By on April 8, 2016

2016 Toyota RAV4 Hybrid, Image: Toyota USA

After finishing a close third behind the plunging Ford Explorer and Chevrolet TrailBlazer in 2006, the Honda CR-V went on to claim the top spot among SUVs/crossovers in America in eight of the following nine years, including the last four consecutive years.

A victorious ending to 2016 appears less certain for the CR-V. In the last five months, the best-selling utility vehicle in America was the Toyota RAV4, sales of which rose 14 percent in the first-quarter of 2016 as CR-V volume slid 3 percent.

Incidentally, the last SUV to unseat the CR-V on a calendar year basis was the Ford Escape. Back in 2011, the Escape was available with a hybrid powertrain, an option not offered by rival small SUVs. Fast forward to 2016, and the vehicle most likely to unseat the CR-V — the surging RAV4 — is likewise available with a hybrid powertrain. A meaningless, low-volume variant meant to bolster an automaker’s green cred? Perhaps that was the case with the Escape in 2011, but there’s an entirely different story to tell with the RAV4 five years later.

Let’s rewind. In 2011, after losing out in a fourth consecutive year to the CR-V one year earlier, the Escape posted a massive 33-percent year-over-year improvement, besting the Honda by nearly 36,000 sales. Mixed into that 36,000-unit margin were about 10,000 Escape Hybrid sales at the end of the Hybrid’s lifecycle, less than half the total achieved by the Escape four years earlier. Even without the Hybrid’s additional sales, the Escape would still have ended 2011 as America’s top-selling utility vehicle, and by a wide margin.

One year later, despite a modest uptick in Escape sales (plus only a handful of leftover Escape Hybrid sales) and a fast-rising new CR-V, the Escape fell back into its typical number two slot, a place previously held by the Escape every year since 2007, when the Toyota RAV4 grabbed the silver medal.

With a refreshed 2016 Toyota RAV4, however, Toyota began making its claim late last year. Toyota knows what it is to routinely top a sales leaderboard in the United States. The Camry has led all passenger cars in 14 consecutive years and in the last seven months. There, too, a hybrid powertrain makes a meaningful difference. 46 percent of the Camry’s margin over the Honda Accord in calendar year 2015 was made up by Camry Hybrids.

2016 Toyota RAV4, Image: Toyota

For the RAV4, however, the hybrid has played an integral role in early 2016, securing a place ahead of all rival SUVs and crossovers and propelling the RAV4 to the highest rate of growth among the 12 most popular utility vehicles in the country.

Toyota USA reported 76,122 total RAV4 sales between January and March, enough to carve out a 4,528-unit lead over the second-ranked Escape, which you’ll recall is no longer available with a hybrid powertrain.

Among those 76,122 RAV4s sold in the first-quarter were 7,484 RAV4 Hybrids. Subtract that 10 percent of the RAV4’s total and Toyota no longer claims top spot among SUVs and crossovers in America. Sans hybrid, the RAV4 falls to fourth, behind the Escape, CR-V, and Rogue. Sans hybrid, RAV4 volume is up not by 14 percent but rather by a modest 2 percent, outpaced by the rate of growth in the industry at large and easily exceeded by the 9 percent increase in SUV/crossover sales.

Of course, this assumes that without an available hybrid powertrain these eventual RAV4 Hybrid customers wouldn’t have turned into buyers of conventional RAV4s. Yet it’s entirely possible that these RAV4 Hybrid customers are tuned into the idea of the most efficient all-wheel-drive utility vehicle available. (Only the front-wheel-drive Lexus NX300h, which shares the RAV4’s architecture, achieves higher numbers, and only by a single mile per gallon in city driving. The RAV4 Hybrid is exclusively all-wheel-drive.) EPA combined ratings put the RAV4 Hybrid at 33 miles per gallon, a significant increase from the 25 mpg achieved by the most efficient all-wheel-drive, gas-only RAV4. All-wheel-drive versions of the Honda CR-V and Nissan Rogue are rated at 27 mpg combined; all-wheel-drive Mazda CX-5s and four-cylinder Mitsubishi Outlanders are rated at 26 mpg combined.

