By on January 28, 2015

18 - 1974 International Harvester Scout Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinWith so many IHC Scouts here in Colorado, many of them wear out, rust out, get crashed, or get replaced by trucks with modern conveniences such as sub-100dB interior noise levels and air conditioning. In this series, we’ve seen this ’70, this ’71, this ’72, this ’73, and this ’74, and now today’s well-used ’74. I saw this truck when I went to a Denver yard to celebrate Half Off Everything Day on the first day of the new year.
11 - 1974 International Harvester Scout Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinIf this is the original engine, it’s an AMC 258-cubic-inch straight-six. Given how Scout owners tend to mix-and-match engines, though, this could be just about any AMC six.
20 - 1974 International Harvester Scout Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThere’s rust. Oh yes, plenty of rust.
04 - 1974 International Harvester Scout Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinOne good thing about trucks of this era is that there wasn’t much soft material in the interior to smell bad. Still, this Scout’s final owner decided that the truck needed That New Car Smell.
06 - 1974 International Harvester Scout Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinComplicated heater controls aren’t needed— just good old cable-operated levers.
08 - 1974 International Harvester Scout Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinScout production made it into the 1980s, just barely.
22 - 1974 International Harvester Scout Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinOne of my accomplices at the Half Off Sale party grabbed the grille for hanging on his living-room wall. Only $12!

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51 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1974 International Harvester Scout...”


  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Getting creative with the tags today, eh? “cuv” and “AWD!”

    • 0 avatar

      The more tags the better!

      • 0 avatar
        AmcEthan

        $12 for a grill? thats a steal! here at both of out local yards there is no half price days or sales, but every day of the year prices are ridiculously overpriced. Grills here, in any shape, run minimum of $75. each fender is $75, hood is $150, doors $100 each. their minimum price on scrapyard parts of $5, even for screws. we usually have to sneak a few parts out of there when we pay for a bigger part. hear this, the worst parts is engines. if you want to buy an engine, complete or not, stuck or free spinning, its $350 the same with transmissions. and core is required. they will not sell any major part without a core. so it really is a pain in the butt to find good used parts around here. my favorite yard in town dates back to the 1940’s and doesnt scrap any of their cars so all of the many decades of cars are still lined up. that one has the highest prices and is the only self serve one within 30 miles of my house. i have only been to one yard here in iowa that has really good prices and it was at grab n’ go in spencer iowa. there is only 3 junkyards within 30 miles of my house and only one is self serve, but it is VERY easy to find nice condition classics for cheap, especially pickups. we have several 1960’s and early 1970’s pickups still roaming the town as work trucks and rock haulers. i would kill to live in a town with yards like the ones you visit.

  • avatar
    ex-x-fire

    When I was a kid my older sister had a wild boyfriend, his usual mode of transportation was a Chevette. Well, one day he shows up in a topless scout & we go for a ride, talk about a white knuckle experience barreling down the road in a top heavy convertible with no roll bar. The thing would lay rubber from the front & rear tires too.

    • 0 avatar
      Duncan345

      My first car was a ’77 Scout II. I damn near rolled mine when I took a corner too fast (i.e. about 25 mph). My dad had a ’74 Scout II SS back in the seventies. He rolled his when he was driving it home from the shop. Apparently the mechanic forgot to re-install the c-clip in the rear axle. The wheel and axle shaft came right out and he was riding on 3 wheels for a few seconds before the truck flipped. Luckily, the SS model had a roll bar.

      I still have my old Scout. Waiting for the day when I have some extra cash to fix her up.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    How did hood get buckled without smashing the grille?

    • 0 avatar
      Gadsden

      These had reverse opening hoods so probably had the hood up for an extended period until a tree or limb fell across it.

      I had an opportunity to pick one of these up for literally free about 10 years ago. It was a bit of a mess but i had personally gotten it running a few years earlier. Fear of (further) angering my wife (at the time) kept me from pulling the trigger. I regret not getting it, but had i pulled the trigger i’m sure i would’ve regretted that too!

    • 0 avatar

      or someone at the junk yard opened the hood with a forklift.

  • avatar
    wmba

    This vehicle had few redeeming features even when new. After one winter, it had none.

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    I always hated the Volkswagen-style taillamps and the afterthought rear side windows on these things. How anyone favored these over the contemporary Broncos, Cherokees, or Blazers is hard for me to comprehend.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “One of my accomplices at the Half Off Sale party grabbed the grille for hanging on his living-room wall.”

    Your accomplice is in serious need of a decorator, or a live-in girl friend

  • avatar
    mtr2car1

    These things have such a cult following yet are so hard to find, look for them to be the next “it” item on the auction circuit like the 21 window VW van and the 2 door Toyota Land Cruiser.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Over here in Pennsylvania, this Scout would still be considered a viable restoration project.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      My youngest son in SW TX sold his Scout last year to a guy near Brownswille who has a whole stable of IHC TravelAlls, Pickups and Scouts. Not only is that retired guy a collector but he and his family used to be the IHC dealer for that area. He keeps all his fully-functioning IHC vehicles in a giant metal barn, shielded from the elements.

      Admittedly, the Scout my son sold him was tricked out with a totally rebuilt 345, Holly 1100cf Carb, dual exhausts, 31″ tires on 15″ wheels, new paint job in OEM colors, tuck&rolled interior, etc. I bought this Scout decades ago, used, for dirt cheap. Who knew it would bring a lot of money in 2014?

      With a little TLC they last forever.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Yeah this is what people in most areas would call a low rust Scout II. The doors look like they still open and close so the inner rockers haven’t rusted to nothing. The hatch is sitting there open so those hinges haven’t rusted out. I’d grab so many of the parts from that thing.

  • avatar

    I like that the junkyard evidently couldn’t figure out who made it, or otherwise didn’t have an “International” section, so they stuck it in with the Mopars, judging by what surrounds it.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I would have put it with other vaporware things. Studebakers, AMC’s, Renaults.

      • 0 avatar
        anti121hero

        Generally the randoms, (AMC Renault, International, older American makes) are thrown in with chryslers at my local u pull

      • 0 avatar

        Studebaker sold cars from the turn of the 20th century into the 1960s. AMC was in business from 1954 (going back to the Jeffrey Rambler ~1903) until they were bought by Chrysler in 1987. Neither fits the definition of vaporware, and while Renault never really made a serious effort to penetrate the US market, I’m old enough to remember the Dauphine trying to make a run at the VW Beetle.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Well this thing has an AMC 6 which was inherited by Chrysler so the Jeeps get thrown in with the Chryslers now and since this has a “Jeep” engine it goes there too or I assume that was part of the logic of where to put it.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    My Dads friend had one of these in the late 80’s. I guess my Dad and his 2 friends went fishing for the weekend in the late fall. On the way back my Dad was sleeping in the back seat and kept hearing this strange noise from the right rear of the truck (it would only last a second or two). The other two laughed when he spoke up about it, thinking Dad was still drunk so he ended up going back to sleep. A few minutes later the sound returned and it was constant….everyone heard it and then it stopped. Turns out the right rear wheel came off after the noise stopped and was pacing them down the shoulder; the driver let off the gas and the wheel passed them which eventually veered off into the ditch. My Dad and his friend both swear that as soon as the tire went flying into the ditch the rear of the Scout dropped and they skidded to a stop.

  • avatar
    Nick 2012

    I have a soft spot for these being from Fort Wayne, Indiana. A very attractive girl in college also drove one. She was a badass.

    A ~75 year old guy down the road from my parents uses an unrestored late ’50s IH S-Series for maintaining his 100+ acre property.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    There’s something to be said for the simplicity of lever operated HVAC controls. My old 1998 MPV had them, a bit longer than was fashionable to have such primitive HVAC, especially for a ‘luxury’ trim. I consider myself lucky that my 1996 4Runner just made the cut to still have them (rotary knobs introduced for 1998 MY). A well lubed set has a very pleasant mechanical smoothness to them that make them a treat to operate. Fittingly, one of the few trouble spots on these older 4Runners is the auto climate control on the the 00-02 4Runner Limiteds.

    My gf’s family is from Fort Wayne and I never made the connection to Scouts being made there. Makes me want to buy one now! Since moving out to the MidWest, I’ve become quite enamored with the strong manufacturing history out here. Living in Indy, just south of the famed GM town Anderson IN, I’ve become quite drawn to old GM iron (a clean Box B-body is in my future). Maybe it’s a subconscious desire to show some support for the ‘home team.’ Well Civics like mine are assembled in nearby Greensburg, and Camrys like my gf’s in Evansville so I guess I already am (to a degree).

    • 0 avatar
      Nick 2012

      All kinds of stuff was made in and around Ft. Wayne, from magnet wire, Magnavox radios, military hardware, sonobouys, etc. On the auto front, the big 3 were represented in Indy, Kokomo, and elsewhere (I used to live in NE Indy before moving ‘home’).

      If I’m ever looking for a truck, it will be a Ft. Wayne built Silverado/Sierra.

      http://egen.fortwayne.com/ns/projects/history/2000/1980/econ0.php

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Yes older GMT-400 trucks definitely dominate the scene all over Indiana, solid rigs for sure.

        It’s sad to drive through Anderson and see big empty lots where the GM buildings used to stand. I think Anderson was second only to Flint, MI for saturation of the local workforce by automotive manufacturing in the US. When they started to shut things down in the 1980s, it really gutted the community. In fact the top source of employment in Anderson now is healthcare, thanks to the generous union healthcare plans that the retirees are on. Who knows what will happen once that dries up.

        Subaru’s Lafayette plant is also right nearby, but I never see that many on the roads, although it seems like it has increased over the past 2 years.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          It’s not uncommon for the largest employer in any given community to be hospitals – takes a lot of folks to run them. I’m from St. Louis originally – the whole are has about 3 million people and the largest employer is Barnes Hospital.

          Probably not such a bad thing for that kind of city in the long run – health care jobs tend to pay pretty well, and it’s a LOT more stable than the car biz.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    October, 1986:

    My kid brother David takes Dad’s ’79 Scout to school the first day he has his license. He’s tooling his way down Manchester road at about 45 mph, listening to this song:

    The street is somewhat damp, and David is unaware that the Scout’s all-wheel drum brakes don’t like wet streets…not one bit. I told him so, but he was always a hard-head, and didn’t listen. Besides, he was probably in a zone of sorts from the chewing tobacco buzz and Thorogood soundtrack. So, when he sees the red light ahead, he hits the brakes, unaware of the mayhem to follow. The Scout resolutely refuses to stop straight, goes into a clockwise spin (David later called it a “flat spin” because he was a big “Top Gun” fan), and promptly turns into a twirling steel brick, looking for things to destroy. It finds Victim One in short order – an unsuspecting ’74 Ford Torino sitting in the parking lot of an animal hospital. The Scout hit the Ford dead center between the front and rear doors, and laid waste to it.

    Still spinning clockwise, the Scout then twirls its way into the chain link separating the animal hospital and the KFC next door. Game over for the fence. And then the Scout, still spinning, makes a mockery of all the pretty hedges and flowers in front of the KFC, and the back end spins into a light pole in the parking lot, apparently reversing the spin and sending the front end upwards. The Scout comes to rest with the front end spiked on a short concrete pole in front of KFC.

    It was still running, George Thorogood still blasting from the stereo. This is how I found my brother a few minutes after he called me at home to help him out. He was unhurt, which was almost unreal given that he wasn’t wearing seat belts, and thus bounced freely in the the Scout’s all-metal interior.

    And after the tow truck got the Scout off the concrete pole, IT WAS STILL DRIVABLE, even with a bashed up front end and a pancaked rear quarter.

    Dad sold the Scout to the repair shop a bit down the street from the accident site, where it served as a push vehicle until something like 1995.

    THIS is why people love these things, folks…they’re f**king cockroaches.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Most 1974 and all 1975 and later Scouts had disc brakes up front. Of course nowadys many of the earlier ones have front discs too thanks to an bolt in swap of the newer parts. I put discs on my 72 and need to get around to putting them on my 73 also. And yes they are hard to kill.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I have a special place in my heart for old IH pickups and Scouts. I love those old IHs and learning to drive on my granddad’s 63 IH 1000 stepside with three on the tree and the straight 6 brings back good memories.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Even here in dry Southern California these things rust out because of designed in dirt traps .

    A sad thing to be sure as they’re ‘ Trucklets ‘ in the truest sense of the word : tiny little trucks that are actually _trucks_ .

    Noisy & rough yes but amazingly sturdy .

    We used to have one with e 345 C.I. V-8 and a Shortie cab , kitted out as a welding rig for maintenance of the gates high up the hills in Giffith Park .

    We salvaged it in the 1980’s for about $300 , I wanted to buy it but what to do with it ? .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Well most of the parts are shared with the full size trucks and they shared a lot of their parts with the medium duty trucks. I’d call them muscle trucks in the tratitional sense of the term. After all the muscle car formula was to put the full size engine in the midsize car. Well this is the Medium duty engine in the compact truck. Ok not this one since it has the wimpy AMC 6.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    You’ll find one in every car kid, you’ll see

  • avatar
    Pastor Glenn

    International Harvester’s own “Black Diamond” 220 cid and 240 cid OHV long-stroke inline sixes were TRUCK engines, and weighed more than a big-block Chevy V8 engine (750 pounds). They were also too long for the Scout chassis. To save money (I presume), IHC began buying AMC sixes for their full-sized pickups in 1969 and added the option to the Scout, since the engine fit and some folks wanted something other than the very rough slant-four, or the super-tough IHC V8.

    Yes, these were indistructible – except against rust!

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I actually just remembered that there is a Scout for sale, not too far from here, that is the rarest of them all! A 1980 Scout II with a Nissan SD33T turbodiesel!

    Now that’s something Murilee should try and find.

    • 0 avatar
      MRF 95 T-Bird

      Back in the 80’s I used to see around a late 70’s-80 Scout II Traveler Diesel which was the longer wheelbase model. That must have been a rare beast. IIRC in the 70’s when IHC was having financial issues they phased out the Travel-all and built the longer body Scout II Traveler.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Yeah, and they had a pickup version of the Scout called the Terra. I think I’ve seen one of those in the flesh, but not a Traveler.

        That diesel was pretty…weak. It was only turbocharged for the 1980 model year, and even in turbo form it produced a stunning, world-shaking…105 horsepower.

      • 0 avatar
        roger628

        I remember an MT Road test of an early non-turbo Scout diesel. It was so slow that they decided to pit a high school track & field sprinter against one, AFAIR the runner got a fair ways down the track before the truck caught up.

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