By on April 30, 2015

Mayweather with owner of Fusion Luxury Motors

This headline is as true as any other you’ve read over the past few days.

In case you’ve been stuck under a 1980 Dodge Diplomat all week, the so-called “Fight of the Century” between Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao is about to go down this weekend in Las Vegas and all over pay-per-view. As expected, everyone is trying to get in on that sweet, sweet SEO sugar.

Whether it’s ESPN, USA Today, or even Automotive News, media of all sorts are jumping on the Mayweather gravy train and they’re willing to stay on-board as long as the ride will last.

It’s a solid play, too. The young champion is incredibly media friendly and oozes charisma in front of the camera. He’s also known for having a rather large collection of supercars, most of which he doesn’t even drive. (We’ll let you be the judge of his vehicular tastes.) This works in the favor of all the automotive hacks scrambling for stories to justify their weekly contract fees.

But, the championship winning boxer is also known for something else entirely: beating women.

Since this is an automotive website, I’ll skip over the bits about how the Nevada Boxing Commission has never suspended Mayweather after his multiple run-ins (and subsequent convictions) with the law. Nor will I go into detail regarding Mayweather’s unabashed attitude toward those he’s brutally attacked, multiple times. But, I will say one thing: the automotive media, proud to denounce “booth babes” at auto shows while championing female professionals working in our industry, is doing a serious disservice to women and automotive journalism whenever they mention this garbage excuse for a human being in a positive light.

USA Today was the first (at least in the last couple of weeks) to do a deep dive into Mayweather’s relationship with a Las Vegas-area dealer, Towbin Motors. The dealer staff boastfully explains in video how they bend over backwards to keep “The Champ” happy while taking his money. The car selling part is all well and good. After all, Mayweather is expected to garner $100 million USD from this weekend’s fight and I’m not going to get on a soapbox and dictate how dealers should go about their business in a more ethical manner. If I was a car dealer situated near Las Vegas, I’d want a piece of that prize fight pie, too. And had this story run at any other time, it probably wouldn’t reek of opportunism. But, why does a business – in this case, a car dealer – feel the need to align themselves with such an obviously defective asshole? What does that say about the dealer itself? (This particular dealer had a reality show on A&E for a bit, a good indicator of where Towbin Motors is likely to score on the morality litmus test.)

It wasn’t just USA Today. Automotive News got in on the action with an article titled ‘He’s sold boxing champ Floyd Mayweather 39 cars … and counting’, chronicling the all-hours relationship between the fighter and Obi Okeke of Fusion Luxury Motors, a dealer of exotic cars in California. While the story is indeed interesting – giving us more insight into the peculiar nature of how Mayweather goes about buying cars – I still don’t see the need for dealer proprietors to display just how close they are with boxing’s latest bad-boy spousal abuser. Also, I’m guessing it’s not at all difficult to sell cars with outrageous prices to someone who probably can’t read all those bills of sale.

Yet, in the end, I don’t blame the dealers one bit. When the chance to get free press – equivalent to millions of dollars of ad spend – rears its head, you grab it by the throat and squeeze it for everything it’s worth. Business is business: cutthroat, immoral and feelingless (kind of like Mayweather himself, which might explain why he’s so successful at this fight promotion thing).

What I blame is the constant morality bending going on in the automotive media – and the general media – that’s the root cause of all of this. The whole environment is a testament to “talking out of both sides of your mouth”.

Booth babes are horrible … but look at all these cars owned by a convicted wife beater.

Female automotive engineers are great … let’s place this inspiring article right beside the Rolls-Royce Wraith bought by a man who viciously beat his ex in front of her own son.

All the while, media outlets wonder, Why don’t our readers believe what we say?

In the end, it’s not just women and the industry getting beaten down by all of this contrived Mayweather-centric media. I also feel for Manny Pacquiao. He’s not just a boxer. Pacquiao is a smart, respected politician in his native Philippines. And, on top of it all, a car dealer sold him a Mitsubishi Pajero V6.

Hey, USA Today and Automotive News, that’s a story I’d like to read.

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97 Comments on “Editorial: Serial Woman Beater Buys 39 Cars (And Counting!) From Opportunistic Salesman...”


  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Just my opinion, this article could have stayed where it was. Dont see a reason to write about it hear. I dont care for boxing, I dont care what jocks drive and I have never seen pimp my ride or MTV Cribs. I care about cars if anything maybe should have let a female writer do this from a female perspective. I still wouldnt have cared. Not because I condone what he does but because folks have had years to write about this stuff on him and still havent done anything with it. JMO.
    I want to read about cars and car related stories this is really neither.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Im confused…. are you in some kind of binding contract that requires you to open and read every link here? You don’t want to read it, you don’t have to click the link.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        sporty, great point. And to Mayweather, is anyone really surprised that he beats women ? His profession is beating other people. Kinda hard not to take the work home with him, which pretty much is his answer to beating women. Performance in sports may it be baseball, football, or any sport is above moral values. This is male, female, black, white, it does not matter. And women will put with a punch or two to be a part of Mayweathers life. But, damn he has some nice rides.

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          You figure that knowledge and training in martial arts is actually a cause of domestic violence? You don’t think it’s maybe entirely due to being raised in a dysfunctional home where it was normal to watch your mother and siblings get beaten whenever you weren’t receiving your own beatings?

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @rpn453 – “You figure that knowledge and training in martial arts is actually a cause of domestic violence?”

            Works for the anti-gun lobby ;)

      • 0 avatar
        Chocolatedeath

        Nope I missed a few so ..lost some cash there.

    • 0 avatar
      pdl2dmtl

      @Chocolatedeath: This is what I have mentioned to Mark when he took over the helm, and kept on asking with other occasions. I agree with you.
      This is TTAC’s inexorable march to become another “me too” car site. If we the readers do not help with our critique, who will?

      • 0 avatar

        So, in your eyes, where should TTAC place itself in the overall grand scheme of things?

        • 0 avatar
          pdl2dmtl

          @Mark:
          Typically, an editorial board evaluates which issues are important for their readership to know the newspaper’s opinion.
          (I hope that is what you were doing here.)
          I voiced my opinion but would refrain from giving advice. By reading some comments below, it looks like I am not alone.

          What to do is up to you to decide, but hey, you can’t make everybody happy…

          • 0 avatar

            It seems there are people on both sides of whether this is “valid” TTAC content.

            Though, I am disappointed there isn’t more discussion around the topic at hand.

        • 0 avatar
          pdl2dmtl

          @Mark:
          Typically, an editorial is a statement or article by a news organization, newspaper or magazine that expresses the opinion of the editor, editorial board, or publisher.
          (I hope that is what you were doing here.)
          I voiced my opinion but would refrain from giving advice. By reading some comments below, it looks like I am not alone.

          What to do is up to you to decide, but hey, you can’t make everybody happy…

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Mark, FWIW from someone who thinks controversy is a good thing, lest your readers become bored to death & fail to hone their critical thinking skills, I think this is an appropriate EDITORIAL (as you so clearly labeled it).

          And for the record, I read this early today yet am only commenting now, much later, after seeing many comments implying or outright stating that this is somehow inappropriate for TTAC. I could not disagree more.

          First, it does relate to things automotive, as it illuminates exotic vehicle dealership (and popular ones, too) marketing tactics and “automotive culture,” directly relevant to current events (it matters not whether the public figures involved are a famous boxer and opportunistic salesman vs a Tony Stark like arms dealer and his automotive endorphin-stimulating drug of choice.)

          Second, stories about a lack of good taste and sense in discretionary purchases of rare or limited automobiles by a philistine like Mayweather are just as appropriate for a “car site” such as TTAC as a story about stories about a lack of good taste and sense in discretionary purchases of rare or limited works of art would be by a philistine such as Dennis Kozlowski of Tyco infamy would be on a financial news website (coincidentally, many such works of art found in their brown paper protective wrap, haphazardly strewn about his home’s interior, when federal authorities raided his property – never being appreciated as the artists probably intended).

          Finally, you obviously put a lot of time into formulating your thoughts and conveying those thoughts on this subject, as evidenced by your prose and reasoning (i.e. this is substantive, and not some hit-and-run click bait piece, and is an issue that actually troubles you).

          So good on you.

          And not to make comparisons to Jack Baruth, whether one likes, dislikes or is indifferent to his style (I’m a fan of his writing and method, even when I disagree with any of his particular opinions, in whole or in part), but he has helped further cement TTAC’s niche & uniqueness by offering up similar editorials from time to time, whether opining on matters Porsche’s CUV-ization, Lincoln’s woes, or even matters dealing with much more broad popular culture, and he wasn’t always praised for it by the readership (though he often was, and it always seemed to generate debate).

          So, to sum up, keep on keepin’ on with the EDITORIALS…

          People aren’t forced to read them (but I’ll be damned if some of the loudest critics don’t continue to do so)…and they’re relevant to this site, IMO.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        “This is TTAC’s inexorable march to become another “me too” car site.”

        How is asking moderately difficult questions like becoming “Any other car site”?

        “Any other car site” usually avoids controversy like the plague, unless you define “controversy” in that special, Ford-vs-Chevy, Doug DeMuro sense of the word.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The article isn’t about boxing. The author is criticizing the media, including the automotive press, for its alleged hypocrisy.

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-Iron

        Check out Jack B’s “small souls” blog post for a more eloquent explanation of the phenomenon, but Martin Scorcese, Woody Allen (obvs), Whoopi Goldberg, and Wes Anderson (among others), think it is perfectly fine to drug and ass-rape 13 year old girls as long as you make good movies. Likewise, beating women is acceptable as long as you are really good at other athletic endeavors, at least in the eyes of the media. The article is as car-centric as anything on this site and more so than on any other that I know of.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          I suppose that the question here is whether we should shun bad people generally, or if we should accept them selectively depending upon the circumstances.

          I don’t have a good answer for that. I can see both sides of this one.

          • 0 avatar
            MrGreenMan

            Bill Clinton was sort of the high water mark of being able to accept transgression in America if there was at least some sort of public showing of repentance – he’d bite that lip and ten thousand articles would run saying he was sorry, get over it, it’s in the past and he recognizes that. I remember my attorney talking hypothetically of course saying, when making a private placement memo, put everything in there, it’s the 1990s, just say you lived and learned, and people are forgiving.

            The Twitter generation appears to be a lot different. To pick left-leaning people again, Brian Williams is not going to get any free pass after a public apology. The governor out in Illinois wasn’t allowed to do a public apology. That British actor who used the word “coloured” while advocating for some sort of charity that helped black people probably found it a career-limiting event. New Balance is currently being pilloried for what somebody Photoshopped them into even after they tried to set things straight, and Whole Foods is on the pillory for feeding the police and anyone else in the park in Baltimore.

            There was always a repentance angle however light and Americans were willing to forgive; social media appears to have intensified the ability to get stirred up and angry and spend your emotional reservoir, pushing out the historical inclination to forgiveness.

            Forgiveness after repentance is always better for the person who can accept the repentance and forgive. So, it would be good to see this guy repent of his errors.

      • 0 avatar

        The only thing that I’ve seen that comes close to criticizing the uncritical attention given to Mayweather’s car collection, was something at one of the Gawker site’s piece on Stephen A. Smith’s fawning interview of Mayweather, but that was probably more about going after Smith than Mayweather. Jalopnik seemed to be more upset about Mayweather’s cork-sniffing, mostly non-driven car collection than his history of domestic violence.

        My attitudes on domestic violence are informed by the work of Gelles, Straus and Steinmetz, who have shown that it’s an equal opportunity crime and that women are just as likely to initiate an incident of domestic violence as men. However, it’s socially acceptable these days to demonize men, so it doesn’t surprise me that most people think that Ray Rice was a bad person for hitting his fiance back, after she’d already hit him twice and was winding up for a third shot (one reason why the case was adjudicated the way it was).

        Mayweather’s a bad actor, though. He’s originally from Michigan so he’s been covered in the media here since he was a rising star, and he’s always been a jerk. He’s also got a strained relationship with his father.

        It’s interesting to compare the treatment Rice has gotten in the media, though he plead not guilty and his then fiance and now wife, didn’t want him prosecuted, to how Mayweather’s been covered, after he’s plead guilty at least twice to charges involving violence against women, along with being the defendant in civil cases filed by women over violence.

        • 0 avatar
          psarhjinian

          “My attitudes on domestic violence are informed by the work of Gelles, Straus and Steinmetz, who have shown that it’s an equal opportunity crime and that women are just as likely to initiate an incident of domestic violence as men”

          Statistics, both of injuries, complaints and even self-reports utterly fail to back you up on this one.

          It’s an equal opportunity crime? Possibly, but that’s not who ends up in shelters and hospitals more often.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Everyone needs a hobby. His is playing the victim.

          • 0 avatar

            That comment about playing the victim could be seen by some as a microagression against my my ethnicity and religion. I’m sure that there are members of particular groups of people that you’d never even think of accusing of “playing the victim”, no matter how much they’ve internalized their victmhood and attendant feelings of license and entitlement.

            I come from a long line of survivors, not victims. Our unofficial slogan is “They tried to kill us, we won, let’s eat.”

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Feeling sorry for yourself is your stock in trade. From truck drivers who don’t pass quickly enough for your tastes to cops who park (legally) in front of their place of employment to the evil people at the post office, you’re always the victim.

            At the same time, you disparage those who point out actual injustice when they don’t belong to the groups with which you identify. In a textbook, that would show up next to the entry for narcissism.

      • 0 avatar

        Exactly! That’s the entire point and relevancy to TTAC – on multiple levels, as this site not only takes on the auto industry but those who report about it.

        Well done, Mark.

    • 0 avatar

      Obviously Mark doesn’t like Floyd.
      I don’t pay attention to boxing either, but let’s face it:

      #1 Floyd isn’t the first rich man to hit women.
      #2 Floyd won’t be the last rich man to hit women.

      Floyd is worth over $200 Million and has $1M (at least) of pocket money.

      Anyone driving a VEYRON ain’t poor.

      I respect that he has a Veyron.

      I disprove of hitting women, but that’s a job for THE LAW to deal with.

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-Iron

        You “disprove” of hitting women? How does that work? Is it similar to how a moron respects someone for having a material possession?

        • 0 avatar
          Scott.A

          He’s hit multiple gf’s now from what I know (which is what this article says) and also from what I know about woman beaters, he’ll probably beat the next one too. And she’ll still get in the relationship with him. Don’t have a lot of sympathy for opportunistic women who jump in the lions den because it turns them on and the white knights who cry when the girls get bit.

          Are men and women equal? Is beating a woman worse than beating a man? Reconcile these beliefs if your answer is “yes” to both of them.

        • 0 avatar
          MeJ

          Nice…
          Bigtruck better,(to quote Howard from the Big Bang Theory),
          “…Grab a napkin homie, you just got served!..”

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        “I respect that he has a Veyron. ”

        I don’t. I respect people that buy Veyrons because they are interested in owning the ultimate in automotive technology and, you know, DRIVE the stupid thing. I don’t respect idiots who buy the thing to park in their garage for the sole purpose of taking pictures next to it to remind everyone else they have a Veyron.

        He’s the poster child for idiotic conspicuous consumption.

        • 0 avatar

          “He’s the poster child for idiotic conspicuous consumption.”

          I’m sure he doesn’t care about your opinion!

          • 0 avatar
            eamiller

            Nor yours.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Mayweather will probably end up broke, just like so many other “successful” boxers, NFL & NBA Superstars (as well as other athletes, white, black and Hispanic – Hector Camacho blew through 40 million and is a broke recovering crack addict now) as the parasites keep digging their fangs and sucking parts into him, year after year, bleeding him dry –

            Just like Mike Tyson, who blew threw 300 million in a decade since the apex of his career.

            It’ll be partly his fault, because he equates displays of consumption with respect from peers, even as he’s used and abused by predators (managers, agents, family and “friends”).

            THUG LIFE.

            (Cultural OR Psychological similarities to Goodfellas, Madoff, etc.)

            *Didn’t post 1st time so delete duplicate if it posts twice – Thanks.

        • 0 avatar

          +1

          I wouldn’t respect him though, even if he did drive it. He sounds like scum and like an entitled esso bee.

          I generally don’t pay attention to stuff like this, but I’m appalled that other car sites are giving him good publicity.

  • avatar
    mshenzi

    If you MAKE Pacquiao and his Pajero the story, I’d happily click on that.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    I haven’t been under a car all week, but I hadn’t heard about this fight until now
    Maybe boxing just doesn’t get the media attention that it used to.

    • 0 avatar
      John

      Young people in the US going into boxing today are almost exclusively Hispanic. Mixed martial arts is the fastest growing sport in America, and the world. I think that’s why boxing doesn’t get much media attention.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    It’d be nice if the website stuck with The Truth About Cars; not The Truth About People Who Buy Cars and Pose For a Picture With a Car In The Background.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      This site has always had a heavy focus on the automotive industry… where does this article fail in that regard, and how is 1 article indicative of some grand overarching failure in content relevance?

    • 0 avatar
      Detroit-Iron

      I assume you never read Steve Lang’s articles when he was here?

      • 0 avatar
        zamoti

        While the headline itself may appear as clickbait to a certain degree, I don’t see that the content is outside the scope of what this site would normally produce. Many articles are directly related to cars, but plenty are also related to car culture, the financial environment thereof as well as social impact. More importantly, this site has a history of attempting to rise above the rest by being forthcoming about honesty, moreso than what peer publications may provide. Mark saw bullshit and called bullshit.
        To a certain degree I think that Mark took this as an opportunity to demonstrate that he’s interested in continuing this tradition which I wholeheartedly support. If he gets a few more clicks in the process, I doubt that anyone is going to cry–he’s got to make the numbers after all. That the content in this case is little off to the side of the core topic is forgivable in my eyes.

    • 0 avatar
      kmoney

      I think this is fair game for this website. The articles that relate to the social and economic factors of the automotive industry (especially the well-written ones) are one of the differentiators that make me read this site.

  • avatar
    Ron B.

    Former FF, boxing doesn’t get the coverage it used too because you now have to pay to see it and in my opinion,anyone who pays to watch TV needs counselling. But, It is with great sadness that here in OZ the only way to see F1 or even get results is to place your 30 pieces of silver in Ruperts clammy little palm. Yep,we get a few seconds remarks in the evening news about how Lewis has done it again,then nothing.
    Boxing has attracted the criminal element in Society for at least 200 years. afterall,who would be dumb enough to want to sweat and train just to get your backside handed to you ? The entrepreneur has been there all the time ,only too willing to promote the next dummy who has a long slow death wish.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Rupert is just the middle man, Bernie is the real spider at the center of the F1 Web getting your shekels.

      Oddly I respect that devious little bastard. I wish I could be a S.P.E.C.T.E.R level super villain and get away with it!

  • avatar
    Pch101

    Automotive News is a trade publication. Puff piece profiles of people who work in the business and their companies are the stock-in-trade of trade publications in all industries.

    The Automotive News article wasn’t really about the boxer; it was about the dealer. Those pieces aren’t intended to be investigative journalism, but filler for the publication. If Automotive News made a regular practice of attacking car dealers, then it would lose a lot of its readership, who just so happen to be car dealers.

    • 0 avatar

      I agree. But, it is just the latest in a long string of articles from multiple outlets this week.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        I’m not really disagreeing, just adding some context.

        Most of what we read in the media is not “news,” but some mixture of fluff, rehashed press releases and summaries of press conferences. That has been particularly true in the automotive media, which has been dependent upon the ad dollars of an industry that spends considerable sums on advertising.

        Similarly, sports coverage has been generally pretty vacuous. Now you’re seeing what happens when the two topics intersect.

        That being said, is anyone surprised that a guy who beats up people for a living is violent? Boxing isn’t much of a sport, in my opinion.

        • 0 avatar

          I hear you.

          It bugs me to no end when one moment I am reading an article about how Mr. Busch winning last weekend shouldn’t cause people to validate his actions with his ex (by the way, he wasn’t charged with anything) and now we have those same outlets milking the hell out of Mayweather’s amazing car collection – a guy who went to jail for domestic assault but seems to be made of Teflon.

        • 0 avatar

          An argument can be made that boxing, or any of the martial arts, is sport at its most basic level, two people competing. I’m simultaneously attracted to and repelled by boxing. A great boxing match, Ali-Frazier, Hearns-Leonard (or Hearns-Hagler), or the Gatti-Ward trilogy is compelling.

          Primates, the great apes and aquatic mammals included, love to watch violence. Humans also love to watch other humans excel, one reason why we like music, art and sports. Combine violence and high performance and it’s not surprising that prizefighting and other martial arts are popular.

          • 0 avatar

            I don’t know where you get the idea that any mammals besides (some) humans like to watch violence, or anything else for that matter. Some may participate in violence, at least under certain circumstances, but watching it? It takes a certain type of brain to want to be a spectator, one that’s almost certainly unique to humans.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Why Dog gave women trigger fingers. Help those in your life learn to use them.

  • avatar

    What is the point of this piece? I question if it’s really about taking shots at other outlets and Mayweather, or if it’s just trying to pull in some of that “sweet Seo sugar” that everyone else is getting… It’s not like the search engines car about which side of this debate you’re on, it’s all about getting some type of “current event” in your content.

  • avatar

    With all due respect to this article’s detractors, critical debate on damn near any automotive related topic has been the cornerstone of TTAC for over a decade.

    TTAC is supposed to challenge you, perhaps make you question the motives behind what others say. That’s a GOOD thing!

    You may say I’m just sucking up to the new boss, but these articles are why I joined 9+ years ago and (one of the reasons) why I only want to write here.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      Agree. We can’t just accept articles without placing them in the context of current events. Otherwise we would never understand why other people are reading/talking about electric cars.

  • avatar
    Tinn-Can

    How Gawker-esque… It seems I missed a lot while I was on vacation last week.

  • avatar
    Johnny Canada

    Goodbye TTAC. It was fun while it lasted.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    The article certainly is appropriate, as other media outlets have chosen to focus on cars and Mayweather there is a tight automotive connection.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    His going broke story is going to be epic, it is going to make Tyson and Holyfield’s look amateurish. Arrogant, illiterate boxer who spends money like a drunken sailor, what could possibly go wrong?

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      It’s hard to go broke buying super cars you’ve famously paid cash for. Even if you spent $20M on super cars, they’re going to be worth, what, $10M 10 years later? Heck, if he’s not driving them, some of them are going UP in value. People love to point fingers at flashy cars as the reasons athletes and musicians go broke, but paying cash for easily resold assets isn’t the reason. Spreading it to the posse and “investing” in every idiot scheme your crazy uncles and cousins and dogwalker and whatever can come up with to bilk you out of your cash is. At least you can sell the cars, often for $.50 on the dollar or more.

      • 0 avatar
        VenomV12

        I watched my neighbor blow the better part of a $100 million contract and he isn’t even a quarter the idiot that Mayweather is so I know quite well that Mayweather easily can and probably will blow all his money. You act like this is something new and is hasn’t happened dozens, even hundreds of times. You are aware that there are many ways to go broke, not just spending all your liquid cash, right? You really think the odds that an illiterate boxer that spends money like water won’t go broke are good, seriously?

        I watched my neighbor spend $500,000 on a gold chain with a massive gold and diamond pendant, if I said to him take that $500,000 and invest in a McDonald’s franchise instead that will make you money he would have laughed and said no. I talked him out of buying a golf course and hotel for $6 million years ago at the urging of his financial adviser/high school friend that I knew was in trouble (the owners offered it to me months before for $3 million), and that went belly up a few years later.

        Bad investments, women, casinos and managers and attorneys that rip you off is where you lose all your money, not cars or residential homes. A million here, five million there, then the IRS and before you know it, you are dead broke. He was taking care of directly about 20 plus family members, not including staff, etc etc, even if he gave them conservatively $30,000 each a year that’s $600,000 a year. He bought his mother a house for about $400,000, another $200,000 in cars for her, invested in businesses for her and his brothers and sisters that all went belly up, cars for them also, another $2 million in cars for himself. Even with rudimentary math skills you can figure it out yourself.

    • 0 avatar
      Viceroy_Fizzlebottom

      Mayweather is set to make over $150 Million from this one fight (yes, you read that correctly). He ain’t going broke anytime soon.

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    Just a small note:

    I’m in favor of allowing women to eke out a living. I know it’s controversial.

    Therefore, I think it’s just abominable to discriminate against the cute, attractive, and big-breasted. The booth babe has a noble tradition as a product specialist beyond the Bundy Bounce.

    I assume it’s simply an attempt for little people to gain some notion of control over who they think is bigger. Nobody ever pretended Sonny Liston was a prince, either.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    For the record, I skipped every story I saw regarding Floyd’s car collection. I could give two you-know-whats about the details of his fabulous wealth.

    I really liked and admired Money Mayweather…UNTIL I learned about his sociopathy, misogyny, and troubling issues with NOT being able to stop himself from physically and emotionally abusing women.

    Ignorance WAS bliss, but I can’t ignore what he’s done and continues to do. I can’t go back and pretend he did nothing wrong…like he can.

    I don’t care how rich and talented you are; there’s no excuse for that kind of behavior in human society. If you engage in it again and again without the slightest remorse, you are indeed a garbage person. This is not a tough stance to take. Floyd needs honest-to-god HELP, not more fame.

    Unfortunately, he is the king of his particular hill, and like Kim Jong-un, those who take issue with how he conducts himself don’t find themselves around him long.

  • avatar
    healthy skeptic

    >> Whether it’s ESPN, USA Today, or even Automotive News, media of all sorts are jumping on the Mayweather gravy train and they’re willing to stay on-board as long as the ride will last.

    …and with this article, TTAC adds itself to the mix!

    >> This works in the favor of all the automotive hacks scrambling for stories to justify their weekly contract fees.

    Hmmmmm….

  • avatar
    70Cougar

    I hope this article isn’t a sign of things to come at TTAC.

    • 0 avatar

      There’s this big fear that the “new guy” (Mark) is gonna come in and fsck everything up. So people are grabbing onto this story as proof of just that.

      But it’s not gonna happen. TTAC was on shakier ground with Bertel than it is right this very moment.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    “Booth babes are horrible … but look at all these cars owned by a convicted wife beater.”

    Fair enough in itself.

    But do we demand that the industry never write about cars owned by criminally violent people *at all*?

    Or only if they’re criminally violent towards *women*?

    The first demand is consistent, though I think it might be a bit much to demand that no attention be paid to a glorious collection of automobiles because the owner is Not A Good Person.

    The latter is … sexist.

    If a pattern of violence against the innocent is disqualifying (and maybe it should be), it should be so *regardless of the target’s gender*.

    If we are only to be offended by violence against women, then we’re denying they’re equal to men, and people exactly like men are – and we’re also devaluing men to do it, it would seem.

    I prefer just showing me the cars, as long as it can be done without presenting a Not Good Person as somehow excellent simply because they own a lot of nice cars.

    (I mean, hell, I’d read an article about *Hitler or Stalin*’s cars, and they’re both more evil than this guy could be in a thousand years.)

    • 0 avatar

      I totally get this and agree. We also won’t ever see Hitler showing off all the expensive cars he doesn’t drive on Instagram.

      • 0 avatar
        Mullholland

        What about time-warp Instagram?

        Hey, nice article Mark.
        Not a boxing fan but I’ve also not been stuck under a Dodge Diplomat, either. I have certainly been trying to keep my head above the flood of coverage on this self-proclaimed “Fight of the Century” and you’ve given me several new reasons to worry about the future of boxing and humanity.
        Thanks, keep up the good work, ignore the whiners.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      “If we are only to be offended by violence against women, then we’re denying they’re equal to men . . .”

      Because they’re not. It’s especially disgusting to assault women and children because they’re completely helpless in a physical confrontation against any physically competent adult male. Just like Mayweather would be against any decent boxer the size of an average adult male or larger, or any well-rounded martial artist.

      But your point is a good one, and Floyd’s history of criminal violence is actually quite minor. Hitting 100 women without causing permanent physical damage isn’t anywhere near as bad as beating one man until he’s permanently disabled.

  • avatar
    slow_poke

    gave up on reading comments… though i’ll add my feeble weight to one side of the scale:

    Jalopnik annoys me w/ all the cross-marketed stories (planes, etc…) i’d go to that site if i cared… all this decreases the brand point of view in my mind.

    this article seems like it doesn’t tell me about cool cars people make, cools cars i could potentially (or wish) own, or about some great work of fab, imagination associated w/ cars. this is a story about a bad man. don’t need it. in my mind i think it decreases/softens/muddies the brand of TTAC rather than sharpening it. and i kinda like TTAC which is why i’m taking time out of my day to tell you.

    if you’re passionate about this boxer’s unacceptable antics, tell your friends, start a kickstarter, make a quilt. i see no linkage between that and cars.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    The worst part about this article is that it pretends to be an article condeming a man for domestic battery, but it ACTUALLY is an article which just slams other media outlets for being low brow to attach themselves to the fight by promoting a woman beater in order to gain clicks, by mentioning a woman beater in order to gain clicks.

    Guys, no one cares how you think of yourselves compared to Jalopnik or anyone else. That’s not the content we come here to read. The second rule of journalism as taught to me by my HS journalism teacher (after “report as fairly and without bias as possible”) is “YOU ARE NOT THE STORY.” We are not here to read ABOUT TTAC, we’re here to read TTAC ABOUT CARS and the car industry.

    Yes, the other guys are somewhat scummy for writing cheap clickbait about the fight. You guys are far scummier for pretending to be above them by writing about how you’re not writing cheap clickbait about the fight.

    • 0 avatar
      Zoom

      “The worst part about this article is that it pretends to be an article condeming [sic] a man for domestic battery…”

      No it doesn’t pretend that. Besides the media coverage, Mark also talks about the dealerships allowing themselves to be aligned with the wife beater.

      This is an editorial, not a “report”.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        “What I blame is the constant morality bending going on in the automotive media – and the general media – that’s the root cause of all of this. The whole environment is a testament to “talking out of both sides of your mouth”.”

        …He writes in essentially a clickbait article about the fight.

  • avatar
    Zoom

    TTAC IS DEAD! LONG LIVE TTAC!

    Not sure what the “B&B” are concerned about. This is an excellent editorial. I don’t follow boxing, but I have heard of the players. I had no idea about Mayweather’s history of beating women. The fact that any article can be written about him without even a mention of that is rather disturbing.

    I can’t imagine anyone publishing an article now about, say, Bill Cosby’s cars, and eventually Mayweather will get the same treatment. Hopefully.

  • avatar
    Chan

    I don’t give a flying winged rat’s droppings about some abusive sportsman. Those are everywhere, and I can imagine that if they’re good at their games, they earn the paper and can buy nice things. Have your Veyron and your restraining orders.

    The fact that this site and its readers can occasionally take the time to philosophically debate what is newsworthy….that’s a pretty good thing, as long as it’s occasional.

    Our main interest here is the cars, not who owns what car unless the car is particularly noteworthy. None of Boxerbeater’s cars are noteworthy because they are all played out models that every other boring billionaire playboy buys.

  • avatar
    dash riprock

    Click Bait? This is not click bait. At least not TTAC style click bait. TTAC style click bait is any article on Cadillac. These articles are sure to generate dozens of comments, and, hundreds of clicks. And that is just from a single participant.

  • avatar
    ClutchCarGo

    “Business is business: cutthroat, immoral and feelingless”

    This is exactly why giving corporations the same rights as citizens is an absurdity that will destroy this country. And business is not so much immoral as it’s amoral, but it leaves us in the same position.

  • avatar
    Mullholland

    Many commenters seem to want to see detailed reportage of the virtually unobtainable cars of the rich and notorious. Are they lost, ignorant of the unique editorial tradition and scope of TTAC or has their subscription to Hemming’s expired?

  • avatar
    crm114

    It’s nice to see Warren Sapp back on his feet, now apparently working as an investment counselor to other pro athletes.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I do agree that the media shouldn’t be giving any positive press coverage to celebrity criminals but bad press is just as effective as good press when it comes to garnering attention.

    Same old double standard; if you are rich you are eccentric; if you are poor you are nuts. The rich get away with murder whereas the poor are murdered.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Rich bastards and celebs just annoy with their car buys. Although Shia Labouf gets extra points for owning an F-150 Lariat and parking it on it’s roof on an LA intersection at 3am when he could’ve flipped any Escalade, Land Rover, etc, he wanted.

    But I’d build all the things my that would cost many times more than their value, but would need to be done EXCEPT without my financial advisor yelling at me. Like a front AND rear drivetrain CRX sleeper. Or various early ’80s sports coupes with 1,000 plus hp under the hood, while looking bone stock and showroom fresh.

  • avatar
    reclusive_in_nature

    The IRS will be taking possession of those cars soon enough. This human trash will keep living large long after he’s fought his last match. I give him a decade before he’s doing car dealer commercials to keep the lights on.

  • avatar
    Driver8

    Wait, WTF, I thought I deleted that Jalopnik bookmark months ago.

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