The RAV4 Hybrid is therefore clearly offering a consequential efficiency upgrade, one that’s unavailable on other top sellers in its category: CR-V, Rogue, Equinox, Cherokee, Forester, and Escape. Granted, it comes at a cost, albeit not a hugely significant one. The RAV4 XLE Hybrid starts at $29,420 while the RAV4 Limited Hybrid is priced from $34,660. In each case, the hybrid powertrain adds $790 to the cost of an equivalent RAV4 XLE AWD or RAV4 Limited AWD. Furthermore, the gas-only RAV4 must not yet fend off an in-showroom challenge from a more efficient subcompact crossover, though the C-HR is on its way to fight the Honda HR-V, Jeep Renegade, and Chevrolet Trax, among others.

As for the Escape, we now see how it all comes full circle. The last utility vehicle to outsell the Honda CR-V over a calendar year basis was a vehicle available with a hybrid system, which thanks to a licensing agreement with Toyota, used a hybrid design seen in Toyota hybrids, too. The next vehicle with a strong chance of outselling the CR-V also uses a Toyota hybrid system, only this time, it’s a Toyota. Ford, which indirectly replaced the Escape Hybrid with the C-Max mini-MPV, sold a combined total of 75,653 Escapes and C-Maxes in 2016’s first-quarter, only 469 units shy of the outright RAV4 total.

Even at its peak, the Escape Hybrid was not sufficiently successful to force rival automakers into pouring green resources into their competing vehicles nearly a decade ago. But if the RAV4 continues to top the leaderboard because it’s sourcing added strength from its hybrid offering, competitors will be spurred to more committed action.

[Images: Toyota]

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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42 Comments on “Want To Beat The Honda CR-V? Sell a Hybrid...”


  • avatar
    Quentin

    Ford didn’t use Toyota’s HSD for the Escape. They basically had overlapping patents and came to an agreement to play nice with one another’s patents instead of getting into a court battle over it.

  • avatar
    shaker

    Nice to see Toyota getting some Prius DNA into a vehicle that makes a bigger difference in efficiency – more should follow their lead.

    I’m hoping the Malibu Hybrid system makes it into the next-gen Equinox (RU listening, Chevy?)

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Toyota (and Ford) hybrid powertrains are underrated, partly because they are installed in such boring vehicles and partly because journalists have such an irrational hatred for anything that even vaguely smells of CVT. The RAV4 Hybrid powertrain is a big upgrade over the standard 2.5/6 speed in every respect from responsiveness to power to smoothness to quiet. Now if only the back seat didn’t feel like a park bench that sunk into mud and the center stack didn’t feel quite so Fisher-Price.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      “The RAV4 Hybrid powertrain is a big upgrade over the standard 2.5/6 speed in every respect from responsiveness to power to smoothness to quiet.”

      True, and a recent review here on TTAC concluded as much.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I’ll be the dissenting voice then. Despite all the generational improvements, I still find the different mode switchover s and engine cutting off then kicking back on to be less pleasant overall than the excellently paired 6a/2.5 combo. In my fiance’s family they have a 2012 SE 2.5 Camry, a 2013 rav4 limited, a 2013 Camry xle hybrid, and now a 2013 Lexus es300h. The hybrids don’t get appreciably better mileage in how these particular cars are used in the real world, and the disconnectedness if the had compared to the regular automatic makes it not worth it IMO.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          Maybe Ford’s hybrid system is smoother and their dry-clutch automatic is worse than Toyota’s, but I drive a Focus automatic and a C-Max Hybrid of identical vintage back to back, and there’s no question the C-Max is smoother, stronger and more economical. Adding the electric motor smooths out the lumpy power curve of the 2-liter. But the Focus DSG is astonishingly efficient on the highway, where the yawning MPG gap narrows to a tiny sliver.

