By on January 8, 2015

2014-Lada-Granta-672x410

Since the first Ladas left the assembly line in the 1970s, the automaker has always held the top spot on the sales podium, month after month, year after year. Until November 2014, that is.

Automotive News Europe reports that problems between parent company AutoVAZ and several of its suppliers helped to bring Lada’s continuous dominance over the Russian domestic market to an end that month, when Kia moved 10,834 Rios over the former’s 10,520 Grantas to take the monthly gold. Those problems have since been resolved, per an AutoVAZ representative.

Despite the hiccup, Lada is still the czar of the Russian market, having sold 351,992 units between January and November of last year; Kia holds a distant second with 175,491 sold. The Granta is also holding its own overall, with 139,405 copies taking to the highway over the same timeframe. Hyundai’s Solaris (105,142) and the Kia Rio (84,350) round out the top three.

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19 Comments on “Supplier Woes Lead To Lada’s First-Ever Loss Of Monthly Sales Crown...”


  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I wonder how much of this is tied to sanctions? It isn’t mentioned whether the suppliers are domestic or local. With the ruble crash, I could see some disagreements on payments in euro/ruble.

    Let’s dust off the tooling for the RWD cars at the Izhevsk and RosLada factories and start cranking those puppies out. As antiquated as those cars seem when taken in the scope of the global market, in the backwater villages where money is hard to come by and suspension durability and ease of maintenance is a top consideration, those old Fiat based cars were just the ticket. Heck I wouldn’t be surprised if Izhevsk still had the stamping presses and tooling to make the old 412 Moskvitch! That was an indigenous design with a copy of BMW’s 1500cc slant-4 and an even tougher construction (rear leaf springs)

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Attempt at bypassing spam filter:

    I wonder how much of this is tied to sanctions? It isn’t mentioned whether the suppliers are domestic or local. With the ruble crash, I could see some d1sagreements on payments in euro/ruble.

    Let’s dust off the tooling for the RWD cars at the Izhevsk and RosLada factories and start cranking those puppies out. As antiquated as those cars seem when taken in the scope of the global market, in the backwater villages where money is hard to come by and suspension durability and ease of maintenance is a top cons1deration, those old Fiat based cars were just the ticket. Heck I wouldn’t be surprised if Izhevsk still had the stamping presses and tooling to make the old 412 Moskvitch! That was an indigenous design with a copy of BMW’s 1500cc slant-4 and even tougher construction (rear leaf springs)

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Watching the James May Top Gear special about People’s Cars, the history of the Fiat 124 cum Lada Riva was amazing. I couldn’t believe they made such a car for so long – though May demonstrated how it was rough and ready for harsh conditions, where the camera crew’s Range Rover Sport was not.

      But anyway, these Ladas must be MUCH cheaper than other (surely better) cars from 1st world marques.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        You used to be able to buy a new 2105 (carbureted, optional 5spd instead of 4 for about $200 more) for right around the $5000 mark. A fuel injected 2107 would go for about $500 more, and the 2104 wagons were about the price of a 2107.

        The fwd Ladas went up in price from there: a Samara II (fwd hatchback or sedan) which is considered to be a decent upgrade in road manners and speed went for $6500 or so.

        The Grantas are the ‘cheap’ Ladas relative to the $9-11k VAZ 2110 based Priora, nto sure what they go for now but they are nowhere near the old $5k rwd cars.

        BTW the “Riva” is the export name of the rwd 2107 (tall chrome grille). The Niva is the nimble little fulltime 4wd trucklet. Those have been modernized and are now Lada 4x4M (M = Modernized). Fuel injected, suspension and NVH improvements, it’s still a very old and crude little beast but for the right application it is still very relevant, particularly at their price point.

  • avatar
    pkov

    test

    • 0 avatar
      pkov

      Well that one finally appeared, maybe I can comment now.

      You can’t drive long in America without developing a little jealously of the countries where they’ll let you buy something crude but tough.

      Listening to your gorgeous new ride weekly develop another pothole induced rattle makes you realize that simple toughness is in fact it’s own kind of refinement.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        “…simple toughness is in fact it’s own kind of refinement.”

        Excellent point. Unfortunately, the reviewers always attach the adjective ‘crude’ to that feature. Henry Ford’s advertising of the Model T once largely consisted of a loudspeaker at the factory announcing “If we take you there, we’ll bring you back”, over and over. Today’s car buyers, though, want more than that.

  • avatar
    schmitt trigger

    My same thoughts.
    These newer Ladas would be nice in Moscow or St. Petersburg.
    But in the rough and unforgiving steppes and tundras that comprise the majority of Russia’s territory, it appears to be too fragile.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      This is why Lada still sells the Niva. For when you really need to fix your car with two baulks of timber, bindertwine and a sledgehammer, and need to run it on vodka.

      What amazes me is that the Samara is still made. That car sucked when it was new, which was, what, thirty years ago?

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Aren’t they still making the Samara because of other markets – Iran or something?

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          You used to be able to buy a new 2105 (carbureted, optional 5spd instead of 4 for about $200 more) for right around the $5000 mark. A fuel injected 2107 would go for about $500 more, and the 2104 wagons were about the price of a 2107.

          The fwd Ladas went up in price from there: a Samara II (fwd hatchback or sedan) which is cons1dered to be a decent upgrade in road manners and speed went for $6500 or so.

          The Grantas are the ‘cheap’ Ladas relative to the $9-11k VAZ 2110 based Priora, not sure what they go for now but they are nowhere near the old $5k rwd cars.

          BTW the “Riva” is the export name of the rwd 2107 (tall chrome grille). The Niva is the nimble little fulltime 4wd trucklet. Those have been modernized and are now Lada 4x4M (M = Modernized). Fuel injected, suspension and NVH improvements, it’s still a very old and crude little beast but for the right application it is still very relevant, particularly at their price point.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Samara was a HUGE hit when it came out, in 1985 it was actually a very modern fwd hatchback. Compared to the RWD Ladas it went like stink, handled incredibly, and looked like something current.

          When the sedan variant came out with the fuel injected 1.5 (magical letter “i” on the badge) VAZ 21099, people went nuts. The darling of speed crazed young Russian guys without the money to buy a grey market German car.

          The Samaras became known for the most rattly plasticky interiors ever known to man, even compared to the old Zhiguli. Truly awful in that regard.

          They’re actually quite durable and have a decent long travel suspension, see below

          link:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JsZELdNdGGw

      • 0 avatar

        Niva is not like that. It’s more like a Suzuki Sidekick. If you want to fix with timber, you need UAZ Hunter. I think you can still get them with carburated engines.

  • avatar
    Onus

    The Granta has a fair bit of Renault / Nissan parts in it ( having driven one ).

    I don’t think auto parts are sanctioned. But, the currency situation probably required them to re negotiate their contracts.

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    To increase market share among Russian vegans they could introduce the Ensalada…

  • avatar
    Pastor Glenn

    Having lived in the UK and having had to pay for my own cars (unlike 50% of the drivers there who get company cars handed them every year), and living on the tightest budget imaginable, I ended up having clunkers for cars (“bangers” in English). Got fed up with that, so bought a brand new 1987 Lada Riva (2107 type) with 1.2 litres, 4 speed. Over 55 mph it was excruciatingly loud. But tough as nails.

    Sold it, got more bangers, got fed up, had a Saab blow up on holiday on the wrong side of England from home, so ended up buying a new 1990 Lada Riva 1300 5 speed. Much better. Had a cambelt instead of chain, so much quieter too. The 5th gear made it tolerable at 70-75 mph.

    Just advanced the daylights out of the distributor timing, and the MPG went from mid 20’s to mid 30’s. (Brit “petrol” being that much better and higher octane than Russian stuff of the day).

    The Riva was actually a great car, far better than the 1984 Pontiac 1000 (nee Chevette) we’d run in the US before moving to the UK. Yes, it was crude. Yes, it was a brand new 1967 Fiat 124 licenced car with changes including incredibly thick steel which added several hundred pounds in weight and made the steering rather heavier than the Duece and a Half trucks I’d driven in the USAF (da, who needs gym, just drive Lada….)

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