By on April 4, 2016

Speed Limit 29 Sign, Image: James Brooks/Flickr

Dozens of factors combine to determine posted speed limits on highways and local roads. Among those factors are vehicle limitations, weather conditions, non-motorized road users, old ladies writing letters to city council, and — perhaps most fundamentally — design speed.

What is design speed? Read on, my friends.

Disclaimer: This article is for entertainment purposes only. Always obey local traffic laws, including posted speed limits, always wear your seatbelt, don’t drink and drive, don’t text and drive, yield to pedestrians, and always dispose of used motor oil properly.

According to the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), design speed as a concept was first introduced in 1936.Its first definition described design speed as “themaximum reasonably uniform speed which would be adopted by the faster driving group of vehicle operations, once clear of urban areas.” More recently,FHWA changed the definition toreflect the highest sustained speed permitted by the features of the roadway itself under ideal conditions. Design speeds generally do not change after a roadway is first built or is substantially rebuilt because its underlying topography dictates it. 

A road’s design speed are determined by a number of factors: sight distance, vertical curvature, horizontal curvature, and superelevation (banking).

One of the most basic necessities for driving at any speed is sight. Drivers must see a sufficient distance ahead in order to avoid an obstacle or a crash. The American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AAHSTO) published a table of recommended stopping sight lines for various road speeds. In the table, minimum sight distances are recommended for various speeds. A road designed for 25 mile-per-hour traffic should have at least 155 feet of stopping sight distance, a highway designed for 70 mph traffic should have 730 feet of stopping sight distance. These guidelines aren’t mandatory, but are widely accepted.

While stopping sight distance is easy to visualize, vertical curvature is slightly more abstract. Vertical curvature measures the change in slope steepness. It occurs at the tops and bottoms of hills or valleys.

Effect of crest vertical curves on sight distance., Image: U.S. DOT Federal Highway Administration

In the picture above, we can see that the sight line drawn from the following car to the leading car is at risk of being cut off by the hill’s crest. A crest like this would limit vehicle speeds by temporarily reducing stopping sight distance compared to a flat road or one with constant slope.

Effect of sag vertical curves on sight distance., Image: U.S. DOT Federal Highway Administration

At the bottom of a decent, the effect of sag is felt mostly at night. On an unlit road, the vehicle’s headlights may not completely illuminate the necessary stopping sight distance. Instead, the vehicle’s headlights point at the bottom of the valley instead of downrange. This condition would not be as noticeable during daylight or on a road equipped with street lighting.

And now we break out the slide rulers and pocket protectors.

Horizontal curvature, or turns in normal-speak, are a major factor in determining design speeds. The AASHTO guidelines use a scary looking math equation to decide design speeds on curved road segments based on the amount of allowable “side friction,” or — more plainly — lateral Gs.

The equation basically determines cornering speeds based on maximum lateral G loads. The equation changes when superelevation, or banking, is factored in. On a super-elevated turn like a cloverleaf on-ramp, some of the cornering forces would press the vehicle into the pavement instead of being fully counted as lateral Gs.

Cross section of vehicle on superelevated road., Image: U.S. DOT Federal Highway Administration

However, much of this hot Ti-83 action is unrelated to a vehicle’s ability to handle curves without losing control. Instead, it’s passenger comfort that dictates the maximum lateral G load. Worse yet, it’s based on passenger comfort tests carried out as early as the 1940s, when neither women nor front suspensions were independent.

From the FHWA:

The values currently in use are based on research of passenger comfort (blindfolded passengers) conducted in the 1940s. Subsequent advancements in vehicle technologies call into question the validity of the historic research and its continued use for design and analysis purposes.

Maximum side friction factors for various design speed., Image: U.S. DOT Federal Highway Administration

So how then are design speeds reflected in posted speed limits? Well, it’s complicated.

According to a report from Purdue University, speed limits on rural and suburban highways are typically set between zero and 10 mph below the highway segment’s design speed. But it isn’t just design speed that dictates a given speed limit.

Other factors identified in the report for setting speed limits on a given road segment were: 85th percentile free-flow speed, design speed, road surface characteristics and condition, road classification (limited-access highway, two-lane road, etc.), type and density of roadside development (residential area, farmland), roadside or on street parking, 12 month accident history, and pedestrian activity.

