By on July 31, 2015

2015BuickRegalGS-3

It’s not often you get to see the future when you look at a car.

Admittedly, the 2015 Buick Regal GS AWD looks nothing like a crystal ball — it’s a deep shade of white that I never knew existed and its 20-inch wheels wrapped with summer rubber are … challenging.

But I can see the future of Buick in this car.


The Tester

2015 Buick Regal GS AWD

Engine: 2-liter, turbocharged I-4 (259 horsepower @ 5,300 rpm; 295 lbs-ft @ 2,500-4,000 rpm)
Transmission: 6-speed automatic

Fuel Economy (Rating, mpg): 19 city/27 highway/22 combined
Fuel Economy (Observed, mpg): 24 mpg combined; 60/40 highway/city

Options: Driver Confidence Package #2 (Adaptive cruise control, Automatic collision preparation) $1,195; Driver Confidence Package #1 (Following distance sensor indicator, Forward collision alert, Rear cross traffic alert, Lane departure warning, Driver and passenger seat memory settings, Side blind zone alert) $1,040; Power moonroof $1,000 (!); White diamond tricoat $995; 20-inch aluminum wheels w/ summer tires $700; Cargo area tray $140; Floor mats $140; Cargo mat $80.

As tested: $46,025


Allow me to practice my Google-certified armchair psychology for just a moment.

Are you a middle child? Do you find yourself grasping for an identity, sandwiched between two personalities so large that Siegfried and Roy would blush?

Buick would like to talk to you. Their latest effort, the 2015 Regal GS, screams middle child worse than black fingernails or repeated trips to the principal’s office. If you’re a parent (I’m not), or ever been to the principal’s office more than once in a day (I have), then you’ll understand.

The normal Regal — built on the same Epsilon II platform as the Chevrolet Malibu — is a geezer’s paradise of creamy leather, creamy ride and plenty of storage space for Werther’s Original candies. To say that the Regal has no character is wholly inaccurate. The Regal has spirit like “Dean Martin’s Celebrity Roasts” used to: tightly packed in an easily digestible delivery so smooth you could eat dinner and never miss a beat. For that reason, the Buick Regal may be the Salisbury steak TV dinner of the automotive world.

But the Regal GS is a little different.

Back to middle child syndrome, our tester was priced at more than $46,000 all told, and that’s a lot for not-quite-a-Cadillac. If you look far enough into the future, you can see Chevrolet and Cadillac growing far enough apart that Buick — a brand on the ropes not too long ago — will have a future in the United States. The Regal’s stately presence is a perfect middle between Chevrolet’s no-frills Malibu and Cadillac’s upcoming CT6.

But the Regal GS sticks out like black nail polish on a middle schooler. It’s fine for a while, but you just hope it’s something they’ll eventually grow out of.

2015BuickRegalGS-4

Exterior
The Regal GS sports a little more ‘tude than the Regal and I’m all for that. The neatly packaged exterior is handsome (but not aggressive) and curvy (but not bulbous). The GS separates itself from the Regal with a unique front fascia and rear bumper that integrates the dual exhaust tips. Our tester, clad in white, showed its curves very well despite being white, the color that encompasses — though somehow lacks — all colors.

The Regal GS’s heritage as an Opel is evident. The Insignia-based looks are clean and sharp, and belie the idea that at its heart, the Regal is just a retooled Malibu. Admittedly, I loosely remembered that the Regal was related to the Malibu, but had to double-check my facts when the car first arrived. That’s a good thing.

The Regal GS’s waterfall grille and logo looked a little big to me and felt like overcompensation for a car that wants to very badly be American sports sedan a la ATS-V. It’s not. It has too much Opel. And its all the better for it.

There are some curiosities on the outside. The faux hood vents are a little low-rent, and the underline body crease that extends from the rear wheel forward like a hockey stick is entirely too dramatic.

2015BuickRegalGS-12

Interior
Any conversation about the Regal GS should begin and end with its seats. The deep buckets are soft and comfortable, with pockets for my rump that held me in place when I threw the car around. There are accented trims and stitching to break up the pallid gray world of most mid-sized sedans, and I love that.

But on the rest of the interior, the GS reads like the back of a bottle of mouthwash. Aside from two buttons near the top of the infotainment screen, which read plainly “GS” and “Sport”, you’d be hard pressed to realize you’re in the performance variant of anything. Even the digital instrument readout in front of the driver doesn’t have much special going on. Its customizable performance pages are limited to lateral grip, transmission temperature and oil pressure. That’s not performance so much as it is perfunctory.

In back, the Regal sports rear legroom that’s better than the competition and a copious amount of trunk space for a sports sedan. The Regal GS’s 107.8-inch wheelbase is fully one inch shorter than the BMW 3-Series, but by my measure, Buick takes advantage of its space better, which I can appreciate.

2015BuickRegalGS-14

Infotainment
Fitted with Buick’s IntelliLink system, which is a variant of Chevrolet’s MyLink and Cadillac’s HotLink (I may have made that up), the car’s entertainment and information screens are easily laid out and logisticalistical (I may have made that up too). Among its competitors, the system General Motors uses is among the best and least fussy. The standard measure for how I know such things: I’m confident my father could have figured this thing out in 5 minutes cold. That’s a good sign.

Our tester’s stereo, a Bose-branded, 9-speaker affair, was fantastically clear and rich. I know there’s a habit of dumping on premium sound systems — especially those named Bose — but I wouldn’t imagine anything other than this setup in a Regal GS. Good thing it comes standard.

2015BuickRegalGS-6

Drivetrain
The Regal GS is powered by a turbocharged, 259-horsepower, 2-liter four cylinder and it’s a little bit of question mark. For starters, you should consider that it adds a whopping $14,000 to the bottom line, bumping the price up to $40,075 for the GS model.

I get that the GS is a throwback to Buick’s semi-lucid performance days. Their Grand National coupe was a 1980s legend. That black body could command attention and pink slips at any dragstrip — especially if someone were dumb enough to call it “granddad” while sitting in their Corvette. Recent examples of the Grand National have sold at auction for more than $165,000. Yeah, they’re that awesome.

I’m not as confident that the Regal GS will command the same price at auction in 20 years, but its mechanicals are interesting. The aforementioned 2-liter, turbo four is married monogamously to a six-speed automatic transmission if you opt for all-wheel drive, or a six-speed manual if you choose front-wheel drive. The GS also adds four-wheel independent suspension; MacPhersons up front and four-link in the back with adaptive damping all the way around. Shod with 19-inch shoes — or 20-inch wheels in the case of our tester — the Regal GS will sprint up to 60 mph in 6.5 seconds, according to the manufacturer.

Are you not impressed? You should be. Taken alone, the Regal GS reads on paper like an Audi. For serious. No really, it does.

Fire the Regal GS up and let’s chat.

First, you’ll notice that despite having more power under the hood, the Regal GS is just as quiet as its wafty brother.

Second, the turbo four didn’t sound to my ears like it was enhanced at all. I respect that. Its engine doesn’t sound particularly awesome, but hats off to Buick for playing the cards they were dealt.

Third, despite being a sports sedan for Buick and having an automatic transmission, the Regal GS doesn’t have steering wheel-mounted paddle shifters. I know, I know, paddle shifters scream “sport” like compression leggings on a 50-year-old — but they’re just par for the course these days. Go fig.

2015BuickRegalGS-9

Drive
Once you get past that, the GS is a hoot to drive. Its 259 horsepower doesn’t do much for its 3,500-pound mass, but the 295 lb.-ft. of twist races up to highway speed with grins along the way. Of all the features the GS does well (interior comfort, exterior looks, and Werther’s Original cubbies) it handles better than your father’s handshake. Our GS AWD shifted its mass and wriggled its way around corners like a competent European sedan. That could have come down to its summer tires wrapped around 20-inch polished wheels — which I’m not sure how many people would actually order in an AWD car — but goodness can the GS grip.

But in my tester, I noticed that by tapping on the Sport or GS buttons very little of the car’s inputs change. According to Buick, GS is a more aggressive setting than Sport, which is a more aggressive setting than normal driving conditions. Aside from its steering firming up a little, I was hard pressed to tell the difference between any of the GS’s three drive modes.

In all, the GS is the best kind of Regal that money can buy, but its $46,000 price tag is a lot of money for this kind of Buick.

And it’s hard to imagine that this kind of Buick has much of a future with Cadillac around.

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139 Comments on “2015 Buick Regal GS AWD – Get A Grip, Man...”


  • avatar
    vvk

    By all accounts, I would rather drive a Micra. But that’s just me.

    >The Regal GS’s 107.8-inch wheelbase is fully one inch shorter than the BMW 3-Series, but by my
    > measure, Buick takes advantage of its space better, which I can appreciate.

    By my measure, the Opel, aka Buick, is a huge, heavy car with dismal rear leg room. Last I checked, it is not built on a RWD platform, does not have 50/50 weight distribution or a longitudinally mounted straight-six sitting behind the front axle. I don’t know, to me it seems like it should be bigger inside.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      I agree with you it loses some interior room compared to its footprint, but its far better then the Lacrosse, and other “full size” sedans, (looking at you, Taurus) which are egregiously tiny for their footprints.

      For what that’s worth.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        I honestly think that the best Buick on sale in the US is a Toyota, and it’s called the Avalon. Cheaper than this Regal and faster to boot, it probably matches it on fuel economy (using regular fuel no less). Better space and higher quality interior, understated looks and badge.

        The Lacrosse is a weird proportioned super tall and bulky CUV looking thing with bad interior space.

        Can’t say I’m unbiased, I’m going to test drive an Avalon tomorrow morning!

        Potholes must think “nom nom nom” when they see these GS on rubber band tires coming down the road.

        • 0 avatar
          2drsedanman

          Good luck with the Avalon test drive. If possible, be sure to sit in one with and without the sunroof. I thought there was quite a bit more headroom without the sunroof, so that is what we went with. I liked the 2012 model I test drove a few years ago too. It was a little softer than my 2015, but didn’t drive as well. The V6/auto combo is hard to beat.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Well it’s a Carmax lot, the specific one I’m looking at is a well worn ex-rental XLE in a beige-green I’m not actually interested in buying, they may have a nicer Limited on the lot though. This outing is mostly go get a first impression and to see how these things might hold up long term (this one was a rental for 57k miles). Looking at cars.com, with my budget I’m mostly in XLE territory. I like the idea of cooled seats and HIDs (and rear seat heaters with rear climate control) but I can probably get over myself :)

    • 0 avatar
      ferdburful

      Most BMW 3 series don’t have a 6 cylinder either.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        The only ones that count, do. Straight 6 goodness is the only reason to buy a BMW.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        This car is the cynical old GM think that didn’t die in the bail-outs and is proof that GM simply doesn’t want to sell you a Buick of any type. I can’t get over the fact that GM has the hubris to charge 46K MSRP for an undersized, not particularly performing or luxurious Buick. For 46K, there are dozens of choices that all come before this vehicle. There’s a reason even discounts don’t move this model and that is because I can even think of several cars under 30k that I would much rather have than this car. Buick as a brand is dead, they alienated the people who bought their cars in 2005, the name is permanently tarnished, the products haven’t been there since the late 80s/early 90s, Buick is not coming back in the USA, take it to the Vet already and get it over with.

        Coming from a Buick family, I will definitely be recommending a Honda product when it comes time for my mother to replace her 2004 LeSabre, either CR-V or Accord.

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        That may be the case but the point is that the RWD 3-series is designed to house a LONG longitudinally mounted engine/gearbox, so naturally it should have MUCH less space.

    • 0 avatar

      I mean, the 3-Series is practically mid-sized by now, but I almost put the Regal in a tweeter category, as existing somewhere between compact and mid-sized. Some other examples of this would be the first-gen CTS, the Kizashi (remember that one?) and the previous 200/Sebring and Avenger.

      • 0 avatar

        In Europe, at least in the past, there are more size categories than in US; Subcompact like Corsa or Merc A-class, Compact like Astra, EU size midsize like Vectra/Insignia/Regal or Merc C-class, US size midsize like Omega or Merc E-class, full size like Admiral or Merc S-class.

        • 0 avatar

          Those are the exact same categories we have here.

          • 0 avatar

            Not exactly. Ford, Toyota etc in US have only one midsize – there is nothing size wise between say Camry and Corolla – in Europe they have Avensis. Avensis is essentially compact based on Toyota Corolla but slightly larger and upper trim and considered as a midsize (in US Scion sells some car based on Avensis). Camry would be considered as an executive sedan if it was sold in Europe. Of course Camry has no chance to compete with European cars including Opel. Or Ford Scorpio – was executive sedan competing with Merc and BMW. Mondeo/Contour was considered as a midsize car.

          • 0 avatar
            heoliverjr

            Following up on Inside Looking Out, the Regal is indeed sized for a category(subcategory) we don’t often get in North America. I’m going call it the European midsize. The Regal(well technically the Insignia) was designed for a part of the world where most North American midsize cars would be overgrown. Another example is the Acura TSX which is smaller than an North American Accord but was the European Accord. Mazda had a smaller version the of the previous generation Mazda 6 that they sold in Europe and I’m pretty sure there are some other examples if I think about it some more.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      The wheelbase is shorter than the 3-series by more than an inch. Aaron should fix that.
      Regal is 107.8″
      3 is 110.6″

      Despite almost 3″ less wheelbase, the Regal is 8″ longer overall, and only gets an extra 2″ of legroom. Oh, and it has less headroom in the back. I’m not sure how the Regal takes advantage of its space better than a 3 series.

      I have the impression the Regal’s backseat was designed for car seats, not people.

  • avatar
    BDT

    It seems like a good car, I just can’t be bothered to care about it. It needs…something. I don’t know what, but it needs it.

    • 0 avatar
      zamoti

      It needs a price cut! $826.56 is the payment over 5 years with nothing down–and I didn’t include tax. All that money and you get an OK car with a 2.0T.
      This makes me feel better about my used eurotrash that requires regular repairs.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Your GS might still be worth a year’s worth of payments by then.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Yep, if you want a Regal, buy it used. You can get one with the 2.0 turbo, leather, sunroof and 25,000 miles or so around here in the low $20,000 range, CPO.

          That’s a lot of car for the buck.

          • 0 avatar

            Oh yeah, the Regal suffers from some of the worst depreciation in the industry. I don’t know that it extends to the GS variant, but it is not uncommon for one that stickered at $35K to be worth $24K within the first year.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The MKZ was worse believe it or not, at least in the first 18 months.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The only Lincolns that should be purchased new are the MKX and Navigator. Everything else will hurt you. Oh, and people need to buy the Continental in massive quantities. I need a good used selection.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            From this day forth, the edict across the land is to buy the Lincoln Continental.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I can’t believe the GS trim costs you at LEAST $14,000 – when it’s largely an appearance package.

            Smacks of Trofeo with less content changes.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Lots of FWD non-turbo models please. My daughter will need a car one day.

            Corey-

            That is some looney tunes. The engine should be a $1500 option. The appearance package should be a $2000 option, AT MOST. That’s approximately $10,500 for GM to roll around in and laugh at consumers with.

          • 0 avatar
            Dan

            “I don’t know that it extends to the GS variant, but it is not uncommon for one that stickered at $35K to be worth $24K within the first year.”

            I don’t know about the GS either, but around here it’s not uncommon for one that stickered at $35K to sell for $27,000 brand new, after an 8 month tour of duty collecting dust in the back corner of the lot.

            14 percent of the new Regals listed on cars.com are 2014s or earlier.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Has anyone ever paid retail for one of these, ever? I actually really like the basic Regal Turbo like Hertz used to have tons of. Reminded me very much of the Saab 9-3. I would expect generous amounts of hood cash on them. Just the way the General rolls.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    GM’s “Pearl White Metallic” is an amazing paint hue that makes any car its on look fantastic. Its absolutely excellent.

    Despite my Buick issues (which are significant and escalating) my parents bought a pearl white 2015 Regal T AWD. (non GS). Their theory was “they cant all be lemons, and you took one for the family” :-) Its a looker, very comfortable, and pulls hard. My biggest deal breaker with the car is they made half the HVAC system touch controlled for 2015 (it was all buttons and knobs in 2014). Terrible

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      Would you give us(me?) a rundown of what’s happened? I know you’ve had problems and I was hoping to hear about your current situation when I clicked this review. Thanks!

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Long story short-ish…

        So, I am going to start with the good, for what that’s worth. The 2.0T puts a smile on my face every time the boost comes on. My lifetime is 8.6L/100 kms (27.35 us mpg). I currently have 37000 kms (23000 miles) on the clock. I seem to average 35mpg through the Canadian Rockies. The car is fantastically comfortable, dead quiet, the Buick Intellilink works well, and we love the dual zone auto CC, it works really well for a generally warm guy and generally cold lady (climatically speaking :-). The car is right-sized for our lifestyle, and we really like it on the road. Take note: If not a lemon, this car would be a really great car for us. Issues not lemon related are; the headlights aren’t stellar, the car is pretty rolly polly in the curves, and it has a turning circle roughly the size of the USS Enterprise, CVN-65.

        So…

        Within the first week, I had the car back into the shop because the clutch hydraulics were misrouted. They were rubbing on the frame. If I wasn’t so picky, I wouldn’t have noticed the clunky clutch and I would have had to use roadside when the line burst. Since then, you guys know that I was never happy with the way the trans feels. It makes a “release-bearing”-esque grind on the 1-2 and 2-3 upshift. This still exists, and they’ve never been able to figure out why. They replaced the trans, but reused every bit of hardware around the black box. Made the shifter action worse. Multiple shop foremen on multiple test drives acknowledge hearing the noise, but I was either treated with “we could not replicate after you left”, “it was a loose heat shield rattling, we replaced it you should be good!” (no change) “I think this is a new manual trans for 2014, it might be normal”. This last one really pissed me off, a cursory google search is enough to indicate the F40 debuted in 2007 in the G6 behind the 3.9. Don’t fabricate if you don’t know!

        Anyways, while that’s more of an annoyance, last summer, the CEL came on. I took it in, Clutch Position Sensor code. They swapped the sensor, no problem. Around Christmas, I kept getting recurring CELs…CPS again! The dealerships response was “Well, we replaced it already…it’s probably fine.” I was like, I bet you, sooner or later, the car won’t start. Finally, June 19th, I was stranded on the departure ramp at the airport. Push clutch, press starter, car goes to accessory and tells me to “Push Clutch to Start Vehicle.” CPS ruins my day! The worst part, couldn’t even bump start it, because the push button start wouldn’t allow it to go past accessory, with the car not thinking the clutch was pushed. Got towed to my new chosen dealership, they replaced the sensor. Fine.

        A week later, we drive 5 hours away to Jasper to camp. Saturday morning, we go to start the car, and….nothing. CEL!!! Luckily we have service. Call roadside, and we get towed to the nearest dealer, an hour away in Hinton (6 hours from home). Luckily, the weekend oil and lube tech they had working was a total boss. Pulled the (dozen or so) codes, found that he was getting shorts and communication faults when he wiggled the main comm harness. So, he figured there was a short. He managed to start the car, we drove straight home on one tank. My new dealer followed up, pulled up the floor, found a sharp spot in the floor plan. (Another manufacturer defect, IMO) They filed it down, replace the wires, cleared the codes and gave it back. At this point I don’t know what to think. Seems like a likely root cause right?

        A week later, we are in Vernon BC after touring Okanagan Wine Country, 6 hours from home. We start the car….CEL comes on! I scan it…P0806, clutch position sensor. We fill the car with a gas can, get our bags from the hotel, (still had to pay), and drove straight home…through the night. It DID start the next day, but we didn’t want to take any chances. Took it to the dealership. They had it for well over a week and had to place a tech support call, GM engineer in Detroit told them to replace the harness from the clutch to the ECU.

        Have had it back for a week, and now…we have a long weekend road trip planned this afternoon, 2500kms round trip!

        Other mechanical maladies as of yet unfixed/undiagnosed include, a random rough idle when cold, (almost stalling), and sometimes the engine is very hesitant when accelerating. They cleaned the MAF and it was smooth as silk…for about a week.

        So, about a month ago, I started a case with GM customer service in Ontario. I’ve been making the case that the car has demonstrated multiple factory defects, that have left me stranded, and worse, the same subsystem keeps acting up in multiple new and creative ways. Because of this, we have decided the car is not trustworthy, and the fact that “they have fixed it” (and they have, my new chosen dealer has dealt with every problem swiftly, as they have manifested). As I said, it keeps screwing up in new ways, on the system they “fixed”. So I have been pushing that they need to buy the car back, because they built and sold a demonstrably faulty vehicle. So, last week, we were talking about “trading in”, i.e., I would give them my car back, and I would finance a (very specifically specified) Cruze, as it would be a very economical car for the 15000 kms in road trips we have planned in the next year. And, we know from multiple Jack Baruth Rental Reviews, the Cruze is a damn solid economy car. I’ve enjoyed this little stretch of a premium car, but, I figured this would be an opportunity to just get something functional and plan for the future. So, they come back and tell me I can give my car back, and finance a Cruze for my lease payment….for the next 84 months!!!! They tried to lump the lease residual into the new finance! I was so gosh darn ticked off (family website, trying to keep it clean). Offended, shocked. I let the guy know, that despite the verbiage we used….this is not an “appraise this early lease break and make customer pay residual” situation. Whether I am financing a new GM vehicle or not (which now it’s not, due to my anger at the crap they tried to pull) this is not a trade, it’s a buy back. If I was going to spend 45,000!!!!!! dollars on a Cruze, I’d just keep the Verano and buy another car!

        It’s been a week of silence since that discussion. Calling him back this morning actually…

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          That’s a long short story.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Short-ish.

            I was going to write this all up and submit it to Mark, once I got a final resolution from GM, for you all to read and comment on, but I guess now I dont need to.

            You 28, bball, corey, danio and a few others were very helpful with advice during my buying phase and sympathetic to my early concerns, I definitely wanted to bring you all up to date on the saga sooner or later, haha.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m genuinely sorry to hear about all of this though. My initial thought is in general, its much safer to buy a common variant of a model than the top trim simply because typically the top trim is where the non-standard things go. A standard model with a standard drivetrain and some basic luxury features fits me well.

            My other thought is where is the Clutch Position Sensor located and how expensive is it? 200 series Volvos have a fuel relay located inside the cabin under the glovebox which is known to go out after X years of use. The trick was to keep a spare in the glovebox and change it out if necessary (10 min job, could be done with no tools). Maybe the trick here is to rotate the sensor out every so often if RenCen is going to screw you on a new lease… or Dad’s Ninety Eight becomes the summer car and you find a beater for winter :)

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’m glad to hear an update, been wondering. You haven’t been around as much here lately…

            Apparently because you spend your time at the GM dealer with your crap Verano. Ugh! I would have filed the car under “Not trustworthy for trips, like a Discovery II.” and stopped wanting to drive it long ago.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Still reading every day Corey, just so damn stupid busy that commenting regularly isn’t a priority.

            Agreed the car isnt trustworthy, as I said below to TEXN3, “We really don’t trust the car at all. Sadly, at this time its our only road trip worthy car, the other car is a runabout. We’re really hoping GM will step up and buy the car back sooner or later. In the meantime, were depending on Roadside and Trip Interruption Insurance, and the fact that we can both remote work if needed. And… if it craps the bed again, that’s gotta be the silver bullet…. right?”

        • 0 avatar
          TEXN3

          I mean no disrespect to you Dave, but these are the types of issues/concerns that prevent people from trusting GM and FCA (and to a lessor extent, Ford) with their money and time.

          I know my wife would not want us taking a car like that ok trips anymore. We had a car that stranded us multiple times in the 4 years we owned it, and it was a car with many great virtues. 2007 Outback manual. The Accord that replaced it has had no problems but yes, it’s “vanilla”. I want her and my boys to literally be able to gas and go. It was either that or a Fusion Sport. I went with the better depreciation.

          On the flip side, my folks 2012 Explorer Limited just suffered from a bad valve spring. Car isn’t driven hard, lives primarily in Park City, Utah, so the issue was a weird one and it’s just outside the warranty. Ford and the dealer, Larry h Miller, have stepped up and covered all costs including a rental. They’re using the problem as r&d I suppose. It also helps my dad has bought several vehicles from them and has a GT350 on order but still, no jerking around like GM is doing with you.

          I just don’t get why companies would treat people that way. But I also don’t understand why anyone continue to support them. I support the workers on the line, but not the unions or execs.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            No disrespect felt Mr. TEXN3. It was down to the Verano or a V6 Accord. Sadly, I didn’t want a coupe and didn’t know about the Accord Sport at the time. I like the big power, but the dual tipped, 6 speed manual having, 2.4L Accord would have been totally acceptable.

            I said to myself quite a bit when I bought it, “I hope the old GM devil has truly been exercised, and I don’t feel stupid in a year!” Well, I feel dumb :-)

            We really don’t trust the car at all. Sadly, at this time its our only road trip worthy car, the other car is a runabout. We’re really hoping GM will step up and buy the car back sooner or later. In the meantime, were depending on Roadside and Trip Interruption Insurance, and the fact that we can both remote work if needed. And… if it craps the bed again, that’s gotta be the silver bullet…. right?

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Sorry to hear about your Verano woes Dave, sounds like typical bone-headed parts swappers at the Buicks dealer(s). I think people generally overestimate the quality of service and technical aptitude of dealerships, when in fact they are no better than many independent shops, and in fact much less capable at this sort of diagnostics work than independent shops specializing in this area of automotive repair. In your case of course, with a new car under warranty the dealer is the first stop.

            It’s these sorts of stories that continue to persist into this day and age that make me question the veracity of the claims that “all brands are negligibly different in reliability these days.” I’m sure some one out there has put a ton of miles on their Verano with no issues at all, but this sort of hit or miss inconsistency is just ruinous, especially when coupled with inept and/or indifferent service departments.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          That’s awful Dave.

          Hopefully GM steps up and takes the car back. VW didn’t step up for me, and I haven’t bought one since. Luckily, my issue was limited to Arizona and other extreme heat states. I was able to sell my car to someone from out of state.

          Does the province you live in have any arbitration process for lemon law?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Does a lemon law apply to a lease though in the same way?

            PS. Guy here at work bought a new 2014 Traverse (against my advice!!) and had so many issues with airbags, seat belts, etc etc electrical that GM took it back and gave him a 2015. He had decided to take them through lemon proceedings (qualified under number of fixes and time in shop) before GM finally agreed to take it back.

            I was thinking yeah… could have had an MDX. Then you’d just be going by the dealer if you ate at the restaurant near it.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            “Does a lemon law apply to a lease though in the same way?”

            As far as I know. It does in Arizona. And that state doesn’t really like to protect consumers.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Arizona:

            “What you have some kinda problem?” *Fires hand gun in random direction*

            “There, I helped. Go away.”

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            That is pretty much what happens. Sometimes there is complaining about Mexicans and Obama. Unless you live in Tucson. Then most people are Mexican (or at least don’t have a problem with Mexicans), still have guns, and like Obama.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Sadly, there’s no lemon law in Canada.

            There is http://www.camvap.ca/, which is a binding arbitration, but which the general opinion is, wont help me much.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Dave sometimes (usually) I forget you’re Canadian, even though it’s right in your login name.

            To me, you live in Oregon.

            And now I’m excited to get to Phoenix for a couple days this October!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            You should be. October is a good time of the year in Arizona.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @Corey

            You’re equating our Canadian brothers with Oregonians? That’s pretty low.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I can’t help it. To my mind the PNW weather is just like Canada, and is also similarly expensive like Seattle. The people there enjoy moss and being in the outdoors, like PNW people.

            So, Oregon.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You do realize the rest of Canada is not like or geographically near PNW?

            Terrance and Phillip are probably going to track you down and fart on you.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Yes I know!

            He’s in Calgary – not THAT far off.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Corey…. Calgary is dry is hell. People move here and suffer chronic nose bleeds. Theres a whole big mountain range between us and the PNW, it slightly has an effect on the weather.

            Then head east to my hometown and you have 110 degree summers and -45 winters.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Winnipeg needs to reboot its weather system, its clearly got a memory leak or something going on.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            It was a paper map so it was flat :(.

            At some point I’ll visit and go around Canada a while. Should be able to get some great pics. Wherever Tim lives seems photogenic.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            “There is http://www.camvap.ca/, which is a binding arbitration, but which the general opinion is, wont help me much.”

            Arbitration does work sometimes.

            A former coworker got a full refund from Honda after two years of failing to fix a bad front-end shake.

        • 0 avatar
          319583076

          Wow. I had no idea your problems were this extensive! Sorry to hear about them, but thanks again for sharing. Reviews are fun, but ownership experiences are valuable knowledge! I bet everyone would appreciate a submission, sorry if I stepped on any toes.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            How about once this is resolved, whatever that looks like, I’ll take this transcript, clean it up, add to it a bit, then send it over to Mr. EIC.

        • 0 avatar
          kvndoom

          God damn, Corey… ugh!

          At this point I’d take a visit to go see my imaginary friend in the seediest ghetto neighborhood around, and “accidentally” drop my keys on the sidewalk and not notice.

          It’s easy to see why so many people who got burned in the 80s and 90s started buying camcords and never looked back.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      A coworker got a ’13 or ’14 Regal as a rental recently and specifically praised the practicality of the button-intensive center stack (the same stack which, predictably, the press had criticized). I told him, “Funny you should mention that . . . .”

      I wonder what the take rate is for eAssist vs turbo vs GS. I believe the former two now are the same price.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        The buttons don’t bother me at all. I spent a good portion of my adult life in aviation so seeing the buttons reminds me of a cockpit.

        I do see how some people wouldn’t particularly like it though.

        • 0 avatar
          Mandalorian

          Dave’s story has an element of classic tragedy to it. He does a long elaborate search for the perfect little car with the perfect little manual transmission that checks most of the perfect little boxes. The hero goes through a quest. At the end he emerges victorious only to find the prodigal son is a lemon and it’s Achilles’ heel is it’s manual transmission.

          • 0 avatar
            JD-Shifty

            Have we really become such a sad nation of helpless sissies? chances are the problem can be researched, the sensor can probably be jumped or unplugged or easily replaced. a permanent fix will be available soon.

    • 0 avatar
      CincyDavid

      Pearl White GM cars can be frightening to look at in bright sunlight due to mottling and blotchiness. GM just can’t seem to get a handle on paint application…
      I have seen brand new pearl white Escalades that just look awful, Granted, pearl white is a bitch to paint, but for crying out loud, every other manufacturer seems to get it right, why not GM? Surely, if PPG or DuPont, or whoever provides the paint, can get it right for everyone else, what’s wrong with GM?

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “The normal Regal — built on the same Epsilon II platform as the Chevrolet Malibu — is a geezer’s paradise of creamy leather, creamy ride and plenty of storage space for Werther’s Original candies.”

    Really? Somehow drivetrain additions in the GS trim make this iteration of the platform 180 degrees different than the base/luxury trims? Dragging out the tired image of Buick to then say “but the GS trim is ZOMG” later is juvenile. Trims are just that, trims. They will only enhance the bare bones slightly from an engineering standpoint. Much better to be honest and say “while the overall model is a true sport sedan, Regal customers should check out the GS for the full effect”.

    “In back, the Regal sports rear legroom that’s better than the competition and a copious amount of trunk space for a sports sedan. ”

    We know this has been inadequate since the model launched. Did GM alter the model for MY15? Serious question. Otherwise an inch better than another model which sucks in rear legroom, the 3 series, is nothing to write home about. Neither model suits buyers who regularly have rear passengers.

    “If you look far enough into the future, you can see Chevrolet and Cadillac growing far enough apart that Buick — a brand on the ropes not too long ago — will have a future in the United States. ”

    Cadillac is the brand with a murky future, all this brand/distro channel has to do is sell a better Chevrolet model be it car or truck. The Opel Regal sticks out in the lineup because it was never intended for Buick.

    This particular model has alot of problems, but perhaps the biggest is pricing. $46K for a literally an Opel rebadge in boy racer trim? Opel might be nice but its not that nice. But then again Cadillac has similar pricing fictions which they make up for in massive rebates. This model might do the same.

    • 0 avatar
      legacygt

      I still don’t understand why GM doesn’t want to sell Opels as Opels in the US. They’ve tried badging them as Saturns, Chevys and Buicks. Why not sell them as Opels? Sure that would mean introducing Americans to a new brand but so me that’s easier than selling them under brands that are already laden with baggage. GM shouldn’t need to do a lot of research to find out what everyone already knows: Import brands sell at a premium in the US. I know that to the people who read this site, the name on the badge doesn’t make much of a difference. But imagine if the Opel lineup was being sold in the US as a “German Import Brand.”

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        You raise good points and this has been mentioned before. Playing devil’s advocate a bit though, VW is the “German engineering” brand and yet it struggles in the US. GM has also made Cadillac the “German” brand, how well that works you can judge for yourself. If Opel were to come over, Cadillac would need to change its product/position.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        GM did import Opels as Opels from 1958 to 1975. During much of that time, GM had no subcompact US made cars. The Vega was the first threat to Opel’s place at Buick dealers. Then the dollar’s devaluation in the ’70s made German cars too expensive to compete with mass-market economy cars. GM responded by replacing the much admired 1975 Opel Manta with a rebadged Isuzu Gemini. Essentially, they replaced a legitimate Audi Fox/Toyota Corona competitor that drove better than either of them with a slightly higher quality 3-box Chevette. Opel’s brand was destroyed, perhaps consciously.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        This could work. My wife wouldn’t buy a Buick, but she would entertain an Opel. Because as everyone knows Buicks (aside from black turbo Grand Nationals) are “old people cars” built by Government Motors. Opel also has a nice logo, while Buick’s logo reminds me of the stickers you get with your Lego castle set.

        GM’s previous Opel imports don’t even register with my age group (born in the 70s).

      • 0 avatar

        Opel has a bad reputation in Europe. Not competitive with Fords and VWs at all. I am sure it will get same rep here too quickly. At least Buick sounds premium and is top trim. I would even buy one if it was not GM and Opel.

        When a was looking for new car Opels (Vectras and Omegas) always seemed odd. There was something outdated and crude in Opels even though they drove better than Japanese cars. It was weird and I could not understand why until I came to US and experienced GM cars. It explained it all. Regal is a good car but when I first sat in Regal in SF autoshow I had that sickening feeling of “Opelness”. I honestly do not know why GM for its premium car decided to rebadge Opel, kind of defeats the purpose.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I agree with regard to your assessment about the juvenile. There’s an overriding concern about snark with him – to the point that subject matter is lost.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “As tested: $46,025”

    I can’t get over that.

  • avatar
    Timothy

    For 46 grand that interior is abysmal. Black plastic stretching as far as the hands can reach, the temperature readouts for the climate control are cartoon like, and the shiny plastic making up the lower portion of the center stack would look out of place in a car cost half as much.

    Why can’t GM put together a decent interior? It boggles my mind! I’m actually angry that GM has the balls to charge 46 grand for it.

    Audi A4, Mercedes C Class, BMW 3 series all have fantastic appointments inside. Wanna stick closer to home? The Lincoln MKwhatever is leaps and bounds ahead of this.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I see this as a possible buy at 33-35K with the base model a hair over Verano in pricing.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      $46,000 is too much money for any Buick that doesn’t say either RIVIERA or ELECTRA 225 on it, and is the length of a Baptist church pew.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      The A4 is nothing special inside nor was the previous gen C class. Some 3s are nicer then again some really aren’t. Go take a look at a 320i, it’s rather plain. I wouldn’t characterize the A4, 3 series, or previous C class as having “fantastic” interior appointments.

      • 0 avatar
        Timothy

        Let’s compare apples to apples. 2016 cars. Optioned to reach the aforementioned 46,000 threshold. You can’t compare a 33,000 320i with a 46k anything… apples and oranges.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Tim you are right. At it’s price point, the interior of the GS is terrible. I can’t see buying this over an MKZ or ES, let alone a RWD German vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            AND, because I just looked. The ES starts at $8,000 less than this GS. And of course is larger, better made, has a V6, a much nicer interior, and will be worth thousands more when you go to sell it after 100,000 carefree miles.

            And they do many interior color options now! Brown!

            http://www.lexus.com/build-your-lexus/#!/zip/45241/series/ES/year/2016/trim/9000/buildId/102/interior-colors/my-dream-car/{-x-:-04U7-,-i-:-LA53-,-a-:[],-p-:[],-z-:[]}

  • avatar
    Fred

    There is a manual transmison offered, but only on the FWD It took me a long time to find one to test drive and it was pretty good, but that was over a year ago. My issues was price and questionable readability.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    These things are going for more like $38K which is a bit more reasonable.

  • avatar
    GS 455

    Aaron a GNX might fetch $165,000 but you can buy Grand Nationals all day every day for under $20,000.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Not a bad car but 46K is huge money, I do not know what the US price would be, to lazy to look it up, but why would I want this over a V6 accord? I like Buick and the germaness of the this car , and I like the fact you would not see one on every corner, but I could not fork over anywhere close to 40K for this. Maybe as a 3 year old CPO at 21K, it would be a buy but I need someone to lease/buy it new first.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Agreed. This car’s sticker is laughable. It should sticker for 8-10k less and then would still need incentives to move it. The interior is simply too small – interestingly, similar complaints exist for the CTS.

  • avatar
    PhilMills

    “In back, the Regal sports rear legroom that’s better than the competition and a copious amount of trunk space for a sports sedan.”

    This is all fine so long as your rear-seat passenger is the Headless Horseman and he’s cool with stashing the flaming pumpkin in the trunk.

    I really wanted to like the Regal GS, but after getting a chance to sit in one while my car was in for service, it’s a no-go – Swoopy looks are nice, but I expect a Buick to be able to fit people in the backseat without giving them a crick in their neck.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      It really depends who will be in the back seat. The local GMC/Buick dealer had one in stock when we went to go look at a Sierra. For my needs the GS would work fine. The kids (15 and 12) fit in the back without any issues and its generally a nice looking car.

      A 46k asking price is kinda dear though. I’d be surprised if transaction prices are anywhere near that.

  • avatar
    ezeolla

    Power moonroof $1,000 (!)

    Why is there an exclamation point here? That is pretty standard pricing for a sunroof option

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      Agreed, and I like the fact that it’s a standalone option, which is not the case on a lot of vehicles.

      More sensibly optioned (yes to AWD, the nice white paint, sunroof, and floormats; no to the driver’s confidence package and the 20″ wheels), this car comes out to $38K in KBB’s online “fair purchase price” tool. Nobody in the real world is paying $46K for a GS.

      I also seriously question whether or not the author actually sat in the rear seat of either the Regal or the current 3-series. Regardless of what the specs sheets may or may not say, the latter is much more comfortable for three- or four-passenger journeys.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        It’d sure be nice if Honda gave you the option for a moonroof on a Sport especially since Mazda and Ford do.

        • 0 avatar
          kvndoom

          It befuddles me that Honda based the Sport on the LX and not the EX trim. If I were buying a 4 banger Accord I would just buy an EX and put some better looking wheels on it.

          In car lingo, “Sport” is an insult not an accolade.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    @Aaron:

    “The normal Regal — built on the same Epsilon II platform as the Chevrolet Malibu — is a geezer’s paradise of creamy leather, creamy ride and plenty of storage space for Werther’s Original candies. ”

    Huh? I don’t know what “normal” Regal you drove, Aaron, but the mid level Regal with the 2.0T is a LONG way from being a geezer-mobile. That gets this car to 60 in the mid six second range, and the suspension isn’t a bit floaty.

    I drove a midlevel Regal with the 2.0t and found it to be plenty taut, and plenty fast.

    Are you sure you’re not confusing this with the non-turbo Regal? Or maybe the Lacrosse (that is a floatmobile, or at least what passes for one today)?

  • avatar

    It’s worth noting that this is not the same powertrain the Regal started out with. The pre-facelift (which was from its debut in 2010 or 2011 up until 2013) had the old 2.0-liter from the Cobalt SS, Sky Redline and Solarice GXP, among others. The 2014 and later is indeed the newer engine from the Malibu, ATS and CTS. That’s a lot of torque.

    I like it, I do, but I don’t know that I like it for $46K. In fact, I definitely don’t, because my mind goes to several cars for that same money, like the Genesis for luxury (you could just about get the awesome loaded-up 5.0-liter V8 version for that money), and GM’s own SS for performance—which is just as much of a novelty—or the Charger SRT…which I don’t like as much, but is nevertheless a better use of that kind of money. Or maybe a CPO 535i/550i.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    They really named the option packages “Driver Confidence” and then added things like lane departure warning and adaptive cruise control?

  • avatar
    NotFast

    Like the car, but not the price. You can get an equal or better car same or fewer dollars.

  • avatar
    xtoyota

    For $45K you can get a Hyundai Genesis 3.8L AWD loaded…311HP …118″ wheelbase…
    incredible interior… 8 speed with paddle shifters ETC.
    This has got to be one of the best values available

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I need to read up more on the new Genesis model but I am inclined to agree with you. Assuming you can get one WITHOUT the H Hyundai badges, they seem really nice. The interior is miles ahead of where it used to be.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Some dealers sell them with the Bentleyesque badges already applied. Otherwise, 20 minutes with some dental floss and goo-gone will get you there (except maybe the steering wheel cover?)

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          So on the 2015+ model, the wheel cover actually has wing badging already. Only the rear reflects the H logo.

          http://95octane.com/2014/08/15/2015-hyundai-genesis-3-8-awd-review/

          The interior looks great. I’m thinking leg room should be a little better in this size car, but it’s doable.

      • 0 avatar
        Uncle Bobby G

        Most dealers offer them as an add-on for the sedan, off the lot. If not, Amazon and eBay are your friend. A set of black wing badges for my GF’s Genny coupe was $45 shipped from Amazon.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I take issue with the Coupe even being called Genesis. It shares so little and has no common styling theme. Every time I think about it, it makes a little less sense to call it that.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Yeah, it’s really more of a 3rd-gen Tiburon than anything else. At the time the two were launched, they were the only RWD cars in Hyundai’s US lineup and the big H was undecided on whether or not ‘Genesis’ should be a separate brand or subline or what.

  • avatar
    zaxxon25

    I am a middle child … which is why I got the Malibu with the 2.0T instead. Far less $ for basically the same car.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      I was kind of thinking the same thing – I find the Malibu Turbo quite a likable car, I’m not quite sure if I’d be so enamored with it if it cost about 50% more. Not only that, it looks like the lighter Malibu is a touch quicker.

  • avatar
    hubcap

    Forty six large is a lot of scratch for this car. Not to say that I don’t like it because I do but for the MSRP I’d be in a SS 6mt with all of the accompanying LS3 glory.

    I wonder what actual transaction prices are because on AutoTrader you’ll see used 13s and 14s in the mid 20s. It wouldn’t surprise me to get one in the very low 20s with just a bit of negotiation.

  • avatar
    readallover

    Just like Malibu, just like ATS the backseat is unusable for adults. We tried them all. What is GMs problem? Sedans need backseats. People may put up with that crap in a 3-Series, but not these.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      The models are all foreign designed and intended for global consumption.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      When the ATS first came out I took a trip to my local Caddy dealer to have a look. One peek in the back seat was all it took for me to know that it’s was too cramped.

      That being said. If you’re single or a couple with no kids it would work. I really think that GM wasn’t targeting households with kids when they greenlit the ATS.

  • avatar
    matt3319

    I gotta say I love the GS AWD but my only gripe, and I think everyone would agree, is the super steep entry price. $46K is hugely out of wack! So what did I do since I wanted a AWD mid size car? I did t get a GS but a V6 AWD Chrysler 200S. The big difference was the price. My listed for $33,475. That $13K less. And I walked out the door under $30K w/0% financing too. So, I love the GS but not for the crazy price.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    One of my daughter’s neighbors has a car like the one pictured. I’ve never taken a close look at the badging to see what trim level it is, but it sure pretty in that pearlescent white.

    When my Pontiac went in for it’s recall earlier this year, the local Buick/GMC dealership gave me a 2014 Regal with the eAssist. It was a nice car, very well trimmed out with a nice leather interior and the mandatory touchscreen in the dash. I didn’t even know it was an eAssist model until I opened the trunk and saw the big lump where they hide the batteries. Basically, that car drove a lot like my G6, nothing too wild or bad. Just a nice car.

    Like others have noted, $46K seems rather high for this car, AWD and all. I doubt that anyone pays that, but even so, I would hope this would go out the door for a lot less than $46K. It’s almost like GM doesn’t want to sell this car.

    Ah well, maybe down the road it will make a great used car for me…

  • avatar
    wmba

    “Regal is just a retooled Malibu. Admittedly, I loosely remembered …”

    Nope, the 2012 Malibu is a re-tooled Insignia, four years after the 2008 introduction of the Opel Epsilon II platform. Fake cheering for the home team.

    Then there is this:

    https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/05/buick-regal-tops-among-traded-one-year-ownership/

    That’s what’s not quite right, and it starts with bad seats and 46 shades of interior black. Owners just don’t really like them. Based on DaveinCalgary’s travails with the Verano, avoid the 6MT, or you’ll really be pulling your hair out in tufts during the lease.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    dave–I hope you get your situation with the Verano resolved. GM should buy you car back and not force you into trading for another GM product but I doubt they will. If not, if you can afford it you should terminate the lease and get a Honda Accord. The base 4 door Accord with a 5 MT is not a bad car even though it does not come with heated leather seats and comes with limited colors–black and grey. With a manual the Accord is sportier than many midsize cars and it is very reliable and holds its value. My wife has a 2013 CRV which has been very reliable. I haven’t had bad luck with my GM vehicles but I have had a less than desirable experience with GM dealers with service.

  • avatar
    JREwing

    Drop the stupid driving nannys and the special paint, and that’s $3200 off the sticker right there.

    And, as nice as the sunroof is, I would yank it for another $1000 off the sticker. So now it’s a $42K vehicle.

    Also, for most people, all-wheel-drive is not necessary. So save a considerable amount of weight and fuel, plus another $2500. Now we’re under $40,000 – and a much better deal.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      You could easily get a barebones 3-series, C-series, A4, ES, G and Genesis for under 40k as well. Far superior cars than the Buick. In most cases with better utilized back seats as well.

      GM is on crack with this pricing. This is a $33-35k car max.

  • avatar
    gasser

    Lipstick on a pig. The turbo is the only attractive part of the Regal. I’ve sat in both Verano and Regal. Both have inadequate rear seat room for adults (what teens turn into) and one is only less bad than than the other. Price, depreciation, horrible dealer service, mediocre handling and (subjectively) mediocre styling, all say “stay away” like the rattle on a snake. Buick and Cadillac are both history in 5 years when gas prices and interest rates are back up.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    So for $45k, I could have:

    A 4 cylinder FWD based AWD Buick built on a Chevy Malibu Platform
    A loaded up Lexus ES350 with a six cylinder engine and the Lexus ownership experience
    For $2.5k-5k more (depending on if I wanted AWD) I could have a Lexus IS350 with more power, a six cylinder, a RWD chassis, and the Lexus ownership experience
    A loaded Chrysler 300 with more room, a nicer interior, RWD or a RWD-based AWD chassis, and a six cylinder
    A BMW 328i with the tech package and premium packages ($2k more for AWD)
    An Acura TLX SH-AWD V6 advance package with a more powerful six cylinder, one of the most sophisticated AWD systems anywhere, and every option in the book along with a premium car dealer experience
    A Cadillac ATS

    A Ford Fusion Titanium AWD, which, like the the Buick, is a FWD-based AWD 4 cylinder turbo car that shares its platform with a mainstream vehicle, has 250ish hp, and a brand a step below the Lexus’s and BMW’s above, along with (in the Ford’s case) a brilliant fun to drive chassis, one of the sexiest 4 door bodies on the market, every option in the book, and a price $7500 below the Buick.

    Were it me, I’d probably go for either a Dodge Charger R/T Scat Pack or, once I finished gagging and assuming I could learn to look myself in the mirror, a BMW 335i with the six speed manual, non metallic paint, sensatec seats, and the only options being the dynamic handling package and harmon kardon premium stereo.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Nothing wrong with admitting you own a BMW. It’s the bragging part that becomes offensive; as well, the road assholes have been taken over by Audi and LR.

      The 335 is an excellent car for folks who enjoy driving. The Lexus IS too.

      • 0 avatar
        tjh8402

        @Dave M. – I used to own a BMW 3 series, an e46 330i zhp, and it was an absolutely wonderful car. I wish I still owned it. Compared to the e46, the F30 is completely inferior as the “ultimate driving machine” and normally (if I was in the market), I would refuse to buy it to protest what BMW has become. However, no one else offers the combination of 4 doors, RWD, six cylinders, and a manual, so BMW is the default choice. Otherwise, the Q50, IS350, or ATS 3.6 would all be preferable to the 335, but unfortunately, none offer a stick, or at least not with their 6 cylinder engines and the S4 is both AWD and pricier than the $45k being discussed here.

        • 0 avatar
          dolorean

          Just bought a 2000 BMW 323 Ci e46 while stationed here in Germany from an Officer shipping out. Absolutely floors me why I never drove one before. Solid chassis, troquey engine that loves to meet its redline, phenomenal road manners, shotgun feel 5 spd gearbox, and nicely appointed with stuff you need not bangley-geegaws. It’s a real treat although maintenance costs aren’t the cheapest.

          And it all came down to the fact that I didn’t want to be THAT guy. That BMW guy. You know the one. How do you know him at a party? Don’t worry, he’ll tell you.

  • avatar
    22_RE_Speedwagon

    The price on the 2016 regal GS was just lowered by $3300. It’s a start.

  • avatar
    hifi

    $45k for an invisible, mediocre car from a brand that hasn’t built a competitive vehicle in almost forty years. Sounds reasonable.

  • avatar
    dolorean

    “The faux hood vents are a little low-rent…”

    And yet, some one will spend good money at the local Pep-Boys for the mega-awesome plstic sticky side vents and portholes and will inevitably festoon them on the sides in asinine locations to increase his bling-quotient.


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  • JimZ: “He has two master degrees in engineering” no he does not. he has undergrad degrees in Economics...
  • 28-Cars-Later: This particular model clocks in at $21K currently/12K miles avg. 4/5/19 $22,900 3,109 4.9 4GT/A...
  • d4rksabre: There are so many better cars for that kind of money it’s almost a joke that this even exists.
  • Fred: I have to agree, the color and the seats are probably really nice, but I would expect more. Maybe put the NSX...
  • schmitt trigger: “….use illegal Mexican-sourced labor…” That was then. Nowadays, because of...

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