By on December 2, 2015

12 - 1987 Cadillac Sedan Deville in California junkyard - photo by Murilee MartinOne slimy thing that unscrupulous junkyard shoppers do is to lock all the doors of a car with interior parts they want to save for themselves on a later visit (presumably after they’ve done a few smash-and-grabs to get the money they need for the parts). They’re banking on the reluctance of more ethical junkyard shoppers to destroy a junkyard car’s window or punch out a door lock, and that’s the case with today’s Junkyard Find. Still, I was able to get some decent through-the-glass shots of the gloriously yellow and nicely preserved interior of this 1987 Cadillac Sedan de Ville.
01 - 1987 Cadillac Sedan Deville in California junkyard - photo by Murilee MartinJust look at those seats! This might be a Touring Sedan, but I didn’t see any badging and a bit of research indicates that the Touring Sedans had rear-seat headrests (which are not present on this car).
16 - 1987 Cadillac Sedan Deville in California junkyard - photo by Murilee MartinThe Cadillac de Ville went to front-wheel-drive starting in the 1985 model year, but Cadillac kept some of the styling seen on the older rear-drive models preferred by the marque’s target demographic at the time.
09 - 1987 Cadillac Sedan Deville in California junkyard - photo by Murilee MartinThis car is in very, very nice condition, with just a few easily-fixed cosmetic blemishes. Did the notoriously trouble-prone HT4100 engine under the hood give out?

The ’87 Sedan de Ville started at $21,659, which was a few hundred bucks less than the smaller BMW 325 sedan and about the same as the Saab 9000S sedan, but a massive $5,560 more than the very nice Nissan Maxima sedan. Cadillac Style or Nissan Style?

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

89 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1987 Cadillac Sedan de Ville, World’s Yellowest Leather Interior Edition...”


  • avatar
    threeer

    How positively posh…

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    One of these (maybe a few model years later) won a Malcolm Baldrige National Quality award. I saw this being boasted about by Cadillac in my father’s stock mailings from GM. Looking at the cars I asked my dad if he saw what was wrong with one of the cars. He did not. I told him to look at the headlights…one was so far out of alignment it was painfully obvious. How that photo made it into a GM shareholder packet without anybody noticing was beyond me.

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    How can you tell this Cadillac is very low mileage? The leather wrapped wheel is still intact and not worn down to grey suede like every single GM leather wheel until the mid 2000’s when they finally figured out how to make them last.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    “Cadillac Style or Nissan Style?”

    Nissan has style?

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    How can you tell this Cadillac is low mileage? The leather wrapped wheel is still intact and not worn down to grey suede like every single GM leather wheel until the mid 2000’s when they finally figured out how to make them last.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Nope not a Touring because of all the trims. The Touring was rather de-trimmed, and had different seat style, and never said “Sedan de Ville” on the side. I suspect this non-sport color was not available on Touring either – white, blue, maroon, black, red. Also had different rear lights, which did not feature the spear emblems.

    Though it has very few flaws (Look at how nice the headliner is, this was garaged!), the ones it does have (cosmetic exterior) combined with the 4.1 make it a no-go. There are plenty of either 4.5 or 4.9’s available – both of which looked less crap than this version. They’re worth $3,000 in top condition with low miles, max.

    If this model ever needed anything, it was the 1991 lengthening and refresh.

    Interesting thing to note, though they kept the same door handle and surrounding panel for the newer version, they switched the leather on the door pull for wood panel, I suspect to prevent discoloration. I also suspect this lemon frosting color interior option went away before 1991.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      How do you know all of this stuff? Bravo. This, along with my research of the first Buick plant in Flint that burned down in 1901 (off the now non-existent Kearsley street in Flint), has really topped off my useless automotive knowledge of the week.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Lol, I like to read about car trim level details. And special editions. And before I buy something I research it extensively.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        W Kearsley St is still there. I used to work at a building on W Kearsley and Saginaw (Flintown!). I have no idea where the original Buick building was though.

        Now I have to go listen to some Dayton Family.

