By on November 24, 2015

BMW 318is

TTAC commentator tedward writes:

Hey Steejeev,

I thought I’d finally throw my hat into the ring as my wife and I are on the hunt for a second family car.

We currently own a ’91 BMW 318is and a ’13 Volkswagen Jetta Sportwagen 2.5 — both manual, of course. In our previous lives as NYC residents, this was an extravagant stable that required personal sacrifice and demanded constant justification in casual conversation.

On one hand, we find ourselves with one real life car that fits us all; on the other, a relatively unsafe car that shouldn’t be relied upon (at 200,000+ miles) for day-to-day duties.

The big change here has been the average speed the cars are driven (at 20 mph, an E30 is acceptably safe for car seat duty) and the number of mission critical tasks we set for them. It’s no longer a duty cycle of joy rides or long road trips. Our day-to-day lives hang in the balance. Both cars run aftermarket suspensions and season-specific wheel setups. I am notably open to modifying my rides.

Our consideration list has boiled down to a new Volkswagen GTI, Volkswagen Jetta GLI, Ford Focus ST or Subaru WRX. If we go used, a BMW 328xiBMW 530xi wagon or an Audi A4 Avant six cylinder are in the cards. The new GTI and used 530xi are currently leading the pack.

My wife’s must-haves are stick shift, sunroof, massive front legroom, no cloth and a torquey drivetrain. My own minimal input has been to keep all the turbo options strictly on the new car list, especially since all the older cars she likes to drive trend to be premium products.

I’d ask opinion givers to keep in mind that the new Volkswagens can be had for $3,500 under MSRP right now. Also, she’s already been completely underwhelmed by the Subaru and Ford interiors, so nice things do matter with this one. We have two kids and two dogs, but this car doesn’t really have to carry all of us all the time; that would just be a bonus.

Thanks for your help!

Sajeev answers:

Being completely underwhelmed with Subaru and Ford interiors means you both want to pay more money for machines that ape your rather Germanic garage. Nothing wrong with that.

Then again, the Vellum Venom in me wonders what you two would think of the stupid-nice interior inside the latest F-150. Not that I recommend you get one…

No, you both want an Audi or a BMW, or maybe a new Volkswagen considering the deals out there. My gut says to look harder at a 3-series or an A4, as they will be a decent value and their higher volume parts selection makes them easier and cheaper to repair out of warranty than a more bespoke 5-series. I recokon an A4 is the one, especially if the Volkswagen scandal taints Audi’s public perception. Watch the incentives flow!

Steve answers:

This makes me laugh because I now have a 2008 Volkswagen Passat with the VR6 engine and a 2008 Audi A4 with the 2-liter turbo. That Volkswagen drives an awful lot like an Audi A6 with a V-6, and the Audi drives like a Volkswagen with a not so thrilling four-banger. I’m glad you had the fortune of choosing the 2.5-liter in the Jetta because, honestly, I don’t see the benefit of the 2-liter when it comes to everyday driving.

I’m going to throw in a bit of a wildcard into this mess of models because there’s one model I sold recently, and it simply impressed the hell out of me: a 2003 BMW 5-series with a manual transmission. Mine was a 525i sedan and I liked it because it had excellent ergonomics and interior materials that weren’t equaled in the later generations. The E39 generation offers a bit of a retro feel while, at the same time, it’s completely safe and not overladen with an endless array of electronic gizmos that detract from the driving experience. That car has a great balance between space and sport and it’s exactly the right fit for your Teutonic tastes.

One of the less shocking findings we have discovered at the Long-Term Quality Index: the fewer the features on German vehicles, the better their long-term reliability, and the longer the prior owner keeps their ride. I would educate yourself a bit by clicking here, visit a few enthusiast forums, and focus squarely on condition instead of price.

You can afford to buy a mint condition, low-mileage version and you already have the ‘new’ car. I would take an E39 for a drive with the 2.5-liter inline six. I think it represents the best balance between what you want in theory, and what you would truly enjoy. If you have been driving the E30 for this long, the E39 will be a revelation. Good luck!

[Photo credit: BimmerToday]

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83 Comments on “New or Used?: German Car Lover Wants Germanic German From Germany...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Well, like Sajeev says – go used so you’re not throwing money away, and get something with good parts availability. Used A4 Avant gives you max utility and “normal” parts prices. While my heart always wants to say “GTI!” a practical wallet does not.

    This article should be tagged First World Problems, by the way.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      “go used so you’re not throwing money away…Used A4 Avant”

      LOL! A used VAG product is the very DEFINITION of a throwing money away.

    • 0 avatar
      tooloud10

      Used A4 Avant and GTI are about as closely matched as you’re going to find when it comes to usefulness, parts prices, and reliability. It’s like the same car.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “an Audi A4 Avant six cylinder are in the cards”

      ” Used A4 Avant gives you max utility and “normal” parts prices”

      Possibly – but the B6 A4 Avant with the 2.7TT *ate turbos for breakfast*, from all I’ve heard; the packaging was not kind to the cooling on that system. I recall them saying it was even worse than on the Allroad 2.7TT, which is saying something!

      (If he meant some other A4 with a different, more suitable/reliable 6, that might change things.)

      (On the main topic, if used wagons are on the list, and they like the idea of a WRX … the Outback 3.6R has a *really nice* interior compared to lower-spec models, and gives you “wagon” without “God help me, I bought a used German station wagon” factors.)

  • avatar
    seth1065

    The GTI is a great choice and as you said deals can be found, I would go for that. If you like the jetta wagon the GTI should be right up your alley. And easier to park in the city than a 5 series , big sun roof, 6 speed.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    That little 2.5L lugging around ~3400lb of 5 series will not yield satisfactory around town performance. I vote used current generation GTI, but specifically in the lowest S trim with the performance pack and LSD. It will have tons of grunt, a scrappy, grippy front end, minimal equipment issues and that great German interior. I recently drove a new Golf and came away seriously impressed, particularly with the 1.8T. It delivered performance similar to a luxury car. Just effortless. I am imagining the GTI to be even more grunty down low, but also rewarding up top and dynamically rewarding as well.

  • avatar
    hreardon

    Lightly used 2013-2015 A4s can be found at a nice discount. Allroads of the same vintage are great, too, if you’re willing to forego the manual transmission.

    I was on the fence between a used ’14 A4 6MT Sport and a new GTI Autobahn with the adaptive suspension. Ultimately, the interior space felt very similar between the two and everytime I drove both cars I found myself excited to get into the GTI and merely ‘pleased’ with the A4. Don’t get me wrong, the A4 will have better service/support, probably better overall build quality and longevity as well as resale – but my heart just wasn’t in it. Plus, the manual transmission in the GTI felt much better suited than in the A4.

    So in the end, I got the ’16 GTI Autobahn Performance w/adaptive suspension. The car is wonderful, quiet, composed, roomy and most of all: brings a smile to my face. No doubt I’d be perfectly content with the A4 (first world problems, right?), and my friends are surprised to see me in a Golf after years of Audis, but it’s just a great car that ticks all the right boxes for me.

  • avatar
    Fonzy

    Get the GTI. I picked up a manual GTI with performance pack a few months ago. It’s one of the best driving cars I’ve had. You get the warranty along with the Apple connect on 2016 models.

    I was in thinking the same thing as you before I bought the GTI. I was thinking used 335i or used ISF. Then I test drove the GTI and its the perfect sporty sleeper car.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Totally out of my element here. I’m just glad to hear someone is happy with their German iron.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    GTI. 4-door, stick.

    The BMWs you and Steve mention are both great cars, but not easy at all to find with both reasonably low mileage AND your wife’s requirement for a stick.

    Shoot, if BMW still made their circa 2004 cars, I’d have a new 535 xiT in my garage, but I’m one of those lunatic New Car Guys!

  • avatar
    olddavid

    I want to be tutored in “Hip” by these two. Please? My kids will thank you.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Well, look at that. I’m finding lightly used ~2013 328is with Xdrive for new GTI money. That’s an interesting conundrum, actually. Looking at Truedelta reported repair costs, it seems they cost about the same to keep running as well. Hmmm….

    Jetta Sportwagen with 2.5 and manual? Blessed be, you have chosen wisely.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      That’s exactly the problem. So much body style choice at roughly same money in this category.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      There is no such thing as a 2013 BMW wagon with a stick (in the US). Wagon seems to be a requirement, since that was mentioned as one of the used choices. 2012 or older and stick is a possibility, albeit a rare one. I have an ’11 328i wagon, RWD with stick. On snow tires it is just fine in the winter, and handles a LOT better than the AWD version with it’s taller and softer suspension.

      But for the money, I would just buy a new GTI at a big scandal discount and call it a day. e91 BMW wagons with sticks are stupid money for a good one. I would not part with mine for less than $30K.

