out the paperwork to sell the cars.

      The cars still mostly sell themselves, you see, so the dealership hired the number of salespeople it takes to take care of the details. In my short time there, it really looked like they were moving the metal.

      I liked the car we were there to see, too: a 4-door 2016 Civic Limited with the tech package. My wife’s new commute is beyond Leaf range, and we have young kids in car seats, so coupes are out for now. We’re looking for something which can handle that commute until we get our Model 3, which might be a while….!

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Having grown up in a family that with the exception of a Country Squire, always had a 2 door in the form of either a coupe, shooting brake or ‘personal luxury car’ I grew to despise them.

    Just as I am growing to despise the lack of headroom and visibility in this generation of sedans.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I just don’t understand why they didn’t make it a lift back. The trunk opening is ridiculous.

    I had really high hopes for the Civic coupe based on the concept, maybe they pull it off with the Si, but this is an unattractive car.

    And it’s not that I don’t love coupes. I’ve owned 7 coupes in my lifetime. Thanks to the Land Ark I’ve never been without one in the pool.

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      Agree on the lack of a liftback. I would miss that more than the rear doors tbh.

    • 0 avatar
      tjh8402

      @land ark – another vote here for a lift back. they wouldn’t have had to change the style one bit and it would’ve made the car so much more practical. I’m addicted to my hatchback and I don’t see myself getting a conventional trunk (unless its Lincoln Town Car huge) anytime soon, but I hate CUVs.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      +1 I’m sick of all these coupes that clearly should have been hatchbacks! Even the Mustang suffers from this. With a tiny deck lid and huge glass it is just begging to be a hatch. The hatch is so much easier to load and hold more items especially if the rear seats fold down.

      Not sure why people swear they need a 4 door sedan when almost everyone is just commuting alone. I’ve owned more 2 or 3 doors rides then 4 door versions and it was never a problem. The few times when added passengers they just suffered with less legroom. If you’ve flown on an airplane recently you are already prepared for the sedan seating situation. Its not *that* bad for quick trips. The longer doors are a draw back in parking lots but the improved visibility makes up for it.

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        I had someone debate with me on a 4-door versus a 2-door for their next car. They really liked the coupe, but kept saying that it made more sense to get the sedan version. He was mainly concerned about ingress/egress.

        I finally asked him, on his current sedan, how many times did he have anyone in the back seat and when they did, honestly, how long were they actually sitting in the back seat. That’s when he realized he would be just fine with a coupe.

  • avatar
    Zykotec

    I dread the day we can’t get a non premium coupe with a manual. Not that it matters too much as I prefer my cars seasoned anyway, but I hope my kids will still be able to buy interesting good looking used cars that are fun to drive in the future. And premium cars just aren’t really fun to neither drive or own imo…
    Also, the practicality of having separate doors for front and rear seat entry is highly exaggerated. I’ve owned a few 2 door hactback sedans, and I loved being able to just toss the crocery bags behind the seat without having to open another door, or fasten my childrens chairs without having the front seat in the way. + the added bonus of controlling the kids (or drunken friends on weekends) entry and exit from the car. Having rear doors is only really useful of you still have rear facing child seats, or if you’re a taxi driver.
    I wish the CR-V was available as a 3 door… (or that the Element was available as a 5 seater and was a bit less ugly)

    • 0 avatar
      operagost

      Old (or really fat) folks have trouble getting in the back of a coupe.

      And kids (who aren’t mine) like to kick the back of the seat to get out.

    • 0 avatar
      zamoti

      Unless FCA does something nutty, the Challenger with a Pentastar and a stick might be a solid bet for the future (since you said non-premium).
      However, that foot-operated parking brake is awful, so very out of place.

  • avatar
    Jaeger

    The notion that subtracting two doors from a sedan makes the resulting vehicle inherently more “sporty” is laughable.

    • 0 avatar
      Zykotec

      The way some automakers also change the roofline when making a coupe will often reduce air resistance resulting in a faster car.
      But, yeah, it’s mostly because coupes look better, and because no one makes a 4 door sportscar.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        I doubt you will find any correlation to Cd and acceleration. That’s dominated simply by power/weight ratio & traction.

        Most people I know don’t think coupes (non-sports cars, that is) look better, which is likely a reason they don’t sell well.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      That’s opinion. I stated it above, but coupes sometimes have less weight, lower rooflines and/or centers of gravity, and then are often marketed as more sporty with different packages/options, different wheels, height differences, sometimes power differences, etc.

      And there are some very good 4-door sports cars out there. Porsche Panamera, Alfa Giulia Quadrifoglio, Rapide, BMW M3, M5, RS7, and even the Evo and WRX to name a few.

  • avatar
    ajla

    You know which company could really use a 2-door?

    Lincoln.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      A Lincoln coup would be good for those who are beyond childbearing age, I guess.

      I won’t be in that market for another 10 years at least. My youngest is 16 months, and we have to help him get into his seat.

      The thing about a 4-door is it works for everyone. I assume that the 4-door Mustang would be a Lincoln.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      It’d certainly be easy enough to make one on a Mustang platform. I’m sure the thought has occurred to them. But then again, they also probably remember the last one they made (Mark VIII) didn’t sell.

  • avatar
    SnarkyRichard

    Unbelievable that Honda , who makes the best FWD manual transmission , only offers it in the Civic model line (discounting the Si) in the LX which they still refuse to give an adjustable wiper delay (available in most base models today). There are people who don’t want their snowmobile (CVT) trans . The last car I’ve owned with just a single speed wiper delay was a 30 year old Celica GT . Honda is stuck decades in the past with this practice . I know it’s part of the trend of eliminating manual transmissions in favor of lower production costs , but some people want what they want and to hell with the trends !

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Honda: “Fine, will give you a manual in a higher trim. But we’ll only paint it black or gray.”

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Yep. This is the way Honda’s worked since I bought one in 1985.

      Probably keeps their costs down.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        Except they offer real colors with manuals in Canada, don’t they? Why does a much smaller market get more choices?

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          The Civic has been the best-selling car in the “Great White North” for the past several years, but even on the Accord line, you could get a top-line Touring equipped with a four-pot and a stick (though no Adaptive Cruise), unlike in the States. Perhaps that has something to do with it.

          (Of course, the base Accord LX was equipped with automatic climate-control WITHOUT A/C until the 2016 model-year in Canada! Who knows!)

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    I love coupes, and Im very happy that Honda (my favorite automaker after Ford) has kept them alive. Ive said it before and Ill say it again: my new car of choice is a Honda Accord coupe with the I-4 and 6MT. Either an LX or Sport trim. And Id keep it forever, barring any disaster that destroys it.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Insulting the general public doesn’t sit well with the traditional Honda ethos.

    Given the prodigious ugliness and impracticality of that little wheeled insect, however superbly built, my take-away from that ad is they know they goofed.

    Maybe there’s an Akio in their executive chain that must be humored.

    That’s a startling Aaron Rodgers clone they found, btw.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Ugly it may be, but I’m seeing them everywhere. I’ve seen more new Civics in the past 3 days than I’ve seen ATS’s or Cascadas all year.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        New coupes or including 4-doors?

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          Only 4-doors. I didn’t even know they made a coupe for the new one.

          When I read “prodigious ugliness and impracticality of that little wheeled insect” I thought you were referring to all Civics, but I can see how “impracticality” would apply to the coupes alone.

          Still, I don’t think I’ve ever seen a new model take over the roads as quickly as the new Civic.

          • 0 avatar
            otaku

            Really? Driving in and around the suburbs of Boston, I don’t think I’ve seen even one example out on the road yet (coupe or sedan).

          • 0 avatar
            Luke42

            I’ve driven a 2016 Civic, and it’s a really compelling package.

            It’s cheap, cheerful, technologically advanced, and just plain nice inside.

            It’s also very nice to drive with the turbocharged CVT trim. The extra torque means that the engine runs at lower RPM lazily shoves you along, kind of like a diesel car.

            The handling seemed good, but I can’t really speak to it because I live on a Cartesian grid, and we don’t corner here. Insusoect it would have cornered well, but in would have had to drive 12 hours back to where I grew up to find some real twisties.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            The Coupes just came out recently. They look better-executed than the Sedan, which comes across as too much “four-door coupe” than I’d like to see, but it’s still decent, especially inside — a 6’2″+ individual could be reasonably comfortable in the back seat.

            The upcoming Hatchback looks the best of all: four doors, and a Hyundai Azera-ish vibe to the side. Same rear-end as the other two, just a little overwrought, but I’m sure it’ll sell like hotcakes! (Can’t remember what body style the Si and Type-R will be available in, but one is the Coupe, and the other will be the Hatchback; I believe the Sedan will be LX, EX(-T), and Touring only.)

      • 0 avatar
        Jaeger

        That’s my experience as well. Seems like the day after the new Civic hit the dealerships they were instantly EVERYWHERE. I’m not a huge fan of the styling – kind of wish they had toned it down a bit for the mainstream models and kept this extroverted aesthetic for the SI / Type R. But they way these things are clogging up the streets, Honda clearly knows better than I do.

        As for this particular model, I don’t get the coupe thing at all and never will – but hey, if people think having less doors makes their car more awesome, have at it.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          Civic owners I know are excited about the new car. And I don’t mean guys driving lowered, fart-can equipped cars.

          I’m talking about people who bought their current Civics as disposable appliances, drive them into the six figure mileage range, and want to upgrade before they have to change the original brakes. These are people who don’t want to do any maintenance on their cars other than oil and tires, and they’re looking for more of the same.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I see that only the LX is available with a manual transmission, all the rest have the CVT. I’m not a CVT hater, but I wouldn’t consider it a sporting transmission either.

    • 0 avatar
      SnarkyRichard

      If the late great Soichiro Honda saw what a bunch of corporate bean counters his company has turned into , he just wouldn’t just spin in his grave . He’d be doing back-flips and puffing out ash farts too !

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Most of the trim levels are CVT with a turbocharged 1.5L engine.

      I liked how it drove with the CVT+Turbo — and I very much prefer that combo over a step-shift automatic. But I’m not a conventional car guy, so your taste in drivetrains may be different than mine.

      I was evaluating it as a long distance highway commuter, and it wants to trot and cantor instead of walk and gallop. That’s a great match for the mission we have in mind for the car.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    I actually like 4-door sedans, but everything in my yard now is a 2-door coupe or 3-door hatch. Go figure.

  • avatar
    Shiv91

    I love coupes, but then again I’m single, childless and don’t go out in a group much…*shrug*

  • avatar
    mchan1

    Why build a coupe when CUVs are hot?

    Honda could’ve just brought back the Civic Hatchback!

    Oh, wait! Honda already has the Fit and HR-V models!

    Never mind.

  • avatar
    CarnotCycle

    Coupes as a category haven’t gone anywhere – it’s just there’s so many purpose-built coupes it makes no sense for (most) automakers to chop their sedans.

    Pony cars as a group are very good in the current era for example, and surprisingly economical. Why would there be Fusion two-door when Mustang sits right next to it on lot? Is there really that big a circle on the Venn diagram for guy who desperately wants coupe but has to also have the extra couple cubic feet of trunk space or whatever? Doubt it.

    Honda may have a point in their ads regarding true compact coupes.

    • 0 avatar
      otaku

      Some people just prefer the two-door body style, but don’t require all of the muscle car performance offered in the Mustang. As much as I like to read about the Mustang in magazines, I own a 2008 Ford Focus coupe as my daily driver.

      Why, you ask?

      Well, for one it was much less expensive to purchase. It’s quieter, more comfortable, it weighs a heck of a lot less, gets way better fuel economy, and because it has FWD, copes with the harsh realities of New England winters about a billion times better.

      Also, the insurance rates are much more reasonable and up until about a year ago, was the only coupe Ford sold with actual independent rear suspension.

      • 0 avatar
        otaku

        Just wanted to notify all of the so-called enthusiasts out there who endlessly criticize every automaker regarding the limited availability of manual transmissions (not to mention brown, diesel-powered wagons) and then in the same breath turn around only to comment about how coupes should be discontinued altogether because they’re supposedly impractical and nobody buys them…

        There is a special circle of hell awaiting you and all of your automotively hypocritical brethren.

        If you’re really an enthusiast, it should be about more variety in vehicle offerings for everybody, not just what you personally want.

        That is all.

  • avatar
    bobmaxed

    Thanks for explaining that Honda commercial. There’ll be plenty of people who won’t get it

  • avatar
    tbp0701

    I had a 2000 Accord Coupe for a long time and put nearly a quarter million miles on it. In all that time I never thought, “I’m so glad I don’t have rear doors! This rocks! I am so cool!” Okay, well maybe I thought the part about my being cool on occasion, but when doing stuff like flipping the seat up for a third passenger to duck and get in or when crawling around cleaning the back I usually thought having rear doors would be handy, even if the coupe did look ginchier.

    But Honda’s advertising these days makes me cringe. Remember the days when they didn’t seem to feel a need to compare their cars against anyone else’s, nor make the standard car ad claim that driving a certain car will make you a more unique individual? Or did I imagine that?

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      So I guess the questions is, when taking everything you liked about the coupe and comparing it to everything you disliked, which won out?

      You spent your money on the coupe so there had to be some sort of appeal.

      Many cars are compromises. Best we can do is choose what works for our own individual situations.

      • 0 avatar
        tbp0701

        You’re correct, and the likes definitely won out, so much so that I held onto it a while after getting my current car and only sold it when a family friend needed a decent car and would take care of it (he’s still driving it). I’m glad of it, as if it had been treated like many old Hondas are I’d felt like I betrayed a friend.

        As for why I bought it, it was at an off-lease auction. Since dealers weren’t that interested in a four cylinder midsized coupe (even if it was a Honda during a time when that was considered fairly special) it went for a pretty reasonable price. I then kept it through several years and a lot of miles, including a pretty tough time. (In short at one point it was a big deal to me to have it in a hospital lot and take drives between being attached to an IV). So, it became special.

        I was even reluctant to shop for another car, but as the Honda was approaching 250K miles and I was driving over 80 miles a day at odd hours, I decided it was time to find another. The Honda kept going, though, so I took my time with research and test drives. I still kept the Honda for almost another year after getting the new car.

        Incidentally, driving a 2000 Honda to a dealer and test driving 2012 Hondas really illustrated how much the company’s cars had changed. I couldn’t find a new one I liked (and I did try another Coupe but couldn’t find one with a manual). I wound up buying a Mazda.

        So that’s way more than you asked, but yes. While there were times I would have liked for it to have a set of rear doors, all in all I loved that Accord Coupe. But being over 40 I decided it was probably time to have some rear doors on the next car.

  • avatar
    TTCat

    In over 4 decades of driving, I have never had anything but 2-doors (and manuals for that matter) – really don’t see that ever changing – well, I might wind up with my first “Stronic”, but I don’t like the idea much…

  • avatar
    laserwizard

    The new Civic is bloated, ugly, and worthless. It is really not a Civic – it is a psuedo Accord that is as large as the original Accord without any of the quality or innovativeness.

    Honduh has become worthless. It sits on its reputation and builds vehicles for idiots.

    And two door products no longer sell. I remember when Chrysler sold 150k Cordobas in 1975 and they were two doors!

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      It really isn’t a Civic as I knew the Civic in the 1990s. It replaces the Accord.

      And the Accord replaces Acura.

      If you’re looking for a cheap practical car like the Civic was 20 years ago, you should look at the Fit.

  • avatar
    Moparmann

    I understand the “practicality” of four door cars, but at 6’4″, with my seat positioned for me, NO ONE can sit behind me in a majority of cars. Ergo, I ‘ve always leaned toward two door cars; and yes, I think they look sleeker, BUT I DO NOT think that any of that “look” transfers to or assists my personal well being. I finally broke tradition with the purchase of 2012 Honda Fit Sport. The fact that there was a decent amount of room behind my fully rear positioned seat was a factor. Since I am still considered a bit quirky, it is, however, a 5 speed manual! :-)

  • avatar
    rpn453

    The RWD S-platform 200SX is only slightly less bland than the FWD B-platform Sentra? Seriously?

    Edit: I see now that there was a FWD B-platform 200SX in North America from 1995 to 1998. No wonder I never paid it any attention. A shame they sullied the name like that.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Yep, B14 Sentra/Sunny coupe was a 200SX here. The S12 200SX was also pretty dull (on this continent, at least).

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        At least it wouldn’t be dull in the winter. Even the lowly Chevette provided enormous fun for many thousands of Western Canadian high school kids!

        • 0 avatar
          tbp0701

          Good point. I once had a Chevette, which was even worse than the Pinto I also had. Every trip, especially in Winter, with either of those cars was a bit of an adventure filled with unknowns (and enough hand tools and supplies in the back to attempt another roadside repair).

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            What year? The mid-80’s ones didn’t seem to have many problems.

            Very simple cars. If you maintained them there wasn’t much to go wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      tbp0701

      I’m not certain, but I believe it was a ’76, and I had around 1988-89, so it was pretty old. My most vivd recollection of that car is driving to a job interview and engine cut power on the Interstate. The car wouldn’t go over 30 as I got it to the side and out of everyone’s way before getting plowed into. After a few minutes trying to find the problem without success, I figured I’d get it off the freeway, but then it went back to full power.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        You can’t be too hard on a twelve-year-old used car from the seventies!

        I have no experience with the early ones. They seemed pretty durable by the time they made the ’86 that I had for a couple years in the mid-90’s. That one also appeared to have been treated well by its previous owners.

        The oldest one that I can recall was a baby blue version that a friend received, handed down from his grandmother. It was probably an early-80’s model but I suppose it could have been as old as ’79, judging by the front grille design.

  • avatar
    Eyeflyistheeye

    While the new Civic sedan has grown on me, the coupe is hideous. Not as much as the 9th generation Civic coupe which has to be one of the ugliest cars I’ve ever seen with its awful fender flares on the wrong side of the car (the front).

    Pity since from what I heard, the Civic coupe drives like a Prelude. But, the Prelude was always gorgeous. This isn’t. Which is extremely vexing since the 1992-2000 Civic coupes were handsome cars.

    If anything, bring back the three-door hatchback instead of this freaking atrocity. It was unique, it was authentically Japanese Honda and Honda never made an ugly three-door Civic (even the EP3 looks good with bigger rims).

  • avatar
    Paddan

    Ford really needs to bring back the EXP.

  • avatar
    John

    Here’s a serious question: why does Honda price the Civic coupes higher than the sedans?

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I think the Civic coupe has basically built its own brand, like the Corvette, Wrangler, or the Mercedes SL – it’s become a unique product with no real competitors.

    Pretty remarkable.

  • avatar
    suspekt

    The Civic is a brand unto itself. I think they are very wise offering the 2 door body under the Civic banner (as does the Accord).

    I never understood why they dropped the Prelude nameplate but in retrospect it made sense to consolidate sales under the Accord/Civic models.

    As an aside;
    I really wish Honda would offer the following model which I would go buy tomorrow:
    – Honda Accord V6 FOUR door
    – 6 spd manual
    – awd with torque vectoring as deployed in Pilot/Ridgeline

    If the 6 spd manual were the next gen 10 speed auto or 8spd DCT that would be fine too.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Acura offered a version of the previous TL which roughly matched your criteria, but it sold poorly. I don’t think you’ll see Honda try it again.

      • 0 avatar
        TMA1

        The poor sales probably had more to do with the looks (beak) and pricing of the old TL. As for an 8-speed DCT, that would leave you with no reason to buy a TLX.

  • avatar
    KevinC

    The best coupe out there is now a decade old, and still a brilliant car – the BMW 330Ci with ZHP (performance package) option. Beautiful, fast, efficient.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    It’s nice they picked some Canadian people to star in their Civic commercial.

    /South Park reference

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