[Images: Speed Limit Sign, James Brooks/Flickr; Figures, Federal Highway Administration]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

66 Comments on “How Design Speeds Dictate Posted Speed Limits...”


  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    Here in Texas, speed surveys are involved (the 85th percentile rule) – once a road is opened or widened, the state or local authorities are supposed to monitors drivers’ speeds, and adjust the speed limit based on how fast 85 percent of the drivers go.

    • 0 avatar
      SunnyvaleCA

      These 85th percentile tests always seemed a little suspicious to me. Supposedly the state does these tests frequently, but I’ve never even once in my 30+ years of driving seen a big sign on a road that reads “speed test in progress; please drive as quickly as you think safe without any fear of speeding tickets.” I mean, how do you measure “natural” speed if you don’t allow people to drive in a way they feel is natural?

      • 0 avatar
        carlisimo

        I’d say we already drive at our natural speeds, posted speed limits be damned.

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        It also is odd that for an 85% rule, you must put the cart before the horse–build the road, then have people drive on it, then figure out how fast they are supposed to go.

        • 0 avatar

          That IS the pure, though rare, way it is done. Build a new road (or take all the speed limit signs off an older one) and do the speed studies to find out what is the best speed limit to post that will tend to yield the safest and smoothest traffic flow with the fewest crashes.

          It is terribly counter-intuitive, but 85% of the public will choose the correct speed limit more accurately than any engineer or politician.

  • avatar
    Fred

    On the way out of town Speed limit increases from 35 to 45. People are good on the 35 part but they like to speed in the 45 zone especially since there is a little passing lane. The police like it as well. Eventually out side the city limits the road increases to 70 mph. Even those that are fast in the 45 zone have a a hard time getting up to 65 let alone to the limit. It’s like people have a natural speed limit, regardless of what is posted.

  • avatar
    OzCop

    What Duke said…same thing in KY where I spent 27 years of cop-dom. Texas of course has a broader rule set, being more flat and more straight. I was shocked the first time I traveled a two lane highway in Texas and the speed limit was 70…and that wasn’t your normal US highway, rather a somewhat more narrow state highway. I consider the elements of the article above to be more of a convoluted group-speak approach, designed and thrown into to state and local laws by means of bureaucratic mumbo-jumbo…

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      Probably a state highway or farm-to-market (FM) road. Most highways with two or more lanes had 70 mph speed limits (65 at night), before the 55 was imposed in 1974.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I spent nearly 3 decades in state highway design in California, and you’re exactly right. Ask any state DOT, and the Public Affairs “officer” will give you mumbo jumbo just like the article. That just proves the author did actual research, he just didn’t talk to any engineers.

      Of course, he wouldn’t have been allowed to talk to engineers and vice versa – we tend to be undiplomatic. For instance, if asked about red light cameras and safety, we blurt out that accidents can be reduced by lengthening the period of the yellow light and putting a 3-4 second delay on the cross traffic green after the red, the cameras are just for revenue. That sort of thing gets us in trouble.

      The truth is, we actually used all that math to obtain design speed, but we work for elected officials and their political appointees who apply fudge factors like the jokingly mentioned little old ladies writing letters, a host of organized groups, county/city elected officials, and our own lawyers who demand we design for the least competent person eligible to receive a driver license.

      Design speed and related stopping sight distance, passing sight distance, decision sight distance, etc., are just guides. The actual setting of speed limits is a purely political act. Don’t blame the highway/traffic engineers, we work for the guys you elect to office.

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    A bit off topic, but,this factor: highway robbery by municipalities. I’m naming names on this one near me. For decades now, Dillon, Colorado has heavily patrolled a very wide, four lane portion of Hwy 6 that has painted medians, wide shoulders, excellent visibility, and the limit is posted at 50 at the behest of Dillon. There are several roads within just a few miles, that by physical parameters are far, far more hazardous and have higher speeds limits. Certain days and times of day I am damn near embarrassed by this tiny town having one, two, sometimes even three officers writing tickets on this road.
    National Motorists Association has documented other cases just like this around the USA. It is wrong to set and enforce unreasonable traffic laws to finance a city government.

    • 0 avatar
      Advance_92

      Dillon’s trouble, but Empire is still the king!

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      I know Dillon’s speed limit BS well, having been stopped there on one of many ski trips. I was let go with a warning. Good choice. When I was pulled over on the connect between Breck and Keystone, I was pulled over in an area with a sudden drop to 30. No talking my way out of that one; he was a revenue robot. So I took my revenue to Utah for a few years afterwards…a $150 ticket vs $15K in vacation spending…take that, revenue pig.

  • avatar
    Jeff Waingrow

    In my area, small towns are linked by state highways. I’ve noticed that a number of drivers do 50 mph in a 55 mph zone, and go almost the same speed when the limit turns to 35. It’s as if they’re completely unaware of speed limits in the first place. And it’s not just older people who do this. Could they all be text messaging?

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      I too tend to drive what feels right, oblivious to posted speed limits, otherwise, I go with the flow of traffic, with weather and other conditions overriding. Even 35 mph feels too fast around lunch time, where all the fast food places are clustered and their driveways poorly staggered, meaning opposing traffic making lefts (into driveways) in the center, have to leapfrog each other.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Studies show time and time again that changes in speed limits have minimal impact on traffic speeds. A change in speed limit might be followed by a change in average speeds that is perhaps 5-10% of the change in the limit — a 20% change would be at the high end of normal. So for example, a 10 mph decrease in a posted limit might be followed by an average decline in speeds of perhaps 1-2 mph, and vice versa for a speed limit increase.

      Most people drive at speeds at which they are comfortable for their own sense of safety. On an open highway, that choice of speed is generally OK, which means that the 85th percentile should probably be used. But drivers don’t always adequately account for hazards that they impose on others, such as pedestrians, so some limits should be set below the 85th percentile.

      But if you want to get drivers to slow down, then the design speed of the road should be changed accordingly. Reducing the numbers on the sign will just result in a higher percentage of vehicles that are exceeding the speed limit. You have to nudge drivers to intuitively want to slow down, not just instruct them to do it.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Here in Cincinnati, getting people to actually go the speed limit (and not under it) is difficult.

        • 0 avatar
          DukeGanote

          Because almost all Ohio limits are antiquated BS unrelated to any modern design speed. For example, the 35-mph speed limit beloved by municipalities was enacted in 1929 — think about it! Over 85 years ago; the year of the St Valentine’s Day Massacre, when dinosaurs like the Ford Model A ruled the road.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That doesn’t actually relate to what I said, at all.

          • 0 avatar
            DukeGanote

            100% relevant: when speed limits are political BS, like where we apparently both live in metro Cincinnati, compliance is wretched.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            When speed limits are BS, generally it means people ignore them and go -faster- than the limit. Not slower.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Modern technology doesn’t make it safer to drive faster on local roads. Interstates, yes, but not in residential and business districts where pedestrians and pets and driveways and intersections and all the rest are pretty much the same.

          • 0 avatar

            I think most people understand that a 2012 Camry stops faster and in a much shorter distance than a 1928 Model A.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            It isn’t just about stopping distance, and it isn’t just about you. You have to share the road with others and you really should take their safety into account.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Same in Northwest Ohio — the underposted numbers on I-75 (in the parts without the official state flower, the orange construction barrel), and the resulting left lane bandits, are endemic.

          Just this morning, a C6 ‘Vette was parked right next to the semi train. (To the driver’s credit, he did get in gear and completed his “pass” when the I flicked my left blinker.) I don’t care if your car is Torch Red (as that car was), I would assume a trooper isn’t going to bother you unless you’re faster than 10 over!

      • 0 avatar
        qfrog

        I agree. The term I like to use to describe this behavior of driving based on internal factors rather than the posted limit is risk homeostasis. I believe in the UK this is the theory behind the zigzag side of the roadway markings. Giving the perception of a narrower roadway which in turn plays to the driver’s perception of risk. Elevate the perception of risk and people* drive slower.

        *does not include rally drivers.

        • 0 avatar
          DukeGanote

          I like to call this behavior of setting speeds limits without regard to the majority of drivers (and only with regard to fear-mongering rather than actual risk as measured and documented in a traffic and engineering study) “political BS”. I’ll take majority rule over the smug arrogance and revenue-generation of so-called authority, thank you.

      • 0 avatar
        smartascii

        If what you say is true (and I have no reason to doubt it), why have speed limits at all? Nobody pays any attention, anyway, so the only remaining explanation is that it makes the safety nannies feel better and gives the enforcement branches some revenue opportunities.