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          The part of Kearsley that ran through ‘Chevy in the Hole.’ If you look at Google Maps, it was parallel to the old Grand Trunk Rail road. You can still see the road outline and rail road outline in the ‘remediation’ area, even though GM built over it. After they razed the fuel tank / injection molding plant, it somewhat revealed the original 19th century plant’s foundation along with the road. If you drive by today, I’m told it looks more like a park than a decaying industrial site. I remember those plants ‘running,’ then being torn down while I was going to school. The late nineties and early ‘oughts were such a cluster f*ck for GM’s manufacturing landscape.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Ok, I know where you are talking about now. Where Kearsley now turns into Glenwood. I didn’t realize Kearsley used to keep going there. It does look like a park. A park that no one goes too. But that’s three quarters of Flint now.

            My family’s company poured the concrete in those plants in the 90s, when they retooled, only to have them close a few years later. I remember going to Buick City in my early teens and seeing H-Bodies being made. That’s a [email protected] holy site as far as I’m concerned. GM [email protected] Flint raw. Saginaw, Lansing, and Pontiac too. They are like small rural towns with a factory that shut down, except on a massive scale.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            That’s crazy to think about that concrete being the last thing left of such a historical site. Depending on the remediation plans, your family’s concrete may end up being there for a century. The concrete around the recreation building at Kettering just had top soil put over it to make baseball and soccer fields. It was too costly to disturb the polluted ground so they just covered it up.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It’s also expensive to break concrete up. A lot of those floors are poured well over a foot deep and reinforced with various materials. None of it is really worth much, and like you said, many of these places are polluted to superfund levels. That’s why Packard has stood so long. It’s all concrete and rebar. No one can make any money on tearing it down to offset demo/remediation costs.

            I’m sure my concrete is at Pontiac Truck and Bus and possibly Wixom as well. I haven’t been on the Wixom site lately, but I’d bet money, some of my concrete is still there. Maybe they park RVs on it now.

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          I believe it was this plant that my friends and I broke into. I’m unsure. It had a complete CMM lab, offices and injection molding machines still in place. We also saw some HAAS six axis mills for some reason which confused us. After we found files with employees and their SS #’s, a buddy of mine let a guerrilla newspaper, The Uncommon Sense, know. Talk about an ensuing sh1t show… GM came down on them for withholding the files and making a huge PR fiasco. They also complained loudly about Kettering students trespassing on their grounds. Campus security started patrolling GM property shortly afterwards.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Kettering students are such trouble makers…

            You may have attended the only school that is in a worse neighborhood than my alma mater, Wayne State. $hit, our university police force has a SWAT team.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            I found some electronic records of our mischief:
            http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:Tsajx5voajEJ:www.peoplestribune.org/PT.2005.08/PT.2005.08.1.html+&cd=1&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us

            http://www.autonews.com/article/20050214/SUB/502140745/briefly:-porsche-puts-posh-on-the-golf-course

            In the auto news search for Delphi. I’m surprised Farago didn’t jump on this and report it on TTAC at the time. I first started reading TTAC way back then.

          • 0 avatar
            redmondjp

            I was at GMI in 1984-86 when all of the plants in Happy Valley were all still humming along. Back then, GMI still had a 5-story parking garage (why did they tear it down?) right next to the now-razed GM plant to the east. I used to repair my 1975 Pontiac station wagon up there on the 4th floor of that parking garage.

            I had no idea of the history of that area and that I was at ground zero of the sit-down strike until years after I left.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            redmondjp-

            I can only imagine what Flint was like in the 70s and 80s. I can only remember as far back as the mid-90s. Even then, the Flint area was better off than it is now. I was occasionally working in downtown Flint last year, and it’s bad. It’s even worse now that the biggest anchor, Citizens Bank, has their Flint HQ gutted by the new bank.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            redmondjp,
            The parking garage had a structural failure in the nineties. One of the floors gave way. It was luckily empty. The recreation center is where that structure used to stand and is an amazing facility.

    • 0 avatar
      kmars2009

      Actually the lengthening and refresh occurred in 1989. Then again in 1995. The smaller boxey ones seem more appealing to me for some reason. Also, is there ANY engine put in these cars that it truly any good? The 4.1 came out when the V864 was a joke. So I supppose the 4.5 or 4.9 has no issues? I just cant be sure. I do know NORTHSTAR was a disaster…I can’t believe they used it in so many products. Just give me a Lincoln Towncar…I know they will last the test of time.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Forgot to mention there was no Touring model until the 1991 re-refresh.

