By on September 30, 2015

Mazda Concept Tokyo

Mazda on Wednesday released a teaser image for a sports car it will show off at the Tokyo Motor Show on Oct. 28.

The automaker divulged few details about the car, other than to say it would “almost condense Mazda’s entire history of sports car development into a single model,” which means nothing in itself. What may be more significant is that the car will be shown alongside a 1967 Cosmo Sport, which was rotary powered. Or maybe that doesn’t matter at all.

We’ve all but given up on rotary powered engines being fuel-efficient and commercially viable so calling this an RX concept would be a long throw.

Nonetheless, the classic sports car proportions are all there: long hood, steeply sloped rear end, two doors and presumably two seats.

Is this the next-generation FT86 that Mazda could make with Toyota?

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48 Comments on “Mazda Teases Sports Car Ahead of Tokyo Reveal...”


  • avatar
    MBella

    I wonder if a rotary could be efficient as a generator in a hybrid system. If Mazda built a hybrid RX along the lines of a McLaren P1, Honda NSX etc. It would be pretty cool.

    • 0 avatar
      EAF

      RX-9.

      It will be powered by a Mazda rotary with a Toyota assisted hybrid.

      Source: Motortrend 2011

      • 0 avatar
        redav

        It’s just a concept, so it doesn’t have to be limited to real-world practicality.

        I absolutely could see a sort of 918 / NSX hybrid based on a rotary. But I don’t think so. Rather, I think it will be a celebration piece–something that blends the history of the rotary, the flavor of the Miata, and their various styling cues through their history.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    Give it 250+hp, a high redline, keep the weight around 2700lbs and the price under $30k and you have a winner. Probably my next vehicle too if/when I decide to send the S2000 to pasture.

    I’d go for a 2+2 too, it’ll make it an easier sell since I can cart my son in it until he’s around 11.

    • 0 avatar
      bludragon

      Where do I sign? – current RX-8 owner considering a new mazdaspeed3 when they come out with one (next year?)

      I think that combination of power, weight and price is unrealistic though. One of them will have to give.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        Well you can make one yourself now – buy an FR-S/BRZ and slap a supercharger on it (most of them are ~$4500).

        But in all seriousness, when those transact at roughly $25k and hit all the wickets except power, I think 50hp for an extra $5k is more than reasonable.

        • 0 avatar
          Maymar

          I would hazard a guess that this will start slightly more than a loaded Miata (so starting a little over $30k).

          Also, is it as easy as slapping a supercharger on, from a manufacturer’s perspective? They’d have certain reliability targets to hit. More power means stouter components, which means more weight or more cost. The closest equivalent to this I can think of is the 370Z, which likely mostly hits its $30k base price by virtue of economies of scale (but then is also around 3300lbs). I can only imagine this would be ND Miata-based (like the RX-8 was NC-based), and considerably lighter, but it may also be closer to 200-220hp.

          • 0 avatar
            duffman13

            A manufacturer isn’t just going to slap on a blower. They have more things to think about like emissions and fuel economy. However, most aftermarket supercharging solutions negligibly affect fuel economy outside of full throttle because the blower is on an internal clutch and the pulley is freewheeling unless the intake air volume (read: throttle position) is high enough real power is actually demanded. Emissions are largely unaffected too, as everything post-engine stays the same (different story if you’re talking turbo).

            I guess the real problem is the engine – now, Mazda does have the MZR from the speed3 which would give it 260 right out of the box, but if they’re introducing a new sports car they might want a new engine. I don’t know if we’ve heard anything from them about turbocharging future powerplants, but a variant of the 2.0 skyactiv motor with around 12-15lbs of boost would hit those power numbers easily – the big things would be swapping in lower compression pistons, designing the exhaust/turbo manifold, and

            250+ NA just isn’t doable with a 4-cylinder unless you go the S2000 route. Given mazda’s track record I doubt they’d go 6 anyway, and the S2k route leads to terrible fuel economy and equally bad emissions. That would mean boost is the only logical answer.

          • 0 avatar
            White Shadow

            Why not? Porsche already did it with the new Boxster.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      Personally, the sports car I wish Mazda made is an RX-8 but with a 300 hp V6. Call it an MX-8. It would preserve all the great points of the RX-8 (which are many) while fixing its biggest problems (which also are plentiful).

      • 0 avatar
        bludragon

        Sounds great, but I would expect a 300hp v6 to be bigger and heavier than the renesis in the RX-8, which would have a bit of a knock on effect in terms of overall packaging, weight and CoG. One of the defining features of the rotary is that it is small and light, so the weight can be kept low and behind the front axle.

        Or at least that is the theory. There could well be an engine swap thread out there to prove me wrong.

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          A V6 is larger, but the Renesis isn’t that light because it’s all steel. LS swaps don’t seem to add much weight, so an aluminum V6 should be no worse. For CoG & packaging, a V6 is much better than a V8 because it keeps the weight closer to the center and leaves a lot of space at the front for the radiator, steering rack, & accessories. The V6 would raise the CoG slightly but not unlike a Miata.

          I haven’t driven an RX-8 with a V6, but I think it would preserve the car’s nimbleness, weight balance, and fun-to-drive characteristics–much more than a V8 would. Plus, I wouldn’t feel safe going up to a ~400 hp V8 unless I replaced a whole bunch of other stuff, too.

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    Surely you could give us a bigger version of the picture than that Aaron? Every time a B&Ber has to visit Jalopnik for the same story, baby Jesus kills a kitten.

    https://i.kinja-img.com/gawker-media/image/upload/1453323959226591658.jpg

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Clearly it will have 22 inch wheels and be lifted three feet off of the ground but will still be a “sports car”.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    You are so beautiful
    To me
    You are so beautiful
    To me
    Can’t you see
    You’re everything I hoped for
    You’re everything I need
    You are so beautiful
    To me

    Love you, Mazda…mean it with all my heart.

