By on January 20, 2015

2016 Honda HR-V

Those shopping for a small, fuel-efficient crossover can now add the 2016 Honda HR-V to the list, thanks to its EPA-certified 31 mpg combined rating.

Autoblog reports the HR-V also delivers 28 mpg in the city and 35 mpg on the highway, but only if one opts for the FWD model with CVT. Adding power to the back brings the rating down to 27 city/32 highway/29 combined, while swapping the CVT for a six-speed manual in the FWD variant pushes the savings down to 25 city/34 highway/28 combined.

The FWD HR-V’s figures best those from competitors like the Nissan Juke, Kia Soul and Chevrolet Trax at the pump, while Mazda’s CX-5 can keep up on the highway figure; the CX-3, which awaits EPA-certification, may do better than the HR-V, however. Its platform-mate, the Fit, outperforms the crossover at 33 city/41 highway/36 combined.

The 2016 HR-V is due in U.S. showrooms this spring.

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46 Comments on “EPA: 2016 Honda HR-V Nets 31 MPG Combined...”


  • avatar
    insalted42

    By this time next year, the HR-V will be outselling the Fit. Possibly even the Fit and Civic combined.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    “Not only does the HR-V best competitors like the Nissan Juke, Kia Soul and Chevrolet Trax at the pump, the crossover also bests the Fit”

    Not quite, the EPA lists the Fit @ 29 City / 37 Hwy

    • 0 avatar
      Wraith

      And the CVT makes 33/41 (LX) or 32/38 (EX & EX-L).

      I guess the only way the HR-V beats the Fit (in EPA ratings) is if you look back to the old (2013) model. And even there, the top-rated HR-V configuration matches the top-rated Fit at 28/35.

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    Honda will regret cannibalizing CRV sales.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Not if it’s with another Honda product.

      • 0 avatar
        mkirk

        Worked for GM. But yes, I see this a a winner for Honda but only if it is not too close to the CR-V price wise. If that happens I could see the midsiz truck issue rearing its head. Of course this is a pretty hot segment so the market has pretty much debunked that worry.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I disagree, the HR-V is the perfect starter kit that would easily lead into the CR-V step-up. Well played, Honda

    • 0 avatar
      kovakp

      “Honda will regret cannibalizing CRV sales”

      For footprint, this *is* the classic CR-V. Was poking around the current CR-V yesterday while my wife’s Fit was getting warranty maintenance. Jeepers, how they’ve perceptually if not actually grown. Clunky.

      I don’t think the new Fit is flying out of showrooms, either. There were 5 new ones receiving no attention at our dealership in the two hours we killed there. Walk-ins were mostly looking at Accords and Oddys.

      I really think the HR-V is more a Fit replacement than a competitor for CR-V sales.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        “I really think the HR-V is more a Fit replacement than a competitor for CR-V sales.”

        This. Likely a bit more profitable, too.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        “Jeepers, how they’ve perceptually if not actually grown. Clunky.”

        It’s all perception. In reality they’re within ~3 inches of one another in basically all specs. It’s only even grown in weight 262lbs (8%).

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          I know, right? I was absolutely certain that the original CR-V was almost HR-V sized, but when I looked it up, the stats proved otherwise. It’s the Toyota RAV4 that’s grown the most. If Toyota made a subcompact CUV it would be almost the same size as the original RAV4.

          • 0 avatar
            Zykotec

            Even driving and owning a CR-V you will think it has grown a lot since the first gen ( I own an ’07 3rd gen, and recently test drove a ’98), but it’s just improved packaging and less glass area, and some added width (the wheelarches no longer stick out from the body). The trunk got stretched a bit when the spare went under the floor, so technically the body is longer than on a first gen. But total outside length is about the same.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The mythical Renegade is supposed to top 30 mpg highway also, but when can I buy one?

  • avatar
    Wraith

    Looking at the AWD crossover competition, the HR-V (27/32, 29 combined) pretty much matches the XV Crosstrek (26/34, 29 combined). The Juke and the larger CR-V, Outback, Rogue, and 2.0L CX-5 all make 28 combined.

  • avatar
    DeeDub

    “the crossover also bests the Fit, which provides the HR-V with its platform”

    You might want to recheck that math. Were you comparing it to the previous generation Fit?

  • avatar
    npaladin2000

    Everyone credits the Juke with “starting” this segment in the US, and being relatively successful, but everyone negletcs the part where the Juke has a beast of a powertrain, it wasn’t built to sip gas, it was built to go fast. It’s a hot hatch, and the “competition” are mostly snooze-hatches instead.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Really? The only thing I’ve heard anyone credit the Juke for is making a supreb effort at unseating the Aztec as the most awkward looking vehicle in recent memory.

      • 0 avatar
        npaladin2000

        Clearly you haven’t driven one. The thing really moves, and handles like a frigging Mazda3.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          So it handles like an economy car? Okay

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          “No, it handles like a Mazda3.”

          Which is…an economy car. LOL.

          • 0 avatar
            npaladin2000

            Except a Mazda3 doesn’t handle like most other economy cars now does it? :) Saying something handles like an economy car means nothing, a Corolla is an economy car. So is a Smart FourTwo. So is a Prius. But so also is a Focus, and also some of the better Civics out there. And Imprezas, they actually handle pretty well too.

            And two cars that handles really really well are a Mazda3 and a Nissan Juke.

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            Following that logic your S2000 is simply a Honda Miata. They are both little 2 seat convertible sports cars.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            “Following that logic your S2000 is simply a Honda Miata. They are both little 2 seat convertible sports cars.”

            From a handling perspective I’d agree. The only real substantive difference between the two is about 70hp.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            “A good handling car can make quick transitions in direction without a lot of body lean, without losing traction, without getting squirrely at all.”

            Thats the vaguest handling-related answer I’ve ever read.

            Virtually no modern cars will loose traction nor get squirrely under normal driving conditions nor evasive maneuvers.

            In other words, you’ve just said that every modern car handles well.

          • 0 avatar
            npaladin2000

            “Virtually no modern cars will loose traction nor get squirrely under normal driving conditions nor evasive maneuvers.”

            1. I never said anything about normal driving conditions, I said quick transitions.

            and 2. Bull, take a look at the recently published on this site Chevy Spark review. Among many others. Plenty of cars out there can’t be pushed hard.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          So what makes an economy car handle “good” vs a “bad” one?

          I don’t mean statistically or technical suspension geometry stuff, I mean just based off of driving them.

          • 0 avatar
            npaladin2000

            If you need to ask that, then you’ll need to turn in your B&B badge. :)

            It’s all about steering, suspension, chassis tuning, etc. A good handling car can make quick transitions in direction without a lot of body lean, without losing traction, without getting squirrely at all.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          Evasive maneuvers = Quick transitions

          If you read the comments you’d see that I did read the Spark review, “virtually” implies that not all cars handle “good”, the Spark being an example.

  • avatar
    calgarytek

    The AWD model is interesting. This means the front wheel drive version has, what, a torsion bar in the rear where as the AWD has fully independent suspension?

    Also, without that extra upper control arm in the front, it aint no first gen CRV. I’ve got one in ‘standard’. It’s damn good.

    Would love to convert it to DOHC VTEC. Anyone got a B16/B18 head ‘sitting around’?

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    I prefer manual transmissions. The HR-V will offer one, the Mazda CX-3 will not. The CX-5 does, but it’s much bigger.

  • avatar
    Freddie

    Any vehicle available with a stick is worth checking out.

    I can’t remember if I brilliantly thought of this myself or I read it somewhere, but the CUV as the default family car is a return to the 50’s when cars were tall and Mom and Dad – and especially Grandma – could step into a car instead of bending over and crawling in. After six decades it’s a backlash to longer, lower, wider.

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