        @Kmars, your dates are off. Yes it got longer in 89, but new hood grille bumpers and slight interior modifications and improvements in 1991, along with electronic ride controls.

        1994 was the new K-body Deville, from the previous C-body. Facelifted for 1997.

        • 0 avatar
          kmars2009

          Sorry…it was changed in 89. I know, I was actually driving to Ft. Lauderdale on I75 when one passed me in fall of 88. Ot was the first “all new” one I had seen. Much bigger than the previous. Google it my friend. Check tje images of the 89 DeVille. In addition, I have attended the NAIAS Since 1985. I think I know my cars…even gawd awful Cadillacs. They tried to beat the premiere of the restyled 90 Lincoln Towncar. They did pretty good, then the Towncar stole the sales. Then it was a matter of if you wanted a FWD Cadillac or old RWD Brougham, or very new Towncar. I do remember my car history quite well.
          By 91. I was living in Phoenix…the first time. 90-94…left then came back in 15. Even living in Phoenix, I flew back each year for the Detroit show.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        4.5 is known to be good in MY88, and 4.5/4.9 from MY89-95 and that’s about it. Supposedly the 4100s in MY86-87 where better per rumor.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The 4.9 will pull you along, slowly but smoothly, forever.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I can’t recall seeing the lemon yellow Cadillacs after MY91, but they did exist as refreshed MY89s and 90s. I’m thinking it was a 70s trend held over through the 80s.

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      Prior to Hurricane Rita, I worked at a synthetic rubber plant that was built when Japanese captured in the rubber plantations in Indonesia during WWII. Half of it had been shut down in 2000; and the plant’s boiler house back in the 70s, I think. That half and the boiler house was torn down in 2005.

      The boilerhouse had some Babcock and Wilcox boilers with huge brass nameplates that had 1917 build dates on them. There were also some steam driven fuel oil pumps inside. Once the asbestos was removed, I took pictures of everything inside, then removed a set of boiler nameplates and arranged to have the steam pumps removed for preservation; one of them is holding down a cart on my carport while two others are in a private collection up north.

      Anyway, I was told that if there was enough salvageable materials, they would pay to tear it down; while if it was mostly concrete; you had to pay to have it torn down. That was the case with our plant; but laws passed after all the plant shutdowns in the 80s and 90s no longer allow you to leave such buildings up, so it had to be torn down.

      Someone took pictures of them tearing the boilerhouse down; it was very substantially built along with the brick and mortar boiler fireboxes. The boilerhouse put up a good fight; but today’s machinery made it pretty routine to tear down even such a massive structure; the attachment that looks like an overgrown version of Edward Scissorhands or a pair of wire cutters, and a jackhammer attachment soon brought it down; leaving just the slab behind.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        I didn’t catch this yesterday. Thank you for sharing. There is an old cotton mill in Cateechee, SC that has a hydro electric GE turbine still intact. The mill was the Norris Cotton Co if I remember correctly. It is half torn down but the powerhouse still stands. I photographed the h3ll out of it. It’s a beautiful part of the structure. Gorgeous high ceilings, ornate wood work, and the casting of the enormous generators is very intricate. At the turn of the 19th century, industrialization was considered to be the high point of society. Construction and manufacturing of the infrastructure is evidence to it.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Could see that yella down the golf club.

  • avatar
    whynot

    “This car is in very, very nice condition, with just a few easily-fixed cosmetic blemishes. Did the notoriously trouble-prone HT4100 engine under the hood give out?”

    I’m guessing owner (who usually had it parked in his/her garage) died and kids decided to just junk it versus going through the hassle of selling it.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @ whynot: I am assuming that you are correct.
      @ coreydl: thanks for the insight.

