By on September 4, 2015

2015JaguarFType-4

Jaguar-Land Rover might be looking to expand their manufacturing operations, but it isn’t because the car side of the business is booming.

Out of the 36 brands sold in the United States, Jaguar is seeded 32nd year-to-date with 10,221 units sold, ahead of Maserati (7,506), Smart (4,682), Bentley (1,685) and Alfa Romeo (443), and behind Fiat (28,421), Scion (32,691) and Porsche (34,876).

(Holy crap, Porsche is selling more vehicles than Scion and Fiat!)

To stem the tide, Jaguar is cutting prices and introducing free maintenance in the United States, addressing the two main concerns prospective buyers have with the brand — high purchase pricing and maintenance costs — according to Automotive News.

The Jaguar XF, once the most expensive offering in its segment, received a price reduction of $5,275, landing the final MSRP at $52,895 with freight. F-TYPE pricing remains similar, but with additional equipment for added value. Other models see adjustments between $1,500 and $3,000 either to pricing or enhanced packaging.

The new EliteCare program provides 5-years or 60,000 miles of complementary scheduled maintenance on 2016 model year vehicles.

Hopefully the new F-PACE and entry-level XE, with a starting price of $35,895, will turn things around for the British marque.

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34 Comments on “Jaguar Slashes Prices Because It Really Needed To...”


  • avatar

    I think, honestly, that this will go a much longer way toward making Jaguar competitive with the Germans in terms of sales numbers than will manual-transmission F-Types and such. Part of the reason people buy BMWs, Audis and Mercedes-Benz’ is because they are easy luxury brands to own. They also heavily subsidize their leases, something else Jaguar might consider doing…

    • 0 avatar
      Car Ramrod

      Good point on the leasing. My understanding is that few people actually buy this class of car outright.

      Still, it was depressing when the original XF launched with a high sticker and V8 engines only.

      • 0 avatar
        matador

        If you outright buy a new Audi or Mercedes, you may be nuts. You lease it, or buy used. One of the reasons I bought an Audi was the massive depreciation- a used A6 isn’t much pricier than a similar-age Impala. If you bought new, that’s a lot of depreciation to take.

        • 0 avatar
          seth1065

          I have to think a similar A6 will cost more than a Impala w the same miles.

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            You were saying?

            http://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/detail/646765987/overview/

            http://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/detail/645902076/overview/

            I think the dealer is a little high on the Impala, but it can be done….

        • 0 avatar

          I bought a 2011 X5 with 33K miles (CPO *and* a generous warranty) a month ago. It was originally $68K; I paid less than half of that, all-in.

          • 0 avatar
            BrunoT

            There are some great deals on used X5’s with lowish miles. You just have to be ready to absorb some repair risk post-warranty.

            It’s a rarity. A vehicle that, in the right configuration, can handle well, haul stuff, and haul a little arse. (0-60 5.2 sec for V8) For under $40K used with some warranty on it. CPO would be the 3.0 at that price.

        • 0 avatar

          This is what killed SAAB. Most went out as leases, and when the banks shut down…I recall an article, a dealer said he sold 20 a month, 18 of which were leased. He sold 2 a month for a while, and SAAB went away.

    • 0 avatar
      baconator

      The only significant price drop is on the XF, which is a very dated platform that really does not have the features or styling to compete with the 5-series and E-class. They also had a mismatch of power level and pricing compared to the E350 and 535.

      I really wish Jag would drop the price of the XJ’s Supercharged version ($90k base) down closer to the $75k base price of the V-6 car. At $90k it’s right at base S550 pricing and still needs the Portfolio package to feel as luxurious as the Benz. Optioned the way dealers order them, they cross over the $100k threshold; the difference between the lease payment on an V-8 XJ and the lease payment on an S-class could itself be the lease payment on a second car. The XJ is a really nice car, but so is the S-class.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        The 2016 XF is on the same platform as the XE; an all new aluminum platform.

        I think they really screwed up by styling it too similarly to the old car though, because even people who read sites like this are apparently unaware of the 2016 model being a completely new car.

        If people who care about cars enough to comment on websites like this one think that they’re still selling the old DEW98 platform XF, then the casual customer won’t even bother test driving the new one to see how different it is, even if he doesn’t care about platforms.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Gimme a fecking I6.

    • 0 avatar

      As a matter of fact, Jaguar/Land Rover may be bringing us straight-six engines again. The current corporate V6 is literally the latest AJ-V8 engine block, minus two pistons and with some balancing magic to make it all work (and presumably smaller bores). That was probably done given the company’s need for a six-cylinder engine in a short amount of time, and with limited funds.

      Meanwhile, Jaguar/Land Rover has been, up to now, using a Ford 2.0-liter EcoBoost engine for its four-cylinder applications, like the XF and the Range Rover Evoque. But the company has been working on its own modular line of engines called “Ingenium”. The four-cylinder Ingenium engine will debut with the XE and redesigned XF, from what I hear, but…as it is modular, it may also have a version with two extra cylinders…which would be the straight-six you and I want so badly.

      TL;DR: Seems Jaguar is working on a new line of modular straight engines, which will include four and six-cylinder variants.

      • 0 avatar
        jthorner

        Maybe Jaguar could talk to its former sibling Volvo which has the tooling for a very decent lineup of modular 4, 5 and 6 cylinder engines as used in most Volvos from the 1990s up until a few years ago. Today Volvo is going all in on heavily boosted 4 cylinder engines, which strikes me as all wrong in their price class.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        I definitely read about plans to make straight 6 Ingenium engines. The other interesting thing about the Ingenium engine line is how much commonality they have between the gasoline and diesel engines; they even share blocks and other major components if I recall correctly.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    The XE is getting rave reviews over in Europe as the BMW 3-series that BMW didn’t build. The price points on the XE are impressive.