          Does your relatives’ “real world” driving consists of 70+ mph highway travel? Or if it’s in town, do they brake hard at the last minute and use the accelerator as a toggle switch rather than a rheostat? There is some skill involved in getting the most out of a hybrid, but it’s nothing a smooth driver doesn’t do already.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Yeah I mean in the Ford case you’re comparing to arguably one of the worst mass market automatic transmissions on sale today (Powershift DCT). I personally think that Toyota’s FWD 6A Aisin is one of the better automatics I have driven in terms of shift smoothness and timing, while retaining a crispness with a lot of torque converter lockup that makes you feel more connected to the motor (and helps fuel economy). The HSD robs me of that ‘directness’ and I guess I haven’t driven them enough to anticipate when it will use which motor (electric, or gas, or both).

            And yes the driving is made up of a lot of suburban and highway driving. Driving style varies, but my gf is like Driving Miss Daisy in her non-hybrid SE, her lifetime average is something crazy like 33 mpg, and that’s with winter driving, a fair amount of stop and go on her commute, etc. Her dad, who’s a bit more aggressive but not lead footed at all IMO, averages about 35ish mpg in his ES300h. On 60-65mph state highways, the gas Camry has gotten damn near close to 38mpg, which was just about the same that the XLE Hybrid Camry got in similar conditions.

            Having said all that, I’m not hating on Hybrids at all, I just personally prefer the standard variant most of the time.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    CR-V is probably the best cute ute out there in the compact segment.

    We had a brand new, 6 miles on the odometer, stripper RAV-4 LE FWD as a rental last month. We put 1300 miles on it in 5 days driving to Death Valley and back, including extensive off-road use.

    If I hadn’t gotten norovirus 12 hours before we left (and then drove from Santa Ana to Beatty, Nevada so sick I don’t remember 1/3 of the drive) and them my wife got it 36 hours before we had to leave, I would have had some epic pictures for a review for TTAC.

    We had to return it unwashed and empty to Hertz, because even giving ourselves a 2-hour pad for traffic based on the initial ETA for the drive back wasn’t enough. We barely caught our flight home. You should have seen the look of horror on the agent’s face when we went to drove it off. Caked in dust and mud inside and out. The way we treated that RAV-4 is exactly why I will never buy a used car – ever.

    Anyway, there were some things we really liked, but there were some things we hated. We noticed some build and quality issues, and the driver seat broke on day one, and could not be adjusted forward and back. This is why I was stuck doing all the driving while sick, we couldn’t get the seat to budge for my wife to drive. There were some surprising panel gaps.

    The Equinox is super dated. The Rogue is meh. The Escape has a not so great history. The CX-3 is definitely interesting but on the smaller side for this class (as I understand it is a bit of a tweener). Compass or Patriot – gag. Terrain see Equinox. RAV-4, I left not understanding why they sell so many as they do (don’t translate that into me thinking it is terrible, it’s not, it was very competent on some really rough terrain for starters). If I was buying in this class and I didn’t want luxury or near luxury, CR-V – all – the – way.

    The biggest downside, the AWD components are near useless. I’d save the Cheddar and just go FWD.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Shame there is no photo documentation of that adventure. The RAV4’s approach and departure angles and relatively good ground clearance are the vehicle’s strongest attributes to me. Like the Forester, it can actually get somewhere off pavement. I did find the AWD handy on sand and steep scrambles out of a wash. The rest of the vehicle is a bit too cheap and utilitarian feeling for the price.

      Where in Death Valley did you go? I have fond memories of taking a 90s Camry up to the Racetrack and through the rutted road to the Panamint dunes while some camper in an old 4Runner laughed at me.

      And eff noroviruses. I would go years and years between any sort of barfing. And then I had kids and got sucked into the orbit of toddler microbes. Now one of these GI viruses runs through the house several times a year.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        We did Titus Canyon together and I did the drive to Racetrack solo. On our third day I had to drive from Badwater back to Beatty to drop my poor wife off at the hotel, then drive out to Racetrack solo.

        Titus Canyon was definitely more — interesting — then the road to Racetrack. Some serious craters in the road, bulging rocks, some pretty darn steep sections both up and down, and some narrow areas even in a RAV-4.

        Funny story about Racetrack. Coming back, and with more familiarity with the road, I was driving 30 to 40 MPH on the way back (that poor RAV-4 was squeaking inside like a 1998 GM product on the drive back to Santa Ana) and I could see these headlights behind me. Not catching up, but not falling behind. I was thinking to myself, “wow, that’s one Hell of a driver behind me.”

        I reached a point where the road was narrow and there was an oncoming truck. The truck that I caught up to pulled over, and those headlights as I slowed down were closing in fast. I felt I would rather just let them pass me at this point then try to keep the pace, so I took the opportunity to pass the slower truck, then pull over to let the oncoming truck pass us, and then wait for those headlights to roar past.

        It was a Toyota Corolla being driven by a skinny Asian kid like he was playing Collin Raye Rally Racing. Just SCREAMED by in a cloud of dust. I was convinced I would find the flaming remains of a rolled over Corolla somewhere in the desert but I never caught up to him. Just NUTS.

        Racetrack Road was in good shape, generally just wash boarded to Hell. Titus Canyon road had standing water and mud in places. Definitely was at the limits of the RAV-4 from a ground clearance stand point.

        As far as norovirus, it hit me at 2:30 AM about 3-1/2 hours before I flight took off. When we were in security I was just dying. The line was 50 minutes long, I needed two toilets so bad, and I was just drenched in sweat. My wife is a doctor and she was so worried she was saying we shouldn’t get on the flight, I was, “lets do this.” Even the flight attendant checked on me about 2 hours into the flight asking if I was OK. Oh lady, please do you have anything to stop my stomach rebellion and please keep bringing me water. I thought it was food poisoning, and we were blaming the restaurant we ate at the night before.

        There was one day where we both felt good, and then Thursday night my wife starting to feel off. Friday morning same thing, she was dying. She actually soldiered out to Badwater and was done. By the time we got on the plane to head back we were both healthy.

        Got AMAZING pictures of Death Valley for the super bloom, but alas not a single picture of the RAV-4.

        Agreed that the interior is very utilitarian. A broken driver seat out of the gate, poor alignment on the fuel filler door, uneven panel gaps around the rear hatch, and regardless of the front to rear adjustment, it was utterly impossible to find a comfortable driving position. My back was in AGONY and there was no lumbar support adjustment for the driver seat. Lots of hard plastic, although the seat materials in particular look like they will last forever.

        Good ground clearance, GREAT traction control programming. The 4-banger is pretty gutless when it comes to passing power, but given enough asphalt in front of you 100 MPH can be found pretty easily. Road noise was bad, it’s noisy inside. Base stereo was very good and iPhone integration FCA good. It just plain worked (hello Ford and GM, I’m talking to you!).

        The seat alone is a deal breaker for me. One of the worst I ever sat in. A travel pillow behind the back helped. Ugh, I’m getting old.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          Nice story, thanks. Envious that you saw it in bloom. I laughed at the Asian-piloted Corolla bit. When I was at the Racetrack walking around on the lakebed looking at the mystery rocks that slide in windstorms, I noticed a rooster tail coming down the valley at quite a good clip. Back at the dirt road I see it is a rental Sienna minivan driven by an Asian family. Like most day tourists they had hardly a lunch’s supply of water despite being 25 miles from pavement on a road with more than enough loose sharp rocks to take out passenger car tires. They wandered about taking pictures while grandma sweltered in the sun in the passenger seat. I had second thoughts about taking a sedan back there despite multiple days worth of food and water and a full size spare in the trunk.

          Fortunately, I was camping out there and those groups cleared out by mid afternoon. Walking on that completely empty lake bed while a full moon rises in absolute silence is an experience I won’t forget.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            I had no such luck. Even being out there on a Friday it was FULL of people right to sunset. Driving out I couldn’t believe the stream of vehicles heading out to Racetrack in the dark.

            I never got any pictures of the basalt bedrock formation on the north side of the lake because there were always people there.

            Apparently if you see the actual “tracks” of the moving rocks you were lucky. I though they were there year round but apparently they are only visible once every 2 to 3 years depending on weather, moisture, temperature, etc. etc.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Actually, the CX-5 is Mazda’s entry in the compact class. The CX-3 is subcompact. The CX-5 would be my top choice, and it’s not all that much smaller than its competitors.

      The new Tiguan should be interesting, though, and probably overpriced.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        They should be able to price the Tiguan competitively with the production at the plant in Mexico rather than importing them from Europe. Whether they deliver on this by equipping them adequately at competitive prices remains to be seen, but the Mk VII Golf seems to indicate that moving the production can make the pricing a lot more competitive.

      • 0 avatar
        BoogerROTN

        Having recently test driven the CRV, CX-5 and Santa Fe Sport, I’d choose the Hyundai over the other two mostly based upon interiors. The CRV is bleh, the Mazda isn’t much better (and I’m a Mazda5 owner); the Santa Fe was the only one that felt like it belonged in a ~$28K vehicle…

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          The Santa Fe Sport is a proper mid-sized five-seater, with about the same amount of usable room as the Edge and Murano. The Tucson would be Hyundai’s compact entry. But for what the Santa Fe Sport costs (not all that much), it makes an argument against quite a few compact crossovers.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          Although the Hyundai Santa Fe Sport seems more Ford Edge sized, yes, it has a VERY nice interior for the $. I rented one and was impressed with its rich latte-and-cocoa interior colors, swoopy dash with well-done fake wood, top-notch HVAC control feel, etc. The exterior was handsome too, with copper metallic paint and gunmetal wheels. Tons of cargo space too – I used it to transport a big ass air conditioning unit. And it was a fine highway cruiser, with low noise, a good ride and minimal head toss, and a very good balance of power and economy from the base power train. Hell, the only thing that would stop me buying one is that it was an absolute snooze to drive, largely because of the completely lifeless steering.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      Having only 6 miles on a rental car is pretty unbelievable. Just transportation of the car to the rental agency would put more miles on the car.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Don’t discount the Theta twins as sales combined trumps this conversation with half decade old car!

      The rear seat slides for more behind seat storage or spacious seating that rivals Tahoe/Yukon. The Active Noise Cancelation works wonders compared to those notoriously lacking sound deadening in the chase for fuel economy.

      • 0 avatar
        ixim

        +++a lot! Low OTD helps them sell a lot of Thetas. Ditto the V6 option. Looking forward to the 2018 redesign.

        • 0 avatar
          KixStart

          “Low OTD…”

          I have to wonder what GM’s margins are on this, along with their other lower-end vehicles. If gas goes up again and truck sales pause, are they screwed?

          The Thetas were a real disappointment to me. Heavy for the class, lower end of usable interior space for the class and, in spite of what was originally a class-leading feature, direct injection in the 4, not particularly quick and fairly thirsty. I had hoped for better.

          • 0 avatar
            ixim

            On paper, you’re right, kix, but I have had two fwd I4 Equinox’s and they will clock 30+ mpg on the road and 25 mpg overall. They are smooth, quiet and fast enough for most driving. Build quality is better than Toyota with nicer interiors. Top tier gas prevents the GDI carbon problems. Overall, dated but competitive. With all the design and tooling costs long since paid for, I’ll bet the General makes money on every one.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            Our Terrain is roomy and quiet and the styling the fiancé likes. Though pokey with 2.4l and AWD, the HPTuners tune I put on ours really perked up and makes it move from stoplight with no problems going faster than traffic.

