By on September 16, 2015

bull. shutterstock user KRONA

Jeff writes:

All righty, Mr. Sajeev, I have four vehicles in the driveway: 2014 Toyota 4Runner Trail Premium (wife’s ride), 2006 Toyota Highlander Hybrid (teenage son’s ride), 2004 Chevrolet Silverado 2500HD 4X4 (my POV) and 2015 Ford Police Interceptor Utility (my company car). Three weeks ago, I arose at my normal 6 am, let the pups out and started a pot of coffee. Shortly after, the dogs are going nuts, so I open front door to investigate. I’m greeted by my neighbor’s 1000 pound steer literally on the front porch. No big deal. We live in a very rural area and I was raised with big animals. I grab a handy dog leash and smack the big boy across the nose fully expecting him to turn and run so I could herd him the 1/4 mile back to the neighbors.

No such luck.

He instead backs off porch, lowers his head and, as I am coming out the door, he charges. Again, not afraid of big animals, I side step him and go in the driveway amongst my cars where he proceeds to play ‘chase the redneck’ with me for a few minutes. Unfortunately, he can’t make the tight turns I can, being that he’s 800-plus pounds heavier, so he is clipping the corners of the vehicles with his horns as he chases me. The wife is now standing on the porch in shock, dialing 911. I run to the front door with him on my heels, manage to close the door before he gets to it, and he butts the front of the house while I am grabbing a shotgun.

I go back to the door to find him playing whack-a-mole with the two Toyotas (proud American beef, I guess). I go out and blast a few rounds off right over his head and literally a couple right across his face (in the air, not at him) with zero results. By now Bully is accustomed to me so he isn’t trying to stab me with his horns, but it takes my constant attention to keep him off the cars. I hop on my golf cart and rush him. He proceeds to put his horns under front bumper and tries to flip the thing but only manages to get it a foot or so off the ground before giving up.

A deputy finally arrives at end of my long driveway. Bully decides the shiny black Charger looks like more fun and takes off at a full run. The deputy is a new guy from the Atlanta area and has never encountered a frisky steer, throws car in reverse and starts backing up the dirt road. He finally tries to scare the steer with its siren. Turns out that is a mistake as the steer charges the Charger, resulting in the deputy unloading a full clip in his face. (Interlude here, when attempting to kill a large bovine it is best to aim for the brain or heart. 9mm slugs thru the sinuses really only make them annoyed.) The steer decides chasing the redneck around the cars was more fun and less painful so he comes back towards me. The deputy finally gets close enough to put another clip in his skull and our wild morning slows back down. The county road crew shows up with small crane and trailer, and the deceased bovine is transported to local Sheriff’s Boy’s Ranch for slaughter.

True story. (OMFG SON! – SM) 

Now to the question: The 2006 Highlander Hybrid is in great shape before this — 130K and kid loves it — but he is insisting we leave the damage so he has “cool stories with proof” to wow the girls with when school starts back in a few weeks. Does it make sense to make my neighbor pay for the damage on an 8-year-old car when kid doesn’t want it fixed? Estimate was a little over $1,200 for each car and neighbor is already angry he lost the beef but he’s willing to pay. Obviously the wife’s ride gets fixed but I’m leaning towards leaving the kid’s as is. Thoughts?

Sajeev answers:

Come on Son, along with the damage to your property you’re also saying the bull went mad for a Charger? Olé!

How ’bout we add to the story with another deputy called in for backup…and he showed up in a red Taurus! 

So about the trashed Highlander: provided it’s still street legal and safe on the highway, I would not fix it, as per your son’s wishes. Should you ask for repair money anyway? It depends on your relationship with your neighbor. You will take a big hit (sorry) when it’s time to sell or trade in the Highlander, so it’s not all fun and games. Maybe your neighbor was wrong for letting the bull leave his property. It sounds like you don’t care, so I reckon it was an honest mistake.

Is it worth making the neighbor pay for it? I assume he/she is a decent person, and letting this slide is the right move. That’s just being a good neighbor.