      • 0 avatar
        tedward

        Krhodes
        Sorry for the late response but you own my unicorn. The last three cars we’ve bought have all had their value measured against the price of your wagon. The only reason I don’t own one for life already is abusive nyc environments, mistrust of the mechanical treatment of the wagons I did engage with and used car finance rates. I will third owner one some day. Mark my words.

        We’re buying a car this week come hell or high water. I’ll remember to post something here when we do.

  • avatar
    GermanReliabilityMyth

    Hey Steve, not sure if you’ll see this buried in the comments, but I was hoping to get your $0.02, as one of my favorite writers for TTAC (Sanjeev is pretty cool too).

    I bought a ’14 Sportwagen with the 2.5 and have been very satisfied with it so far. Part of my reasoning for buying it is that it represents my best chance for a reliable VW, considering it’s connected to an Aisin 6 speed. Reports of the later 2.5’s longevity have been favorable, indicating a fairly long-lived engine with minimal fussiness. Do you have any personal experience with it or have you seen it show up at auctions with decent mileage on the odometer?

    Personally, I enjoy its torquey nature, exhaust note and always being on a power stroke. It rarely, if ever nets me above 30MPG on the highway, but combined, I sit around 26MPG with 70% in town driving, so no complaints. IMO, it’s one of the few 5 cylinders that delivers the power, or the sensation thereof, of something between a 4 and 6 cylinder, with the corresponding fuel economy to match. Seems like a fair compromise to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven Lang

      I try to buy every well maintained 2.5 Liter I can find. The late models still get too much competition from the franchise dealerships but the older ones do quite well. I bought an 06 Beetle with about 110k and the 2.5 Liter for only $2000. It had automatic, leather, and a roof. Did nothing to it and sold it for $4200.

      A VW Like that I can live with! Glad you like yours.

      • 0 avatar
        GermanReliabilityMyth

        Thanks for the feedback, Steve! That’s very encouraging to hear from someone who’s been there, seen that. The wife and I certainly do enjoy ours and will continue to pamper it.

  • avatar
    mikedt

    Sounds like they need to contact this guy

    http://mybuildgarage.com/author/carreraboy/

    If I wasn’t married an early mint BMW would be in the driveway.

  • avatar
    NotFast

    Where did you guys get that picture of me?!

  • avatar

    So, I hear there’s a ’91 318is with some light mods going up for sale soon?

  • avatar
    319583076

    You can tell that 318is is a manual just by taking a gander at Fritz’s muscular, well-developed left calf. Dankeschoen, Fritz!

  • avatar
    Nostrathomas

    I’m surprised they haven’t considered a Golf Sportwagen. It might not be a GTI, but it is quite a bit more practical (for those kids and dogs), and is available in a manual in the lower end of the range (In Canada, it’s available as a manual all around).

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      They already have one.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      There’s no manual 1.8t se. If there was there wouldn’t even be an email for me to send ttacs way. Even ignoring the tdi scandal the diesels aren’t interesting enough to drive so those were always out.

      I’d probably jump warranty and tune + clutch flywheel swap immediately if I could get that car. I drove a stage one passat 1.8t and it was incredible. And that’s hardly the best package to represent the drivetrain.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        A stage one ECU tune is an intriguing way of spicing up a 1.8T Sportwagen. Any idea about how well the manual and automatic transmissions handle the additional power? Transmissions are expensive.

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          The manual is carryover and should be fine but the flywheel and clutch won’t stand up to it. I haven’t heard of any issues with differentials synchros or gears themselves. It is a really leggy cruise oriented manual though, with a very heavy flywheel. The fix for that was a six speed swap for the previous generation cars (my wagon will go that route eventually), but I’m not sure if the new generation ecu’s allow you to simply tell the car to recognize the other transmission. I’ve heard there’s more component protection on the mkvii cars. This btw was a very stupid move on vw’s part. All they’ve done is ensure that all my post sale custom goes to third party vendors. They’ve”protected” their trim ladder at the cost of losing the profit margin rich after sales.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    Sell both, buy the upcoming MINI Clubman S w/ AWD & 6MT for the family, and buy a heavily depreciated BRZ/FR-S for yourself. You can even fit the kids in the back. It will be more 318is like than anything else you’ll find newish these days.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      I like the Clubman but I wonder how much practicality you gain given the price difference between it and a GTI?

