By on August 21, 2015

USA minivan sales chart July 2015

Not since January of last year had the Honda Odyssey finished a month as America’s top-selling minivan. Indeed, not since October of last year had the Toyota Sienna not been America’s best-selling minivan.

But in July 2015, Odyssey sales jumped 18 percent, year-over-year, enough to overtake the Sienna on a monthly basis.

America’s whole minivan category is in a state of flux in 2015 as a shutdown at FCA’s Windsor, Ontario, facility produced a dramatic slowdown in Dodge Grand Caravan and Chrysler Town & Country sales, particularly of the fleet variety. The one true minivan of the bunch, Mazda’s 5, has been discontinued. The improvements recorded by the Kia Sedona are impressive relative to Kia’s historic Sedona levels, but it remains a small part of America’s minivan segment.

Sienna sales, meanwhile, are up 12 percent and are on track to rise to a nine-year high after five consecutive years of U.S. sales growth. Sienna market share in the people carrier category grew to 29 percent through the first seven months of 2015, up from 22 percent at this stage last year.

The Grand Caravan/Town & Country’s market share has tumbled from 49 percent through the first seven months of 2014 to just 31 percent so far this year. Honda’s market share in July, specifically, was 30 percent. Both the Sienna and Odyssey outsold the combined FCA efforts in May of this year.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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32 Comments on “Chart Of The Day: Honda Odyssey Puts An End To Toyota Sienna’s Best Seller Streak...”


  • avatar
    Joss

    A Quest for Nissan sales…

  • avatar
    banerjba

    In Canada, both the Honda and Toyota’s base price is about 60% higher than the FCA vans so the Dodge/Chrysler are still very popular. Either Japanese van start at about $40 K on the road and go up to the mid $60s.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Is the red bar connecting the brake lamps on the Odyssey an Elite-only feature? I notice some which have a cheap looking chromed plastic between the lamps instead.

  • avatar
    Rday

    Like both vans. THe 2010 Sienna i had was perfect and never had to be in the shop except for brakes. Loved it very much..absolutely flawless, the Odyssey needs an expensive timing belt replacement which makes it less desirable for me.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Looking at this graph, even in a down year, FCA does pretty well with their minivan twins which is why I can’t believe they’re actually going to cancel the Dodge version and try to go upmarket.

    • 0 avatar
      redmondjp

      Yes, this decision has VW Phaeton written all over it!

    • 0 avatar
      MLS

      As I understand it, FCA plans to take the Town & Country downmarket to cover at least part of the Grand Caravan’s former territory. Before incentives, the current Chrysler van starts at $30K and its Dodge sibling at $22K. I expect the next generation T&C to split the difference, which would significantly undercut Honda and Toyota while matching the also-ran Nissan and Kia offerings.

      All that said, I still find FCA’s decision to merge the nameplates idiotic.

  • avatar
    banerjba

    Vans just make sense. We were looking at alternatives to replace our 2011 Sienna LE with 4 cylinder. It has been excellent but the end of the 4-year lease offers an opportunity for change. We need something for our aging parents as one pair does not drive at all and others do travel with occasionally as well.

    We looked at:

    Nissan Pathfinder and a low mileage QX60 – very hard for old people to get into the back seat. No handle and high step in. That was a deal breaker. I love Nissan vehicles and actually like the various JATCO CVTs I have driven.

    Mazda5: I love this vehicle because it comes in a stick. But it is very tight inside – and we are small Asian people that this vehicle was designed for. Even then, I find it tight. Also the fuel economy is almost the same as the 2.7 litre Sienna so no real savings there. Very well priced though.

    Honda Odyssey – this one is a contender. The styling is a bit odd but this is one one we would buy if we did not have a Sienna. But there are none available locally as they switch out to 2016 models. Our dealer did not even have a test model left. Prices are very high, like the Sienna. Plus there will be a new more normal looking model soon.

    Honda Pilot: Very flat stiff seats, high step in, very expensive and poor fuel economy.

    I think we are just going to buy out the Sienna which is like a giant version of our Camry. We do a lot of city driving and the van with the 2.7L gets only 2-3 mpg less than our 2006 Camry did or our 2013 RAV4 does now. Highway mileage is really not much better than our old V6 Uplander (only about 2 mpg better), but it is a giant brick so no surprise there.

    Still, it is a very nice vehicle for what we paid.

    • 0 avatar
      xtoyota

      “Honda Odyssey – this one is a contender. The styling is a bit odd ”

      It’s not odd it’s UGLY …. side few needs a big update
      Previous Honda Odyssey was much better design.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        “I think we are just going to buy out the Sienna which is like a giant version of our Camry. We do a lot of city driving and the van with the 2.7L gets only 2-3 mpg less than our 2006 Camry did or our 2013 RAV4 does now.”

        4 cyl van? I am much disappoint.

        • 0 avatar
          Willyam

          Yea, I’d agree with that. The Odyssey has cylinder deactivation (it works, we get about 24 hwy at interstate speed rates).

          The way our interstates are here, the semis seem to be breeding, and the V6 extra horsepower has come in mighty handy a few times when squeezed. Usually, we don’t drive it aggressively at all, but when you need it, you have it.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    We have a 2012 awd Sienna.One of my best automotive decisions was to trade our low mileage enclave in for a low mileage Sienna.it has the perfect drivetrain combo and meets my criteria of serving its intended function very well.Ive driven through about 10 inches of unplowed snow in our neighborhood on the OEM all seasons.I do wish for better road isolation,and the 2015 has addressed this.When low mileage 2015s start showing up in 2 yrs or so,we buy another.In fact we have already “presold” ours to a family at church. We may ultimately pay more without a trade in but they’re really friendly people.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    I think there was a lot of money on the hood (or whatever import equivalent of the diss is) towards the end of the model year. If true car is to be believed, I know someone who recently got an Odyssey for $1k less than their “great” price without even trying.

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      I can confirm this. We picked up an EX-ENT (or something like that, basically the EX with the “Entertainment” package single dvd screen in the ceiling and wireless headphones) for cheap. I had to have the truffle interior, so they discounted one still on the trailer a week out before I even asked. A lot.

      They offered an even bigger discount if I’d take the EX-NAV (no DVD, just in-dash nav). They even offered to get me some ipads so the kids wouldn’t need the main screen, apparently they over-ordered this config.

  • avatar
    SoCalMikester

    so FCA with their twins, is still basically the #1 seller in north america… and they want to get rid of one? IDK what theyre doing, but they should keep dodge with a fleet version cheaper than the promasters, and a performance one, because why not?

  • avatar
    banerjba

    Principal Dan: I know the 4 cyl did not get a lot of love in the US but it is great here in Toronto. City driving is peppy enough and highway is adequate. A lot of our cabs locally use Siennas with 4 cyl. Canadians typically buy more fuel efficient options as gas is a lot more expensive here as are the vehicles themselves. I am a big fan of Toyota 4 cylinders. Normally aspirated 2.7 is a great long lasting design. Plus the car feels a lot less nose heavy than the V6.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Yes we are spoiled here in the US but that Toyota 3.5 V6 punches above its weight and except for slightly indecisive transmissions it is a glory to drive because of its nice fat torque curve.

      Here in the US I believe you could only get the 4 cyl in the rental spec model.

  • avatar
    nguyenvuminh

    TTAC must be the only auto website where you can find minivan fans posting their thoughts without getting inundated with attacks :-) And that’s why I check it regularly. Nothing new here, love the flexible practicality of a minivan. The only complaint is that the market for minivan tend to be a practical lot and yet, no diesel or hybrid yet. Fuel economy of low 20s to mid-high 20s in this time and age for an all around family hauler is just not acceptable. That and the modern Sienna and Odyssey have gotten so big, that’s all the gripe I have.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The problem is also the shape. The Ford Transit Connect Wagon has fuel efficient engines that get 30+ highway MPGs in bigger, heavier, and sometimes AWD applications, but can’t crack 28 in the TCW.

      I’ve driven the TCW around and my wife’s 355 HP, 5000 lb, AWD MkT gets the same MPG.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      No the Best & Brightest tend to get judgmental about those who pick CUVs over minivans (as most Enthusiasts do.)

      I’ve got a Highlander but when I’ve used it up I’m going to take a long look at the more practical people movers.

  • avatar
    Syke

    Kia Sedona owner here, and very happy with it. The flexibility is wonderful, as I can: camp at the racetrack; haul 4×8 sheets of chipboard for the new house carpentry projects, haul five bicycles (three inside on a floor rack, two off the hatch with the strap on rack) – and that’s without using the two bike extension to the rear rack or putting my three bike haulers on the roof rack; pack enough tentage for the two of us plus my sutlery plus muskets for a reenactment weekend; haul lots of people of the rare occasion I need to.

    In fact, the only thing my Ranger pickup could do better is haul a motorcycle. I now have to use a trailer.

    I still don’t get the unpopularity. Then again, I’m not exactly worried about my public image.

    • 0 avatar
      wolfinator

      You don’t get the unpopularity of minivans, or of the Sedona?

      I’m a recent minivan buyer, and I passed on the Sedona because I don’t trust Kia quality. I’d be willing to give a second look if the entry level price was low enough (as it is with Dodge), but Kia’s asking serious money for the Sedona now. Yeah, it comes with tons of equipment, but reliability and sticker price is more important to me than frivolities…

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        You passed on the KIA because the price isn’t like the Dodge? The GC’s price is so low because you get nothing. The Sedona at least gives you alloy’s, projector headlamps, auto lights, body colored trim.

        I’ll pass on the Dodge and Chrysler every day of the week at $21K….plus Chrysler kwality is enough to deal with. People can scream about the Pentastar V-6 but for all that power and displacement it’s not any faster than the competition.

        • 0 avatar
          wolfinator

          I don’t care about alloys, auto lights, or body colored trim. None of that matters to me. Frankly, almost none of the features that Kia thinks are worth Toyonda money are worth it to me.

          Kia’s current business model is clear: pile on a lot of features (electronic gizmos, alloy wheels) and use that to attract buyers at price points very close to Toyota/Honda.

          That’s not of interest to me. If I’m going to spend Toyonda money, I want Toyonda durability. Otherwise, you have to discount your product to make worth consideration.

          I don’t expect everyone to have that perspective – I’m trying to explain why KIA might have trouble gaining traction with its minivan.

          But maybe this time around will be different. Perhaps the pool of people willing to trade known reliability and resale for painted trim bits is large enough.

  • avatar
    wolfinator

    You don’t get the unpopularity of minivans, or of the Sedona?

    I’m a recent minivan buyer, and I passed on the Sedona because I don’t trust Kia quality. I’d be willing to give a second look if the entry level price was low enough (as it is with Dodge), but Kia’s asking serious money for the Sedona now. Yeah, it comes with tons of equipment, but reliability and sticker price is more important to me than frivolities…

  • avatar
    banerjba

    Kia should make its little Rondo CUV slightly bigger. It has excellent styling and is based on a very reliable platform and powertrain.

    Canadians buy a lot of Hyundai vehicles too but oddly they don’t offer any kind of van after they killed off the Entourage. The Santa FE XL is there though which is a very nice vehicle at a decent price.

    We are starting to see lot of older H/K vehicles here, which is good considering we can go from -30C in the winter to +35 C in the summer. Looks like quality/durability is comparable at least with the Americans makes if not quite at the Honda/Toyota level yet.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      The 2008-ish Rondo was lovely. Lifting that a few inches would’ve made an excellent Encore competitor, likely at a price ~10% lower than it or the contemporary CRV/RAV4.

      The new one presently available in Canada but not the US; meh… they’ve slammed the roof down and destroyed the airiness of the original. It’s nearly indistinguishable from the Forte hatch. Not missing it here.

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