  • avatar
    markogts

    I wonder how bad must be Mitsubishi management feeling… they have an excellent alternative with the Outlander phev and they keep delaying it in the US.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Of course, both versions of the Saturn Vue were also available in a hybrid, of the mild variety, and they never sold well.

    I am seeing an inordinate number of 2016 RAV4 units with temporary tags, in both hybrid and standard-ICE guises. In my mind, the facelift was a cosmetic improvement, and may also have helped propel sales to where they are.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      The Saturn VUE was horrid. Even with the Honda V6 and 5-speed automatic GM couldn’t get a break. The Saturn was hobbled with the exploding Honda 5-speed auto during that period, so you could get self-destructing GM CVT, or self-destructing Honda 5-speed.

      /facepalm

      • 0 avatar

        Or you could buy the stick. You really could. Since no one did…

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          My aunt had one with a stick. She bought one of the earlier ones, having traded in her 2nd-gen Saturn SL for it.

        • 0 avatar
          wstarvingteacher

          I bought the stick in the 2002 model Vue because I would not put money down for a CVT. The stick had to be replaced under warranty. The clutch slave cylinder and clutch also went out but I paid for that. Timing chain went at 180k miles. I really found no saving grace that I can credit it with. I think the CVT was available for the first year only. Sure it did not last long.

          Otoh when I bought the 2007 with the Honda power train it worked perfectly. Got rid of it because I was through with the general.

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          @Flybrian, I heard a manual transmission VUE with manual pull away from a stop sign through the first three gears while walking the dogs. Yes, they do exist.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Honda once again followed the accounts and bean counters and built an inferior CR-V from the last model. Average reliability now for Honda with Toyota and the RAV4 getting better every year. We test drove a cr-v last year, fit and finish was sub par compared to the Forester and RAV4. It is not all about a Hybrid model for increased sales.

  • avatar
    rev0lver

    I’m picking up my Rav 4 XLE Hybrid tomorrow. I’m pretty excited.

  • avatar
    theonlydt

    I’d say it’s not just that it’s a hybrid with lower fuel consumption. This is also the “performance” option with the V6 having been dropped. Now you can have your cake and eat it – a relatively small premium for the hybrid, that’s made back by better fuel economy, while delivering stronger performance and AWD only.

    I wouldn’t buy a standard Rav4. I’d be tempted by the hybrid.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Well, Kia has been dragging its feet getting the Sportage hybrid online, and I’m not sure where that plan stands now.

    But their upcoming Niro looks promising, and will offer much higher MPG than any other CUV.

    It’s about time this market segment improved its fuel economy.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    With only a $790 price premium for the hybrid version, I have to wonder if the RAV4 hybrid is purely a CAFE compliance vehicle for Toyota. I find it hard to believe that less than 10% of RAV4 buyers are willing to pay only $790 extra for the hybrid version, unless Toyota is purposely restricting supply because the hybrid version is not profitable and hence they would lose money by selling more of them. I assume a lack of profits is why Ford did not continue with the Escape hybrid, and why the CRV does not provide a hybrid version.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The reality it that the Hybrid system does not add a lot of cost to a car. The eCVT is cheaper to make than a conventional automatic or CVT. Yes the battery pack does add some cost but since it is a small pack it doesn’t cost the mfg that much. Remember the MKZ Hybrid is the same price as the ICE only version and it certainly isn’t a compliance vehicle.

      There was no lack of profit on the Escape Hybrid, they were able to charge a premium for it and it sold pretty well. The reason that the canceled it was to make room for the CMax. It was also done in hopes to make a bigger dent in the Prius dominance. Many people who buy hybrids want to announce that they are saving the earth and the tiny road to green leaf badge and different wheels do not broadcast that the same way a name plate that is only available as a hybrid does.

      However Ford has been making noise that the Escape Hybrid will return soon.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    The Escape Hybrid was not meaningless. It provided a significant increase in MPG vs the best conventional Escape in the type of real world driving that many people do in their daily driving.

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