[Image: Shutterstock user KRONA]

Send your queries to [email protected]com. Spare no details and ask for a speedy resolution if you’re in a hurry…but be realistic, and use your make/model specific forums instead of TTAC for more timely advice.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

76 Comments on “Piston Slap: Raging Bull, Immortal Highlander...”


  • avatar
    ant

    When I was a teen, my dad was very adamant about the car I drove not having any body damage. It gives the police a reason to pull you over whenever they feel like it.

    example: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n3G7zFMt0uQ

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      I have to agree. Hold off on the repairs and let your son drive to school for a week with the physical evidence (in these days of cell phone cameras, kids don’t believe anything they don’t actually see), but get the work done before the snow flies.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    This story just made my morning, what a great read first thing in the day.

    All I get when I open my front door is a view of the neighbor’s cat crapping in the flower bed. If I bark at it, it runs as if for its life and does not maul my cars.

    As a teen, I wouldn’t want the sheet metal on the highlander fixed either. I would consider painting any gore marks that may have gone down to metal to prevent rust, though.

  • avatar
    WhiskeyRiver

    Trade the damage for BEEF! Beef is worth more than money these days and custom butchered fresh beef is the best.

  • avatar
    golden2husky

    Putting aside the kid’s wishes for the moment, there is hesitation to repair a car because its “eight years old”. Wow, that is pretty telling. I just repaired my 23 year old station car because a guy sideswiped while it was parked. Took off, of course. Body damage- to me- is just not acceptable. Don’t care if it is old but having creased metal and broken lights “repaired” with colored tape? Ugh.

    That said, if you choose not to fix it, don’t charge (no pun intended) your neighbor for it. That will create ill will. Your son will likely get tired of the story in a week or so and since he was not the one chased, its not such a cool story. And then you are stuck with a vehicle that is worth much less at trade in time.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      I’ve long thought that the best part, often the only good part, of a 10 year old car is not sweating the dings and dents.

      It’s a mid 00s appliance. It’s in the care of a 16 year old boy. A heirloom it’s not.

  • avatar
    Wade.Moeller

    There are two claims when a vehicle is damaged. Actual damage and loss of value. Actual damage is just what it says, the cost to put the vehicle into the same condition it was before the incident. Loss of value is the reduction in value when you go to sell the vehicle, whether you fix the damage or not. Even if repaired, a future buyer (who happens to notice the repaired damage) will offer less then they would if the damage had never occurred.

    If you decide not to repair, make sure you inform your neighbor that the money is he is paying is to cover the loss of value, not the damage repair costs.

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    Since son doesn’t want it fixed, maybe come to some sort of deal to help pay for fixing up the spots that will rust otherwise? Perhaps he can throw some steaks in the deal as well.
    Being a city kid I don’t know if anyone’s insurance would cover a bull attack, or is the neighbour also having to absorb the cost of losing that bull on top of the damage it did, plus the police call and butchering the big stupid animal?

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I love beef. I love bison. And I love elk.

    Red meat is delicious, and contrary to “conventional wisdom,” healthy.

    I stay in shape by exercising, meditating, staying away from processed foods (anything in a non-refrigerated box, carton, bag, anything with white or most what flour, sugar, hydrogenated oils, partially hydrogenated oils, or that doesn’t spoil after 2-3 days if refrigerated), and by eating vegetables, fruits and plenty of red meat.

    I hope that steer was a grass fed one, hopefully an Angus or Hereford, and will be put to delicious use. I hope that it yields 400 lbs plus of tasty, nutritious steaks, hamburger, ribs, etc.

    Mmmmm.

    Beef.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Where to you get your grass fed beef? Or heritage pork? I stop on the way home from Northern Michigan when I can, but there doesn’t seem to be any place around the Detroit area (except for grocery stores that jack up prices).

    • 0 avatar

      I like the way you think.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I’m the last person on earth to buy into “fads,” but am a true believer in a modified paleo diet (clean meat + veggie + fruit) for us short GI tract humans.

        Processed food = Satan

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I like bread!

