By on April 3, 2015

1024px-Peugeot_308_CC_e-HDi_FAP_110_STOP_&_START_Active_(Facelift)_–_Frontansicht,_10._September_2011,_Düsseldorf

I recently returned from a week-long visit to Europe, the world leader in diesel hatchbacks and cigarettes. There, as I always do when I arrive in Europe, I came face to face with a stark reality: there are still human beings driving around in Peugeots.

And in fact, I was one of them. I visited the tiny island nation of Malta, a former British colony located somewhere between Sicily and Africa, and I rented a Peugeot 308CC. Although I cannot be sure, I believe this stands for either “Coupe Convertible” or “Chimpanzee Cerebellum.”

Anyway, this ended up being a gigantic mistake on Malta, because it turns out that the entire place is no larger than a bathroom trash can, whereas the 308CC is a bit Colossally Corpulent. Not by American standards, of course; the 308CC isn’t even large enough to be seen by the naked eye of people who are driving Escalades and G-Wagens. They would have to use a telescope; the same one that prevents them from running over the poors.

But by Maltese standards this thing was huge, and I quickly regretted my decision. I especially regretted my decision when I began driving the vehicle on Malta’s UK-style, right-hand drive streets. Imagine it: there I am, shifting with my left hand for the first time ever, and at the same time trying to pilot a boat of a bad-visibility convertible down streets that were barely large enough for one single subcompact Ford Ka. It was such a bad situation that the woman at the Avis counter said – I am not kidding here – that the vehicle’s rental insurance policy covers everything “except the mirrors.”

And then, after a while, I realized something: although this car sucks for Malta, it would be great in North America.

Think about it: the 308CC gets excellent fuel economy – or at least the diesel-powered one I drove did. I know this because they gave it to me with half a tank and told me to return it with half a tank, but instead I drove it around Malta for three days and returned it with a quarter tank because I believe, after exhaustive study, that the entire country does not possess a single gas station.

It’s also got a lot of cool features, like an infotainment system, and automatic windshield wipers, and an iPod hookup, and a power-operated top, and a scary-looking lion logo on the steering wheel, and some very cool Peugeot Center Caps, one of which I stole.

And sure, it isn’t fast, but let’s be honest here: the kind of people interested in a convertible that has a lot of features and gets good gas mileage don’t really care about performance. You could give these people a 308 CC and strap in the same engine that powers a paper airplane (air) and they would still be happy.

But here I was driving it around Malta, a dusty island nation where the largest vehicle is a 1980s Toyota pickup that appears to have run over an entire flock of sheep, in this vehicle that simply didn’t belong there. It belonged in North America.

And that’s when I started thinking: what other vehicles belong in North America?

One obvious answer is the Volkswagen Amarok, which is this midsize pickup truck that appears to be roughly the same level of “large” and “competent” as the Chevrolet Colorado. I saw a well-equipped Amarok in Istanbul, a land of no pickup trucks, and couldn’t help but wonder why this vehicle isn’t also sold in America, a land where one brand sells more of one truck in four months than Volkswagen sells overall vehicles in the entire year.

Of course, the Amarok would have to be tuned up a bit if they wanted to sell it in America, since the base-level one has only 120 horsepower. This makes it roughly as fast as volcanic lava.

Another good contender: the Audi A5 Sportback. Have you heard of this thing? Imagine, if you will, a four-door version of the Audi A5, with a hatchback like the A7. Now, I fully admit that the segmentation of the luxury car world has grown to a point where things have gotten ridiculous, but Audi has largely stayed away from that stuff. And why? BMW would sell a Gran Coupe version of a tennis shoe, so why shouldn’t Audi?

And here’s the crazy part: although BMW’s proliferation of Gran Turismos and Gran Coupes has been only within the last year or two, Audi started selling the A5 Sportback in 2009! In other words: they created a cool new segment five years ago, and then they let BMW take all the glory.

But these are just a few examples, so now I’m posing the question to you: what cars should be sold in North America? And some guidance: avoid obvious answers of cars you want to see in North America, like some high-performance sports car or a crazy hot hatch. Focus instead on vehicles that would actually do well; vehicles that actually have a purpose; vehicles that would actually find success on our great continent. Like the Curious Coyote.

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201 Comments on “QOTD: What Foreign Cars Should Be Sold In North America?...”


  • avatar
    derekson

    Skoda. All the Skodas.

    • 0 avatar

      Sorry, but I don’t think it’ll fly. I know a guy who has one of their offerings, and it’a never-again car, although it was built under the WV reign. In particular suspension failed on it. I had a car where the lower ball joint separated – it was Mitsubishi Galant. Not a particularly successful or reliable car. Now of course one anecdote is not the data, but think about it in general: a less reliable VW, made from cheaper materials. No, no, and no.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Poverty spec watered down VWs? We already have those. Only foreign VW we need is the Scirocco.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The Scirocco is the last car VW needs to bring over. A more expensive two door Golf/GTI that competes in price with pony cars? Nevermind, I want to see them bring it over so it can be as successful as the Eos.

        • 0 avatar
          pbxtech

          I drove to my local VW dealership to look at the EOS for my wife, who wants a convertible. A hardtop, mid-sized, FWD convertible would allow for four seasons driving in the Midwest. It would have been two cars in one. At $36K to start, we settled on a Mazda 6 and a used convertible. It may be a great car, but I did not even sit in it.

      • 0 avatar
        Demetri

        I could get down with some Polo GTI if the price was right.

    • 0 avatar
      Mattias

      Should rebadge the Skodas to replace the junky North American Jetta and Passat. Skoda isn’t even sold in a majority of countries

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        I think either that strategy would work well, or alternately they could re-content the Jetta and Passat and put VW back in the semi-luxury brand range and position Skoda as the competitor to Honda/Toyota/Hyundai/Ford/etc. I think either way would be smarter than continuing to engineer US-specific stuff that’s cheapened more than the Skodas are.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Would be nice if Truth about Cars got a U.S. writer , writing about overseas vehicles with some basic knowledge of those vehicles? Sounds like a 15yr olds excursion to the Smithsonian Space Centre

    • 0 avatar
      marjanmm

      Exactly. Bigger, more reliable and cheaper than equivalent VWs. Extremely conservatively styled which judging by this blog is exactly what is needed for success in US.

  • avatar
    jmo

    Toyota Century and any Citroën.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Now we know where the tooling for the VW Eos went.

  • avatar
    DanyloS

    Doug, Your living in Philly/NoLibs is having an affect. The 308cc would be great all over the city or most cities, small streets/tight turns, etc. But once on the highways or general middle america the little car doesnt stand a chance.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    There are no hydropneumatic-suspension Citroens in production anymore, but we need hydropneumatic suspension in the US. Badly. It would be perfect on our roads. Applied to a giant, cabin-cruiser-like sedan, it would also give Deadweight the car he really wants.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Subaru Levorg 2.0DIT, also known as the WRX wagon we can’t have. Why are only the Japanese and Europeans allowed to go fast *and* carry a ton of stuff at the same time?

    • 0 avatar
      mike89

      “Why are only the Japanese and Europeans allowed to go fast *and* carry a ton of stuff at the same time?”

      A V8 powered truck is faster and can carry a lot more stuff than most wagons. And you can get one for less than what we euros pay for a poverty-spec grey Golf diesel with a manual and hubcaps.

      And don’t even make me start talking about VAT, taxes on displacement, emissions or power figures (depending on the country), fuel prices, road sizes, lack of parking places,…

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      CVT only… they can keep it.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Also, the A4 and A6 Avants should come back here.

      • 0 avatar
        manny_c44

        Yes the a4 and a6 avants are wonderful! I guess there are a lot still on the used market but not in manual.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        And the 5-series wagon. Baffles me that the BMW honchos have admitted that the 5GT is an abject failure in the US (and steals more profitable 7-series sales when it does sell), the new 3-wagon is actually selling decently, and they STILL won’t bring over the 5ver wagon. Price it higher than the X5 if need be. Some of us would still buy one. Certainly more than 5GTs!

        And finally, the C-class wagon to round out the Euro wagons.

        I figure we have 5-10 more years before CUV-fatigue sets in, and we see a resurgence in actual wagons as the hot new thing.

      • 0 avatar
        Fred

        Not to mention the A3 Sportback (aka wagon), and don’t forget the manual box.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      “Why are only the Japanese and Europeans allowed to go fast *and* carry a ton of stuff at the same time?”

      We did have the Dodge Magnum and the CTS-V Wagon. Both faster than a WRX Wagon and I don’t think either Japan or Europe had them.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I would have said the Holden Commodore Sportwagon a few years ago, but the years have caught up to Zeta.

    The Cactus would sure be interesting.

  • avatar
    SilverCoupe

    I came across an Audi A5 Sportback a couple years ago in Nice. As an A5 owner, I did a double take when I walked by it. My A5 is the first non-hatchback I have owned since the ’64 Riviera, but the lack of a hatch has not been a problem. On the other hand, I have never owned a four door, so I guess I would not really have gone for the Sportback had it been available.

    It is fun seeing all the Peugeots over there, though. My father in law owned what was probably one of the last running Peugeots in the Philadelphia area many years ago.

  • avatar
    colin42

    Mazda 6 Wagon
    Skoda Octavia Wagon
    Actually almost any midsize wagon that can be sold for <$25000 (i.e. 1 size bigger than the Golf wagon)

    and
    Ford S-Max

    • 0 avatar

      Agree on midsize wagons <25k.

      None of the cars of today bear any resemblance in appearance or virtues to their counterparts from my youth, with the possible exception of the Corvette. I’d love a Peugeot 404, but the 308cc is no 404.

      That said, it’s a good looking car by today’s (admittedly very low) standards, and it’s a bit different from the automotive hoi polloi. So bring it on. If TrueDelta.com ends up recommending it, if it’s fun to drive, and if it comes to these shores with a clutch, I might even buy one.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      Hear, hear. And while the Accord estate wouldn’t break the $25K mark, the Toyota Avensis or Hyundai i40 probably would. However, none of these would meet Doug’s requirement that the vehicle do well in the NA market. It kills me as a wagon driver, but you couldn’t give away wagons here due to silly style objections, mostly from women.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        No. You can’t give wagons away here, because SUVs are more practical and nicer to drive for most people. People in the snow belt like the ground clearance. Young families like the easy child/stuff loading height. Old people like the high hip point. Everyone likes the higher view and status vs a sedan or minivan. The added handling benefits of a wagon vs a CUV are overblown and irrelevant to most people. Aside from gas mileage, which is beginning to converge, there’s no valid reason for the wagon over the CUV… which is why Toyota and Honda killed the Camry/Accord wagons almost 20 years ago and essentially replaced them with small CUVs.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Stop making so much sense. The brown diesel wagon mafia is going to put a horse head in your bed.

          I’d say they’d throw you in the back of a diesel Mazda6 wagon, but unicorns don’t have trunks.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Buyers are fickle, they can be convinced anything is “good” for them.

            I saw an Encore with NY plates parked next to a rental Spark yesterday in a Crown Plaza parking lot and had a nice chuckle. Some retail buyer somewhere was convinced that sad looking Encore complete with lo-po motor was worth buying even though it is closely related to the much derided Spark (both Gamma II) and I’d bet dollars to doughnuts the same buyer wouldn’t even LOOK at a Spark.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The Encore is a distant relative of the Spark but it’s a much closer relative of the far more appealing Sonic.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Closer than one might think. All three start off with the same Gamma II platform but get different hats and content.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_Gamma_platform

        • 0 avatar
          ClutchCarGo

          It’s hard to do a compare because we don’t get wagons anymore, but in general I find that SUVs and CUVs offer less practical storage space than my Sable wagon. And I still prefer the ride in my 13 year old wagon to the ride I’ve experienced in any of my friends CUVs, so handling is not totally irrelevant yet. I will admit, tho, that part of my resistance to CUVs is the premium mfrs have been asking over the cars they’re based on, which is based on desirability and a big part of why mainstream wagons aren’t offered. Mfrs have little interest in serving my frugality.

          • 0 avatar
            shaker

            It’s all about visibility, seat height and the perception of safety that an SUV provides – the Soccer Moms and Boomers have voted with their dollars.

            Alas, poor Wagon, I knew it… once, long ago.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          One aspect Wagons are a lot more stable in a cornering situation, CUV’s do “trip over” going over roundabouts etc Yes I saw one doing that, first time for everything

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Subaru sells Outbacks pretty well (and for just under $25k MSRP)…

        I also fairly regularly see the wagon-esque A4 Avants from the last time Audi brought them here; wagon-y things are not entirely unpopular.

        • 0 avatar
          derekson

          In New England I see a ton of VW and Audi wagons. But I think we’re about the only place in the country that buys them. The A4 avant isn’t rare at all around here though. I’d imagine the NE dealers were probably not thrilled that Audi stopped bringing the Avants over, since they probably lost a significant number of sales to BMW/Mercedes/Volvo after that.

          • 0 avatar
            MBella

            They are very popular in the Northwest too. I just bought a 2000 E-Class wagon, and there were plenty of options.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      As much as I’ve loved the idea of the S-Max in the past, the new Edge is about the exact same size (both have a 112 inch wheelbase and 188 inch length). The Edge is about three inches taller, but who cares. There really isn’t any reason to buy an S-Max over the Edge anymore (maybe a manual transmission). The Edge has better engines, a better interior, looks better, and has AWD available. You say you are jonesing for the 2.5T powered S-Max? Oh, well the Edge has the 2.7TT from the F150.

      Edge = agressive looking S-Max with AWD and better engines. Now go buy your forbidden fruit.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Haven’t looked at the numbers but I’d bet the S-Max has significantly better interior volume than the Edge despite the similar exterior dimensions. I’d guess off the top of my head that the S-Max is as roomy inside as the pending Chinese-market extended-wheelbase Edge.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The 2015 Edge actually has more cubic feet of space behind the first row than the S-Max. 73.4 vs 70.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Huh. I wouldn’t have guessed that. I guess the higher roof makes up for the higher floor.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            To be fair to the S-Max, it’s still on the first generation. The 2nd gen S-Max comes out next year, and I expect it to be more roomy than the, very much improved, Edge. Specs haven’t been announced though.

            Since the Flex is going to die and the Explorer is going to a RWD set up, I think the S-Max/Galaxy would fit in the Ford US lineup. I’d just prefer that the Flex not die though.

          • 0 avatar
            derekson

            Do we actually know *what* RWD platform the next Explorer will be riding on? Is it an all new platform just for that and the Lincoln version?

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      Mazda6 wagon for sure. Even the Accord or Toyota wagons.
      As you say…if they can be had under the 25K price, at least to start.
      But the Honda, Mazda and Toyotas are the only possibilities since they have a decent dealer network here now and bringing over these should be no big deal.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      I got my TSX Sportwagon for 28g, so I’m thinking your <25g price is a bit of a dream, especially if imported from Europe with exchange rates and all.

  • avatar
    PandaBear

    BYD

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    A5 Sportback absolutely. It’s the best looking sedan Audi sells. Much more attractive than close cousin A4, more practical, and it doesn’t have the droopy A7 frog butt.

    I really hope they bring it here when the next gen A4 and A5 make their debuts. I would pay literally all the money for an S5 Sportback, it’s probably the ultimate car.

  • avatar

    Ford Ranger.

    Yes, I know, it’s almost as big as an F-150, blah blah blah. I had a US Ranger and liked it, I’d happily buy another Ford pickup but don’t want an F-150 like a million other people have.

    Also, the Land Cruiser that the rest of the world gets. And the Mitsubish Pajaro

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I want a Ranger too. I’m one of those people who must fit their vehicle in their garage. Ford will still get a sale from me because the SWB Expedition/Navigator fits.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Why would you choose a SWB Expedition rather than an EcoBoost Flex?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I wouldn’t until the Flex is gone. If someone doesn’t tow anything bigger than an 18-22 foot boat, or go off road, there is no point in buying a Expedition over a Flex.

          My plan is to keep our MkT until after the next Navigator comes out. Then I’ll buy a used current model Navi. I’d buy another MkT if I could find one then.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Jayco in Australia is making 5th Wheelers in Australia, that suit them from a tiny 21ft to 24ft. Generally like the Mazda BT 50′, they can tow any comfortably up to 26ft

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Ditto Mad Anthony.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      You do realize the global Ranger on sale now is NOTHING like the old compact Ranger, right? They didnt just stop making the truck here only to sell the exact same truck elsewhere.

      The new Ranger is a mid-size. If that’s what you want, then I have but one question for you: do you prefer the upscale Canyon or the Silverado-meets-Captiva Sport aka Chevy Colorado?

      • 0 avatar

        I’d prefer the option of a mid-size to only having the option of full-size. I carry enough stuff to justify having a pickup, but I also use it to commute and work in a city, so having a little more maneuverability and better gas milage would be a plus.

        I’ll probably consider the GM twins when I’m shopping for my next vehicle, although it would probably take some decent cash on the hood given the current price points.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @John Taurus
        It is also another ” metric tonne” capable as well, has a payload of. 2,200llb mininium. maximum 3,000lbs. As big as an early 2,000’s F150. So it is not small, Subaru Brat sized vehicles disappeared sometime ago here

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          Which is exactly why it would canabalize the highly profitabe F-150, or the other way around (making a US Ranger a flop). If you have a winner (F-Series) on your hands, especially one that youve dumped a TON of money into recently, why upstage it with something else?

          Ford wouldnt be able to price the Ranger any if at all cheaper than the F-150. Who, besides internet commenters who wouldnt buy either one in real life, would choose a less capable truck with nearly the same MPG and MSRP?!

          “Madanthony” refrenced the old Ranger, which is why I stated that the new one is not nearly the same truck whatsoever.

          His reasoning for not buying an F-150 is silly (with SO many varieties avalible), which is why I suggested the Canyon.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Not just not nearly, very different indeed. Yes it would be very similar to the current F150′

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N,
            You commented;
            “If you have a winner (F-Series) on your hands, especially one that youve dumped a TON of money into recently, why upstage it with something else?”

            If it’s a winner, then how can it be upstaged?

  • avatar
    theonewhogotaway

    Citroën C4 in all of its iterations (esp. like the Cactus)
    Dacia Duster
    Skoda Yeti

    could be a good start.

    Every wagon version of current cars that exists outside the US, but not in the US, would be even better

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      As I noted above, you can’t give away wagons in the US anymore unless it’s a high end make like MB or BMW, and even those are low volume. The style conscious buyers here will walk right past a Toyota/Honda/Hyundai wagon in order to pay more for the CUV version that usually has less practical space.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        I repeat, from above, “Subaru”.

        Outbacks sell pretty well – 11 or 12 thousand a month, for the past year or three.

        That’s not *immense*, but it’s … about as third as many as Toyota sells Corollas or Camrys.

      • 0 avatar
        theonewhogotaway

        Any idea how the Focus and Taurus wagons sold before they became unavailable? Lots of people buy hatches or SUVs instead of wagons these days. Look at wagons like Kia Soul. Manufactures have higher margins on SUVs and that’s why they do not sell wagons…

    • 0 avatar
      badreligion702

      Your avatar picture looks suspiciously like the pic I took of my car and use as my avatar.

  • avatar
    brianyates

    dal20402, the most recent CitroenC5 can still be purchased with their hydro pneumatic ssuspension,however,Citroen is not sure if the new one will have it. A shame in my view, my old DS 21 Pallas rode more comfortably than my 09 550i.

  • avatar
    ajla

    It is getting old but I’d still like the Strada to come over.

  • avatar
    Sceptic

    Lada Kalina

  • avatar
    Pch101

    “Focus instead on vehicles that would actually do well”

    The list will be very short if business sense enters into it. Perhaps the Ford Ecosport would work.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Since Fiesta production is moving to Thailand, maybe they’ll build some EcoSports at Cuautitlan.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Ford believes that it would cannibalize the Escape, so it probably won’t happen.

        • 0 avatar
          brn

          pch101, Ford is probably right. I’m not sure there’s room for both in the Ford lineup.

          • 0 avatar
            derekson

            Would they really overlap more than the HR-V and CR-V do? Or more than the Fiesta and Focus? The subcompact CUV market is definitely doing pretty well, so it seems weird that Ford wouldn’t have interest in competing there will a product that is basically already completed and would just need to be certified.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            I don’t get the sense that the current Ecoboost is really up to the spec of the new HR-V or CX-3. Ford would probably either have to price it as a loss leader, or risk having an Escape with cash on the hood end up cheaper. A repeat of the Contour/Taurus of the mid-90s.

            I strongly suspect they are designing the next one to overcome this issue.

            (Also, I’m not sure the Fiesta/Focus pairing in the US is a resounding success.)

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            They are in different size classes — the Ecosport is a foot shorter than the Escape. If there is a Ford that would lose sales from this, then it would probably be the Fiesta.

            If automakers should bet on anything these days, it should be crossovers. If I was Ford, I would dip my toe in the water and give it a try with the next model, so that it can be designed with federalization in mind.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            @pch101 If the relative pricing is anything close to what it is in Europe, the Ecosport won’t be attracting many Fiesta buyers. In the UK it starts $1,500 higher than the Focus.

            I don’t think US buyers will preferentially purchase a smaller car unless it’s perceived as premium. That’s not the case elsewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            US prices would necessarily be lower than they are in Europe. The HR-V would have to be a benchmark.

            The US subcompact market is small, but I would presume that more of it will want the higher seating position of a crossover. The trend is moving away from passenger cars.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            @Pch101 Sure, the absolute prices will be lower, but the relative prices typically don’t differ much.

            I doubt they could move a lot of Ecosports at HR-V prices, because the HR-V is a lot nicer. And I’m guessing they won’t be able to afford to price them a lot lower than the HR-V and still make a profit.

            Add to that the cost of federalizing a car never intended for sale here — that cost a fortune for the Fiesta — and cash on the hood of the Escape, and you’ve got a pretty narrow pool of buyers.

            The answer here is to make the next Ecosport a nicer car, which I suspect is their plan. Mulally said in early 2014 that the Ecosport would probably get here “eventually,” which I suspect means “when we replace the current one with a new one that actually makes sense for the USDM.”

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “I’m guessing they won’t be able to afford to price them a lot lower than the HR-V and still make a profit.”

            It’s intended to be a high-volume world car, so it would probably work on that basis. The US purchases would improve the capacity utilization and help with the cost amortization, as is typical with other subcompacts.

            “Add to that the cost of federalizing a car never intended for sale here…”

            As I noted, I would not recommend that. The next model could be designed with federalization in mind.

  • avatar
    catachanninja

    The ford ecosport and ranger both should find a home here.

  • avatar
    Demetri

    Suzuki Swift. I never could understand why Suzuki kept dragging their feet on bringing it over here before ultimately bailing on the American market. The unique styling at least gave it a chance for Suzuki to sell some units here, unlike the boring looking Kizashi and SX-4.

  • avatar
    ccd1

    Exige S Roadster

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Mazda6 wagon.
    With or without the diesel.
    I don’t understand why it isn’t here. I don’t care is they only sold a small portion of 6 as wagons, it still should be available. How in hell does this effect cost and such just to offer it even if only a few sell?

  • avatar
    Jimal

    A-M-A-R-O-K

  • avatar
    jimbo1126

    As the 308CC is sold in Mexico (starting around $32k U.S.), I’ve seen a couple here in Houston. Nice, but I think the Cascada will be a more saleable product here.

  • avatar

    It’s very difficult to imagine a vehicle that could be a success, however modest. Doug’s little convertible could be an example, but GM is already promising us a new one (idiots at Consumer Reports think it’s going to compete with MX-5, but really it’s exactly like 308CC — it’s even based on Cruze). What else is underserved? Small sporty car? Just ask people for whom BR-Z is underpowered. Small sporty car with hard-blown engine to replace EVO? Well, Ford is bringing RS already.

    There’s a bunch of interesting people movers around the world, but the failure of Mazda 5 pretty much puts a stake through that.

    Okay, Amarok, may be. If it were someone other than WV, it could finally put Frontier out to pasture.

    But it’s difficult. I guess the only car I think may have a small chance is Daihatsu Rush. It’s a bit like Suzuki Grand Vitara in design, and it would compete against RAV4 in the same way Lexus GX competes against RX. It’s unclear, however, if the public sees it that way, and Rush’s longitudial architecture is an atavism like Jeep Grand Cherokee.

  • avatar
    cpthaddock

    I suspect the answer you weren’t looking for is price. The same thing that affects VW sales volume. These are the cars that put the context to German luxury car pricing.

    Without European mainstream vehicle pricing underpinning them, the they rely on magic pixie dust, well fed and “watered” journalists and a heavy, heavy dose of ungulate produced prejudice to justify their premium.

    Don’t believe me? Raw, asinine, racist prejudice runs rampant against superior but uncommon vehicles in what passes for a fair amount of UK auto journalism!

  • avatar
    akatsuki

    I always wanted the Alfa 147 – looked so much cooler than other compacts (e.g. Mazda 3). A bit of a rattlebox.

    Peugeot 407 Coupe was also good looking… no idea how it drove

    Renault Kangoo was a rough but kind of fun dorky car.

    Lots of kei cars

    Some holdens and Ford aussie products would have done well.

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    I think Citroen could do a decent business in NAFTA if they federalized some of their DS cars. With the euro in the toilet, selling some excess production capacity for some suddenly-valuable greenbacks could make sense.

    They would just need to scape off enough upper-income Mini, Volvo, ex-Saab, and even some “over it” German customers to make it work. At the very least, they’d sell a lot of SUVs.

  • avatar
    carguy

    I know I’d probably be the only customer for this but I’d love to see the BMW 1 series RWD hot hatch on sale here in the US.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Question is kind of a red herring, methinks. US auto market is probably the least restrictive in the world. No displacement taxes, easy credit, at-cost gasoline. Not to mention we have a huge range of landscapes and climates. So if a vehicle fails or isn’t viable here, but it is elsewhere, you can probably point to some asinine, byzantine regulation that has forced folks into it instead of what we would choose here.

    308 CC would bomb here just as the Eos did. I think the fact that it’s a rental car kind of says it all.

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      All this is true, but only after you get through the U.S. somewhat unique safety and emissions standards, which are all but cost prohibitive unless you know you’re going to sell enough volume.

    • 0 avatar
      Beerboy12

      And the chicken tax…

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      sportyaccordy, me thinks so too, a red herring.

      I believe that any and ALL foreign cars should be sold in the US market that can pass muster IF there is a market/demand for them.

      But this topic makes for good click-bait.

      Suzuki, anyone? Eh? Renault?

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      The US market is great for buyers, it sucks for sellers. Somewhat randomly different than elsewhere regulation, a physically large country with a widely dispersed population that makes support hugely expensive, and a populace that is used to buying cars by the pound at deep, deep discount prices. Good luck with all that.

      I think the ultimate solution is simply allowing some amount of personal import of non-conforming cars. Say one every 5 years per person or something. Then buy whatever you want.

  • avatar
    Menloguy

    Ford Focus station wagon. With the Euro getting weaker against the dollar, Ford can export a small volume of the wagon version with the standard US-spec 2.0 engine to the US from its Saarlouis, Germany plant like they are planning to do with the RS version.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The wagon isn’t going to sell at the same price point as the RS. They’ll build the RS on demand and sell them for $40K. Plus, Ford would rather sell you an Escape or C-Max.

  • avatar
    z9

    I haven’t really followed what VW is doing with it but the previous generation Golf Plus is kind of a cool car. Just a Golf, but taller. As a tall guy who prefers small cars and has learned (via the Ford C-Max) that sitting upright is quite comfortable, something even smaller (and for heaven’s sake lighter) would be awesome. I suspect the American Tall but Small market is not very significant.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      It’s a market that’s developing here now. The Buick Encore is basically this type of car, for example.

      I believe the Mk VII version of the Golf Plus is now called the Golf SV (for SportVan).

  • avatar
    bludragon

    Compact hatchbacks: 1 series hatch, civic hatch (which appears to be coming for MY 2016 now).
    One mid-size wagon: Accord, Mazda6 or Passat.

    Or perhaps I just need to finally get on the CUV and SUV train.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      Unfortunately the only 1 series the US market is likely to see is the new FWD sedan based on the Mini platform. I assume the RWD hatch will go away even in Europe as all the 1-series cars shift to that platform (along with the X1).

  • avatar
    gt

    I vote for the grand c-max. Even if it were only a 5 passenger model, the more practical shape and sliding rear doors are a huge improvement. In my opinion, the grand c-max is the model that should have been sold here in the first place.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      It was going to be. Along with a gas powered regular C-Max. Then the ATVM (Green) Loans happened and we have the C-Max Hybrid and Energi.

    • 0 avatar
      Felis Concolor

      After several months of driving around in my SO’s C-Max, I’d love it even more to see the 3-row version as an option in this market.

      I still want to see Ford’s B-Max brought over; it’s a Fiesta with a useful back half.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I’d like the three row version too. However, Ford decided that the Transit Connect wagon was a cheaper way to do it. It certainly isn’t as refined as the C-Max.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      Yes! I run into young families that express interest in my C-Max, but need a third row.

  • avatar
    Onus

    UAZ Hunter and the 70 series Toyota landcruiser. Both with diesels of course.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Onus,
      I did consider a Landcruiser pickup and I have driven the V8 diesel Landcruisers. They are magic.

      My decision to buy a BT50 was driven by the fact that the 70 Series are not the best on road vehicle, like a Wrangler.

      They are as tough as nails and as capable or even more so than a Wrangler off road. The Wrangler loses out with endurance and durability.

      When I lived in the Northern Territory it seemed every other vehicle was a 70 Series.

      • 0 avatar
        Onus

        Al,

        That’s my thoughts on the 70s series. Its built solid. Its simple. Its durable. What more could you want in a truck?

        But at the same time driving that around can get really tiring. I drove my 1990 f250 daily for 3 years. Let’s just say it takes its toll on you.

        That v8 diesel sounds wonderful.I believe it was originally created for the tundra. But the idea was killed after the global financial issues. Ford also had an v8 created that now finds its home in land rovers. The ram v8 is now going in the titan xd.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @Onus,
          In 2012 when I was in Vegas for a few weeks for work I had a F-250 SuperDuty with the PowerStroke, among the many vehicles. It was a damn nice pickup. The build quality was the only let down.

          I drove it everywhere, up to Mt Charleston to the ski joint, where there was snow and down in Vegas an hour away it was over 80 degrees.

          Hoover Dam, that was great. We drove out past the Vegas Nascar Raceway and towards Utah for 60 miles or so then turned right down through some red rock National Park. I even saw on the side of the road FCA’s Ram’s mascot! One of those mountain goats, with horns and all.

          We ended up in some fake Northern Italian town complete with a lake and covered bridge and had lunch.

          The Strip was sh!t after a few days. I had much more fun on Freemont St. That was great.

          Took a chopper ride into the Canyon for a Champagne lunch. Now that was great.

          I noticed when we left Vegas we overnighted in Honolulu and the vehicles in Hawaii are smaller overall. That was another great night. Dukes on Waikiki.

          Then the next day we made it to Townsville in QLD and spent the night in town at bars, clubs and strippers.

          I love my job!

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do think the US market should be opened up with a more efficient system of regulations and controls.

    This then would allow the consumer to decide what is and what isn’t viable in the US market.

    Australia has shown that even a small number of a particular brand/model is viable at a given price if the consumer is prepared to pay for the vehicles.

    It’s a pity you guys can’t even get current grey imports. That would be a good start as a litmus to see what the US consumer wants.

    Like many nations the US market is driven by affluence and regulatory controls that do influence the market makeup.

    First up, the removal of the chicken tax is a must. The alignment of fuel and emission standards is a must.

    The US has the potential to have the most varied vehicle market globally due to its market size and economic standing.

    The US the average of over 270 000 vehicle per brand/model. It’s nearest rival is 60 000 per brand/model. This alone indicates the US can comfortably increase the number of brands/models to the consumer by 50%.

    But, that means the UAW, US manufacturers, government have to push for change.

    Let the consumers decide, not the UAW, business and government. America is the land of the free, not constrained.

  • avatar
    blueflame6

    I am convinced that there would be sufficient sales to justify selling big, luxury Citroens in the US. If Maserati, of all companies, can make it work there’s no reason you couldn’t find Citroen buyers. The Frenchness of it is the attraction for Eurosnobs(*), going too far trying to “adapt it to American tastes” would be this plan’s downfall.

    (*) I don’t exclude myself from this.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I think it would be a challenge to sell them at luxury prices–the suspension is fantastic, but the rest of the car is not quite refined to luxury levels. You’d have to look at a VW CC or Hyundai Genesis in-between pricing model.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      Citroen would probably have more luck selling the DS sub-brand than the main line of cars. They’ve been killing it in China, for example. The US market isn’t necessarily similar, but they could attempt to go after a lot of the customers that Volvo/Saab/VW have lost for various reasons (going too far upmarket/dying/going too far downmarket, respectively).

  • avatar
    lpolyak68

    My first post!

    Toyota Avanza, its a rear wheel drive minivan with a manual transmission I saw in Mexico

    Lada Kalina NFR, sub $14K hot hatch. There is a turbo version (200hp) coming soon for a couple grand more.

  • avatar
    vwgolf420

    I’d like VW Polo and the VW Up. The Citroën DS3 and Citroën DS5… One of the big disappointments on my trip to England was when I rented a car in London to take on a day trip to Stonehenge and Salisbury and the people at the rental agency called and told me I would be getting a DS3. When I got there, it was gone and they have me a Mercedes C Class instead. I must be the first person on earth disappointed in being bumped up to a Benz.

  • avatar
    1998redwagon

    personally, i think we need a golf, jsw (excuse me a gsw!) and/or passat wagon with 4 motion.

    yes, yes, yes, preferably w a manual and in diesel. brown is already an option.

    tease me all you want but i already own a passat wagon 5mt and a passat sedan 6mt diesel. i would have bought a new passat wagon if they made one in 2013 when i was looking. but nobody makes a midsize wagon anymore.

  • avatar
    RS

    Swap out some VW’s for Seat’s.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    “I saw a well-equipped Amarok in Istanbul, a land of no pickup trucks, and couldn’t help but wonder why this vehicle isn’t also sold in America”

    The base sticker price of a 177 hp Amarok with an AT in Germany is over $30k + tax. VW would have to discount it substantially for the US market, and would not be able to sell enough of them to make up for the lack of margin. A total money loser.

    If the small truck jihadists would pay European prices for these things and live with the low horsepower ratings, then perhaps it would make sense. But they won’t.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Psych101
      Again, you are presenting data and information that is misleading and loaded. I do know you will state your information is accurate for Germany, but why not pick a country that has a relatively similar tax base, other than the 25% chicken tax which stops the Amarok from coming into the US.

      Here in Australia we can buy a 4×4 turbo diesel Amarok single cab for $27 000USD. Remember the Amarok is the most expensive midsize pickup on our market.

      http://www.volkswagen-commercial.com.au/en/configurator.html

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @BAFO – The same thing that “stops” the Amarok, stops the Scirocco, Polo and numerous others. It’s what’s called “business sense”. Your kind of *thinking* would run a business into the ground ASAP!!!

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @Exceptionally DiM,
          A cut and paste, I suppose this guy lies.

          ………………………………………………….

          At the Los Angeles auto show, Jonathan Browning, CEO of Volkswagen Group of America, said the German automaker would seriously consider bringing the Volkswagen Amarok stateside if the U.S. government killed its 50-year-old Chicken Tax.

          Read more: http://wot.motortrend.com/1312_volkswagen_u_s_ceo_amarok_could_come_here_if_chicken_tax_goes_away.html#ixzz3WI8AELxP

          ………………………………………………….

          You are correct it’s business sense. Imagine if all the chicken takeouts in the US had a 25% tax added. Do you think the hamburger joints would complain?

          How many will start up a chicken joint.

          They would call it “the chicken tax”.

          Use google, you might actually make some great contributions. Anecdotal evidence from you Winnepeg apartment isn’t very accurate.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @BAFO – So what’s the *official* Scirroco “excuse”? Polo excuse?

          What about a simple “We Just Don’t WANNA!”, and they leave it at that? How would that fly with stock holders, dealers and VW fanboys/girls??

          So the excuses start flying. I’d ask VW how much_smaller_OEMs (especially at the time), including Mitsu, Isuzu, Mazda, Datsun, Toyota, etc, did it in the ’80s? But gargantuan VW Can NOT???

          Yeah, not all OEMs want to throw everything they have at North America. They have to choose carefully.

          So ask yourself why they would trade low-margin autos for their current high-margin offerings in the US?

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @DiM,
            Use f#cking google and find out.

            You always ask questions, when you must be on the net like everyone else.

            How hard is it??

            The sooner you learn to use the net to gain answers.

            The only reason I can see for the way you interact is to troll. Why else would you come out with some of the dumbest sh!t here.

            Use the net and do a little research.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – They’re what’s called “rhetorical” questions. There’s likely not an official excuse for every auto that OEMs decline to sell in North America, but if there is, I don’t care to hear it. I know it PR bullsh!t regardless.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @DiM,
            Why do you use rhetorical questions?

            This means you don’t have a clue.

            You will then waste massive amounts of cyber space arguing over a rhetorical question that you are clueless about.

            Is this trolling or is this not.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – You make them rhetorical. You’ll obvious never answer simple questions that prove your asinine theories stup!d. I’ll put them out there anyway, you sidestep with the ad hominem as usual, maybe throw in some *UAW* and *trolling* comments and that’s that.

  • avatar
    MR2turbo4evr

    Hilux and 70 Series Landcruiser.

  • avatar
    readallover

    Fiat Strada
    Ford Ecosport
    Ford Falcon Ute
    Holden Commodore: Calais and Ute

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Anything that isn’t a CUV or some kind of city car, really.

    Bonus points if it has crazy performance or legitimate 4 wheel drive.

  • avatar
    islander800

    Peugeots, definitely.

    On our trip staying in France, we rented a Peugeot 208, 4-door direct-injection diesel 5-speed (a sub-compact by American standards), and it was amazing. It put my Honda Fit to shame in all respects: the steering wheel was like from a Formula 1 car, quick ratio, gobs of torque from a smooth sub-2-litre diesel, remarkably so when accelerating to pass at 120 kmh, handled like it was on rails, great seats, interior appointments of Volkswagen quality, and it got about 50 mpg on combined town and country driving.

    I’d trade my car in a minute for one of those if they were available.

    My wish? Sergio would partner up on a distributorship arrangement with Peugeot to sell and service through the Fiat/Alfa Romeo dealership network in North America. I say North America, since I’m in Canada…

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    Renault should set up shop here. They can bring the Clio Sport and the Duster with them, possibly even the Logan. Most of their models are well suited to the US market. Spacious on the inside, firm but absorbent ride, extremely safe, economical and surprisingly reliable.
    Also, I would take a Holden Ute in a heartbeat.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Beerboy12,
      Renault have been making inroads here. For Renault to supply vehicles isn’t as hard as one would think, considering most Nissan and Renaults share much of the mechanicals, even with some MBs.

      Here’s a Renault product we will be getting. I just hope the front end isn’t what depicted in the image. Uck!

      http://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/renault-ute-coming-in-2016-20150209-139mcr.html

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Novo Uno stick please. I will lease it.

  • avatar
    dtremit

    Weird Japanese minivans.

  • avatar
    Pecci

    Besides Scirocco, I was really attracted to Alfa’s MiTo & Guilietta cruising about the Italian countryside.

    I guess you figured it out. I want cars here that I can actually afford.

  • avatar
    wmba

    My experience is that all cars at reasonable prices ($40K or less) have pretty much turned into anodyne blobmobiles. Even the GTI I drove was hardly a slam dunk in the fun-to-drive department – I struggle to equate my feelings about it with the gushing reviews.

    So, I hardly think that bringing over a bunch of underwhelming Euro cars is something to dream about, especially as the only ones really missing are odd Renaults, Peugeots and Citroens. Our market has a sampling of VWs, so how is some Skoda or Seat going to be so much different that it matters? Is a Kei car suitable for markets outside Japan? Only in dreams.

    We are a bunch of cheapskates, so VW leaves off the port injection part of the dual fuel injection that is part of the Euro/Global GTI, Golf R, A3/S3 experience. And for good measure, VW puts in a six year old touch-screen, instead of the nice ones they sell elsewhere. And they’re probably correct to do so, because the moaning and groaning that would ensue if they priced us up a real one would be immense. How much for that little s**tbox? is the standard response from North Americans used to driving around in low-rent-upholstered big bags of wind like the typical mid-sizer or flagship-sized trucks.

    I couldn’t care less about the distinction between wagons and CUVs, endless arguments about Jeeps, frame or unibody debates. The average person has their own set of prejudices about vehicles, not much of which has relevance to enthusiasts who are actually awake. The fanboi forums show dedication to marques for no apparent reason that ever struck me as being particularly valid – same arguments I used to hear in the 9th grade back in 1959. Apparently I’m supposed to believe some make or other is better than another, just because.

    And then there are some Australians, mad as hatters, who come on this forum trying to get people to buy some cack old global Ranger, recently restyled, as if it were some sort of automotive renaissance.

    As they say, the grass is always greener over the next hill. and the next, etc. etc., ad infinitum. Hope springs eternal. Dreams never die. And when the rubber hits the road Joe and Jill Average increasingly buy that paragon of efficiency, an pickup truck, a Wrangler for the adventure they’ll never take, or some lame CUV.

    The manufacturers know how we actually vote with our dollars about 100 times better than we do. And that’s why the choice we have is what it is.

  • avatar
    cpu

    Hilux.

    http://www.toyota.com.au/hilux/specifications/sr5-4×4-extra-cab-pick-up-turbo-diesel-manual?WT.ac=VH_HiLux_RangeSpecs_SR54x4Extra-CabPick-upTurbo-DieselManual_Specs

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      To compete with, what? The Tacoma? It already leads its segment (such as it is), so why muddy the waters when Americans clearly prefer the watered down Taco TuRD.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Ford Ka, Fiesta 3 door, Opel Adam, Peugeot RCZ, Honda S660, VW Sirocco.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Agree on all, but realistily, the Ka is for emerging markets (read: cheap) and the North American press would hang it from the highest tree, even if it came free with the purchase of a bag of chips and a 32oz drink. Same story for the EcoSport others have mentioned.

      “So what if its cheaper than the MSRP of a 95 Ford Aspire, the plastics rub my arm wrong! I want premium materials, I just dont want to pay for them!”

      Kei (S660) cars would be great….for a few. But they wouldnt sell nearly enough to justify federalizing them (not to mention having to add safety equipment and features Americans cant seem to live without, making them weigh as much as a Civic while being slower than a bicycle with a flat tire).

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    VW Minivan of some variety, can’t recall their names right now. More wagons and, I think it’s time for the French to return here.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    All the Keis.

    The virtual Mahindra diesel compact pickup.

    Pinzgauers.

    Octavia and Duster.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I would like to see an end to the UJSC (Universal Japanese Small Car) hegemony.

    I think the Fiat 500s are a step in that direction.

    I’ve been hoping that since Buick is likely to use more Opel models in their lineup we’d see the Adam over here, however it seems that the next Chevy Spark will be a derivative of the Opel Karl at least. Note to GM: Don’t make me look outside the “family”… I’d go for an Adam. I can’t be the only one.

    I’d love to see the small FWD pickup trucks that are popular in Mexico, Central and South America make a stand here in the US. The domestic manufacturers all have them, I’m hoping that one of them gets the guts to sell one here. I would have thought that FCA would have been bold enough to do it. But, with the release of the Colorado/Canyon, maybe the response will be enough to encourage GM to sell their FWD mini pickup truck here, too. If nothing else, it would help with CAFE.

    Many Renault-Nissan vehicles share components, why no Renaults here? I know they had a deplorable reputation after the AMC merger, but I understand they’re better now. I would love to see the Clio here and the new Twingo. But I wonder if the new Smart ForTwo precludes that now.

    There’s a Fiat I think would do well here (Panda), but as it may be disguised as a Jeep, that may be a no go. At least get real and send over the 500L Living model (but give it a better name), seven seats along with the recently announced torque converter six speed autobox would get folks to take notice.

    I don’t know if it makes sense, but it would be interesting to see how Lada would do in the US. The Kalina looks interesting, and the evegreen Niva (not the Chevy version, although that seems pretty decent, too).

    Just my short list after several Porters this evening…

  • avatar
    velvet fog

    None of them, they’re all EuroTrash piles of shit and anyone who wants one should move to that socialist shithole.

    Just like that hot girl from high school, they are the forbidden fruit you want until you get it and realize they are batshit crazy and there is a reason they are on their fourth marriage.

  • avatar
    krayzie

    Subaru Levorg

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    You know what I’d like? I’d like for all Canada-spec Honda Accord trims to be available for sale in the US. Especially since they’re already built in the US. Thanks for nothing, Honda.

  • avatar
    deanst

    The Peugeot Bipper Teepee- just for the ridiculous name, and the Renault Zoe – so that I could get a nameplate for my daughter.

    But seriously, I would like any manual transmission station wagon or hot hatch. And the Opel Adam.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      The problem is that “Bipper Tepee,” as ridiculous as it sounds in English, doesn’t sound half as ridiculous as it does when pronounced in French.

  • avatar
    PeteRR

    Land Rover Defender double cab.

  • avatar
    mechaman

    I’d like to see Opel here on its’ own, not as a disguised Buick – no kick against Buick, tho. I’m still mulling over a low miles Opel(Saturn)Astra. When the Publisher’s Clearing House people show up with my check … might buy one as a spare …

  • avatar
    vent-L-8

    Citroen DS-9, Citroen cactus and Mercedes R class Marco Polo Westfalia camper.

  • avatar
    STS_Endeavour

    The Citroen C6 (if they ever fire up production again), Rover 75 (again if the dead ever get brought back to life), and the Ford Falcon. Definitely the Ford Falcon.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      Isn’t the next Falcon just going to be a rebadged Fusion/Mondeo?

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @derekson
        Falcon name will die at the end of local production. Ford has a major problem here with sedans as the Mondeo is not selling

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          The next Falcon should be based on a Mustang. It only seems fitting, but a RWD sedan would fill the vacant hole left in the Ford/Lincoln lineup. Not necessarily a 3-series fighter, though it shouldn’t have to be German, Cadillac, pickup or ???, if you want the upgrade from FWD sedans.

          And a V8 option wouldn’t kill anyone either. Not Necessarily with 450+ hp, but with a manual trans option, even if it costs more.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Worst possible choice. A Mustang is a tiny “sportish” sedan ,nothing like the almost NY Taxi sized Falcon. Ford is killing the Falcon nameplate when local production stops

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Ford is killing the Falcon, but did they permanently retire the namesake? The Mustang chassis can be stretched, but who says taxis have to be fullsize sedans? Or RWD for that matter. The Tahoe and Expedition can do the job though. Point is fleet is/was about the only takers for fullsize sedans.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Yes nameplate gone

  • avatar
    darex

    Audi A1

  • avatar
    burnbomber

    Second the reply requesting the compact Mahindra pickup.

    What a concept. A basic compact pickup truck to compete here in the land of F-150s and super sized hatchbacks.

    An economical compact pickup has a universal appeal and I don’t even understand why that market hasn’t been filled for years. One good model, if it gets good reviews from the market, will sell well.

    Our elected government’s sick regulations are getting in the way of progress.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Saangyong from Korea

  • avatar
    Forty2

    The Amarok would sell like mad here. Unsure about its baby-bro the Saveiro, but I saw both in Argentina and they’re pretty nice.

    http://carroecarros.com.br/nova-saveiro-2015/

  • avatar
    dwford

    Volvo V40.

  • avatar
    koshchei

    The Peugot 508 Estate. Great fuel economy, great ride, beautiful car. And you can get it with a diesel, in brown, and with a stick. What’s not to love?

  • avatar
    immortalsix

    Ford Everest.

    Spiritual successor to the Jeep XJ.

    A real-deal, midsize SUV with way more nuts than almost anything out there.

    Body-on-frame, solid rear axle, electronic locking diff, 3.2L I5 diesel, 6MT, 7 seats, holy shit.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    Ive said it before, and this article brings it up again: (old)GM shouldve sold Saturn (including name, logo and dealer network but not the GM-ized Spring Hill factory) to PSA.

    PSA couldve phased in their federalized models to replace the terrible Oldsm….I mean Opel… no wait, Saturns they were selling. Take this car for example, the 308CC, it wouldve made an excellent Saturn with very few alterations. The Cactus would be a fantastic vehicle for the marque. The kind of people who bought Saturns wouldve loved these small, quirky cars.

    Remember the Saturn Homecoming? Of course pick another place besides Spring Hill (new North American PSA/Saturn factory in the southern US?), and that wouldve been a thing again, and with good reason. Classic Saturns (ION excluded) would be welcome as well as the new PSA-sourced cars.

    I believe it was a great missed oppertunity by both companies. Didnt GM and PSA have some sort of partnership at (or around) that time?

  • avatar

    I didn’t read through all the comments (sorry), especially one in which the nature of the question will generate the same answers as always. But here we go, at the tail on all comments and say frpm Fiat: Punto and Panda,introduce you to subcompact goodness.
    And Doug, the 308 is roughly equivalente to the Focus and Golf. It may or not fall apart around you after 6 months, but not that crazy a deaç. Put a 2 . 0 in it. Let her rip. wpuld do fine

  • avatar
    baconator

    The VW Polo would do well here, I think – it’s very refined and happy at US highway speeds. I have several friends that looked at the new Golf and thought it was too big.

    BMW 1-series hatchback.

    Pagani Zonda.

    Piaggio Ape.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      I wish they’d bring the Polo GTi, but guess the business case would be rather weak. If it were around the FiST price, I’d for sure be interested. The Ford ST twins come off as a tad bit “busy” inside and I like the relative tidiness of VW interiors in general, as well as the slightly more conservative exterior styling.

      And the Toyota Land Cruiser pick up. I swear I see them all over the place here in Saudi Arabia and they just look like what a truck should look like. High ground clearance, appropriate size and a low liftgate and bed. Yep, which means it’d never sell in the US…that, and the 121400 SAR starting price ($32,000 and change).

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “I drove it around Malta for three days and returned it with a quarter tank because I believe, after exhaustive study, that the entire country does not possess a single gas station.”

    I typed in “gas station Malta” and Google shows me seven options.

    “…some very cool Peugeot Center Caps, one of which I stole.”

    So basically you’re just kind of a dick American. Thanks.

  • avatar
    Slow_Joe_Crow

    Would this include used cars? I’ve wanted a Peugeot 106 Rallye for years. Also big Citroen station wagons and small MPVs like the Picasso or the early Fiat Multipla with the bug eyes.
    I also want some big stuff, a Ford Transit Crew Van and a Land Rover Defender.

  • avatar
    Blaz

    You should get the new Suzuki Vitara.


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