    340 HP 6-banger with a manual, RWD and 0 to 60 in 4.7 seconds? All for about $41K allegedly well equipped? Color me very interested.

    Even told the DSW that this is the first car to peak my interest in 7 years.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      Agreed on the XE. I’m sincerely hoping that they’re still offering the maintenance program three years from now when the lease is up on my GTI.

    • 0 avatar
      BrunoT

      It looks like a fine effort. But with all lux brands, or most, there’s $10,000 in options on some of them. How it prices with what you want on it will determine the value equation. And it better resale better than the XF if they want to lease them.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    as much as Toyota Corolla buyers are criticized for being boring/conservative (lower case c)in their car choice….luxury leasees are even moreso lemming-like.

    BMW (X)3/(X)5 series, E/C/GL(C) Merc. ES300 (sigh). those are the go-to cars with subsidized leases held up by strong demand post-lease.

    Good luck Jaguar at changing perceptions, look how long it took Audi.

    As James May put it in his original XF review, when non-car people think Jaguar/Britain they think something with a bowler hat on.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    The F pace launches this month which should signal the start of great things for Jaguar

  • avatar
    meefer

    At my time of purchase, I was being offered $73-77K used CPO or new leases around $1K a month on F-type V8s. Buying new compared to these two options seemed really silly. I ended up in the lease. I’d love to do an AMA about this for the B&B if there’s demand.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I’d be very interested – don’t know if AMA still lives with the new sheriff in town. I loved AMA!

      Jaguar seems to be doing a lot right in how they package their vehicles – they are gaining my interest but I’ve always had a soft spot for less than mainstream brands and/or oddball models.

  • avatar
    ccd1

    Not sUre AMA still exists. Was supposed to do that for my TT RS and nothing happened

  • avatar
    mchan1

    Haven’t really seen any Jaguar vehicles in my area, Bay State. I knew 1 person that actually bought a Jaguar.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      Yeah I don’t ever see them around in MA either, but I think the crossover will sell well as I see sooo many Q5s and Lexus RXs, and this car is right in the same wheelhouse but with a flavor of British luxury. I expect the F-Pace will put Jag back on the map in the US.

  • avatar

    I’ll have to check, but I’m pretty sure that the new XF shares its platform with the XE and upcoming F-Pace crossover, so it’s probably cheaper to build than the outgoing XF, which had a dedicated platform.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      It does share the platform, but I’m not sure it’s necessarily cheaper to build per unit at this point considering that said platform is all new and the old platform had long been amortized. The price reduction is probably more about competing with 4 cylinder competitors and offering a V6 at similar cost as a reason to buy Jaguar.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    The new F-Pace SUV looks good and the warranty upgrade is good too, but they definitely have to get the leases cheaper also since that is what really matters. The XE looks good and it should do well I would think.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Jag is in kind of the same predicament as Caddy…. it’s basically a store brand now; maybe slightly better. So they have to charge store brand prices. Bigger problem is waning interest in large sedans and sports cars.

    XE and F Pace are steps in the right direction but they are so commoditized it all seems a little pointless. Jag has better dynamics out of the box, and is decently priced, but comparable Bimmers will have subsidized leases or better resale values, along with much stronger dealer support. 335i vs XE V6S, dynamic edge of the XE can be made up with $3K or so in non-run flat tires, springs/shocks and upgraded brakes. You can’t fix Jag’s resale issues. And like Steve Lang said, resale values are the difference between a company surviving or dying. They killed Saab and they are killing Scion, Fiat and Jag.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    I see NO new Jags on the street…NONE. Range Rovers all over the place, but my sense if that they are just not selling.

    If I was in the market for a luxury car, I’d play it safe and go least common denominator with a BMW or MB in a dark gray or black color, so I would blend in. As it is, we have kids in private school, so we will continue to get Hondas.

    My awareness of Jaguar’s current lineup is so low that I couldn’t even tell you what they sell now, sort of like Acura…they exist, but are not on my radar.

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    Jaguars problem is marketing . Say what one will about cheesy Hollywood XKRs in corny James Bond films, but it kept the brand in people’s minds.BMW? Lexus? MB? Obvious luxo brands.

    Jaguar? Uhh…..oh, yeah that’s like the British Infiniti, but without the post-50K mile reliability (hence resale). Range Rover makes SUVs , so they’ll do alright without the need for heavy marketing.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    I worked for a multiline luxury dealership from 2004-2008, and Range Rover sold a lot of Escalades…people would lease or buy ONE Rover, and they turned out to be so nightmarish that they would march across the parking lot to the Cadillac store and get an Escalade the next time. Mercedes MLs and RLs had the same effect. The fixed operations manager’s wife leased a Mercedes RL350 and by the end of the lease, the service department had turned in $33,000 in warranty repairs trying to keep that heap running. She wound up in an Escalade too, by the time the dust settled.

    That dealership has since added Jaguar to their lineup, and dropped Cadillac, so I wonder how that plays out when their buyers get disgusted with a particular brand of SUV, they have no fallback unless they go to the Chevy store across the street…

  • avatar
    jthorner

    Jaguar seems like a brand which has largely lost its reason to be. Chasing the Germans is a fools errand, and Jaguar no longer leads in Grace, Pace and Space.

    The combination of high initial price, me-too technology and a loss of real uniqueness and passion combined with a long history of poor reliability and a revolving door of owners leaves consumers with little reason to pay attention.

    If you want OMG uniqueness, get a Maserati. Why a Jaguar? is an increasingly difficult question to have a great answer to.

  • avatar
    Marsden

    Wow. Jaguar’s barely outselling Maserati. How the once-semi-mighty have fallen.

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