By on December 8, 2015

002_KOERU_image_blackHI-RES

Settling the debate between whether Mazda’s Koeru concept from Frankfurt was a new CX-5 or CX-9 (or CX-7?),  CEO Masamichi Kogai told Automotive News that the answer may be “none of the above,” apparently.

On Monday, Kogai said that the Koeru could get the green light as a sporty crossover, sold alongside the CX-5 as a wagon-esque crossover aimed “to generate more driving pleasure,” Kogai told Automotive News.

Media reports on Tuesday likened the lower, fastback, five-door Mazda wagon to a possible Subaru Outback competitor, which completely forgets what an Outback looks like today.

(That’s because the Subaru Outback has nearly 9 inches of ground clearance, is the size of a battleship and isn’t really “sporty.”)

It’s hard to tell what itch the Koeru would scratch from Kogai’s comments to Automotive News.

“It’s a totally new car. It’s a lower, sporty SUV. It’s close to a wagon,” he said. “The CX-9 rides higher. So does the CX-3 and CX-5. (The Koeru) aims to generate more driving pleasure.”

So it’s a MazdaSpeed5? There’s that new turbo four in the CX-9 that looks awfully tasty.

Mazda has some ground to make up and history has proven that the market for Subaru Outback’s is lucrative, but extremely loyal.

Remember the Toyota Venza? Honda Crosstour?

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20 Comments on “Oh, So The Mazda Koeru Might Be a Completely New Car...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    What’s the point in making every model look alike unless they’re built on the same architecture?

    It’s perfectly clear why a Suburban (should) look exactly like the Silverado, but there is no reason to make the volt look like the traverse.

    • 0 avatar

      Chevy made the Saab-based Malibu look like the truck for a while. Mazda made the 626-releated MPV look like the Protege 5. Ford made the Escort ZX2 look like the Taurus in the back, and later the Mustang in the back. For a while Ford put the Gillette grill on everything. Now they are putting the Fusion grill on everything. The Germans like making everything they make look like everything else they make. Not saying it’s right or wrong, but everyone does it.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      Because the look is one of the best in the market today.
      Lots of companies use the look throughout…like BMW and Audi.

      And since it is the best…use it.

      Looks to me like the CX7 is now a high Crosstrek type wagon/suv.
      And why not? It is a pretty good car.

      And as for the soon to come turbo skyactiv 4…look forward to seeing it across the line. I will be in the 6 as well as the Miata.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Maybe I’d consider one in FWD trim. I’m definitely not in the Outback camp.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Soon crossovers will have the same ride height as regular sedans and they’ll come up with a new term for it. Like Super CrosSport or something.
    They still won’t be true wagons though, they’ll have to have aero fastbacks.

  • avatar
    Funky

    It looks and sounds interesting. I really like my CX-5 (2016 “GT”). I don’t believe this Koeru could replace my CX-5 since I drive the CX-5 on mountain roads (i.e. if the Koeru is performance oriented, I would imagine that it won’t do well on unpaved roads). If it is more like a wagon, maybe, someday, it could replace my V60; but for this to happen the Koeru would have to be a “true” wagon/sport wagon (and, it doesn’t sound like it is). I am having trouble determining how this would fit my current vehicular needs. But, it does look good and if it is as nice/fun to drive as my CX-5 (or, more so based on the article), it might be worth a try.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      You want to drive a crossover somewhere beside a freshly paved road? That’s just silly.

      Btw: Don’t like the name Koeru, but I suppose it’s no worse than the alphabet soup or the Mazda# (that’s a number sign, not a “hashtag”) they use now.

      • 0 avatar
        Funky

        Yes, I know most people don’t get a chance to use a crossover in this manner. The CX-5 does very well on mountain roads. The roads on which I drive are maintained as public roads, but are unpaved (stone or dirt…and without large ruts or large rocks since it is a maintained public road…there just isn’t enough money in the “state” budget to pave every road). In the past, on these same roads, I have driven other SUV/crossovers like a Jeep Grand Cherokee, a couple Volvo XC70s, a Chevy Equinox, and a Subaru Outback, as well as sedans such as Ford Tauruses, a couple Pontiac 6000s, a Ford Contour, a Saab 9000CSE, and I have driven minivans on these roads such as a Honda Odyssey and a couple Ford Windstars. Needless to say, only the SUVs/crossovers inspired confidence in this environment. Based on all of this experience, on these roads, in all of these types of vehicles, I believe the CX-5 has been the best so far (but, admitidly, sometimes memories can be a bit fuzzy and skewed toward recent experiences). The ride is not choppy, the road noise is not overwhelming, and I feel like the thing still handles predictably on the mountain roads.

      • 0 avatar
        Drewlssix

        Un like many late adoptors out there Mazda at least has a long proud alphanumeric legacy and one that mostly makes sense.

        There’s no confusion or misdirection with the convention and if a new model were introduced and you knew nothing of it but it’s name you would instantly deduce what kind of vehicle it is.

        Mazda announces its new Mazda 9, you know they are stepping back into the large sedan market. CX1? Obviously a Mitsubishi Mirage sized crossover.

  • avatar
    qfrog

    Mazda would like to give the public an alternative to the Audi A4 allroad.

  • avatar
    b534202

    Maybe finally something to replace the Legacy wagon.

  • avatar
    krayzie

    This is Mazda’s 1st gen Forester?

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Looks to me like it’ll have the approximate footprint of the departed Toyota Venza, but will be more driver-focused.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Seems to me more of a Murano-size competitor, but it’s hard to tell with no scale to the photos. Perhaps it’s something Infiniti EX-sized?

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      That’s what I was thinking…a proper 5-seat mid-sized crossover, like the Murano. Technically, the Venza was a competitor to the Murano and Edge (its lack of ceremony meant it also competed with the lower-priced Santa Fe/Sport), but sat a bit lower, so that it was more like a slightly-lifted Camry wagon. The way the author is describing this Mazda Koeru concept makes it sound like that might be the case for its production spawn, too.

  • avatar
    vtnoah

    I dig it. Would be tough to go up against the outback as it’s slayed all previous challengers and it’s better than ever. Next car for the fam is going to be an Outback to replace our Forester but I’ll take a trip to the Mazda dealer to check this thing out just in case.

  • avatar
    derekson

    Yeah I was confused when I read about this elsewhere as a more car-like, wagon-like crossover for driving enjoyment and then comparing it to the Outback. At this point the Outback is basically a straight up 100% CUV.

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