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        It will be costly… the last one I built on their website was $36k*. It is really the only 6MT, AWD hatch/wagon that you can buy, though. A 328i sportwagon is 8AT only for new.

        *I’m really curious to get inside a Clubman and see how much space it really has. I had an MKV GTI and a Prius v in the past, so I’m hoping it falls somewhere between the two. My wife’s 11 year old MINI might finally be usurped if it is big enough, offers AWD, and keeps the MINI charm. I could potentially swap both the ’14 Rav4 and the ’05 MINI with the Clubman and get back down to 2 cars. Having 3 cars is nice, but there is a lot of cost that goes along with the MINI that she loves having but can’t practically drive for 10k miles a year.

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          The 328i sportwagen will also start at around $45k, but you’ll never find one for sale under $50k.

          • 0 avatar
            tedward

            No manual on any other new wagon besides the vw. I had a bmw dealer tell me he could special order it and when I asked him to show me it got embarrassing. They are not going to homologate a drivetrain to satisfy a custom order.

        • 0 avatar
          hubcap

          @Quentin

          I just built a GTI and Paceman and the results were a bit surprising. Here’s a quick look at the total price and the options on each car.

          GTI 4 Door
          -performance pack
          -lighting pack

          MSRP $31,935

          Mini Clubman S
          -british Racing Green
          -sport Package
          -premium Package
          -black bonnet stripes
          -power folding and auto dimming mirrors
          -18″ wheels
          -40/20/40 folding rear seat
          -universal garage door opener with compass

          MSRP $33,650

          That’s much closer than I expected and when you add in the additional year of warranty and the two additional years of free maintenance the Clubman just might come out on top.

          They’re both really good cars and I don’t think one could go wrong with choosing either.

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            Wow, I didn’t know the GTIs were pushing that high. While the Clubman would potentially be my wife’s car, I’m still pretty bad about pushing her to tick all the sport boxes. That is how she ended up with the optional LSD in her 2005 MCS.

            I agree that both are good choices.

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          GREAT recommendation. She hasn’t driven the new mini yet although I have. Only objection she’ll have is her mother’s Cooper s had a belt failure immediately out of warranty that lunched the engine. Mini made it right but that will probably give her pause.

          We live in mini friendly country as well. Great roads for angry little cars here.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            If I had to replace my 2011 328i 6spd wagon, I would make tracks for the Mini dealer for a Clubman. Despite my usual rules about new cars with no local dealer. I’d manage. It’s the only thing on the market that even comes close.

            Shame you can’t do European Delivery on one.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      Isn’t Mini at the very bottom of every reliability list?

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        Yea, but he frame of reference is a 25 year old BMW and a VW Jetta. It won’t be that drastic.

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          No that’s the big concern with mini. Both our cars are reliable and see very high mileage. We average over 20k a year on the vw. Getting a reliable car for an individual is about knowing drivetrains, trims and maintenance quirks. Brand generalizations are for bulk and wholesale buyers.

          For instance, no used gti’s with the fsi.

          • 0 avatar
            Quentin

            FWIW, our MINI has been very reliable. We’ve had 2 problems in 11 years and 75k miles, one completely covered outside of warranty. My MKV GTI (FSI motor!) was a nightmare in comparison. Strangely enough, the FSI motor was solid. The rest of the car was a wreck.

  • avatar
    omer333

    I know you’re family’s hot to trot for Teutonic iron, but why not go for some Japanese steel instead?

    A 2015 Honda Accord Sport 6MT ticks all your wife’s requirement boxes, not only that it will be the easiest/cheapest to maintain and insure. Nor to mention the higher resale value, plus you won’t have the stigma of being a VW owner in this current climate.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      I was going to suggest a CPO TSX or G37. It sounds like she wants a more premium interior than the Accord

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Long term ownership costs don’t seem to be the top priority here, and if a Ford Focus interior has turned his wife off the Accord isn’t going to fare well either. There’s a lot of budget-grade hard plastics in there, like most mainstream midsizers.

      I agree with MBella that the G37 certainly warrants a look, especially if they want to retain some steering feel. The G37 steering is a thing of beauty in this age of EPS. The interior might pass muster too, it’s about as nice as their Sportwagen. A few stick shift examples are floating around too.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      No moonroof on Accord Sport. Need to go up a level.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      I like the mt v6 Hondas but the coupe thing doesn’t work for large dogs and multiple car seats. The gli is a way more useful interior. We’ve owned Japanese cars, there’s no prejudice against, but almost all of them lie/misrepresent front legroom compared to the German options. My wife’s inseam is over 38″ and our three year old is already rocking 6t clothing, size matters.

      No vw stigma issues. Next year will bring a new scandal, probably one with a body count. More to the point, If I let that sway me there’s almost nothing that doesn’t get disqualified with just a little bit of digging, even Honda.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Dude, you’re not getting any younger, just give in a get a Hyundai Santa Fe.

  • avatar
    omer333

    To be truthful, I was looking into a CPO Jetta GLI, but the dealership experience and the cost of ownership was a turn-off.

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      Omer

      We almost did as well. My wife really preferred the looks of the gli but couldn’t tolerate all the passive aggressive comments about how it was “good for not being on the newer mqb chassis.” I exploited her competitive nature on that one for sure.

      The big difference for me was the turbo not the platform to be honest. The twin scroll on the gti really makes a world of difference. The chassis, while clearly an improvement with mqb, is not reason enough to go golf over jetta. The pq’s are still more than class competitive in the c segment, much like the accord’s is always comparing well even at the end of an eight year product cycle.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    If you’ve got a thing for germans, you want to get them young. There are exception, but they don’t usually age well.

  • avatar
    BigPapa

    Considering used BMWs? Need a torquey drivetrain, sunroof, German ergonomics, a stick shift, and all wheel-drive? How about an e90 BMW 335xi? Extra points if you get a 2007 – 2010 one with its mod-friendly N54 motor.

    The twin turbocharged 3.0L will put down 380 foot pounds and 330 horsepower to the wheels with a Cobb ECU flash (which can be had for $800 or less). No bolt ons needed. A good one can be had on the cheap these days (sub 20K) and if you’re even slightly mechanically inclined, the aftermarket parts base is HUGE for this car so you can save some serious dough if you’re willing to do it yourself or have your 3rd party BMW mechanic do the work.

    The 328xi will be nice, but it won’t be a whole different than your 318 si with the exception of power being sent to the front wheels in slippery conditions.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    If a Focus ST is on the list, substitute an RS. More power and all wheel drive. Maintenance costs for it are likely to be lower than for anything from Germany.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      The RS is from Germany, but I know what you’re sayin’. I think the OP and his wife want something with a bit more interior refinement.

      • 0 avatar
        tedward

        Yupv on the refinement. Nope on the reliability. Modern turbo Ford’s are going through their teething process right now. Vw has far greater volume on the technology and had already paid those dues. I respect and enjoy current Ford’s but they scare me fat more than current vw’s. I’ll revisit that when they have a year or two more in the market.

  • avatar
    lon888

    If you really want a three pedal car then cross the GTI off your list. It took several months of looking and waiting for me to get 2012 GTI with a manual and navigation. A manual shift Focus is much easier to get – you might only have to wait for about a week to get your near-bespoke car.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      I disagree. Within 250 miles of my location in suburbia WV, there are 91 4 door GTIs with 6MTs per cars.com. A huge portion of them have the performance package, too.

  • avatar
    slance66

    The BMW 5 series wagon seems the way to go here. Especially with no i-drive. The prices for 5-6 year old used models are nearly in line with cheaper used 3 series wagons. The room and most of all ride quality, will be vastly better than an A4 Avant.

    Not sure where the OP resides now, but a GTI anywhere near NYC strikes me as unwise. It’s likely that the roads will eat it alive.

    • 0 avatar
      glwillia

      The E60 wasn’t available without iDrive. Also, I’m not sure if they imported manual E61s stateside, but even if they did they’ll be next to impossible to actually find on the used market.

  • avatar
    CarnotCycle

    For a little extra money upfront (and a lot more forever after!) one could step up to a E60 M5; get the six-speed manual (wife wants manual, premium!) – only 1500 made, one might sell it for more than they paid, assuming they hold onto it for another decade. V10 has ‘only’ ~380lb. of torque, but even ten years old those things are still very, very fast and quintessentially German in the high-engineered precision of all their myriad dysfunctions.

    YOLO!

    • 0 avatar
      tedward

      I uh, almost did that. Then I found a ream of horror stories very much in line with those found on timing chain Audi 4.2’s.

      A mechanic friend said that a good percentage of second owner cars with those engines end up being abandoned on his lot. The fact that even after the repo they end up costing him to get rid of them was enough to dissuade me.

      • 0 avatar
        CarnotCycle

        So tedward, to make long story short, writing my original message here sent me down a rabbit hole where I emerged on the other side a proud owner of…a 2008 E60 M5 with a 6MT.

        Picked it up for $24k, 78k on the odo, jet black, two owners, bone stock, clean Carfax, all the toys are on it and they all work.

        First thing I’m doing after delivery is getting an oil-sample analysis to make sure the lovely V10 isn’t going to freeze from worn rod bearings ready-to-fail. Because E60 M5.

        In the near future, when I’m surely going to be slowly pushing this formerly fast thing to side of road, hazards on, I’m going to blame you.

        YOLO!

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          Awesome! You sir,have bigger balls than I do for sure. Not that I’m personally adverse to a riskier car, it’s just that I’m slightly terrified of my wife I guess.

          I’m seriously jealous.

  • avatar
    hgrunt

    318is owner here! Used to have an E46 sedan too.

    Agree with the first-choices of GTI and 530xi. If you’re taking lots of long road trips, I’d lean towards the 530xi. I’d also take a deeper look at various 3-series wagons.

    The E6x and E9x BMWs are now generally of an age where the platform is proven, and forums have a wealth of information on how to work on one, and address common issues.

    Personally, I’d also look at an E46 Touring, but those are hard to find with a stick.

  • avatar
    Cabriolet

    Funny my wife and i both drive VW GTI’s and we live outside of NYC in Queens. Roads are bad but had no trouble with either car and they both have 18″ wheels. I just came across a killer of a deal on a 2013 Mini Cooper S that i could not refuse. Even with run flats & 17″ wheels the car handles great.To be honest i have more fun driving the Mini then my GTI. As far as both the VW’s they have both been great. 5 years old and other then a set of tires and 1 battery they still drive like they did when new. For the record driving NYC roads for 5 years and both cars still do not need any front end work.

  • avatar
    tedward

    Here’s my follow up. We pulled the trigger and ended up bringing home a 2016 gti SE with lighting package. They’re were three factors that largely played into this.
    1. Scandal pricing at vw. Being able to buy a mid level gti +1k for base price, along with incentive finance rates of 1.9 was huge.
    2.16 is a major year for vw content wise. Simply put the slightly used premiums did not have any desirable features that the gti lacked. Car play and android auto were important here (both phones types in house), although both Google and apple need to get their shit together here if they ever want to earn the trust needed to platform self driving tech. Looking at their current auto product I wouldn’t allow friends or family to “beta” test in one of their autonomous cars. It’s rough, but functionality is awesome and they just need to hurry their updates.
    3. Size. Not living in a flat state means I can only view the extra quarter to half ton of the premiums as a negative. The gti is quiet, comfortable and much, much faster and more entertaining on our roads.

    In short, I love it. I’m not going to tune it, it already comes in at the equivalent of a stage 1 mk6 but with a far more refined turbo power band. There’s just no need for more and I wouldn’t appreciate an increase in non linear power delivery.

    My gripe for vw is pedal placement. It’s never been vw’s strong suit but the extra gap (no doubt to avoid a senior generated ua scandal) makes it worse. If I don’t immediately adjust my technique for heel toe I’m going to move the gas pedal. I really shouldn’t have to do this. We’ll see.

    My wife hates the red exterior accents, which I ignored when I insisted on the lighting package (safety reasons for the lights). I’m de-badging tonight and eventually I’ll find some light housings from an r or bixenon golf to swap over, then deal with the grill stripe afterwards.

    No performance pack? Nope, despite everything I’ve said about it. It just wasn’t worth it as there were none with a manual in my area at all, and with the deal I struck it would have cost me double or triple the 1500 price to actually get the car so equipped (travel costs to other dealers lesser deals.) The car is sick fast already, it’s my wife’s car, and I can now fit any 17 I want for my winter rims. I’m happy with that.

    I gotta give credit to the dealer. Langan vw outside hartford, ct was amazing. We got the car there bc I’ve heard they were good, but the rep doesn’t do it justice. Simply stellar.

    Thanks everyone! The help was much appreciated.


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  • Rocket: I don’t see it. For one, it’s a lot of money to spend. But more important, Toyota is all about...
  • Giskard: Unlike other cars an electric car is likely to “know” it’s plugged in. My i3s, for...
  • Lie2me: I agree, or at least greatly reduce the amount of salt used. Here in southern Wisconsin I appreciate that...

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