By on April 15, 2015

Ford Chihuahua Plant in Mexico

This Friday, Ford will announce a $2.5-billion investment plan for two of its factories in Mexico.

According to Reuters, Ford will spend $1.3 billion to expand its engine production facility in northern Chihuahua for two new diesels, with the remaining $1.2 billion to go a transmission plant in Guanajuato. A government representative said the Chihuahua investment would create 4,000 jobs as a result.

The announcement will be made in Mexico City in celebration of Ford’s 90th anniversary in Mexico, with Mexico president Enrique Peña Nieto set to attend. Ford’s previous major investment occurred in 2008, when the automaker spent $3 billion to update the Cuautitlan plant for production of the Fiesta.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

101 Comments on “Ford To Announce $2.5B Investment In Mexico On 90th Anniversary...”


  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    ‘Merica.

    At this rate, one of the Japanese or German automakers will be the most “domestic” US automaker, as Ford, GM & FCA all continue to aggressively outsource their already broad assembly AND component fabrication.

    One knows it’s pretty ripe when Ford F Series & Chevy Silverado pickups are either hecho en Mexico and/or a huge % of their components are (next up: the 60% Mexico, 30% China, 10% USA Parts Content “American” Pickup Truck, assembled in Chihuahua).

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      You must have missed the end of the article that talked about how Toyota is spending $1 Billion to build a new factory in Mexico.

      Where’s the Kermit the Frog sipping tea meme when you need it…

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I’m going to take a SWAG bet that Honda builds more of the parts that go into their sold-in-U.S. vehicles, and further, assembles more of those same vehicles in the U.S., as a % of overall vehicles sold here, than Ford, GM or FCA.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          *

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I would agree with you. Considering that Ford builds it’s best selling car in Mexico (and the US) and one of it’s best selling CUVs in Canada, there is no way they will have the same American parts % of Honda. They also have a different supply chain strategy. Fusions are being built in Mexico and the US with English and Spanish engines. Soon, those engines will be built in Mexico and Cleveland.

          Let’s not get into a Mexican assembly debate because EVERYONE is opening factories down there. The Japanese, Germans, and Americans.

          • 0 avatar
            morbo

            I for one appreciate that these Mexican car assembly jerbs will help mitigate the need for illegal immigrants to come North. Better for them and better for us… well, those of us outside the rust belt.

            As a frequent driver of a 9 year old Hecho en Mexico Ford Fusion, I got no complaints about it.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            morbo, I know how you feel and I share much of the same sentiment.

            As a resident of the Land of the Free, the Home of the Brave, the Land of Enchantment and the abode of the Illegal Immigrants, I think that expanding jobs in Mexico is a very good thing.

            It will allow more illegal aliens to stay home instead of coming over here to look for jobs.

            Things really haven’t changed all that much since the days that the pioneers came to America, all of them looking for a better future.

            Job availability in Old Mexico is pretty dire. It is plentiful in the US with millions of jobs remaining vacant.

            In America. we have to import much of our labor LEGALLY because we don’t have enough smart Americans to fill those jobs. Those immigrants here ILLEGALLY do the work Americans are too proud to do.

            As far as the US auto industry is concerned, the UAW won’t leave the non-union employers in the South be, with their incessant efforts to unionize the workers, even if the workers do not want to be unionized or represented by the UAW.

            So, for those ingrates, moving production out of the US is the best answer for employers, new car buyers, Mexico and Mexican workers.

            I hope MORE automakers expand their production in Old Mexico, currently the lower labor cost alternative within the NAFTA zone.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            HDC, sometimes I wonder what parallel universe you live in, and how your observations could be so converse to my own.

            First, without Mexicans, both “legal” and “undocumented” working within the U.S., the economy here would literally shut down. They do many of the jobs Americans of any ethnicity, color, race or creed either can’t or won’t do (I have clients running asphalt crews in 100 degree heat who pay really well, yet could not survive if their Mexican employees weren’t available, as just one of many examples).

            Second, life and living standards in Mexico has gotten proportionately far better for Mexico’s middle class as their job opportunities & wages have risen at a far faster pace on a % scale (and in some cases, even in nominal terms) than that of much of America’s (remaining) middle & working classes over the last decade.

            In fact, median hourly wages for Mexican auto workers has risen to nearly $4.00 USD per hour, which is approximately 1000% higher than where they were a decade ago, while their American counterparts have seen an approximate 50% reduction in median wages over the same period.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            DW, maybe my views and observations are shaped by what I see around me every day.

            The Great State of New Mexico is the de facto portal for entry of illegal aliens to supply the rest of the US and parts of Canada.

            My state helps them along with drivers licenses, bank accounts, the right to buy and insure used cars, in order to move them along in the pipeline to the Eastern Blue States.

            There was a time not so long ago that New Mexico, or Arizona was as far as they got in the US.

            I myself have employed hundreds of illegals to help me with the maintenance, restoration and repair of the real estate property owned by my wife’s family.

            I have nothing against H1B immigrants but I firmly believe we need to get illegal aliens headed toward the wealthy Blue States because we can’t afford to feed them clothe them or provide free health care for them.

            The Feds don’t reimburse my state for all the anchor babies born here or the medical treatment illegals get here.

            So, it is not surprising to find that there are different points of view on illegal immigration. I think we can all agree on LEGAL immigration.

            Crime, kidnappings, hostage-taking, B&Es, etc are a real concern for West Texas, AZ, NM, CA and CO, much of it perpetrated by illegal aliens and MS13. The Drug trade is also alive and well and it is rare for the DEA or Border Patrol to catch a Big Wig — it is always the illegal alien mules who get caught.

            Desperate people will do desperate things. My daughter-in-law was a wet-back, coming across at Matamoros when she was 11 or 12.

            Since marrying my son she had to become a US citizen so he could get a security clearance as part of his Commission in the US Army.

            But the rest of her family, mom, dad, older brothers and sisters born in Mexico, never became US citizens – they still carry that Green Card and spend 90 days in Old Mexico and then 90 days in the US and then 90 days in Old Mexico, and so on.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “sometimes I wonder what parallel universe you live in”

            I wonder if Cadillac is successful there.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            First give out generous health care and welfare benefits to your citizens so they can lay on the couch all day and then correctly claim that lazy citizens will not do the work.

            There was a time when citizens were grateful for this sort of work.

            Not hard to justify open borders and broken deportation once you have anesthetized your own workers. The Chamber of Commerce loves it, as do politicians on the left. Lots of locked in votes among the dependent, amnesty seekers and business people.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Not to mention the burden on public schools and every public service from the DMV to heath and welfare to the police department HDC.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “Not to mention the burden on public schools and every public service from the DMV to heath and welfare to the police department …”

            When Bill Richardson was governor he designated all food to be sold tax-free. That was a good thing!

            In order to offset the lost tax revenue, the DMV DOUBLED the annual registration fees for vehicles and drivers licenses. That hurt!

            It really hurts if you have more than one vehicle per household which most legal residents in NM do.

            And the DMV furnishes the registered owner a list of charges accompanying the annual registration renewal, like tire disposal, waste oil disposal, eco-fees, IOW, a total rash of sh!t to pad the revenue to the state.

            Much of the local, county and state police generate a ton of funds writing citations of all sorts on the roads, highways and byways of NM.

            Traveling through NM with out-of-state license plates? Count on making your contribution, often more than once, as you pass through jurisdictions.

            Not too many illegals remain in NM after they get their drivers license. So, not many illegal alien kids in the local schools. Probably more in Albuquerque and Las Cruces than anywhere else in the state because of job availability.

            The illegals usually move out of NM on the day of, or the after they get their NM drivers license unless they were able to find a job in NM.

            The illegals that I hired came up from El Paso with Federico, my American-born Mexican foreman.

            The illegal alien cowhands (Gauchos) that work for my son and his partner/former father-in-law, went as far North as Colorado before coming back to New Mexico but have no intention to become American citizens, ever.

            They send their money home to Argentina to help their parents, live free on my son’s property, taking care of the animals.

            They’re part of a HUGE underground economy. Everybody knows it’s there but no one wants to do anything about it because no American wants to do the kind of work that the illegals do.

            These are not H1B-visa workers.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s easy to calculate how much “they cost”, but illegals may more than offset that by sales and income tax, plus DMV tags. Anchor Babies may grow up to contribute to society, just like any other kids.

            But they’re only guilty of filling a “need” put out there by the US, and a DC that looks the other way *AND* so happens, collects lobby billions from huge employers and industry that enjoy their cheap/productive labor.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            DM, it all started in 1941 after Pearl Harbor with a Congressional Act creating the Bracero program, a program designed to invite Mexican labor to do the work that needed to be done in Agriculture while our Boys were fighting WWII.

            My foreman’s grand parents came to the US that way, on a work permit but his parents were born in Mexico. He was born in the US, long after the Bracero program had ended but the Guest laborers had refused “to go home.”

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            @DenverMike It baffles me that the people who are so offended by undocumented immigrants draining tax dollars (much of which I think is exaggerated — immigrants are often afraid to seek help) are the loudest voices in opposition to anything that would make those workers taxpayers.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            It’s because the border is open dtremit. Get control of the border and legalization makes sense. Don’t control it and legalization leads to more of the same. It was Reagan who did the last big legal amnesty. He was naïve to think he could do amnesty first and border control later. It amazes ME that people cannot see this point.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            @thelaine A secure border is a fantasy out of a fairy tale. The border today is more secure than it’s ever been. Even if we somehow managed to fill the Rio Grande with lava, people would still make it here.

            Take a look at Australia or Italy to understand what lengths people will go to in order to emigrate to someplace where they can have a better life.

            In Boston, most of our undocumented immigrants are from Brazil, not Mexico. Trust me, they didn’t arrive via Texas or Arizona.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Guest Laborers could’ve “refused to go home” all they wanted, but if the jobs had truly “ended”, they would’ve had no choice.

            Remember income taxes are still collect on stolen/borrowed SSNs and never refunded. So DC is in on it as much as anyone.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            @morbo – You can thank NAFTA for the increase in migration from Mexico and Central America.

            With NAFTA, cheap (and often govt.-subsidized) agricultural products flooded Mexico and Central America – basically putting the small farmer out of work (which had been the way of life).

            @HDC

            There are plenty of highly-trained engineers, etc. – but US corporations (make that US CEOs) plead the lack of them so they can increase the no. of H-1B visas, not to mention outsourcing the more rudimentary type of work overseas (from basic engineering to software progamming to even legal work).

            Cheaper labor = higher profit margins which = higher CEO compensation.

            Apple, Google, etc. basically had a non-compete pact with regard to hiring which kept a lid on salaries in Silicon Valley.

            And woe is the skilled worker who is 45+ yrs in age – the companies don’t see them as valued employees who have yrs of experience and wisdom, but instead as being “too expensive” due to the higher salaries (but yet, it isn’t a problem for even older and much more grossly paid top execs).

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            bd2, you are right, it’s all about the bottom line, the profitability of the business and the ROI for the owners/shareholders.

            But it is a fact of business life. And it is the harsh reality of the real world.

            And that’s why I am such a proponent of preparing my kids, and now my grand kids for what awaits them in the real world, even if I have to go broke doing it. (And on occasion, I nearly did)

            The way I see the work environment of today is for a candidate to over-prepare themself, be willing to take a job if offered, even for a little while so they can look for better opportunities elsewhere while employed, and do it all without starting their working life mired in debt.

            From personal experience I can tell you it’s tough to keep the debt thing down. But I think we, as a family all pitching in, have been successful.

            I have two 8-yo twin grand kids to get ready and then hopefully, I will be done.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        This.

        Toyota is investing in Mexico and so is Honda. Heck all the car companies are.

        In the US an experienced autoworker might make $26 to $30 an hour depending on who they work for (base wages in leafy greeny money).

        The average Mexican auto worker makes $4 t0 $6 an hour equivalent USD. It isn’t great money even by Mexico standards, but enough to get by and it’s steady work.

        From a globalization and profitability standpoint, the US just can’t compete. Now get rid of ACA, the pesky minimum wage, OSHA and workers comp and I get we could get to $2 to $3 an hour in the states and get those jobs slowly trickling over the border back.

        This isn’t a only Detroit is going to Mexico issue.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I will not get onto the “moral” issues, but $4/hour USD in Mexico allows for a fairly comfortable life given that cost of living in terms of large ticket expenditures in Mexico (housing – nontourist locations, tuition, medical care) is roughly 1/5th of what it is in the U.S. (hence the boom in medical tourism to Mexico by Americans, given that a hip replacement surgery costs 1/7th what it would in the U.S., while being done at a new, clean Mexican hospital with highly trained physicians & staff).

          He!!, there are many Californian retirees in the SEEDIER parts of California moving to parts of Central America, including Mexican cities & places like Panama, since they can live far more comfortably there than in the U.S. on their $1,100 social security plus the other income they may have.

          Panama City is catering to these Americans, with entire towns that look like American suburbs springing up, where nice, new 1,200 square foot condominiums in safe/policed locations, near new medical facilities and global grocery & retail outlets can be rented for $500 USD per month.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            ” there are many Californian retirees in the SEEDIER parts of California moving to parts of Central America, including Mexican cities & places like Panama, since they can live far more comfortably there than in the U.S. on their $1,100 social security plus the other income they may have.”

            Yup! One difference, these Americans moving there are financially self-sufficient and do not have to depend on the governments of those countries they move to.

            FWIW, my wife’s mom and dad and one of her sisters moved to Germany in Jan 2015 and found the cost of living there to be lower than in the US (excluding a place to live which is free to them because they bought the property decades ago.)

        • 0 avatar
          dtremit

          The hourly wage isn’t as big of an issue as it would seem, though. To cite an example: Motor Trend reported in 2008 that Chrysler’s Toledo South plant was the most efficient in North America, taking 13.7 man-hours to assemble a vehicle. (That’s just assembly time, not counting the hours in anything that comes into the plant.)

          So even if the US worker is making $30, and the Mexico worker is making $4, that’s about a $400 difference per car. And my understanding is that plants in Mexico tend to be a little less efficient. So it’s significant, but not a “game changer” in a lot of ways. Plus a lot (parts, finished cars, executives) has to be moved to and from the plant.

          I think the bigger driver is EU-Mexico free trade, meaning a car built in Mexico can be exported to more places tariff-free than one built in the US. Having that manufacturing base in Mexico gives flexibility, which is sometimes more important than absolute cost.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The wages aren’t a large part of the cost of the car. But most or all of the savings that come from lower wages are essentially pure profit, so there is considerable motivation to find ways to reduce labor costs.

            More to the point, wages are one of the few areas remaining where meaningful savings can be achieved. Some effort can be made to create a more efficient plant, but a lot of that has already happened and future gains will be mostly incremental at best. Commodity costs are pretty much what they are — the price of steel won’t vary much from market to market, for example. Wages are the one bit of low-hanging fruit on the tree.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Toledo South takes such little man-hours to assemble a Wrangler because most of the work is already done in the supplier park.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            It is not wages, but the growing infrastructure , various free trade agreements and being part of NAFTA that Mexico has

          • 0 avatar
            CrapBox

            BINGO!

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        And Toyota already had a presence in Mexico and both Honda and Nissan recently expanded production in Mexico, not to mention Mazda building a plant there a few years ago.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @bball40dtw
        I posted sometime ago how the Manufacturers were opening new plants in Mexico. Volvo has bucked the grand by opening a new plant in the US, admittedly in the no Union South

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Bballdtw40
        Yes they have been but the pace of opening plants in Mexico has picked up considerably. I feel as that Reuters article I think, stated Mexico has reached a critical mass and attracting new investment from the U.S., Europe and Asia. Highly probable that Mexico will be epicentre of vehicle production in NA, in the not too distant future.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @bball40dtw
        I suppose it is relative. I would not fancy a stroll after 5pm in Detroit, unless you had a death wish. Anyway it will be interesting to see how Mexico develops as a Auto Capitol

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Depends where you are. I used to run 5-10 miles at night four times a week when I lived in Detroit. This was in 2005-07 when Detroit was worse than it’s current state. People in the neighborhood knew who I was and I never got hassled. Now, I wouldn’t be happy if my daughter was doing the same thing, but she’ll never be a 6’4″ 235 pound Army Ranger.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      My ex Japanese supplier employer (major tire corporation) is all about investing in Mexican operations right now.

      The Japanese are just a little more conservative when it comes to the next wave of cost savings.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        tresmonos, would they (your former employers) be thinking of buying that giant tire plant south of Ciudad Juarez by any chance?

        It is a major source of air pollution for El Paso, TX. and parts NE from there.

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          No, that’s Michelin. My ex employer starts with a letter further down the alphabet and makes rubber products (not tires) in Mexico. Their tire production is mostly in Asia and a very old and antiquated facility on the east coast.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Thanks! I was hoping some foreign company would buy that Mexican tire and rubber plant and do something about the smog and emissions.

            It is terrible on the West S!de of the Franklin Mountains of El Paso, TX, and even worse in the North and East of El Paso.

            My daughter lives and works on the West S!de.

            There was talk some time ago that Toyo, Yokohama, Hankook and Kumho had been doing an independent site-survey there, but I never heard anything else after that.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            And it rhymes with Moyo.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      You making up facts about Ford and GM trucks to support your moaning?

      The F-Series built in Mexico is mostly for consumption south of (our) border. Most F-Series tucks sold in the US are built here and boast a very high percentage of US-content. Even the F-650 and F-750 medium duty trucks just had their production moved FROM Mexico TO the US (Avon Lake, Ohio; the plant that formerly built the E-Series as its replacement is built in Kansas City along side the F-150, what F-150s that are not built in Michigan).

      GM trucks that arent built here are mostly from Canada. [I retract this statement as others have corrected me.]

      Go walk onto a Ford lot and tell me how many trucks are built in Mexico. Noone can deny that full size trucks are their most produced product.

      Dont forget to stop by and have another glass of Hateraid so you can come back and compare the F-150 XL single cab V-6 to the ATS-V.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        GM doesn’t build trucks in Canada anymore since closing Oshawa truck in ’09. Trucks that aren’t built in Michigan, Indiana or Texas come from Silao Mexico.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The current Silverado/Sierra are not built in Canada. There are three sites that build them: Flint, Ft Wayne, and Silao, Mexico. Most crew cab GM trucks are made in Mexico. Most extended caps are made in Fort Wayne. Flint does mostly HD and regular cabs.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Don’t mention the crew cabs to JohnnyTaurus or he might flip out.

          Awww, man…too late.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            By “flip out”, I guess you mean admit my mistake?

            Or should I go on a 5,000 word misinformation essay about a car unrelated to this discussion as you would have done?

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          I retracted the statement. I am not as well versed in GM operations as I am Ford’s.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            It’s not a big deal to me.

            This isn’t aimed at you, but I’m always surprised that more people aren’t aware that % of domestic parts content is the real tell as to where the overwhelming amount of labor, engineering, R&D and other resources were parlayed regarding the production of vehicles, and that location of assembly of these many thousands of components and subcomponents into a complete vehicle rates as a distant second in terms of value added to the economy.

            And on that note, there are a lot of patriotic feeling people purchasing “domestic” vehicles who’d be shocked that so many of the “furrin” vehicles around them in traffic are more U.S. economy stimulating in their design & fabrication.

            (This is not a moral judgment, but an objective, secular observation about peoples’ massive misunderstandings.)

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      A couple of weeks ago an interesting article was in one of our Aussie news sites regarding the content of US manufactured vehicles.

      The US is ever more reliant on automotive components coming in from Mexico and China in particular.

      The article showed that even though US vehicle production has increased by a couple of million vehicles per year the local US work force has not increased.

      The US auto industry is becoming more and more a vehicle assembly business, Ikea of the motoring world like many other nations assembling vehicles. The global auto industry is sourcing components more and more from cheaper sources.

      I don’t know why people are so wrapped up regarding where a vehicle is made. Who cares?

      Those who use this support local industry as an excuse are living on another planet. Imagine if everyone in the US bought locally manufactured goods, you standard of living would drop significantly.

      Looking at manufacturing as the panacea of an economy is rather backwards looking. I think some of our American brothers and sisters are worried not just about American jobs, but American dominance.

      Don’t fear, the more wealth globally (and just concentrated in a few nations) the better it is for everyone.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Well dremit, at least we know where we differ. I disagree. We have never really committed ourselves to solving the border security problem. The Southern border is not secure, it is not more secure than ever, it is, in fact, porous. The deportation system is a joke. The employment verification system is a joke. The visa overstay enforcement is a joke.

      Democrats looking for future voters and current Hispanic voters, many Republicans, the Chamber of Commerce, the Wall Street Journal, many small businesses and corporations and many libertarians want it that way. That is why border security is never done and advocates will tell you it is impossible. No, it is not.

      Your approach is, in practical terms, surrender to untold millions of illegal immigrants and make them legal ad infinitum. This is the end of controlled immigration, the end of legal immigration, the end of national security. There are an unlimited number of people south of our border all the way through Central and South America who love your plan.

      A better idea is to secure the border and then give law-abiding people who have integrated into this country an opportunity to become legal.

      Whether you believe the fantasy that the border is secure or you believe the propaganda that border can never be secure (or, seemingly, both) you have surrendered your nation. That would be a shame, considering how many have sacrificed to preserve it.

      • 0 avatar
        dtremit

        I didn’t say it was secure; I said it was more secure than it’s ever been. That is hard to argue with; we have more border patrol agents than ever before, and giant ugly fences all over the place.

        If you would have it be secure, then: how would you do it? And how would you pay for that?

        I’ll also remind you that most of those who sacrificed to preserve this nation, as you say, came over here from somewhere else. To get through Ellis Island, all you needed was $50 and the name of a friend or relative who would take you in.

        People coming to America to work is a constant in our nation’s history. The only thing that has changed is the legality of it.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          “I’ll also remind you that most of those who sacrificed to preserve this nation, as you say, came over here from somewhere else. To get through Ellis Island, all you needed was $50 and the name of a friend or relative who would take you in.

          People coming to America to work is a constant in our nation’s history. The only thing that has changed is the legality of it.”

          We certainly will never find common ground dtremit if you cannot or will not distinguish between legal immigration and illegal immigration. That is a bridge too far for me.

          There are plenty of plans for securing the border. Do some research.

        • 0 avatar
          thelaine

          In 1970, fewer than 1 in 21 United States residents were born abroad. Five years from today, the Census Bureau estimates that more than one in seven United States residents will have been born abroad. Eight years from today, the share of the population that is foreign-born will rise above any level ever before recorded and keep surging.

          It defies reason to argue that the record admission of new foreign workers has no negative effect on the wages of American workers, including the wages of past immigrants hoping to climb into the middle class. Why would many of the largest business groups in the United States spend millions lobbying for the admission of more foreign workers if such policies did not cut labor costs?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            thelaine, and I think that most Americans are OK with that, being foreign-born, because we are a nation of immigrants.

            But even in the olden days, the days of the pioneers, there was accountability of where a man came from when settling down in America.

            Napoleon started all that in Europe.

            As Americans we just can’t waltz into Mexico or Canada and squat there but libtards in America believe that anyone, any foreigner, should be able to waltz across America’s borders and squat, vote and claim all the rights and privileges of American citizenship with none of the responsibilities.

          • 0 avatar
            dtremit

            From about 1860 to 1930, about one in seven United States residents was born abroad, too. Somehow we survived that.

            Statistically, the anomaly today is the birth rate, not the immigration rate.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            dtremit, I think it made America better, that’s why we survived it.

            My dad came from Portugal in 1946, my mom from Germany in 1931.

            I was born in America in 1947. Fewer are these days so, I agree, the anomaly today is the birth rate, not the immigration rate.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Even Caesar Chavez was perceptive enough to understand the difference between legal, controlled immigration and illegal, uncontrolled immigration. He opposed illegal immigration.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Yes HDC, a nation without borders is not a nation.

    • 0 avatar

      @DW – it has nothing to do with Cadillac, you could skip it.

    • 0 avatar
      skeeter44

      You guys are dreaming. Have you seen the GDP in El Salvador, Honduras, Guatemala, Nicaragua – not to mention Boliva, Venezuela, etc ? Mexican jobs will do nothing to stem the tide of immigration. Meanwhile your kids can look forward to ever poorer job prospects or finding work overseas.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    Given the drug cartel violence in Mexico, I’m surprised any foreign company would expand its facilities there. Maybe the reports, like the premature ones of Mark Twain’s death, are greatly exaggerated.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Not a problem as long as you pay protection.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      They are not exaggerated, but violence in Mexico is down. Homicides peaked in 2011. Intrestingly enough, Mexico is way safer than most other Latin American countries.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        Eh, I’ve heard its become more violent since I was down there two years ago. The previous president kept assassinating cartel bosses to the point where street thugs got ‘promoted within’ to be the new terrorist organization leaders.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          You had eyeballs on the ground there, so I don’t doubt your words, but I was under the impression that much of the serious violence and serious corruption (versus graft) was narco-cartel related and concentrated disproportionately in particular regions such as Juarez (as one example), and that Mexico’s government & judiciary had cracked down on areas having manufacturing zones/parks (such as Coahuila, as one example).

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            We got to see what only could be a Narco hit in Cuatitlan. That was tons of fun. 5 dead in a Dodge Ram in the middle of the street. Gunned down 1.5 miles from the plant. Also – Last week I was there, all those kids got abducted from a night club 1.5 blocks from the US Embassy just off Reforma. Those kids are dead as f*ck because one of their friends ticked off some narco boss.

            Yeah. Only the northern parts are bad. I highly suggest the B&B go visit Cancun and socialize with the Zeta’s for their next family vacation. Better yet, Acapulco was super safe when I visited. Make sure to bring your teenage blonde haired daughters with you. All that drug stuff is only on the border where the talking heads have done their professional risk assessments.

            I must have forgotten about the time that Mexican Marines kidnapped my coworkers and took all their money. Those classy, trustworthy mutherf*ckers must have just been playing a prank on us! Haha! Get back to fighting crime you silly soldiers.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            Also: borderlandbeat.com

            Whenever I ventured out to visit stuff with coworkers, I would read this until I got super depressed and familiar with whatever current narco activity guerrilla reporters could miserably track.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I recently spent a week down in the state of Jalisco for work, which admittedly is very different from the border areas that generally are the source of drug related issues. Didn’t see or hear of any violent crime, seems that it’s mostly the standard issue of property crime that people are worried about (broken glass cemented to tops of walls, etc). I did have sketchy guys on bikes with backpacks offer to sell me all sorts of drugs, at least once every evening I was there (resort area where the hotel was).

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            In Tucson, the news would have a “BorderWatch” segment every night. My favorite was the drug smugglers catapulting drugs over the fence with an actual catapult that was towed by a Lobo.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The violent groups are more fractured now. It’s like all the Al-Queda offshoots once OBL was killed and thrown in the ocean.

          I haven’t been to Mexico since the height of the drug wars in 2011, but friends tell me that many places are better. Sinaloa, Sonora, and Baja California are better, but some other places are worse. Violence has actually shifted out of cities and to the countryside and thr rural US.

          Murders are down quite a bit, but Mexico is still far from safe.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            Stay long enough anywhere with my degenerate behavior and you’ll see the violence. Most people stay in and don’t socialize or drive around like they own the place.

            I see some of my old Mexican coworkers are more self aware of the cartel and corruption issues of their country via social media. That makes me happy as I feel like there’s hope for a shift in the mindset of that culture.

            There are many educated engineers who I worked with that are just as good as our best up here. The faster they fix their issues, the sooner I can retire there and enjoy their superior climate and topography.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            “superior climate and topography”

            Does topography = T&A?

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            “the sooner I can retire there and enjoy their superior climate and topography.”

            After spending a week in balmy weather, surrounded by delicious cheap food (50 peso meal at ‘comida corridas’ in small villages blew anything I ate in the resort part of town out of the water), my colleague and I were both half-seriously scheming and inquiring about property values and ex-pats’ experiences there. My dream would be to farm a small piece of land out there, cook on an outdoor stove, take siestas in the shade, and drive my produce to market in a beat up little Nissan NP300 :)

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            @bball40dtw

            An emphatic YES on that point. Must be something in the water…

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            A Hermosillo 5 is a middle America 10.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @gtemnykh

            Might be the lack of HFCS in the general diet.

            “Must be something in the water…”

            …or maybe something that’s not in the water?

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            Hermosillo is chocked full of gorgeous women. The DF not so much. That being said, I had a Mexican GF was was absolutely gorgeous when I lived there. Probably the most or second most attractive woman I’ve dated. And I picked her up being a miserable over worked DB.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Actually no, much safer countries in the rest of the Americas where the drug trade is not big

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702303603904579495863883782316

          Wrong again Bob. Mexico is far from being the most violent Latin American country.

          Also, based on even more recent statistics, Mexico has dropped in those ratings even farther. those are from 2012, which had 6000 more homicides than 2014. Other countries in Latin America had homicides increase.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Once upon a time the average Detroit auto worker made around $35 an hour. And there was much grousing about the workers being overpaid. So factories moved to right to work states in the south.

    Once upon a time the average southern auto worker made around $24 an hour. Auto companies enjoyed massive tax breaks to bring the jobs south. Detroit turned into a rotted out husk. Still, there was much grousing by the shareholders about workers being overpaid. So factories moved to Mexico.

    Once upon a time the average Mexican autoworker made around $4 (USD equivalent) an hour. And there was much grousing about them being overpaid…

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      As of 2005, based on the UAW’s own statistics, the median wage of a UAW worker in a manufacturing facility owned & run by GM, Ford or Chrysler (Daimler then) was $74 hourly, which included $28 per hour in terms of cost for health insurance, pension plan funding, etc.

      I was an intern at a financial institution in 2002 and personally saw W2’s of UAW line workers who then made over 100k in salary with overtime included.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “Once upon a time the average Mexican autoworker made around $4 (USD equivalent) an hour. And there was much grousing about them being overpaid…”

      Not so sure about this part since they pretty well match the lowest cost regions in the world. Still, everyone wants a better deal.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        “… since they pretty well match the lowest cost regions in the world.”

        I think NAFTA did a lot in support of that for Mexico. But all-in-all, NAFTA has done more good than it has harmed.

        Obviously, not from the UAW perspective but the take-no-prisoners philosophy of the UAW re their employers has been a huge impetus to get American-based automakers of all nationalities to seek the more profitable green grass on the south s!de of the fence.

        I think it is great. If Mexico employs that many more of their own people, maybe we’ll see that many less on this s!de of the border.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Every single thing that Ross Perot said back in the 1980s about what passing NAFTA & MFN Trade Status for China would do to the American middle class has come true, yet the establishment politicians such as the Bush’s & Clinton’s made fun of Ross and demonized him as some sort of conspiracy theorist at the time he made those predictions.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I voted for Ross Perot. To no avail.

            And I realize that for SOME American workers NAFTA has been catastrophic. They lost their jobs because they were not competitive.

            But I still believe that looking at the whole picture, NAFTA was good for America and the vast majority of our 330+ Million residents.

            During the most recent Dockworkers and Longshoremen strike, their union had to deal with the Chinese and the Chinese who run America’s ports, harbors and docks don’t mess around, and nearly broke the union.

            Just like Sergio doesn’t mess around with the UAW.

            My brother in the LA area told me that the Longshoremen there didn’t gain squat and in fact lost a bunch of pay in the process of not working on weekends and overtime.

            So selling our harbors and ports to the Chinese paid us some dividends I never expected when Bill Clinton sold them to the Chinese.

            I was against that but I was wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            NAFTA was great in theory, if we had only focused on educating our workforce for higher tech trades. We never evolved from WWII industrialization. We never reinvested in our children’s public education. All that money went into everyone’s investment portfolio’s and bumping up the bar of welfare so all those textile workers’ standard of living didn’t change whether they were combining cotton or smoking pall malls on their front porch watching their mill get torn down.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            “Every single thing that Ross Perot said back in the 1980s about what passing NAFTA & MFN Trade Status for China would do to the American middle class has come true”

            That’s narrowly true. But NAFTA and trade policies didn’t end up actually being the cause of all those bad effects. Horrendous fiscal policies are the cause.

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            @HDC

            I voted for Ross also. I literally cried that election night.

            Ol’ Ross wasn’t 100% correct with 23 years of rear view vision, but he had some very valid points.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            No elected president was ever 100% accurate. And even if Ross Perot had been elected, both chambers of Congress would have been against his ideas for the betterment of America.

            And so it is every national election. The Majority rules, even if the voting majority is way less than the eligible electorate.

            And when things don’t go their way, they b!tch, p!ss, moan, whine and complain just like all the libs and eco-freaks who now complain that their prez isn’t doing what they want him to do.

            And we’re not even mentioning the unions who now see that their Cadillac Health Plans will be heavily taxed in the future.

            So, I’m ROTFLMAO, because America always gets exactly what it deserves, because we vote for it.

        • 0 avatar
          tresmonos

          If you don’t want your neighbor coming over the border, you may want to tell your right wing nut job representative to focus on domestic issues that will make Mexico safer. Until then, chicken before the egg.

  • avatar

    Speaking of anniversaries, this Tax Day is my third anniversary with TTAC. On this day in 2012, I introduced fashion blogging into this piece about the New York Auto Show: https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/04/a-new-writer-offers-a-new-look-at-the-nyias/

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Quick: List all sub-$20k cars that are NOT built in Mexico.

    Chevy Sonic
    Hyundai/Kia
    Mazda3

    um, and…?

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • conundrum: Exactly what I did. Went over mine before delivery and it was physically flawless so far as I could tell...
  • Kenn: “And major props for non-turbo motors and regular old automatics.” Along with Toyota’s...
  • nitramaj: I’ve been driving for 22 years now, and I’ve only had three Hondas during that time. My experience is that...
  • EGSE: @mcs Does Tesla have some IP locked up re Halbach arrays? The technique has been around for a long time....
  • EGSE: But you can pay money for a back-lit 3-pointed star on the grille. And some people do…..

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States