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I had to break my addiction to bread & most grains (flour is particularly bad).

            Bread = Glycemic Shock Waves

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Shock waves of deliciousness.

          • 0 avatar
            319583076

            DeadWeight = anti-GM and now anti-flour, pro-beef, though!

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Oh lay an egg. Bread, in the context of a generally active and healthy lifestyle, and a reasonable and varied diet, is perfectly fine and will not harm you in any way, shape, or form. Should you cram your face with wonderbread or twinkies and hostess cakes? Probably not. Should you avoid eating some delicious fresh baked bread for fear of evil gluten? No.

            I ate like a king at my grandmother’s, enjoying all of the fruits of the Siberian harvest: tomatoes, cucumbers, green onion, potatoes, buckwheat, red/black currants. Along with bread from the village bakery, blini (Russian crepes) doused in butter and jam, kebabs made from local pork, milk and sour cream from the neighbor’s cow, and some awesome “samogon” (moonshine) home-stilled by my grandma. Despite all of these indulgences, I lost weight while I was over there because I was walking everywhere, and spending some time helping out with the potato harvest. Talk about a healthy lifestyle!

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @gtemnykh

            I would imagine the food you consumed in Siberia, including bread, was of a much higher quality than the food available in this country.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            @28 days,

            You’re definitely right. So much so that I’d argue the overall quality of life and well being of people over there balances out much closer to us in the US despite lagging behind in many other ways (job availability/material wealth, infrastructure, medical care, etc, etc). I never really considered just how much having access to fresh, high quality food has an effect on my perception of my happiness/wellness. Everyone is different of course, but I put it as a pretty high priority. Additionally, that lack of material wealth is in part why there is no obesity problem over there. Just a smoking/drinking problem.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Russian grain hasn’t been Monsanto’d.

            Even given this, grains in moderation (or strictly so) for us humans; there’s a reason why diabetes is a literal scourge on the human condition, and grains >>> flour is very close to literally dipping your whole tongue is sugar.

            The USDA food “pyramid” is such a bad joke.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @DW

            I read an interesting writeup last year on the Ukraine crisis having something to do with the merchant of death, Monsanto.

            Oh also diabetes is an issue because of the added sugars in everything, although adding grains into the mix only heightens the effect.

            Dr Lustig on Sugar, Obesity, and Diabetes:

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Diabetes is only a large scale issue in places where shopping carts are made up of 3 24 can packs of soda (read:USA). You simply do not see cankles just about anywhere else like you do here. And GMO crops have got absolutely zero to do with it (aside from growing so well that we’re don’t know where to put all of this corn syrup anymore).

            Go ahead and lecture generations of rural Russians that get the majority of their daily calories from carbohydrates, they’ll look at you funny, then maybe offer you a shot of samogon to calm you down. There was even an old rhyme/proverb that translates as “bread and porridge, the food for us!” Proteins are more expensive and harder to come by. Traditionally, most families would keep some hens to lay eggs and occasionally make soup out of, and maybe a few pigs to be grown up and slaughtered by year’s end. In fact, aside from abundant dairy products, most of the protein is probably from fish caught in the nearby river and ponds. Mushrooms take the place of meat in many meals as a savory/chewy component. The center of every meal is a big bowl of buttered up boiled potatoes.

            Most (all) of our modern day food-related health plight comes from over-consumption of food in terms of quantity, but especially overconsumption of nutrient-deficient sugary crap. Couple that with a sedentary lifestyle that comes with a wealthy, advanced civilization and it’s cankle city.

            All we need to do in the US is to put the fork down, and hopefully go do something outside.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Processed and certain other foods produced a larger insulin spike than pure sugar.

            Many, but not all, of these hyperglycemic foods are grains.

            Did you know that eating a baked white potato generates a larger insulin spike than does drinking a can of coca-cola? (this is why it is important to consume other fiber and meats when eating white potatoes).

            Did you know that diabetes in India has absolutely skyrocketed (up nearly 800%) since the introduction of western style, processed foods?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Diabetes is a worldwide health issue. 1 in 9 Americans adults has it, but in Russia, 1 in 16 adults has it too. 1 in 13 European adults has diabetes. Even Africa, the continent has the lowest rate of adults with diabetes has 1 in 20 adults with the disease.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Like I said, the traditional diet in Russia has always been potatoes, along with grains and bread. The rate of obesity is a tiny fraction of what it is here in the US, and I stand corrected by bball on the diabetes, but it is nonetheless statistically much less prevalent. Most of my older relatives have died of heart attacks, a function of how much people drink and smoke. Although it must be said that there is a lot of salt in food over there as well.

            All of these studies with glucose spikes from potatoes and all that other new research is purely academic. Losing the forest for the trees as it were. The evidence on the ground backs up a much simpler science.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It’s probably just good to follow these rules: Don’t eat more calories than you burn and eat as much nutrient dense food as possible. That would take care of most weight issues.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @DW

            I did not know that about white potatoes, interesting.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            @bball

            Agreed in full.

            @28 days

            While that factoid is an exciting news blurb, the reality is that eating that white potato will give you some real useful energy and satiate you. The soda will ultimately leave you dehydrated, in addition to not doing your teeth any favors.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Regular potatoes are fine. Don’t fry them or coat them with butter.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Most nutrients in potatoes reside in the skin (at least for the now ubiquitous American white potato, as grown in nutrient depleted soil).

            Yams and other non’generic white potatoes (yellow tubors and other species grown in other markets) are much more nutrient dense.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            gtemnykh-

            While diabetes is a worldwide problem, you are right that it is worse in the US. The combination of popular foods and people of different ethnic background really makes the US a melting pot of insulin dependence. The worst diabetes rates are in Native American tribes in the Southwest US. They have access to the American diet, live a more sedentary life than their ancestors, and some of their “cultural foods” are things adapted from western ingredients. Frybread is popular among those tribes, but it’s based on things given to them by the US government on reservations. The Tohono O’odham Nation has a adult diabetes rate of 1 in 2!!!!!!!!!!! When my wife worked at a hospital in Tucson, her inpatient rehab patients from that tribe would never have all their toes. Diabetes took them.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Sweet potatoes are probably better for you, but a medium sized regular potato that is baked and dressed with lean meat and veggies is healthier than what most eat. Eat the skin.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Even a bit of butter or sometimes eating them fried (ie skillet fried) won’t kill you :) It’s more so the quantity that’ll get you. Likewise I’d rather drink some “awful” whole milk than a nutritionally-empty soda. I actually had a hard time getting used to the milk over there at my grandma’s, the stuff straight from the neighbor’s cow. It’s so rich and ‘cowy’ smelling for this prissy American!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Right, butter isn’t inherently bad. Just gotta worry about moderation.

            All this talk about a potato’s GI. Like we have a baked potato eating problem in America. Ha. We have a junk food and over eating problem.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        DW impresses me once again.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      400 lbs? Try 750 on the low end. We butchered our three steers about a month ago, and we don’t let our steers get too large, regardless we brought home 747 pounds of pure grass fed harmone free beef. That was from one of them, the other two belonged to other family members but we all had roughly the same amount.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        We get around 440 lbs of beef on average from 1100 pound “on the hoof” Angus steer (1100 lbs before finishing) from a Upper Peninsula source (they raise and process the meat), that allows us to tag a whole animal prior to September.

        They are a very reputable farm and do a lot of 4H work, also (teaching youngsters about sustainable practices and raising healthy animals).

        I’m not sure how you are getting an extra 300 pounds unless you’re including offal, etc., but you obviously are in the business.

        To bball above – I can tell you that the rancher is in Chippewa County in the UP. We buy a whole and divy it up with family.

        It’s Angus, and once you eat it, supermarket beef never tastes good again.

        We’re going to try and get a grass fed Hereford from out west (Colorado) next year (through a guy who works at Wolverine in Eastern Market).

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I usually source from a farm in Clare, but getting better beef from Eastern Market would be great.

          There is a great farm in Yale, MI that does heritage and Berkshire pork. They sell it at Eastern Market too.

          • 0 avatar
            VolandoBajo

            I’d like to find a source in the Phila/Wilmington DE area for freshly butchered meat, like I used to have when my wife is finishing her degree in central DE, but so far, Lancaster PA is the best I have been able to do, and that just about kills a whole day.

            The government and the public health “nazis” have been preaching ideas without medical and scientific backing for decades.

            A cardiologist friend told me in tne seventies that butter was better for your heart than margarine, and it was another quarter century before there was wide publicity that the type of cholesterol in margarine was worse for you than butter is.

            For years the public health cabal preached that pork MUST be cooked above 175, and for a good length of time, to prevent trichinosis. More was touted as even better.

            Then one day, the whole world shifted…someone did some research that showed that that much heat caused carcinogens to be created, and the new “healthy food gospel” was to cook meat at lower temperatures.

            And salt has been vilified for decades. The catch is that the public health tyrants do their testing only on populations with renal hypertension, but espouse the results as being justified for the general public.

            But there was a medical study (done properly, double blind, peer review, etc.) that showed that if you take a normal population, and restrict their sodium intake, one third will have lower blood pressure. But about one third will exhibit no change in BP. And about one third will actually end up with elevated BP on a restricted sodium diet.

            It has also been shown by medical studies that reducing salt intake is only good and necessary for people predisposed to renal hypertension. Not all high BP, just those with the renal form of it. Other medical research seems to indicate that other minerals play a greater role in BP, especially calcium, potassium and magnesium, and in a complex relationship that is not as easy to test vis-a-vis BP.

            I also suspect that if you get regular exercise and eat a fairly balanced diet, even a few sodas a day won’t do you a lot of harm.

            I am seventy, got a perfect physical exam, eat all the salt I want, and have all my life. I drink between one and three or four Cokes most days, and ignore gluten and other food fads. My BP is 130/70, and I weigh 170 on a 5’9″ frame.

            These facts drive my “health conscious” vegan MD brother-in-law and sister-in-law nuts, as they are convinced I am condemning their sister (my wife) and our son to early death.

            But the only two concessions I make to a healthy diet are that I never smoked cigarettes and stopped smoking cigars several years ago, and after drinking enough alcohol for two people for the first 25 years of my so-called adult life, I quit, first for a short-term medical reason, and later, to delay aging.

            And it seems to have worked for me…I can still spend two to four days a week helping my son with his mowing business, and I do my share around the yard and the house.

            There is one public health theory that I do subscribe to, however. The head of one branch of a Japanese system of martial arts and also a system of living and philosophy, Tohei-sensei, once wrote that most people do far more harm to their health by worrying about the food that they eat, than they do from the eating the food itself.

            He advocates that for most people’s diets, if they just ate what they had, and didn’t worry about it, they would be much happier.

            Of course, he makes exceptions for people with really bad food supplies, but he didn’t exclude even normal Western diets from his idea…eat it, enjoy it, don’t worry about it, and don’t suffer because of it. And it seems to work. The only catch is that we have been conditioned as a nation, to be a nation of worry-warts.

            So if you think three Cokes a day is bad for you, they probably will be, though more likely because you worry about them, than because they are harmful per se.

            I’m sure there will be more than one person who will insist that I am bringing a message of death and destruction to the B&B, but this is my story, and I’m sticking to it.

            Or as Cantinflas says at the end of his speech in the movie The Ambassador, “he dicho”…”I have spoken”.

            Or like the hundred year old guys who get interviewed for a newspaper, and who say they ate and did whatever they wanted. When asked if they didn’t worry about shortening their lives, they would reply that they would rather die regretting what they did, than to die regretting what they hadn’t done.

            Sounds like a plan to me.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          “once you eat it, supermarket beef never tastes good again”

          We bought a half pig from an acquaintance who raises a small number locally. And you’re absolutely right, industrial scale supermarket pork is garbage in comparison.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Locally sourced pork is amazing. And don’t cook it to 160!!!! I only cook pork roasts to 135/140. The carryover heat will kill anything else during the rest.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            Amen to that, bball.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Even the USDA has come to it’s senses and declared that 145 degrees safe for pork. They still want me to scorch my hamburgers though. I also don’t cook the breast meat on a whole turkey to their doneness standards. 150 is safe with carryover.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            You are all singing my tune.

            It’s amazing how far quality of meat under large scale factory farm operations has fallen.

            I realize there are many mouths to feed, but there HAS to be a better way (that better balances quality, health & price – even if price is slightly higher – under a more efficient distribution system).

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      @Deadweight

      And here I thought you stayed in shape due to all the calories burned ranting about Cadillac.

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-Iron

      Looks like the “is there a doctor on the plane?” “I’m a vegan” joke needs to be updated.

  • avatar
    jrmason

    Pictures or it didn’t happen.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      Here you go:

      http://assets.rollingstone.com/assets/2014/article/matthew-mcconaughey-channels-rust-cohle-for-weird-lincoln-ad-20140905/167411/large_rect/1401×788-Screen%20Shot%202014-09-05%20at%201.09.39%20PM.png

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Of course junior does not want the car fixed. The poor kid has to drive a highlander to school, probably gets asked daily as to the location of his car seats. Why put a high school boy in a soccer mom rig when you don’t have to? The only option for this kid to escape ridicule for driving such a puss wagon is to have scars scattered around the outside to prove that while he may drive a most effeminate vehicle, he did and does tangle with bulls. I mean for F’s sake, you obviously live in a rural community, obviously are not poor based on the vehicles you already own, get the kid a Ford Ranger or some other affordable first car rig that won’t get him into too much trouble and at least let him have some semblemce of feeling that he has not been emasculated by his parents.

    As for the owner of the cow, I am not sure I care how upset he is. He owes for the damage. In the future perhaps he will consider a steer for his beef needs. Far more docile, as long as you have two or more and some grass for them to eat they stay put.

  • avatar
    319583076

    Coincidentally, we had a loose cow run through our parking lot at work last week. It managed to ding up two pickups, but thankfully it stayed away from my Miata. Weird.

  • avatar
    GermanReliabilityMyth

    Neighbor or not, he’s willing to give you the money to make you whole before the bovine made holes in your property. I’d take the full payout. Why? Even if your son doesn’t want to repair the Highlander right now, he may eventually buy a different car or grow tired of the damage on his ride. Then you’ll wish you had the money to fix it, except you already turned it down. Even if you don’t use it right away, take the money and put it in the bank for the time when, not if, you want to repair the damage.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    Aren’t you the guy who always wrote those letters at the beginning of Playboy back in 1979?

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Minor detail that kept making me cringe: why would someone in law enforcement refer to a handgun’s magazine as a “clip?” My apologies in advance for the borderline autistic nitpicking :)

    Sorry to hear about the 4Runner Trail Premium getting dinged up, that’s my dream truck right there! As an aside, how’s your wife like the 4Runner?

  • avatar
    -Nate

    GREAT morning story ! .

    Agreed , it all depends on the neighbor , I’m hoping this is a good one who had a one time event .

    At the very least , GO GET THAT BEEF ! I’m getting hungry reading Deadweight’s comments here….

    -Nate
    (who misses Farm fresh meats terribly)

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Good grief! I thought I was having a little adventure when I had to stop mowing for a 5.5′ black rat snake in my yard a couple weeks ago. There was also a big orb weaver in the bushes which I photographed! I like those.

    http://pasteboard.co/GyMlVaO.jpg

    Anyway, so bulls wake up sometimes and have a bad day, and come bother you? Why would it come up to your house on the porch? What do you think it would have done if you’d have left it alone?

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Great story.

    Assuming from context that you’re somewhere where it snows. You need to fix it enough to avoid rust. That may mean sanding and painting damaged body panels. I know if it were me I would go berserk at that idea. Just fix the thing.

    But since the snow won’t be falling for awhile yet, you can wait a couple weeks, and let him tell the girls his story.

  • avatar
    RogerB34

    Call the neighbor and don’t mess with the steer.
    Steer or bull?
    Odd that a farm raised steer would be so aggressive.

  • avatar
    Geekcarlover

    You know it’s going to be a bad day when you wake up living in a Crabspirits story.

  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    Your neighbor, a farmer-rancher, has liability insurance (or should) for just such an occurrence. Let him pay for damages you incurred due to his steer’s trespass and temper. He’s already insured the steer, I’m sure, and will be getting a check for its untimely demise.

    Being as rural as you are, perhaps you’re in the mountain west where one encounters other big critters, like maybe bear, buffalo, berserker moose, mountain lion and the like. You can drop a beef with one well placed round through the brain with a 9mm, something it took awhile for your city slicker young deputy a few rounds to discover. However, it’s time you took him and his 12-ga to the range with some slugs and put in some practice, covering carefully the kill zones of animals that can kill you back.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I got steered into reading this story by the headline and after reading it I though it was a bunch of bull. When the law arrived we finally learned that the cow’s life was at steak.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      While some might Acclaim this story doesn’t quite ring true, it’s definitely scary to find a bull in full Fury on your porch! That sort of Prowler is even more dangerous a Challenger than some small Colt. Certainly it wasn’t a Breeze to deal with such a big Charger on the front lawn. Luckily the law was there to Conquest this silly animal, before our OP became a Road Runner – a small Scamp on the Horizon.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      I nearly choked on my ranch dressing. I got roped into this story, but was given a bum steer.

      • 0 avatar
        jrmason

        As much good conversation as this has generated I’m still calling bs. The lack of pictures I requested this morning along with my background has me raising the BS flag. Throw in a few heifers and step in between them and the BULL (not a steer which is a casterated bull and substantially less likely to be as confrontational as a bull) and you might make a believer of me but this is not typical behavior of a lone STEER (again, different than a bull).

        BTW, which was it, a bull or a steer? I saw reference of both, the title says bull but the story references a steer.

        How bout them pictures?

        • 0 avatar
          Jebby

          OP here. To answer many of the comment and queries above: yes it really happened, I could send pics to our mighty host if you seriously need the proof.
          The damage estimates I gave were WAY off mark, seems Toyota and my local body shops feel much stronger about 8 year old cars than I thought. Highlander was @4k, the 4Runner was only @1k.
          We live in rural South Georgia, no snow. Ever. None of the dents went to bare metal, mostly just scratches and dents, most of cost was total repaint since dents were so spread out over entire vehicle.
          The teen driver actually selected this thing over several pickup and sport sedans, ever driven a highlander hybrid? it smokes most ricers, serious sleeper/mom mobile, what can I say? my kid has my weird taste.
          It will not be repaired and I can’t ask my semi indigent neighbor (south of the border imports complete with a large fighting “we don’t fight them just raise them” chicken operation) to cough up that kind of cash. We have a good relationship and I’d like to keep it that way. He doesn’t want insurance involved and that’s his business not mine so long as I get what I feel is fair.
          As for the bride’s 4Runner, it will be repaired on neighbors dime, and she loves it, I only hate it because I’m not allowed to utilize it’s full potential tho she does let me put it in 4H when the dirt road is muddy.

          Glad my experience provided some smiles, I know it’s hard to swallow but I stand by it.

          Cheers!

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Hilarious fiction. Well done.

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    One word: insurance.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Johnster: At least initially, it seemed that Honda thought their redesigned Accord was so good that they didn’t...
  • volvo: Great Summary Johnster NA ice engines with great power/displacement and multispeed ATs. What’s not to...
  • David Cardillo: …hmmmm…Who owns Bloomgerg…? Following statement’s older than...
  • Johnster: The 4-cylinder LE is a surprisingly good car and in larger metropolitan areas they are selling for under...
  • Daniel J: Art I agree. Many are leaving. I just hope they don’t vote for the same crap that for Cali where...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber