By on December 8, 2014

2014 Chevrolet Silverado Crew Cab Z71

Own a new Chevrolet or GMC truck? You might be getting a new set of keys.

Automotive News reports owners of 2014-2015 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 and GMC Sierra 1500 pickups, as well as 2015 Chevrolet Suburban and Tahoe and GMC Yukon and Yukon XL SUVs without keyless start will need to come in to have the keys replaced. Per the bulletin issued by General Motors:

Some customers may comment that if the tilt steering column is in the full-up position and the shift lever is moved between gears, the shift lever contacts the head of the ignition key. Some contact force may rotate the ignition key and shut the engine off. When this condition occurs, the brake pedal was applied.

The keys are already available, as the automaker made the fix in February of this year. The bulletin requires dealers to issue the new key to customers who bought their vehicles prior to the change, and complain of the issue as noted.

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50 Comments on “GM Replacing Keys In 2014-15 Trucks, SUVs Due To Ignition Issues...”


  • avatar
    fozone

    … and this was not caught in testing during development… why, exacty?

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      … because, they got caught “not catching” it (wink, wink… nudge, nudge)

    • 0 avatar
      SayMyName

      To think GM would test its products that competently in the first place is shockingly naive.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Oh how quickly we forget.

        Lets go back to 2010 and 2011.

        Remember this company called Toyota?

        Remember how they were recalling everything they made over every tiny stupid little issue that made many in the B&B scratch their head and go, “really? Is that a real problem?”

        This is an “abundance of caution” recall.

        It “may” happen – just as someone “may” hit the ignition switch with their knee in a Pontiac G8.

        Well, they “may” hit it with their knee if the seat is so far forward that they are smashed into the steering wheel, their head is laying on the dashboard and their knees are pulled up into their chest. Then – MAYBE – the knee just might hit the key fob.

        Notice that GM is basically recalling anything and everything where a key could be remotely be involved.

        Huh – back in 2010 and 2011 I seem to remember Toyota was recalling anything and everything that could slightly involve a gas pedal, or a floor mat, or the brakes ability to stop a car under the just maybe condition of wide open throttle.

        it isn’t a “defense” of GM in any sense that it is a “defense” of Toyota. The regulatory spotlight is on them, hence they are going to recall anything and everything where a key could maybe, possible, remotely, in some weird way, be involved.

        Their lawyers have likely made it very clear, “no more issues with keys, even if the odds are 0.000000001%.”

        I’m sure Toyota’s lawyers said the same thing about floor mats, gas pedals, and sufficient braking power.

        I’ll close with the same observation I’ve made before over the last twenty years.

        It isn’t unreasonable to expect the average driver to deal with a blown out tire. However, Ford and Firestone got nailed to the wall.

        It isn’t unreasonable to expect the average driver to deal with a gas pedal stuck by a floor mat. However, Toyota got nailed to the wall.

        It isn’t unreasonable to expect the average driver to deal with an engine power loss couple with power steering. However, GM is getting nailed to the wall.

        It is completely unreasonable to expect to have an M18 Claymore Mine installed in your dashboard, even if the vehicle is a decade old in an era where the “average” car on the road is now 11 years old. No amount of mad skillz as a driver, I’m better than that can prevent a device designed to save you from maybe, blowing shrapnel into your face and neck killing you and or your passenger(s).

        If I’m told my Ford Explorer could kill me if I follow the recommended tire pressure – I can solve that easily – increase the tire pressure. But Ford got nailed to the wall.

        If I’m told my floor mat might get stuck under the gas pedal – I can solve that easily – remove the floor mat. But Toyota got nailed to the wall.

        If I’m told having 10 keys, a mini maglight, a small bottle of pepper spray, a troll toy, and 15 customer loyalty cards hanging off my ignition key can break the ignition – I can solve this easily – remove the crap off of my key. But GM is getting nailed to the wall.

        If I try to disable my own airbag I’m breaking federal law, I’m going to Christmas tree my dashboard, if I get a wreck I will likely get sued by any passenger in my car, and my insurance company may not cover my injuries because of my willful disabling of a required safety device. Never mind that the unstable agent used in the airbag might inadvertently go off while I”m removing it, resulting in the same Claymore Mine going off in my hands.

        One only has to look at the number of B&B posts on anything related to GM and ignition keys versus Takata and air bags and see the bias of the B&B.

        The faux outrage over GM ignition keys is so transparent, and the lack of outrage over the far more dangerous situation, involving far more makers, and involving vastly more cars is frankly, saddening.

        Another great example of misguided outrage can be used with Ford. Blowing out tires – BAD! Very bad! Even though the problem can be solved for free. Parked Fords immolating garages, homes, and the people in them because over 10 million vehicles had faulty cruise control electrical relays under the hood? That the average owner could do nothing about park outside? Meh – who cares.

        Ford, Toyota, GM and Takata all played out of the same playbook. But apparently a Japanese supplier that is making faulting airbags and blocking, covering up, and denying every step of the way is quite acceptable.

        Good Lord, you just maybe, possibly, might bump a key – or have a trapped floormat – or have a blow out. Rabble! Rabble! Rabble! Rabble! Rabble!

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Oh how quickly we forget.

        Lets go back to 2010 and 2011.

        Remember this company called Toyota?

        Remember how they were recalling everything they made over every tiny stupid little issue that made many in the B&B scratch their head and go, “really? Is that a real problem?”

        This is an “abundance of caution” recall.

        It “may” happen – just as someone “may” hit the ignition switch with their knee in a Pontiac G8.

        Well, they “may” hit it with their knee if the seat is so far forward that they are smashed into the steering wheel, their head is laying on the dashboard and their knees are pulled up into their chest. Then – MAYBE – the knee just might hit the key fob.

        Notice that GM is basically recalling anything and everything where a key could be remotely be involved.

        Huh – back in 2010 and 2011 I seem to remember Toyota was recalling anything and everything that could slightly involve a gas pedal, or a floor mat, or the brakes ability to stop a car under the just maybe condition of wide open throttle.

        it isn’t a “defense” of GM in any sense that it is a “defense” of Toyota. The regulatory spotlight is on them, hence they are going to recall anything and everything where a key could maybe, possible, remotely, in some weird way, be involved.

        Their lawyers have likely made it very clear, “no more issues with keys, even if the odds are 0.000000001%.”

        I’m sure Toyota’s lawyers said the same thing about floor mats, gas pedals, and sufficient braking power.

        I’ll close with the same observation I’ve made before over the last twenty years.

        It isn’t unreasonable to expect the average driver to deal with a blown out tire. However, Ford and Firestone got nailed to the wall.

        It isn’t unreasonable to expect the average driver to deal with a gas pedal stuck by a floor mat. However, Toyota got nailed to the wall.

        It isn’t unreasonable to expect the average driver to deal with an engine power loss couple with power steering. However, GM is getting nailed to the wall.

        It is completely unreasonable to expect to have an M18 Claymore Mine installed in your dashboard, even if the vehicle is a decade old in an era where the “average” car on the road is now 11 years old. No amount of mad skillz as a driver, I’m better than that can prevent a device designed to save you from maybe, blowing shrapnel into your face and neck killing you and or your passenger(s).

        If I’m told my Ford Explorer could kill me if I follow the recommended tire pressure – I can solve that easily – increase the tire pressure. But Ford got nailed to the wall.

        If I’m told my floor mat might get stuck under the gas pedal – I can solve that easily – remove the floor mat. But Toyota got nailed to the wall.

        If I’m told having 10 keys, a mini maglight, a small bottle of pepper spray, a troll toy, and 15 customer loyalty cards hanging off my ignition key can break the ignition – I can solve this easily – remove the crap off of my key. But GM is getting nailed to the wall.

        If I try to disable my own airbag I’m breaking federal law, I’m going to Christmas tree my dashboard, if I get a wreck I will likely get sued by any passenger in my car, and my insurance company may not cover my injuries because of my willful disabling of a required safety device. Never mind that the unstable agent used in the airbag might inadvertently go off while I”m removing it, resulting in the same Claymore Mine going off in my hands.

        One only has to look at the number of B&B posts on anything related to GM and ignition keys versus Takata and air bags and see the bias of the B&B.

        The faux outrage over GM ignition keys is so transparent, and the lack of outrage over the far more dangerous situation, involving far more makers, and involving vastly more cars is frankly, saddening.

        Another great example of misguided outrage can be used with Ford. Blowing out tires – BAD! Very bad! Even though the problem can be solved for free. Parked Fords immolating garages, homes, and the people in them because over 10 million vehicles had faulty cruise control electrical relays under the hood? That the average owner could do nothing about park outside? Meh – who cares.

        Ford, Toyota, GM and Takata all played out of the same playbook. But apparently a Japanese supplier that is making faulting airbags and blocking, covering up, and denying every step of the way is quite acceptable.

        You just maybe, possibly, might bump a key – or have a trapped floormat – or have a blow out. Rabble! Rabble! Rabble! Rabble! Rabble!

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Oh how quickly we forget.

        Lets go back to 2010 and 2011.

        Remember this company called Toyota?

        Remember how they were recalling everything they made over every tiny stupid little issue that made many in the B&B scratch their head and go, “really? Is that a real problem?”

        This is an “abundance of caution” recall.

        It isn’t unreasonable to expect the average driver to deal with a blown out tire. However, Ford and Firestone got nailed to the wall.

        It isn’t unreasonable to expect the average driver to deal with a gas pedal stuck by a floor mat. However, Toyota got nailed to the wall.

        It isn’t unreasonable to expect the average driver to deal with an engine power loss coupled with power steering*. However, GM is getting nailed to the wall.

        It is completely unreasonable to expect to have an M18 Claymore Mine installed in your dashboard, even if the vehicle is a decade old in an era where the “average” car on the road is now 11 years old. No amount of mad skillz as a driver, I’m better than that can prevent a device designed to save you from maybe, blowing shrapnel into your face and neck killing you and/or your passenger(s).

        If I’m told my Ford Explorer could kill me if I follow the recommended tire pressure – I can solve that easily – increase the tire pressure. But Ford got nailed to the wall.

        If I’m told my floor mat might get stuck under the gas pedal – I can solve that easily – remove the floor mat. But Toyota got nailed to the wall.

        If I’m told having 10 keys, a mini maglight, a small bottle of pepper spray, a troll toy, and 15 customer loyalty cards hanging off my ignition key can break the ignition – I can solve this easily – remove the crap off of my key. But GM is getting nailed to the wall.

        If I try to disable my own airbag I’m breaking federal law, I’m going to Christmas tree my dashboard, if I get in a wreck I will likely get sued by any passenger in my car, and my insurance company may not cover my injuries because of my willful disabling of a required safety device. Never mind that the unstable agent used in the airbag might inadvertently go off while I”m removing it, resulting in the same Claymore Mine going off in my hands.

        One only has to look at the number of B&B posts on anything related to GM (or Toyota) versus Takata and air bags and see the bias.

        The faux outrage over GM ignition keys is so transparent, and the lack of outrage over the far more dangerous situation, involving far more makers, and involving vastly more cars is frankly, saddening.

        Another great example of misguided outrage can be used with Ford. Blowing out tires – bad! Very bad! Even though the problem can be solved for free. Parked Fords immolating garages, homes, and the people in them because over 10 million vehicles had faulty cruise control electrical relays under the hood? That the average owner could do nothing about park outside? Meh – who cares.

        Ford, Toyota, GM and Takata all played out of the same playbook. But apparently a Japanese supplier that is making faulting airbags and blocking, covering up, and denying every step of the way is quite acceptable.

        You just maybe, possibly, might bump a key – or have a trapped floormat – or have a blow out. Rabble! Rabble! Rabble! Rabble! Rabble!

        * You don’t lose power brakes on an engine stall, your master cylinder is still pressurized and you have two to three good power assisted pumps of the pedal left.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Well crap – it got SPAM filtered, I tried multiple rewrites of the cut and paste version I wrote and all three got posted.

          /facepalm

        • 0 avatar
          LectroByte

          tl;still dr

          • 0 avatar
            Silent Ricochet

            Ahhh “tl;dr” the sign of a truly immature individual, too busy to read more than 160 characters of text with each scroll of a mouse wheel or tap of a phone screen. Pathetic.

            So here’s your tl;dr version:

            He’s basically pointing out that GM is playing it safe, out of an abundance of caution. Yet the anti-GM bias on this website continues to eclipse even the most deadliest and serious of issues, like the Takata Airbag mess. Basically, the GM hate in this situation is completely unfounded.

            Newsflash, you might have to read things longer than two sentences in the future. Brace yourself

  • avatar
    Jeff Waingrow

    Years ago, my parents had a Chevrolet Cavalier. When you put the driver’s sun visor down, its corner hit the interior rear view mirror and moved it out of its set position. I wondered at the time whether GM ever tested even the most obvious things to see if they worked properly. For an adjustable steering wheel column and shift lever to strike an ignition key at any point is beyond pathetic. That Cavalier experience cured me of buying anything GM for life.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Simple, they ran out of Cavalier sun visors so the guy walked over to the Malibu assembly line and grabbed a handful to finish the Cavalier run.

      This never would have happened if you had gotten the twice the price Cadillac Cimarron Cavalier, those visors would have fit

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      Lets see??? I wonky visor, or a face full of shrapnel? So hard to make the right decision these days.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Don’t forget that GM sold cars with Takata airbags that are being recalled too. Sucks trying to defend GM, almost like they’re indefensible.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          I believe the small number of GM models impacted are actually Ponyota Vibes and Chevota Prizms – but will happily be corrected.

          The issue with Takata is a Takata issue – not the companies that used them issue – with a probably exception to Honda. There is a building case that like Ford with rolling over explorers, Toyota with jammed and misdesigned pedals (not the CTS pedals, the ones without enough tolerance for floor mats), and GM with ignition switches, Honda knew they had a problem with years, was too cozy with Takata, and tried to bury, hide, and obfuscate a growing problem with shrapnel injuries with their airbag.

          Given the growing list of suppliers and companies with this history, it appears to be industry endemic, and points to bigger institutional problems with multinational corporations and the regulatory organizations allegedly watching them.

          As others have said.

          Dealing with a blowout? The average driver should be able to handle that.

          Stuck floor mat in the gas pedal? The average driver should be able to handle that.

          Loss of engine power that results in a loss of power steering? The average driver should be able to handle that.

          Pieces of shrapnel blowing into your face from a malfunctioning airbag? Ya – the average driver should anticipate needing to wear full body armor and a protective mask while driving.

          • 0 avatar
            dolorean

            I believe you are correct as the average driver should (and as an Army Officer, I hate the word “should” as well as “assume, they, supposed to”) and prefer will, must, and required. That being said, the average American driver is incapable of controlling their car during any of these probabilities due to their/our tendancy to shove a Big Mac Value Meal into their pie hole while going highway speeds through ‘Burbia, texting through red lights, STOP signs being there for ‘other people’, shaving and applying makeup while checking ourselves in the rear view mirror, putting another thorozene DVD in the overhead entertainment center so little Johnny will stop trying to communicate so we can check Facebook/Twitter on our status; list goes on.

            The airbag issue needs to be addressed and corrected. There should be no excuse for it. The ignition issue should be addressed and corrected as keyed ignition hails from the Depression era and should be a no-brainer by now. The acceleration problem and blow out tires of Explorer yesteryear were simple issues that could have been addressed if we weren’t obsessed over who’s fault it was.

            This to me is America’s problem. An issue arises, we used to fix it and figure out what happened and who failed it all at a time/date when it could be studied without emotional response. Now, the issue goes straight to cable news where the spin machines begin dispensing the talking points and loading of the blame-train. Meanwhile the issue festers, gets worse and multiplies, until the over 60 crowd who predominately watch cable news get bored with it and move to the latest huge thing they are told to worry over while they dial a lawyer because the nice man on the tele told them they have Mesthothelioma.

  • avatar
    Goatshadow

    Column shifters. Why are they still around?

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Because they make the most sense, console shifters waste valuable space. That’s the real question why are there still console shifters. Dodge rotory dial seems like the only logical step beyond column shifters.

      Every billyjoebob seems to believe a console shifter looks “cool” because that’s where stick shifts belong.

      • 0 avatar
        frozenman

        And yet most auto review idiots complain the Ram’s dial is hard to get used to.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          God help them when they drive a Lincoln with the push button transmission. I wish my C-max had that. I have no need for a console shifter, or column shifter for that matter, on a hybrid MPV.

          • 0 avatar
            Lorenzo

            I’ve owned two early ’60s Chryslers with push button transmissions. When I test drove a MKZ, it was like old times.

            OTOH, a co-worker who drove a column shift automatic had trouble with the console shift in the company car. Whenever he parked the car, he’d turn on the windshield wipers.

            It’s all about getting used to your vehicle. The initial strangeness wears off.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I know, right? My car with it’s electronic steering doesn’t even have a steering column

      • 0 avatar
        EAF

        Lie2me – what vehicle do you own? Excuse my stupidity but I thought all electric steering had the same old column only with a motor assist?

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Ford Escape, no steering column. It’s the weirdest thing when you open the hood and see ground where the column would be

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            It’s still physically connected to the wheels. All cars have to be, as a failsafe should the power/electric steering go out. Tractors gave up on that 50 years ago :P

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Yeah there’s some kind of a chain that connects it physically, but I’ll be damned if I can find it. Already had it in for a recall because apparently the manual steering doesn’t function all that well

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I doubt there’s any rule as to how well the manual steering has to work, only that it’s enough to steer you onto the shoulder.

          • 0 avatar
            KixStart

            “… only that it’s enough to steer you onto the shoulder.”

            Or the ditch. Or a bridge abutment. Close enough.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Do you need a step ladder to check the oil in that thing?

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The 08+ Super Duties have rubber on top of the bumper because that’s where you’re supposed to stand. Maybe on these you’re supposed to bring it in to your GM certified mechanic–oops, I mean “technician” for anything more labor-intesive than a refuel.

  • avatar
    EAF

    I wonder how much money this recall sets GM back? They charge an arm and a leg for a new key / programming.

  • avatar
    mikey

    That “thing” would kick the c–p out of 50 K. Yes, checking the oil may pose a challenge, to some. Though, I’m fairly confident, that such a challenge, won’t be a deal breaker, for the demographic, that may entertain the thought of buying such a vehicle.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Who drives with the wheel fully up anyway, besides bus drivers on their day off?

    Oh right, my mom.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So they came out with a key that doesn’t have such a big head on it?

    Damn fobs are getting so you can’t even put them in a pocket. Next all the cowboys will be carrying “man bags”.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Whether or not this is actually a design failure comes down to what sort of range the tilt steering column has. Many cars have tilt/telescope columns where the entire range of motion is quite likely to be used by some percentage of drivers for operating the vehicles. I remember some Detroit cars that had tilt only columns which seemed to be configured as much to enable people to enter and exit the vehicle more easily as to tailor the control relationship for discerning drivers. If the Chevy pickups are still using the old tilt away columns, I can see why nobody might have tested to see if the controls still functioned without fouling one another when the steering wheel is near horizontal.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Surprised to learn that the Silverado / Sierra still has a column shifter.

    Agree with the view above that it is the best use of space – just surprised in 2014 they still do it that way.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      Unless it’s a manual transmission, I should prefer the gear selector “on the tree.” But Mannix had a Chrysler product with the automatic shifter in the center console, so I’m programmed to think of that as way cool.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      What I found most surprising is the same column shifter is used on all full-size GMS, from a Work Truck Silverado all the way up to a near-$100K Escalade.

      • 0 avatar
        phatcow

        in the defense of the Denali and Escalade, they wrap the touch point of the shifter with leather.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I had a 2013 Suburban LT2 with tow package and other goodies as a rental car and was surprised for the price point how crappy the column shifter was, even if it was wrapped in something that allegedly was leather.

        With that said another surprising point. The rental had 44K miles on the odometer and looked brand new in all respects. Other than some lightly warped rotors it ran perfectly.

        Regardless of my feeling on plastics and leather, it was clearly well put together.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    In other news, Honda recalls 2.6 million more vehicles for the M18 Claymore Mines in their dashboards and steering wheels.

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/money/companies/honda-adds-26m-vehicles-to-air-bag-repair-list/ar-BBgvygZ

    • 0 avatar
      LectroByte

      LOL, why keep bringing up other brands when it’s GM under discussion here?

      • 0 avatar
        ponchoman49

        Because this is really a very minor non issue. I mean who drives with there tilt steering columns all the up? The point being made here is that real problems with everyones favorite two car company darlings are seldom ever reported on these pages yet every little thing with Everyone’s punching bag GM gets discussed as top news! It does get old after a while


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