By on September 23, 2015

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Buick announced Wednesday that its first convertible-only model in the U.S. for 25 years will start at $34,915, including $925 destination, when it goes on sale early next year. The Cascada Premium model, which adds front and rear park assist and other safety features, will start at $37,915.

The front-wheel drive, 2+2 convertible will come standard with 20-inch wheels, remote start, backup camera, heated seats and LED headlights.

The Cascada will line up against the Audi A3 Cabriolet, which starts at $37,525, including $925 destination, and the Mini Cooper Convertible, which starts at $26,550, including $850 destination, for coveted upper middle-class divorcee money.

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The Cascada will sport General Motors’ 1.6-liter turbo four with direct injection and variable valve timing poached from Opel. It will produce 200 horsepower and 206 pound-feet of torque (221 lb.-ft. on overboost) in the Buick. The Cascada will be automatic-only in the U.S. (it won’t be sold in Canada) despite the Opel version being offered as a row-your-own in Europe.

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According to Buick, the Cascada will offer 13.4 cubes of room in the trunk with the top up; 9.8 cubes with the top down. Rear 50/50 split folding rear seats can get out of the way on serious Home Depot runs — or something.

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The Cascada will sport HiPer Strut suspension up front taken from the LaCrosse and Regal, and a Z-link setup in the rear. Navigation is standard on the Cascada, but where we’re going, we don’t need maps, man.

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89 Comments on “2016 Buick Cascada is Your $34,915 Affordable Mid-life Crisis...”


  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    Any compelling reasons to get this instead of a convertible Mustang? (And, no, German engineering isn’t one.)

    No pictures with the top closed? Bet it’s homely. What about the trunk with the top down?

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      NO.

      Ragtops should be sleek and sexy. This is as sexy as Rosie O’Donnell.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      $35K?!?!?!!? Hahahahahaha

      No, both the Camaro and Mustang convertibles start at around $30K. No one cares about Buick.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I’m willing to bet the extra $5K difference over a Camaro convertible will be readily apparent. The only redeming quality of the Camaro is its ability to shrink two sizes in feel when driven hard. Buyers of this won’t drive hard. The Camaro convertibles is God awful by every other standard, from its Coleman cooler interior, Rube-Goldberg Satantic manual roof (10 steps to open and close), complete lack of visibility top up, poor interior layout, and a long list of compromises because Zeta was never meant for a pony car. The Camaro just might have worse exterior bulk vs interior space than an M1 Abrams tank – with equivalent visibility top up.

        It won’t be hard to build a better convertible, and Buick doesn’t come with mullet wearing, chain smoking, meth making, trailer park living baggage on the nameplate.

        No one will buy this anyway, except Avis, Hertz, National…

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        If SAAB were still around (and under GM tutelage), this would be the bones of the 9-3 convertible.

        Interesting that it will be auto only, but I imagine a 6 speed take-rate would be maximum 2-3% if that.

        Keep in mind this has more rear passenger room than the Mustang, Camaro, Mini, A3 and 2-series.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      A few:

      * (assuredly) Front-drive, which is safer for normal drivers
      * (assuredly) Better interior packaging and (likely) smaller exterior dimensions
      * (likely) More trunk space
      * (likely) More rear-seat space
      * (possibly) better fuel economy
      * (likely) a more compliant, refined suspension

      I really like this class of vehicle. This is probably still a bit small (more Eos, less Solara) but it is a nice touch.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Even the biggest GM supporters won’t be able to justify this car over a Camaro vert. Well, with the Cascadia, you might be able to see out of the car with the top up.

        • 0 avatar
          psarhjinian

          “Well, with the Cascadia, you might be able to see out of the car with the top up.”

          You may also be able to fit a human in the rear seat and more than a purse through the trunk (because it isn’t a mailslot).

          The Cascada is a very different class of vehicle than the Camaro or Mustang. It’s also not a vehicle that’s sold at all well in North America, but hell, I still like them.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          This car’s interior will wipe the floor with the Camaro’s, and it will have an actual back seat. It also won’t look like a ragey Transformer on steroids, for those who don’t feel the need for their vehicle to communicate anger turned to 11 at all times.

          I’d rather have it than any Camaro vert with fewer than eight cylinders.

          But even if not a single retail buyer buys it, it will do fine on Hawaii, California, and Florida rental company business alone.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            There ain’t no room back there.

            And rental car companies are going to continue buying sub-$30K Mustang verts unless GM puts giant piles of cash on the hood of this thing.

            I also haven’t seen the interior of either the Cascada or Camaro in person, so I can just assume that the Cascadia’s will be better.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The Cascada’s interior looks about 10 grades better in pictures than even the new Camaro’s, and that would be consistent with recent Buicks.

            That back seat isn’t huge, but have you seen the one in a Camaro vert? It’s there to reduce insurance rates, not even to hold kids, who do have legs.

            Rental companies will pay the same price for one of these that they would for an equivalently equipped Mustang, and get a back seat. This is a fleet car through and through, and GM will provide the necessary discounts to sell it to fleets.

            Comparing this to a ponycar actually provides a very good example of the pros and cons of FWD vs. RWD.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It’s a Buick. It better have a nicer interior than a Chevy.

          • 0 avatar
            Undefinition

            “It also won’t look like a ragey Transformer on steroids, for those who don’t feel the need for their vehicle to communicate anger turned to 11 at all times.”

            Every time I read this line, I burst out laughing.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            Plenty of these will end up on rental lots. The $35k model will end up cheaper than the Mustang because Ford doesn’t need the rental business, and Buick will need it badly.

            Besides, a lot of rental fleets are filled via convoluted bulk-package lease deals where the manufacturer determines the mix, at least in part.

      • 0 avatar
        sirwired

        If somebody’s shopping for a Camaro, they are looking for a much different car.

        This one will have usable back seats, a large-ish trunk, and drive like a slightly-sporty family-hauler.

        This is a replacement for the Sebring or Solara, not a competitor to the Mustang, Camaro, (or the A3 or Mini, for that matter.)

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The Solara and last Sebring were both bigger than this. This is a compact car. It’s an Astra convertible. It’s a Golf/A3 Cabrio competitor.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Right. Those were mid-sized cabriolets, as was the Pontiac G6. This is a bathtub, sorority-girl cabriolet. And a Buick is a no-no in the sorority community, don’t you know?

          • 0 avatar
            sirwired

            I looked at the specs; both the trunk space and rear leg room are much closer to the Seabring/Solara than the A3/Mini.

            Example:
            Cascada Trunk: 9.8/13.4 cu ft
            A3 Trunk: 7.1/9.9 cu ft
            Solara: 11.7

            Cascada Rear Seat: 33.5 in.
            A3: 31.9 in
            Solara: 35 in.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Sorority girls aren’t interested in convertibles anymore. They want SUVs, the bigger the better. The best gift a sorority girl can get is Mom’s hand-me-down GL450 or GX460.

            The audience here is rental companies in Hawaii, California, Florida, and resort towns, with a few retail buyers as gravy on top.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            “Sorority girls aren’t interested in convertibles anymore.”

            Wrangler!

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        Agreed, psarhjinian. Cars of this type seem to catch a lot of flak on enthusiast sites, but they serve a purpose. I have three friends who all enjoy their non-sports car convertibles (respectively a first-gen Volvo C70, a Peugeot 307 CC, and a second-gen Vovlo C70).

        Hate the mandatory 20″ wheels on this. Other markets have 18″ base wheels.

        I’ll reserve judgement until I see one in person, but the Cascada’s back seat may be lacking. It looks like it might be a three-seater, with a second passenger able to fit in if the person riding shotgun really skooches forward. The first-gen C70 is an amazing car in that regard. Four 5’11” people can fit in it in great comfort, top up or down.

    • 0 avatar
      probert

      People won’t immediately think you’re a douche?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      The plastic surround covering the top when down also looks very cheap and poor.

    • 0 avatar
      daviel

      Probably rides smoother.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    I thought the Cascada was/is MUCH larger than both the A3 and Mini Cooper, and doesn’t really compete with them at all.

    This is more a replacement to the departed Solara and Sebring convertibles than any sort of competition to the “2-seats plus a shelf-with-seatbelts” of the smaller competition.

    My wife LOVES her Solara, and I’ve been looking forward to checking this out as a replacement when the Solara is worn out. (She loves the combination of a convertible, usable back seat, and usable trunk. The fact that it drives like a shivering, wallowing, whale doesn’t really bother her.)

  • avatar
    jimbo1126

    So I’m assuming leather will be extra cost, along with option packages that could easily drive this thing over $40K. For a fairly old car that reminds me of a Sebring. No thanks.

  • avatar
    markf

    Look like the VW EOS, total chick car. Plus, after three years and at least 50% depreciation they will be cheap if you want to drive one

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Is it Chinese?

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Because the Eos isn’t overpriced enough.

    Why would you buy this over a Mustang or Camaro cabriolet, or indeed the aforementioned Audi A3 if you want a luxury badge? I don’t think it will help Buick’s image or put more buyers in the showroom, personally…but I guess they know what they’re doing.

  • avatar
    RHD

    This isn’t for divorcees, but for the new girlfriend. The ex-wife will have the SUV and the kids.
    GM is sure to put a bunch of money on the hood, because there are plenty of cars to choose from at this price, and Buicks all tend to have a few thousand on the hood most of the time.
    The name is handy, too… it serves to remind the driver that she needs to do the dishes when she gets back home.

  • avatar
    Chan

    Guys guys guys…

    This is not a “performance competitor” in the sense that the base Mustang and Camaro have performance pretensions. Nobody will be cross-shopping muscle cars with a FWD luxury ‘vert.

    Even ignoring the driven wheels, this is a budget A3 Convertible or E350 Cabriolet. Or a nicer version of the not-so-dearly departed VW Eos and Chrysler Sebring.

  • avatar
    missmySE-R

    I’m going to go out on a limb and say Buick’s going to have about 2 years of successful sales here and then the novelty will wear off quickly. I would argue there’s some pent up demand in this sector of the market that this should be able to satisfy.

    Yes, there are other generally less expensive and equally capable convertibles on the market, but they tend to have the baggage of a boy racer or co-ed image that goes along with them that won’t be as applicable here. Move up a rung to the premium German and Japanese offerings and this looks like a relative value.

    IF advertised well (never a given with the General), I could see plenty of empty nesters signing up for one of these. I suspect that advertising will be a sticky wicket though, I can’t imagine that anyone who sees and wants one of these on the street is going to realize it’s a Buick.

  • avatar
    jmo

    I’m not seeing divorce as much as empty nester moms happy to be rid of the minivan or SUV.

  • avatar
    cgjeep

    I don’t see anyone looking at this and a Camaro. Mustang maybe. But its more expensive than a BMW 2 series convertible and I bet it leases for way more. No one going to get this over a BMW. Oh except my mom and a few other people in their 70s

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      I think the 2 series is a little too boy racerish to be cross shopped against this. Totally different market, I think.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      This is for convertible buyers wanting a back seat and comfort. The 2-Series back seat is even more useless than that of the Camaro and Mustang, and it’s tuned for performance over comfort. Different markets.

      This will also be cheaper than a 2-Series after incentives, although you’re right about the BMW lease deals.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    So is it pronounced the more accurate “Cas-cah-dah” or the more American “Cas-cay-dah?” I have a feeling Buick will tell us it’s the first, but most people will use the second.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    No, not for my crisis. Buick missed it. If they called it Miada, they might of gotten some people mixing it with Miata

    • 0 avatar
      Secret Hi5

      Good point – It’s not a mid-life crisis car as stated in the title. And how does Buick Miasma sound?

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        They can call it anyway they want. There will be 3 whole people to buy it. For 37K? I mean, this is right where Sebring was by what it is. But Sebring was what, $23K, and only rednecks bought it. Where rednecks will get money for this? This car has no stigma of Miata, BMW or Mustang. Who will REALLY want this thing? Compete against Mini? I don’t think, purchaser of Mini will ever think of Buick.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      A real Buick convertible would be 19 feet long and based on the Impala platform, and be called Centurion.

      End of discussion!

      • 0 avatar
        Rudolph

        REAL Buick convertible Buick 80C Roadmaster 4-Dorrars Convertible Sedan
        Dimensions
        133.0 in (3,378 mm) Wheelbase
        213.3 in (5,418 mm) Length
        075.5 in (1,918 mm) Width
        068.0 in (1,727 mm) Height

  • avatar
    dwford

    Typical GM pricing logic: price to be less than the marketing team’s perceived competitors instead of pricing the real product they are selling. They are doing the same thing at Cadillac, which is how you end up with a $75k ELR based on a $35k Volt. Same logic here: start with a $25k Verano and end up with a $35-40k Cascada.

    The crazy part is that this is based on the old chassis that’s about to be replaced. And GM did such a low budget conversion you don’t even get a real Buick waterfall grill. Reminds me of the quick and dirty Opel Astra to Saturn Astra job.

    These marketing people at GM need to get real.

    • 0 avatar
      Sloomis

      I’d be willing to bet that both the Saturn Astra and this car would have turned out much uglier if American designers had gotten their hands on them. I think the fact they’re both badge-engineered Opels is a big plus. The Opel grill on this thing looks much better than a big obtrusive tacky Buick waterfall, IMHO.

  • avatar
    dwford

    I still can’t believe Chrysler gave up this niche that they owned for years.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I see the same B&B that predicted the Encore would never sell are predicting the same.

    This will do fine – won’t set any sales records but will sell more than what a lot of folks think. Rental companies in Florida, Texas, California and Hawaii alone will snap these up. Rear legroom is close to the departed Solara, the trunk space is actually useable both top or top down. The liability for rental companies is going to be way lower even over a base Mustang/Camaro. With standard navigation and leather seats, they can charge a premium rate. That alone will drive sales.

    The Encore? First to what is now a rapidly growing segment with almost 10 entries, and sales have not flagged with all the competition that jumped in.

    The Chrysler Sebring was never a retail sales success because of God awful build quality, driving dynamics, and material quality in the bean counting era, and being ugly as sin after the FCA merger – and not addressing some of the fundamental flaws.

    The only real pros on the old Sebring was it could actually seat four people, top up or down, and the trunk was serviceable, top up or down. Also the power top function was brain dead simple – two latches and a button, and could be operated when the car is moving.

    A lot of people going, “why would anyone buy this over a Camaro convertible” have clearly never spent any quality time actually driving and operating a Camaro convertible. The cars are $h1t – the only good thing about them is the chassis and LS FTW.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Mustang/Camaro are like the Jeep Wrangler. There are many compromises in the design because of what they are, but Americans love them and buy them in significant numbers.

      Let’s not use the success of the Encore make the Cascada as success before it goes on sale here. The Encore is a sub $30K CUV in a growing segment. The Cascada is in a dying segment was killed by consumer preferences and giant pano roofs.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I can’t believe people are spending the kind of money they are on those little pieces of s***. It says: I’ve stopped pretending I need space and toughness and I’m willing to accept awful styling so I can sit six inches higher off of the ground than I used to be able too; but don’t call my car a hatchback!

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I think they should have called it something else, like Reatta. Rely on that little bit of brand history rather than using the Vauxhall name.

        They were content, after all, putting Regal on the Insignia!

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      +1

  • avatar
    Eliyahu

    So this is the new Nissan Murano CrossCabriolet?

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    If this is a midlife crisis car, it’s surely the lamest one in history.

    This is a midlife crisis car for people who buy minivans BECAUSE THEY WANT TO.

    The sort that bought the PT Cruiser and the New Beetle.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    No V6? No thanks.

  • avatar
    cartunez

    Its a Buick so just wait a year or so for the massive depreciation hit then enjoy it for between 22 – 25K

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    What is that gentrified tool bucket on the rear seat purposed for? Mobile beautician?

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    It’s the ONLY convertible I would ever purchase!
    Just got back from Denver where I rented a Camaro from Enterprise. Could not get out easily (because of the moon roof) and no safe visibility.
    I drove a 2015 Dodge Challenger last week in Minnesota and it was fantastic, a far better ride and excellent fuel mileage with the 3.6 engine.
    Once we get the h*** out of California and move to Minnesota we’ll get the Cascada.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    Is almost $40K for this little turd seriously considered affordable?

  • avatar
    rudiger

    The old Sebring/200 convertible was priced in line with the Mustang convertible as a viable alternative for an affordable, domestic convertible that seats four. Plus, it had the added advantage (for practical folks) of being FWD.

    The Cascada misses that price/size point by a wide margin. It will be very similar to the demise of the Pontiac G6 and Solara convertibles. Hell, it doesn’t even ‘look’ like a Buick.

    Just the usual, epic GM fail.

  • avatar
    MonaroCV8

    Well I bought a Holden Cascada back in May. Basically the same as the Buick although the Holden comes with the 18″ rims standard (which I got) and the 20″s are optional.

    Points to note about the car. Interior space is excellent for a convertible. For me the Cascada has to serve as a family car (two adults plus 5yo in a child seat in the back). I understand that the Cascada is built on a longer wheelbase than the Astra even though it is for all intents a ‘vert Astra.

    The stitched leather dash top looks great, has a very nice interior although there have been comments here in the Oz media that the buttons in the centre stack are a bit much.

    Its a heavy car, same weight as a Holden Commodore SS, 1744kg. Performance is reasonable when on boost although stepping off 1000-1500rpm is a little bit doughy. Ride is excellent, I didn’t want to spoil it with 20″s, which I think are a dumb idea for a convertible. Handling is good but the weight is noticeable.

    Best part of the car are the front seats, brilliant. Have the extendable thigh suppot which I like as I am 6’4″. 4 way adjustable electric lumber is great for tall people too.

    The negative for me is the lack of Blind Spot Alert. Rear visibility with the roof up is ordinary, hopefully the next model will have BSA.

    Well put together car too, very nice quality.

  • avatar

    This yet another Opel rebadge that will fail in the US. Like the slow selling Regal this is the wrong design for a Buick car. It will fade away as if it never existed.

  • avatar
    lon888

    This is not a bad looking car. I’m just glad they didn’t stick on one of those ugly, stodgy looking “jail bars” front grille. When this thing gets a good road test, I best imagine it will have much softer suspension settings than its Opel cousin. Too bad good looks, poor performance.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Also, Top Gear liked it! They note it’s actually larger than the A5, which is hard to believe.

    http://www.topgear.com/car-reviews/vauxhall/cascada/16t-sidi-se-2dr/road-test


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