    General Motors wishes they could muster 1/3 of your talent.

  • avatar
    319583076

    I like what I see, but it looks like a 2-seater…I dunno if that’s going to be feasible in my near future.

  • avatar

    Fingers crossed. My biggest fear is the darkness hides super tall sides that will make 19 inch wheels look undersized. My guess on weight is 3250 lbs.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    I’d be happy with just a non-convertible Miata with a lower price point.

    Maybe this will showcase future engine design… I’m betting Mazda has its turbo Skyactive ready for production.

  • avatar
    Demetri

    Looks really nice so far. The tail light design is definitely a throwback to the FD RX-7. TMS can’t come soon enough; I want to hear what’s going to power this thing. MX or RX?

  • avatar
    readallover

    Maybe the 2017 mazda 6 coupe?

  • avatar
    Sjalabais

    Mazda is doing such an impressive job. Over the last couple of years, they have catapulted themselves from “The League of Other Japanese Cars” (TLOJC like Mitsubishi and Nissan) to building the most beautiful, often best deals in their class. That’s true for the 3, 6 and CX5 – all loved by journalists.

    And now this. Without any more details, I wish them the best of fortunes with this strategy.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Mazda makes elegantly styled, quality built, reasonably priced vehicles – some of their vehicles, such as the new 6 and MX-5, make want to rub one out, yet are literally 1/4 the price of far less stylish, worse vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I generally like Mazda as an independent, and want them to succeed! My problems with Mazda are:

        -Lack of AWD across range. I feel they could capture Subaru customers if they did offer it.

        -Continual failure to provide diesel.

        -Continual failure to create large car.

        -Continual failure to create RWD sedan.

        -Probable lack of rustproofing and quality metal/paint.

        -Interior materials iffy.

        • 0 avatar
          Chocolatedeath

          I wont argue about the Rusting, I live in FL and I will acknowledge it aint going to happen even though I live on the ocean.
          I am glad they are taking their time with the diesel (VW). If they took that and added a large battery too it we are looking at a new kind of car for US market.
          RWD : they aint doing it. Just buy the 5 series platform and style it themselves
          I do wish they would bring back the Mazda 9

        • 0 avatar
          redav

          AWD: It seems their latest SUV concept has the Subaru Outback in its sights.

          Diesel: After VW, there will be no market for it. Mazda dodged a bullet on that one, IMO.

          Large car: People don’t buy them much anymore. That segment is now SUVs & trucks.

          RWD sedan: Even BMW is moving away from RWD. Like large cars, it’s a market loser.

          Rustproofing: Obviously, it’s needed, but they may have already addressed it. I’m not in a problem area, so I have no idea.

          Interior materials: I haven’t noticed these to be lacking. I’m not sure what buyers expect.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “almost condense Mazda’s entire history of sports car development into a single model,”

    Indeed, it is quite easy to condense things when they’re always shrinking due to rust.

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    Mazda (and RX owners) have an abusive relationship with the rotary engine.
    We keep thinking it will get better and it keeps emptying our pockets.

    At some point, we just need to walk away. Giving up the “interesting” rotary identity will eventually reap rewards for everyone.

    Recipe for an inexpensive, fun, class-beating Mazda sports car:
    1) Grab the Cyclone V6 from the Mustang/CX-9
    2) stick it in the old RX-8 chassis (with the rest of the Mustang driveline?)
    3) update the interior/amenities
    4) call it the MX-8.
    5) Sell it starting in the $27k range. ($33k for the 380HP EcoBoost version)
    6) Laugh all the way to the bank.

    The engineering on the chassis and drivetrain are already done. Just have to mate them, crash a few of them into concrete and get it NHTSA/EPA/CARB certified.

    I’ll probably end up doing this on my RX-8 as part of my conversion to track vehicle (after my next Renesis bites the dust).

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      I recently sold my RX-8. I wanted to do exactly what you describe, but I just don’t have the skill/time/money for a swap. The RX-8 (MX-8) with the 3.7L V6 would be a perfect car. However, I would hope that if it’s a new car, they’d modify the V6 to add direct injection & some of the other SkyActiv tricks to bump up its efficiency while still maintaining 300+ hp.

      But if it is a new car, then it will take a bit more work to meet safety expectations. Fixing the RX-8 means adding weight (bad), and the Miata is too optimized for easy scaling.

  • avatar
    daro31

    Sure looks a lot like the Jaguar XK8 sitting in my garage.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Difference there is that the Mazda will be capable of movement under it’s own power. :)

      • 0 avatar
        daro31

        Thanks for keeping the reputation of aJag alive, I will be able to afford the most beautiful cars at greatly depricated values. For the record I have 180,000 trouble free kms on my 2004 XK8 convertible. We just returned from a trouble free 2500 mile trip t Myrtle Beach through the Great Smokey Mountains and she did just fine under her own power. Lot less trouble with the Jag them my Chrysler.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Your Jag doesn’t measure in kms, so why are you? Trying to make the numbers sound larger? Measuring total car distance in km, and your “trip” in miles?

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          daro, as a fanboy of Mazda, let me also state that the 2004 Jaguar XJR (4.2-liter V-8 spiked by a Eaton supercharger) my then boss had is one of my favorite cars of all time; it looked sexy AND mean, had a great exhaust note, great interior fit and finish, and a sublime ride.

          On top of everything, it was very reliable (I swear!) – much more so than the Mercedes E550 he previously had.

          It was a fantastic, fantastic , FANTASTIC car.

  • avatar
    RHD

    It’s the 2017 Mazda RX-9 Cosmo, 300 HP, 0-60 in 5.4 seconds, complete with extra large blind spots.

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