        • 0 avatar

          Correct 85th percentile limits have several advantages. A few of the fastest drivers slow down a bit because they perceive the limit is reasonable. Some of the slowest drivers speed up to get in or closer to the main flow – so speed variance and conflicts decrease. Also, having a correct limit posted helps train new drivers that don’t yet have enough experience to choose safe speeds instinctively. AND correct limits help police identify the small percentage of drivers far enough above the normal flow to warrant attention – and maybe tickets.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          Not all speeds are safe, and there are some drivers who should be penalized for driving too quickly.

          In any case, the primary purpose of a speed limit should generally be to provide more information to those who aren’t familiar with the road. The flow of traffic should usually be a fair indicator of how fast one should or shouldn’t go, although there are times when that isn’t the case.

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            See “left lane bandits,” or those who need to be spoon-fed.

            (The folks who would blindly follow the sign if it said “Drive Off This Bridge.”)

  • avatar
    DukeGanote

    Design speed is “based on conservative assumptions about driver, vehicle, and roadway characteristics” (Texas Transportation Institute report 1465-1). The so-called 70-mph design speed of rural interstates is irrelevant to flat straight sections, which is why drivers can and daily DO far exceed 70-mph without tires shredding, paint peeling, and the engine bursting into flames at 71-mph! Not even at 88-mph (as shown in Back To The Future)!!

  • avatar

    That is a very good description of design speed. Two points.

    Duke’s notation that the criteria are VERY conservative is correct and the referenced research shows why that is true.

    A design speed of XX mph means the WORST few places on the road (curves and hills or sags) have that design speed, everywhere else has a higher design speed – often a MUCH higher design speed.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Wow this one needs some editing. Was it typed on a phone?

    1936.Its
    “themaximum
    recently,FHWA
    toreflect

  • avatar
    KOKing

    Wah, this takes me back to the civil engineering classes I took ~20yrs ago.
    The city I live/work in actually does speed surveys on occasion, and openly publishes any speed limit changes. Amazingly, they do occasionally (and just recently, even) get reset UP, though more often they sadly go down.

  • avatar
    redliner

    Great, so now that everyone has modern brakes, modern suspension, and ever increasing driver aids, when will we see increasing speed limits?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Hopefully never, because the skill of the car generally is in an inverse relationship with the skill of the driver.

      The general public has a much easier time driving now than in 1940, so they’re worse at it.

      • 0 avatar
        DukeGanote

        Yeah I imagine repeal of the double-nickel was quite a blow. Except the best year in Ohio with “55” had 1,585 traffic deaths (the year 1983), while 2014 had 1,066 traffic deaths — 33 of which were on rural interstates.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Because zero safety improvements were made between 1983 and 2014. The number of cars on the road is identical as well. Can you please relax? Thanks.

          • 0 avatar
            DukeGanote

            I relax about increasing the speed limit by having read both of the reports financed by — but not done by –the Ohio State Highway Patrol regarding the increase to “65”. Neither of which found any effect of the increased limit.
            http://trid.trb.org/view.aspx?id=371649

          • 0 avatar

            And the first year of 70 on Turnpike had better safety results than the last year of 65. That is not surprising since the 85th speeds are from 75 to 80 and getting closer to the correct limit is an improvement.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Now you’ve just contradicted your point made at 1:04. So I’ll assume you’ve got nothing else to add.

          • 0 avatar
            DukeGanote

            Nothing? Exactly — I spent part of the afternoon congratulating Marylanders on finally increasing their rural interstate speed limit from 65- to 70-mph. Of the 442 traffic deaths in Maryland in 2014, NONE occurred on its 142 miles of rural interstates. It’s always fun to contribute NOTHING to the discussion.

    • 0 avatar
      slance66

      Sure…just as soon as self driving cars take over.

      It really is sad. There’s a twisty, tight stretch of road I drive twice a day that has seen three fatal accidents, and many non fatal, since I’ve lived here. Speed limit is a probably appropriate 40 mph. People often hit 50…and shouldn’t.

      There there is a super-wide, straight stretch not too far away that is 25 mph. Naturally, the cops sit there all the time. It could easily support 50 MPH with no real risk.

      • 0 avatar
        DukeGanote

        Probably not even then; Greens will simply argue that any speed above bicycle speed is a waste of energy: “nobody needs to go that fast, just leave earlier if you want to arrive earlier, whine, whine after sanctimonious whine…”

        • 0 avatar
          RHD

          Putting words in the mouth of others while painting with a broad brush is innately illogical, but surprisingly effective with those who are only paying half attention.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            I’m a “green” and I drive a 460 HP car for fun on the weekends and it returns over 30 mpg on the highway….so speak for yourself Duke….

          • 0 avatar
            DukeGanote

            Sure I’m tarring all Greens, but then I do follow their efforts on both sides of the Atlantic regarding speed limits. There may be a few who actually don’t mind Teslas ripping down the freeway.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Modern cars also usually have a much lower center of gravity than cars of the 60’s and 70’s, which makes a difference as well.
      The other side of the coin is the proliferation of cheap Chinese tires with poor traction, especially at the limits, underinflation due to negligence of maintenance, and distraction from cell phones.

      • 0 avatar
        WheelMcCoy

        Hey RHD,

        I recognize your avatar as that of SpeedRacer’s steering wheel. Push button B for the physics defying grip tires, and you won’t have to worry about slowing down for any curve. :)

        OP – nice article. Like a few other commenters mentioned, I sense each road has a natural limit. NYC’s FDR drive with its narrow sections, lack of a shoulder, and potholes, generally discourages speeding (although some still do).

        Sweeping on-ramps are easy and fun to go fast on. In contrast, a cloverleaf on-ramp with a decreasing radius slows (most) drivers down.

    • 0 avatar
      mustang462002

      If you are bored:
      http://onlinepubs.trb.org/onlinepubs/sr/sr254.pdf

      Great article explains current research efforts.

  • avatar
    mustang462002

    Good detail on geometric highway design.

    To design a new roadway, the use of the highway specifies the speed limits. Interstate vs. city street. The speed limits dictates the geometric design requirements of the roadway along with safety related items.

    An existing highway speed limit is modified using once a complex analysis of traffic flow that is done on various available computer programs after establishing a vehicular count. The programs take into account complex interactions and driver behavior of individual vehicles to propose the most efficient traffic movement. This can include lowering or raising speed limit or changing intersection design and traffic light sequencing.

    Politics does play a role in this. But state DOT are unable to modify speed limits on will as it presents a safety liability to the engineer authorizing this.

    • 0 avatar

      Politics does play a role in this. But state DOT are unable to modify speed limits on will as it presents a safety liability to the engineer authorizing this.

      This SHOULD be true, but sadly it isn’t in many states. Speed limits are often set for political reasons by engineers that do or should know better. Whenever you see posted limits set well below the 50th percentile speeds and sometimes below the 10th percentile – you can be pretty sure that the limits were set with politics, not engineering or safety.

  • avatar
    James2

    Here in HNL, the fastest speed limit (65) had to be imposed by the governor. He told HDOT to make this certain stretch of H-1 65 mph, to which the HDOT Speed Kills Mafia cried foul. But they did so anyway, promptly reverting the speed limit to 55 mph once that length of highway ended.

    The “design speed” of this road could easily be, say, 75 –and guess what most drivers are doing?– but for obsolete thinkers in HDOT.

  • avatar

    Speed Limits here are posted merely to generate revenue. NOT FOR SAFETY.

    There are no “children” on the HIGHWAY at any hour.

    The average car accelerates and brakes fast enough that these limits are ridiculous.

    I typically drive between 15% and 100% higher than the posted limit.

    Except the i80 where I drive around 200% faster than the posted limit.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    I’ve almost always found that speed limits are just too damned low!

    Maybe when the road is covered in snow and/or ice, the posted speed limit might be appropriate (or even high). I couldn’t live without cruise control.

    • 0 avatar
      DukeGanote

      It makes too much sense to set freeway speed limits of 75 mph normally, 60 when wet, and 45 in winter conditions. It’s the latter two conditions that (with ramp crashes) certainly account for most “excessive speed” crashes on freeway.

  • avatar

    I spent a lot of time in the 80’s here in NY campaigning for repeal of 55. The first Cuomo administration loved 55, as it was free money for the State Budget. It didn’t change until George Pataki was elected Governor.

    NYSDOT, and other highway departments do regular speed monitoring. They know the 85th percentile speed (the ideal speed limit) to the tenth decimal. It isn’t a mystery, and can be yours for a polite FOIA request.

    There is a report at FHWA by Davy and Warren, which sets forth the 85th percentile. Safest speed is 5-7 mph above the average speed, which works to about 73 mph on a 65. That number didn’t change much when it was 55 mph. Yes, the statistically safest drivers are just a notch faster than the pack.

    http://www.motorists.org, the National Motorist’s Association, has been at the point of most raises in speed limits in the US, state by state.

    In an 85th percentile world, most motorists are driving legally. Police can go after the true high flyers without being taxmen.

    The curve shows your risk of being in an accident are equal at 55 mph (driving too slow) and 90 mph (driving too fast). The faster wreck is worse, but the odds of involvement are the same. Lethal velocity is over 40….

    There is a body of “research” amongst the insurance companies recommending posting of 45th percentile limits and draconian enforcement for safety. The problem is that the legitimate highway engineers, and the research, points to an 85th percentile, and only in the insurance echo chamber is this correct.

    Most people don’t drive too fast. If everyone on the road is “speeding”, then the law is wrong.

    Please note this does not apply to your residential subdivision or, god forbid, your chi-chi gentrified city neighborhood, just limited access divided highways….

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    What you guys explain above is also what the minister of transportation says here in Ontario when questioned about speed limits. Then you go over to stop100.ca and they point out the following:
    The speed limit on our major highways used to be 70 mph, but following the fuel crisis and conversion to metric was dropped to 100Km/h (62 mph) and never put back. The government claims that dropping the limit increased safety, while ignoring the fact that mandatory seat belts also came into play during this time.
    My favourite factoid is the traffic reports on the news channel where they show the expected travel time based on the speed limit and current travel time based on traffic flow. Other than rush hour, the current time is always less than the expected time.
    Not that the government ever listened to the people if it meant losing a revenue stream.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Maybe this was already covered in the comments, but I’ve found that unless I’m towing a trailer, I never follow the yellow advisory speed limits on curves. It seems to me like they were all established when the average American land yacht had no cornering ability. Is there any truth to this or am I just inventing an explanation for myself?

    • 0 avatar

      True. Many of the design speed criteria that are used for advisory speeds reflect what is safely possible in a tall late 1930s vehicle. Also note that the advisory speed for a semi on a sharp curve is often a LOT lower than for a modern sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        I was more thinking ’70s barge with terminal understeer. I take the curves in a CUV with no loss of traction, and a compact CUV is a lot closer to the shape and size of a ’30s sedan.

  • avatar

    A compact CUV may be similar in size and shape to a 30s sedan, but there is no comparison in cornering capabilities due to modern technology for steering, brakes, electronic aids like stability control, tires, suspension, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      That is correct, but I’m arguing that the speed limits were established more in the ’60s and ’70s for the typical car of that era than the ’30s. Think of a 65 MPH highway with an advisory limit of 50 on a curve.

      • 0 avatar

        Design speed more relates to the 30s car. An FHWA chart for a highway built to a 60 mph design speed shows the impending skid speed for a passenger car at a fairly substantial curve with a 1,000 foot radius IN THE WET is over 90 mph.

  • avatar
    redav

    When I lived in Lousyana, an elementary school was on the major, multilane thoroughfare. Of course it had a school zone, and they lowered the limit all the way to 45 mph because safety is a top priority.

    They also had narrow, two lane, access roads for neighborhoods with speed limits of 55 mph. Most apartment complexes driveways were directly onto these roads. But it was okay–traffic was so heavy and so many people needed to turn left that it was always a parking lot. Except at night, when there were no lights or visibility, then it was okay to just go as fast as you could.

    There was also a port I had to drive to (Cameron, IIRC) that had a school zone on the road entering town that was always in force, even at 5 AM on Saturdays. And the sign for it was on a bend in the road. And there was always a cop sitting there.

    Yeah, **** that state.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • SSJeep: “Built Wild” is truly lame. They could have done so much better in the slogan department. But...
  • SSJeep: the 2.3 is surprisingly quick and capable in the Ranger with the 10-speed transmission.
  • Lie2me: Despite Ford’s best efforts at another botched roll-out I do think they will be a success. I really...
  • SSJeep: Anyone who hates on this monster is not a true car person. The Durango Hellcat is absolutely fantastic and...
  • CoastieLenn: Man I really hope this new exec turns things around. Nissan is starting to look worse off than...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber