By on May 23, 2015

2015 Ford Explorer Exterior Three Quarter

I’ll put the pedal to the flo-ah/of my two-tone Ford Exploh-ah

You know how it’s done.

– Ice Cube, Down For Whatever

The great O’Shea Jackson penned that lyric in 1993, and I know exactly what Ford Explorer he meant. Back in the day, the Explorer Sport was a three-door SUV that could be bought as either RWD or 4WD. It was based on the Ranger, and it was available in a black-and-silver combo that would have undoubtedly pleased Cube, who was the world’s most famous Raiders fan (somewhat presciently, he also accented the word Fleeeeeeex in that song). Back then, the Explorer was being leased by everyone from wannabe rappers to bored Northern Virginia Housewives because Ford was guaranteeing residual values that were simply otherworldly. It was the first SUV that I can remember being that ubiquitous.

Then the whole Firestone thing happened.

For those that are too young to remember that, here’s a brief history as told by Wikipedia. The tl;dr version is that over 250 deaths and 3,000 serious injuries were linked to Ford Explorers rolling over when their Firestone tires experienced tread separation, earning the popular SUV the nickname “Exploder.” In a 2015 world, it’s hard to believe that neither Ford nor Firestone’s parent company, Bridgestone, were sued into oblivion.

But, remarkably, the Explorer name survived. Today’s Explorer, however, bears little resemblance to Ice Cube’s ride. Let’s all just call it what it is now – a crossover, based on the same D4 platform as its much less popular cousin, the Taurus. Ford refuses to admit this; they still call it an SUV, and they still use truck trim level names like XLT.

When I bought my own Ford Flex nearly three years ago, I cross-shopped the Flex against the Explorer and came away massively disappointed with the latter. Same OEM, same platform, same motor, yet the Flex was a much better driver. So when I selected this blacked out Ford Explorer Limited with about 6,000 miles on the clock from the rental car lot, I was prepared to be disappointed again.

Spoiler alert: I wasn’t. Well, not entirely.

2015 Ford Explorer Dash Interior

The interior on the Limited trim is splendid in its execution. Everything about the ergonomics of the car simply works. Granted, I daily drive not one, not two, but three Fords. The 12-speaker Sony sound system worked well for everything from Iggy Azalea to Iggy Pop. The seating position is perfect for smaller female drivers as well as 5’9″ men. Visibility everywhere is outstanding. The ride is quiet to the point of isolation for highway driving. My only complaint is that it should just feel bigger inside than it actually does. The second row is surprisingly small – I wouldn’t recommend that anybody larger than I sit there for any length of time. The third row is useless for anyone larger than Verne Troyer, but when folded down, it provides adequate storage space for a couple of 27 inch suitcases. I’m not sure that the lack of headroom and legroom matters all that much, considering that the target audience for the Explorer nowadays is thirty-something women who need to take two kids, two lawnchairs, and a crate of juice boxes to the local soccer field. The Explorer’s diminutive cabin might actually feel cozier and less intimidating for such a customer.

2015 Ford Explorer Middle Row Interior

That being said, the floating roof look of the Explorer, especially in black, makes it the most masculine of the choices in this segment. Between the Highlander, Traverse and Explorer, I know which one I’d feel coolest driving (cool is relative term when it comes to car-based crossovers, obviously). When I pulled up to meet a colleague for breakfast, she couldn’t find me in the lot because she knew that I was driving a rental car and, as she put it, “That thing looks like it cost a lot of money.” Which is good, because it does, but we’ll get to that soon enough.

The 3.5L V6 doesn’t hurt, either. While the Limited doesn’t have EcoBoost as an available engine, the 290(!!) horsepower and 255 lb-ft of torque means you won’t find yourself on the losing end of too many stoplight races or squeezed out of highway merges. Ford quotes a 0-60 time of somewhere around eight seconds, but it feels much stronger than that on the butt dyno. And, of course, what crossover doesn’t need giant 20-inch rims? I mean, if you ain’t rolling on twenties, you ain’t really rolling.

2015 Ford Explorer Instrument Panel

However, all that power and ballerness comes at a cost, and that cost is fuel economy. While my Flex averages around 21-22 MPG in combined driving, that same engine in the Explorer returned considerably less – around 18 MPG. The ride on the highway is spectacularly smooth, but in-town driving in hip and trendy Downtown Grand Rapids, Michigan was a less pleasant experience. Potholes and cracks in the road were translated much more directly to the driver than I would have liked for a vehicle of this size. I spent all of my time driving in FWD mode, although I wish I had been able to experience Ford’s Terrain Management System, which gives the suburban mom who likes to go mud running on the weekends four different selectable options to “optimize traction electronically.”

In my dream world, I would use this Explorer Limited to tow around a matching black Shelby GT350 to racetracks around the country where I would dominate all, because it’s rated to pull around about 5,000 pounds with ease. Okay, maybe an F-150 makes a little bit more sense as a tow vehicle, but the Explorer is certainly capable.

So why did my disappointment rear its ugly (lack of) head(room)? Because it still isn’t as good as a Flex. The Flex does everything that the Explorer does, and it does it all just a little bit better. And in Limited Trim, optioned exactly the way my rental was, this Explorer is going to sticker out at $43,695 before all incentives. While that’s a relative bargain when compared to a similarly engined and equipped Highlander, it still just feels like a big chunk of money for a CUV – excuse me, SUV – from a non-premium brand.

My recommendation? Definitely grab one from the rental lot if you have the chance. But for your own driveway, go find a Flex SE or SEL.

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65 Comments on “2015 Ford Explorer Limited Rental Review...”


  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    It’s not a bad SUV, very well rounded. Although, I wish we had gotten a Ford Territory derivitave as the Explorer. If you don’t need the vestigial th row though, it’s hard to pick this over a Grand Cherokee which will probably be much cheaper.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      I don’t get three row CUVs. Most are trying way too hard to avoid the minivan. I get why people want to avoid the minivan, but if you really need another row of seating, I think it’s time to give up the struggle.

      Otherwise you end up with a large CUV that is cramped even for small people and has no luggage space.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I do agree that the Explorer is now one of the best looking CUVs. However the overall review made me either want a Flex or a Durango.

    Memo to Sergio, bring us the Grand Wagoneer but for the love of god don’t kill the Durango.

  • avatar
    Steve-O

    From the MPG photo, it looks like your low tire pressure alert light was on. That’s not ideal for a good fuel economy result (or perhaps it’s a reference to the Firestone debacle?). But still, 18mpg around town doesn’t sound terrible for a rig of this size rolling on 20’s…

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Ford refuses to admit this; they still call it an SUV, and they still use truck trim level names like XLT.”

    Denial ain’t just a river in Egypt.
    -Mark Twain

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    This is off topic, but it’s a cool 67 degrees on the beach in Michigan and this is big news; GM is going to have criminal charges filed against it and particular employees by the DOJ regarding the ignition switch CRIME.

    Let’s see if my prediction of the U.S. Bankruptcy’s Court ruling shielding “New GM” from the liability related to ignition switches designed/installed by “Old GM” is now overturned, contrary to the opinion of some that it won’t/can’t be.

    And, as a parting thought, fu#K GM good and hard. I always knew they committed criminal acts costing many people death and serious injuries as the discovery undertaken in the civil litigation revealed.

    I hope many, many GM employees go to jail & that they receive fines so massive that it truly changes automotive corporate culture (*fines many multiples of what Toyota received).

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      http://www.nbcnews.com/business/business-news/feds-find-criminal-wrongdoing-gm-ignition-switch-defect-n363626

    • 0 avatar
      an innocent man

      @DW

      No one can/will go to jail over this. They all got new identities and souls during the bankruptcy, and as such, their old selves no longer exist. So there is no one to jail. It’s like you don’t know how bankruptcy works.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Dope! (Homer Simpson reference)

        It’s not the bankruptcy proceeding/court that will supervise criminal proceedings, but a separate court with proper jurisdiction that the Department of Justice has opened up with findings of criminal acts, with criminal information (aka charges/indictment) that will follow in non-bankruptcy court.

        Let’s not comment on such matters if you’re seemingly this far confused.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I noticed there’s a whole lot of not going to jail for major crimes post 2008. Did we partially abandon the rule of law?

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      I completely agree with you, DW: It is off topic.

    • 0 avatar
      Roland the Headless Thompson Gunner

      I fully expected you, being dead as well, to raise the specter of Ferd under inflating those Firestone tires rather than going through the hassle of re-calibrating the Ranger truckish suspension to achieve a smoother ride. Firestone advised agin doin’ so but Ferd went ahead and saved the 19 cents and quickly got the Exploder into production. Government was down on their knees in front of the mega corporations then as now.

      You a playa! Don’t go gettin lazy!

  • avatar
    Felis Concolor

    Explorer vs Flex sales numbers illustrate precisely What’s In A Name. It started out with a lower price, but now you pay more to get less when you choose the Explorer.

    • 0 avatar
      swilliams41

      After driving a Flex Limited rental and then an Explorer Limited a couple weeks later I just scratched my head. The Flex seemed so much better to me, less tipsy because it isn’t trying to provide a false sense of security by sitting up high. The interior seemed better on the Flex too. I actually like the looks of the Flex better too because I am not a “me too” type of personality. I guess you can put lipstick and 20’s on a pig and it will sell.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The interiors are a push for me. The Flex had a better interior than the Explorer until the 2016 Explorer came out because it was refreshed/launched more recently. Now the Explorer is nicer on the inside.

        As far as ride and comfort goes, the Flex rides nicer because it has a 5″ longer wheelbase and is 2″ closer to the ground.

        The next Explorer will be better than either, but for most people the Flex is the better vehicle right now.

  • avatar
    Firestorm 500

    The Explorer Limited in sat in recently in a showroom stickered for $50,500 before dealer add-ons.

    Yow.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      $43,695

      I read this, and thought “Hey that’s RX money.” But Mark indicated the Highlander costs that much, so maybe the RX has stepped up another $10,000.

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    I think my E46 feels more spacious than these things. I know that it isn’t, but where the BMW makes me mostly forget how small the interior actually is, Ford has done an amazing job of making a large vehicle feel cramped. They have developed quite the talent for that lately.

    Also, if the Explorer is what passes for good visibility, I can’t imagine a CUV with bad visibility. I found the dash high and the seat mounted rather low for a CUV, making it pretty difficult to locate the front corners (and I’m 6′). That’s the perception from a brief ride as a passenger though. Maybe it’s improved from behind the wheel.

  • avatar
    05lgt

    Not needing a third row (and not having a blue oval tramp stamp) I can’t help thinking the JGC V6 is the better option, and it’s still “manly” if you need it.

    I couldn’t help myself on the cheap shot Bark. Truth is I perk up and smile whenever I see you or your brothers name on a post here. Truth is I’d be honored if you took the time to tear me a new one for it.

    • 0 avatar
      st1100boy

      My wife took delivery of an Explorer XLT in January. I still don”t know why. We have one kid, a 5 year old, and we ain’t havin’ no mo’. She just HAD to have a 3-row vehicle. Good thing we have separate finances. I really wish she would’ve bought the 2wd JGC we drove.

      At least she was patient enough to order one optioned just the way she wanted: 3.5, front drive, leather, 2nd row console, no sunroof. That configuration wound up being barely over $30k after rebate and a little bargaining on her part. That’s not bad.

      Maybe the best part of this configuration was the 18 in wheels with nice tall 65 series sidewalls. Great, smooth ride.

      Mileage? 22 mpg on a recent highway drive and 20.5 in daily life. Reasonable, I suppose. I rarely drive the thing, but I look forward to using it to tow my Super Duke to a track day later this summer. At any rate, It won’t look quite so redneck as my usual practice of using my Mustang as a tow rig!

      • 0 avatar
        st1100boy

        I almost forgot: the footwells are way too small. Ugh.

        They’re not Chevy Astro small, but they’re small and strangely shaped. If the shape is the result of some crash test data, I think I’d rather risk a broken tibia.

  • avatar
    319583076

    Lethal Injection is certainly inconsistent, but the highs more than make up for the lows – a solid album.

  • avatar
    Japanese Buick

    My wife drives one of these. She had previously had one of the previous generation truck-based Explorers. When we test drove her current one, it was so much better than the previous model it was astounding. I think Ford is selling so many of these because people are comparing them to the previous Explorers, not other CUVs. Or the Flex, which I couldn’t get her to even consider.

    It is a nice truck, nice ride, nice tech and features that work well, she gets about 20 mpg on properly inflated tires. But as Bark noted, too little room inside for the size and weight of the thing. My wife is short so she doesn’t see it my way, but I find the front legroom inadequte, made worse by the shape of the floor so that if you pull your feet in toward the seat during your normal position shifting, you hit a bump and have to actually lift up your feet to pull them in.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      Mine drives one too. Her previous vehicles were an Accord, a Prelude, an RX300, and an Odyssey, so I was surprised when she chose the Explorer. She said the Pilot was too bland, the Enclave was too expensive and too formal looking, the Highlander was too homely, and the Traverse was too plasticky. I don’t think she considered Hyundai or Nissan. I like it, there’s plenty of room for us, and it doesn’t use any more fuel around town than did her Odyssey. We’ve had it for 18 months and it’s needed nothing more than oil changes.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        I recently drove a rental Lincoln hearse, same chassis, similar size, same engine. The engine had so much highway torque with so little drama, I was surprised to find out it wasn’t an EcoBoost. I’m sure this proves I’d never driven an EcoBoost, but the NA 3.5 is a more than adequate engine even in a car this big. I was impressed.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Was this hearse carrying any cargo when you drove it? Just curious.

          I imagine if the NA 3.5 puts out similar figures to the Cadillac Northstar, it would be adequate for hearse use (since K and G body FWD Devilles were used for two decades as hearses).

        • 0 avatar
          tonycd

          Or whatever they call their larger station wagon these days. I remember the name started with an M and a K.

      • 0 avatar
        319583076

        How many oil changes have you needed in 18 months?

        • 0 avatar
          FormerFF

          Two. It goes about 9000 – 9500 miles before the oil life warning shows up.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Fords don’t use an adaptive indicator they are just reset to a percentage of their 10K interval and then start saying oil change soon at 5%. The default of course is to set it to 100% but you can set it to lower intervals. I never set mine to 100% because my wife drives a lot and she often says “oh yeah” the oil change light has been coming on for a “little while” now. So I set it to 70% and even if it has been on for a couple of weeks before she says something its all good.

  • avatar
    Charliej

    Can anyone tell me why a car should crash, or roll over when a tread separates? The tire does not even go flat, the tread just separates. Why should there be a loss of control if the drive is not brain dead and is at least paying some attention to actually driving the vehicle? All, or at least a large majority of, those deaths were entirely the blame of the drivers involved. I know that you are not supposed to blame the victims, but sometimes the blame all goes to the victims. We all know that a substantial part of the driving public does not belong behind the wheel of anything faster than a riding lawnmower. Licensing rules and requirements do not require any driver to actually know how to drive. If these people actually knew how to drive and react to unexpected circumstances, there would have been a lot fewer fatalities after tread seperations.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      Car and Driver did a test on this, using the Explorer that was so rollover prone. They found that they had no problems slowing and stopping when they intentionally blew a tire.

      • 0 avatar

        I read about that test, and it is not a “real world test”. The driver is for sure experienced and also he/she KNOWS a tire will blow. Just not when, but driver is expecting it to happen. Add a less proficient driver (most people I know will never take their vehicle to the limits, will never anticipate how it will react in an emergency), maybe talking, texting, eating, shaving, applying make up… won’t stand a chance.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The separation usually means instant blowout. But the problem too is most drivers don’t know to coast it to the side. They panic, go for the brakes and they’re sideways.

    • 0 avatar

      I still drive the short wheelbase 2001 Explorer Sport. I never experienced a blowout but once a Nissan Armada passing on the right brushed my Explorer at highway speed between passenger rear tire and rear bumper (pretty much like the PIT maneuver). No dent, just paint transfer, minor contact. From that I learned is not that bad as long as you’re very delicate with the steering wheel. No sudden abrupt corrections (you over-correct and it will tip over, I’m sure). I went from left, right, left, right (all without leaving my lane) a few times and regained control fast enough to chase the other driver who stated he never felt any contact. I had to show him his paint on my truck. He appeared to be honest. I turn as fast or faster than low sport cars and never felt it tipsy. I made changes to the suspension, though (air bags, not lifted). I do not want to blame victims, but I seriously doubt tires were the issue. The recommended inflation pressure was too low, and weight balance sucks. In my year to the left you have the driver’a weight, the gas tank and jacks. Nothing but a very small subwoofer on passenger side. I carry ladders, drills… I tie the heaviest tools to stay on the passenger side. I believe it helps, although had been told many times weight never helps (by a Mazda RX7 owner).

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        “…a Nissan Armada passing on the right brushed my Explorer at highway speed between passenger rear tire and rear bumper (pretty much like the PIT maneuver)..”

        Nice save, but it would’ve been cleaner if you stayed on the gas or floored it. The PIT is just forced oversteer. A good example is the viral video of a ‘police chase’ doing numerous PITs on a Mustang with zero effect. He just keeps driving as if nothing, and obviously staying on the gas. But LE knows most will get the instant queasy feeling, let off the gas and spin out.

        • 0 avatar

          It was on Florida Turnpike South (Ronald Reagan extension). Max speed is 70 MPH and there’s a chance I was going slightly over the limit. My Explorer is a 4×4, and not much happens if I floor it at that speed. I did not let go, neither accelerated until I was in control: Too scared to introduce any variation not knowing how it would behave. Would you mind pointing me to the video? I better learn before I need it again. No plans of running from the cops, but there’s no shortage of morons driving here.

    • 0 avatar
      swilliams41

      Like the GM ignition debacle. Read the cases it is shocking how even with an ignition problem, deaths resulted. Sadly the folks who were driving the affected cars are probably the least into driving or they would not be driving these cars! Enthusiast do not drive Cavaliers!

  • avatar
    dastanley

    I owned a ’94 Mazda Navajo 4WD, which was a badge engineered Explorer Sport (2 door). As I remember, my vehicle was equipped with white lettered Firestones, and the recommended cold pressure was 26 psi.

    My understanding is that Ford replaced the Bronco II with the Explorer because the Bronco II had a bad reputation for rolling over. In order to hedge their bets that the Explorer’s CG was low enough to not rollover easily, Ford wanted to lower the recommended tire pressure to 22 psi. Firestone, rightfully, refused to go along with that recommendation, and insisted that the tire pressure be 30 psi. Ford and Firestone compromised at 26 psi, neither side happy about it, and that set the stage for hot underinflated tires that failed at high speeds.

    Personally, I never had that problem with my factory Firestones, replacing them in 1998 with Big O Tires after the Firestones had dry rot in the sidewalls from the Arizona and New Mexico sun.

    Around 1999 or 2000, Mazda (Ford) sent me an updated tire pressure recommendation sticker to put over the original in the door jam, now recommending 30 psi instead of 26. By then I had already figured out that 30 psi handled much better, not to mention more efficiently. At 26, there was so much rolling resistance that it felt like the parking brake had been left on, as if I was driving on four marshmallows.

    The main problem for Ford and Firestone was that nobody could really prove how fast the ’90-’94 Explorers were going at the time of tread separation, nor what the actual tire pressures were at the time (the tires usually exploded, destroying any evidence of tire pressure). In many instances, the vehicles were overloaded with passengers and luggage. The short wheel base of the Explorer Sports 4WD certainly didn’t help, and the front suspension was still the twin I-beams that was difficult to maintain front wheel alignment. And most normal people that aren’t expecting tread separation are not going to react as a professional driver should. They panic, slam on the brakes, and tense up, thus creating a scenario where the vehicle is more prone to loss of control and rollover.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      The Bronco II had a very bad reputation for rolling over. And it had the numbers to prove it: the worst rate of rollovers per vehicle of any new car on the road at that time.

      And that’s saying something, since SUV’s as a group were much more prone to rollovers back then.

      To my mind, what was most damning about Ford’s response to the Explorer’s rollover proclivities was that they consciously decided to market the car to families with children, precisely because they knew the design was prone to roll over. Their reasoning was that the more conservative driving of parents would make the incipient rollover situation happen less often. Problem was, their marketing to that audience was so successful the Explorer became the #1 best selling SUV in the country, so the things were in the hands of so many drivers that a significant number of rollovers became inevitable.

      In classic GM horse-stolen/lock-barn fashion, the last edition of the BOF true Explorer had design changes that fixed the problem.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      The Bronco II looks like it’s going to roll over when it’s parked. Why anyone bought that when Chevy had a much better COG(among many other things) in the S-Blazer across the road, I’ll never understand.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        “The Bronco II looks like it’s going to roll over when it’s parked.”

        The shorty wheelbase and lifted stance did make it look like a lot of fun to off road and on the street. I can a test to both. So it had a dangerous look to it. It was. I wouldn’t recommend the truck to the inexperienced, but I loved mine. On tight turns, I’d could get air under the inside rear tire.

        It had style too, that the bland S10 Blazer lacked.

        • 0 avatar

          Funny you said that! I get a lot of pressure to change my Explorer Sport, been told I can’t keep it forever… I promised I will buy another car when I turn 75. A Bronco. I do like how they look, but never drove one. After reading your post I might buy one earlier.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Especially if you got an Eddie Bauer with the woodlands interior trim with trees or stripes or whatever.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I have similar impressions of two rental Limiteds. Mediocre fuel economy (about 21 mpg all highway at 70mph), rides very well and very quietly considering the dubs and low pro tires. It is a handsome vehicle from the outside but the interior I don’t care for. Decent materials but just feels chunky with weird ergonomics. The most offensive element is the huge a pillar “lumps,” but I bet that’s integral to the very safe Volvo bones. It has oodles of empty space in random places, like between the driver’s seat and door, way more than any reasonably sized human could use. So nothing massively wrong with it, but that’s a damning opinion given how expensive they are, at least going off the sticker price. I vastly prefer a first generation Highlander in almost every way.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      I wholeheartedly concur on the 1st gen Highlander…they were perfectly sized unless you needed a 3rd row. I kick myself for trading in our base 4 cyl ’03…although it really needed a power seat to be perfect.

      The Explorer does nothing for me visually. It looks clunky/chunky from every angle. Style over function, unlike the Flex. I’d love to see the Flex make it to another generation but I don’t think that’s going to happen.

      Ford’s 3.5 may be a peppy engine, but the gas mileage sucks in every vehicle it’s in. My wife Edge gets 17.8 consistently in an equal mix of highway/city. We’ve never come close to the 24 mpg on the highway. Ford can do better -Ecoboost isn’t the answer at this point. Maybe shaving 500-1000 pounds of fat off the crossovers would help.

  • avatar
    Robert

    I sat in a Explorer when I was shopping for my Flex, I couldn’t believe how much smaller it was inside. No storage room to speak of with the 3rd row up, and I believe it was narrower too.

    I’ve had mine for 6000 miles now, and I’ve never done better than 19 mpg in mixed driving. Despite that I’m very pleased with it overall.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I did a 900 mile round trip in the third row seat, it’s not that bad. You do need to get the person in front of you to move up a little.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    This Explorer looks nice. It should also come with a diesel.

    As nice as this looks the older Explorers did have 4 hi and lo for off roading. They where very limited in off road situations, so I can see why Ford make CUV Explorers now.

    A better vehicle for the Explorer would of been the Everest with the 2.7 EcoBoost. A real off roader with a great looking body.

    It’s a pity Ford can’t translate the looks of vehicles like the Explorer and Everest into their full size pickups. The pickups would look very good.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    That’s the most toilet-liddy hood I’ve ever seen.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Those massive 20’s your so fond of sadly conspire to A) increase rolling resistance and weight, B) make ride quality harsher in city driving, C) decrease mileage, D) reduce traction in Winter driving and last but not least E) cost a small fortune to replace. How in the world did we ever get by on 15 and 16″ tires in these things? Simple answer they were plenty large enough but today’s goofy blocky styling dictates high belt lines and huge massive tires to fill in the wheel wells. I’ll take the plenty large enough 18’s thank you!

  • avatar
    duffman13

    The only real comment I have is good luck towing a track car with a 5000lb tow rating. My wife’s Santa Fe has the same, without access to a super light 14′ aluminum trailer, I’m not getting the S2000+trailer weight below 5000 lbs. With a GT350 tipping the scales at nearly 1000lbs more than the S2k, getting under 5000 is not going to happen

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