      For myself I do not consider these to be true Cadillacs. This is the era during which GM destroyed the reputation and prestige which Cadillac had built up for many decades. A pox on the houses of the senior executives and bean counters responsible for this.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        The Fleetwood Brougham still existed! But by the early 90’s they were de-emphasizing it even in the brochure – all the way at the back. FWD was the way to be for traction, stability, and security.

        http://www.oldcarbrochures.org/NA/Cadillac/1992-Cadillac/1992-Cadillac-Full-Line-Prestige-Brochure/1992-Cadillac-Full-Line-Prestige-02

    • 0 avatar

      It says “salvaged” on the windshield, along with the mileage, runs, and stuff. My guess is it was probably in a minor accident, got totaled, went to auction, and no dealers were interested so the junkyard bought it.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    That front bench seat needs to be turned into furniture stat.

  • avatar
    Aquineas

    For no logical reason, I’ve always had a soft spot in my heart for that car.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Definitely a Hardly Together 4100 failure. What a worthless pile of junk that motor was. V6 power with horrible reliability!

    • 0 avatar
      ponchoman49

      They were much better by this point, especially if one followed the service recommendations. The power output was rather low at only 130 HP and 200 torque but they did run really smooth and provided decent off the line grunt in these light weight FWD cars. The 4.5 and 4.9 were better still and much peppier.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        I thought it had gotten bumped up to 155 before being replaced by the 4.5, but that just turned out to be the output of the initial 4.5. 1990 4.5 with 180hp is definitely the way to go with that one.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    O.K. Cory ;

    When and why did the ducks disappear from Cadillac emblems ? .

    This is a pretty car , too bad about the engine .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      1999 was the last model year to feature ducks, before a modernized logo with plain “interior blocks” on it appeared for 2000 model cars. The logo had been essentially the same 1964-1999.

      It was a bigger overall attempt to shed a geezer image! The wreath was smoothed and modernized that year as well, and it no longer featured individual branches, but one continual branch. The crown atop the logo was also lost in 2000.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Now I will have to check the logo on the never worn black leather Cadillac coat that The Old Man got with one of his mid’90’s STS’s. Black leather with a small Cadillac logo on the left ‘breast’. They couldn’t get a coat that would fit him so he gave it to me. It has been hanging in a closet, inside a suit bag for around 20 years.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Betsy was enjoying her morning coffee. The three turquoise rings she had on her right hand scraped a bit against the waxy insulated paper cup – she lifted it for the sixteenth time in the past ten minutes. Watching the passersby at her favorite Café, it was a relaxing morning. The red clock on the wall hummed as electrons flowed through the old display: 07:39.

    Occasionally one of those passers would notice her. A young child tugged his mother’s hand and pointed, only to have it slapped away quickly. “Stop that!”
    Tamisha came into work, running a bit late, but never too late to give Betsy a little wave and a nod. It seemed like she was always here on Mondays – she never stopped to wonder why. Shaking her head a little bit to clear the friendly thoughts and mildly interested musings, she toddled off to the break room to put away her purse.

    An hour went by, and Betsy had finished her coffee. Thoroughly relaxed, she pressed her feet into her old teal slip-ons, pulling a faded Estee Lauder compact from her purse and making sure her the whispy grey and white hairs atop her head looked alright. She had plenty of blush on already – the light pink powder high up on her cheeks, where her cheek bones once rested when Nixon was in office. “Oh, little touch up.” she muttered, proudly applying more blush across the large lines and valleys of her face.

    In the parking lot, bony fingers found her keys, which had slipped down into the lowest part of her heavy vinyl purse. They were amongst four pennies, a nickel, Sacajawea dollar, and three loose Tylenol PMs. Pulling them out, her head jerked up as she heard a short screeching sound and a honk.

    “Watch it you crazy old bag!” yelled a paunchy woman at the wheel of a gold 4Runner. Betsy looked up over the tall hood, past the rust bubbles and at the woman’s face. Bringing up a hand in apology, she waved slowly and shuffled out of the middle of the parking lane, still making her way towards the yellow square in her line of sight.

    Finding the door lock, she leaned in for closer inspection so she wouldn’t nick a gold tone key against the yellow paint. “Here… we go.” Forty-nine seconds later, the door was successfully unlocked, and she slid behind the soft yellow seats. They cushioned her ample rear while she adjusted her skirt; swishing silk-facsimile fabric noises were the only sounds inside after she’d pulled the heavy door firmly closed.

    The car was started, and a 4100 sitting several feet away from the driver was chirping slightly as a belt tensioner protested another day’s use. But Betsy didn’t reach for the metal bar which would put the old yellow cake box into drive.

    “Now… what was that place?” asking herself cautiously, slowly. Her mind seemed to be gummed up suddenly. “Was this on my list today – when…” speaking out loud seemed to help some, but the information just wasn’t there this time. “Okay, four…four six…b-.” Heart picking up a bit, her ringed fingers tightened around the thin yellow steering wheel, though old skin produced no perspiration.

    Time went by with the car warmed to an uncomfortable degree. Betsy kept it on 80 degrees all winter long. Econ mode, she always remembered econ mode. Gerald had told her those years ago “Don’t use the G-D auto, it’ll run the car outta gas in a hurry with the AC on!”

    In front of her, a sensor noticed something. A signal was sent around the car, and the lights came on both inside and out, with a slight click. Twilight Sentinel remembered faithfully, as it had done for the past 28 years, to light the way ahead.

    “Oh.”

    This activated a sensor for Betsy, too. The lights coming on meant it was dark soon, and she didn’t like driving in the dark. Didn’t want to drive when she couldn’t see. Her eyes welled up a little as her mind latched onto a lecture a couple months ago from her daughter. The anxiety grew while she recalled the event – a chastising about driving carefully, driving at night, calling them to pick her up instead.

    She burst out inside the chiffon yellow interior, as a tear landed on floral fabric “Nobody needs to help me!” Eyes closed and her foot found the pedal on the right, and pressed down. Though the gauges showed no reaction, the 4100 roared into compliance, racing itself at 5000RPM. Minutes passed, though Betsy’s internal agony made it feel like hours.

    The door opened, a stern voice of a man was there. “Ma’am! Ma’am! Stop that now.” as a blue sleeve reached across the steering column, gentle green digital light blocked momentarily before the ignition was switched off, and everything died.

    Betsy slumped over onto the passenger seat, howling and covering her face. Her knee-length floral skirt was soaked in urine. She slowly pulled the green nightgown she had tucked into the waist of the skirt up to dry her eyes.

    A small crowd had formed by now to bear witness – some light Monday afternoon entertainment in the K-Mart parking lot.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    In 1985 my old man bought a yellow ’77 Cadillac Fleetwood with gold leather interior. When he was growing up, he always wanted a Caddy, so he bought this low-mileage one from a cousin who was a car dealer.

    Riding in that monstrous yellow car always drew attention. Sitting in the back seat would bring on immediate car sickness as the ride was so floaty.

    When I got old enough to drive, I sometimes had to borrow it when the Nissan truck was being used to haul wood. It always got plenty of stares when I drove through the more ghetto-ey parts of town to get to my girlfriend’s house.

    One last Caddy memory: When I got my first car – a rusted out ’68 Firebird – my dad and I raced against each other down the main drag of our suburb (I won – no surprise). Afterward he said, “Don’t tell your mother about this…”

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Some people want more, not just a little bit”

    These lyrics are clever.

  • avatar
    sco

    “One slimy thing that unscrupulous junkyard shoppers do is to lock all the doors of a car…they’re banking on the reluctance of more ethical junkyard shoppers ”

    This one really got me thinking. First, could you lock all the doors of an 87 caddy without the keys? Second, as far as I’m concerned the junkyard is as close to the jungle as one can get. I wont block others or hide parts, but if there’s an interior piece I need in a locked car, I’m going in

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Yes, all had powered locks. It’s the big black button next to the door handle. Rear doors have lock buttons as well, but will only lock all doors and do not have unlock function. Safety feature for kids.

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        But the battery is gone, so no power locks? I assume either they found the keys inside, or planned on using one of those devices the wrecker truck drivers use to unlock doors.

      • 0 avatar
        tylermattikow

        Maybe he found a key under the seat or something. I highly doubt that the power locks had power to operate. Many cars (not all) will not let close the door prevent you from latching the door if the door is opened and locked. This is to prevent locking keys from being locked in.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Not GM cars of this era. Lock your keys in all you want, they no care.

          And if you lock your keys in the trunk, the trunk button inside won’t work assuming you’ve had a door open to the car – so you’re screwed there too.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    The second I saw the picture I knew this thread would bring Corey back from his absence of the last few days.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Ha, I have been seeing the emails for new articles, just not had time to comment. I had seminar and meetings on Monday and Tuesday, and drive all over town yesterday after work!

  • avatar
    MWolf

    Wow! I must admit, I am a Cadillac fan. Their older stuff. Yanno, when they still looked like Cadillacs. Actually, I like older cars in general, because you had a choice in colors and options. Like red? Even inside? Ask for it, and you shall receive. Want yellow? Done. White outside, black leather seats? Yup.

    This one seems like it had to have died due to the horrid 4.1 warping a head. Poor thing. If only they just went straight to the 4.5 and skipped the 4.1….

  • avatar
    iganpo

    Man this brings back memories. I drove a light blue 86 DeVille in high school. It was floaty and comfortable, as you’d expect, and plenty stylish. Would lose to my friend’s Maxima at stoplight drag racing. 100 HP from a 16 MPG V8. Tons of engine pinging, lots of brittle plastic trim parts inside and out. At 60K miles it was falling apart despite my family taking good care of it. I don’t miss it much.

    • 0 avatar
      MWolf

      I had a ’90 Sedan DeVille. It had plenty of power. I never complained about power. Takeoff from a light was a measured process, put your foot on the gas too quickly (not even attempting to floor it) could get a chirp from the fron tires. But that was the 4.5. Did it have seemingly low horsepower numbers? By today’s standards, yes. But it had gobs of low end torque. I loved the caremel colored leather seats in that thing. Perfect amount of room for me and my friends. Ahh…my youth.

      The 4.1 was a horror story. Too bad, as the cars they ended up in weren’t bad looking most of the time. They just had a terrible engine.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I had several including an MY85 Coupe de Ville (white/padded white), an MY92 Sedan (white/blue roof), an MY91 Coupe (silver/black roof) but the most memorable was the MY89 white/grey two tone without a rood.

  • avatar
    iganpo

    This was a HEAVY car. Could tell just by trying to open the hood after the struts gave out. Rear springs also retired early, so it always sagged in the back. But damn did this car exude a certain kind luxury.

  • avatar
    skor

    The 4.1 did powerful suck. Horribly unreliable and woefully under-powered. GM fixed the problems with the 4.5, but it was still a dog. They finally punched it out to 4.9 where it had enough grunt so you could pull away from a 76 Maverick at a stop light. Instead of tweaking a kind of good engine, GM decided to try their hand at an over head cam mill, the 4.6. They should have just bought modular 8s from Ford.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I’ve wondered before how Cadillac would have done if they stuck with the 4.9L instead of going for the Northstar.

      Judging by the power gains GM pulled from the 3800 and 4.3L V6 over the years, the basic 4.9L would have ended at about 250hp/300lb-ft.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        GM definitely would have been smarter to copy Ford and go from OHV to SOHC and then to DOHC, rather than skipping a step.

        The SOHC 4.6 does have some issues (namely issues with oil burning thanks to valve seals and issues with plastic manifolds on some years) but nothing compared to the failure rate of the Northstar!

        • 0 avatar
          skor

          The Deathstar’s problems were compounded by the fact that the most common repair….bad head gaskets….could not be repaired with the engine in the car. To do cylinder head service on a Caddy equipped with a 4.6, the entire engine/transaxle assembly had to be dropped from the bottom of the car! This made repairs very EXPENSIVE. Unless the car was newish/low miles it wasn’t worth having it done. Because the repair was generally too difficult for the DIY crowd, when the head gaskets let go, the car was done.

Read all comments

Recent Comments

  • PrincipalDan: Ya know you can have enough fun on a front bench to more than make up for resale. Heck my wife and I...
  • dal20402: This city’s not old enough for really old money, but the oldest money in the city migrated sometime...
  • Inside Looking Out: “The stupidity of the Afghanistan pull out illustrates ” What you are talking about?...
  • SCE to AUX: Yep, those mainstream mfrs were going to destroy Tesla… Then a decade later they realized they...
  • dal20402: Different cultures in different places. Here, the Range Rover’s probably his, and either he or she...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber