By on November 25, 2014

muffler

My daughter Tova usually rides to her job with a co-worker. She’d noticed the car they were using had been getting louder and already had mentioned to her friend that something might be amiss with the exhaust system. On the way to work today, it started to get even louder, and then there was a grinding noise. Tova suggested they stop and check things out, but the driver said it was “only a couple of miles” to the school where they teach, so they continued. Tova said that there was a banging noise and then most of the grinding seem to have stopped. Other drivers were honking and pointing.

One guy even got out of his car at a red light, tapped on their window and asked if they knew they were losing their muffler. They thanked him and told him yes, and then continued on their way. Frankly, I can’t even figure out how just about the entire exhaust system from the downpipe back managed to get back there intact. I’m sure the tubing would bend first but visions of the forward pointing pipe snagging a pothole and vaulting the car into the air come to mind. One can only imagine what it did to the undercarriage of the car as it made it’s way out the back.

I suppose that in a world where people will keep driving on a tireless rim, sparks a blazing, seeing a car dragging an intact exhaust system should not come as much of a a surprise, but, please, folks, as car enthusiasts you can do your less mechanically interested friends a big favor and tell them that when their cars are making bad grinding noises, it’s a good idea to stop and check things out.

At one point or another we’ve all seen someone driving a vehicle that was visibly or audibly broken (or both). What’s the most interesting example of something rolling badly in need of repair that you can remember seeing?

Photo courtesy of Tova Schreiber.

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97 Comments on “What’s Wrong With This Picture? Exhaust Systems Can Be Such A Drag Edition...”


  • avatar
    multicam

    My God, Jim…

    I held my breath expecting a Mustang. I’m glad my make and model isn’t represented this time.

    That picture is making me forget all of my examples . Damn it.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Oops!

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “They thanked him and told him yes, and then continued on their way.”

    That’s when I realize the driver has no care for my safety, exit the car, and call someone else or a taxi. Don’t nobody got time for that.

    Also, this seems to be the standard reaction of women who don’t know things about cars, “Keep driving, it’s fine.”

  • avatar
    phlipski

    I was headed to work one morning and I smell very strong gasoline odors while stuck at a traffic light. As I move forward a few 100 yards and then stop again I realize I see gas just pouring out of a whole in the Jeep Grand Cherokee’s gas tank that was in front of me. I’m talking like a dime size hole! I pull up next to the guy and tell him, “You’re gas tank is leaking gas all over the road!” He just says, “Ok thanks” and continued on down the road!

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      I had a truck that sprung a leak in its fuel line near the filter while I was on the freeway. No one stopped me (obviously), but I noticed the smell of gas, so I immediately exited & parked. When I got out & checked, it was just a steady stream like the truck was pissing itself.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I’ve seen an expedition going down the highway at highway speeds with a front passenger wheel bearing so bad the wheel was at a 25-35 degree angle and was throwing sparks, I quickly accelerated past that accident in the making.

  • avatar
    Duaney

    Two tales for me to mention. One time I was towing a car with a wrecker, and the exhaust system came loose, and somehow, wrapped itself around the drive shaft, and ripped the drive shaft out! The other mention, I sold a car to a young lady who failed to check the engine oil as I requested, and as the engine ran out of oil and started knocking, she simply turned the radio up louder to muffle the noise.

  • avatar
    Waterview

    It’s folks like this that make the “Just rolled in to the shop” website a must view.

  • avatar
    Fred

    One thing I’ve learned after 40+ years of driving and maintaining cars is that it’s a lot easier and cheaper to fix problems as soon as you suspect. A simple muffler replacement of maybe it was just a loose hanger is not a complete exhaust system and who knows what else got banged up in the process.

    • 0 avatar
      greaseyknight

      And folks wonder why our cars last so long and cost less to maintain. I have been guilty of diagnosing the problem, buying the parts and then procrastinating on actually fixing the problem.

  • avatar

    I was driving our government-spec Ford Windstar work van back from a local mall a few years ago, where I had dropped an Apple computer off at the Apple store for warranty work, when I saw a Suzuki Grand Vitara weaving all over North Charles St in Baltimore. It had a flat front left tire that was totally gone, and was driving on a sparking rim. They were weaving all over the place – I quickly passed them and got the hell out of there.

    The funny thing is that this stretch of Charles St. (between Bellona and Towsontown blvd, for my fellow Baltimorons) has a giant, wide shoulder – they could easily and safely have pulled over.

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      I had a lady blow out two tires on the same side. Instead of calling roadside assistance and having the car (a still under warranty E-Class) towed to our dealership she drove it for over 30 miles. When I got the car, there was nothing left of the tires, and about an inch and a half was worn of the wheels.

  • avatar
    MrGrieves

    Saw a guy driving a Bronco II with only a shred of rubber on the left rear wheel. Sparks going everywhere. He happened to be going where I was, and as he was getting out I approached him and said “You know you’ve lost a tire, right?” His response: “Go to h-ll.”

    Hey, I tried.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The only way I can throw any sympathy his way is if maybe you were the n-th person to notify him that day and he was sick and tired of hearing it…but even then I would’ve tried my best to be a little civil about it. Some people, geez…

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    Had me a Mark 3 Jetta, I did.

    Had a rusty muffler, it did.

    Had itself a seriously bad fuel leak, out of the tank, it did.

    Had it junked one day to avoid a flame, I did.

    #applause

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    It looks like it crapped out its own intestines. But I can imagine the exhaust system rotating clockwise (helicopter view) on a left turn and the outs!de tire running it over at “2 o’clock”, then simply dragging behind (6 o’clock). It looks like the lower hoop lines up with the rear tire, if swung back.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Ronnie you are a car guy and a father. Take your responsibilities seriously.

    If your daughter is working in the school system in Ontario she has a secure, well paying job.

    Arrange for her to get a good, safe car.
    Enroll her in a serious driving school.
    Maybe as a gift enroll her in a night school auto shop class.

    Make sure that she never rides with that idiot again. What you wrote is an indictment of our educational system and the people that it hires.

    • 0 avatar
      Fordson

      I kind of second this emotion…but if your daughter is an adult, she should not need you to “arrange” an auto purchase or get her into a driving school or a shop class. In fact, the piece does not state that she is in need of any of these things – she probably has a car of her own.

      But I bet you probably would rather than she did not ride with this idiot any more.

    • 0 avatar

      A few points. We live in Michigan, not Canada. It’s a private school. She’s saving up for her own car.

      Her friend isn’t an idiot, just a typical driver with no mechanical knowledge. Tova tried her best but her friend didn’t want to stop.

      A couple of years ago I got a ride to my credit union with a friend of my son. Not an idiot. As we turned out of the parking lot, his oil pressure light went on. That can mean only one thing. I explained to him that he was three quarts low and that he should stop and buy some oil.

      “I’ll talk to my guy,” was his reply.

      “Let’s stop at that gas station”

      “I’ll talk to my guy”

      “There’s a KMart. Oil is cheap there.”

      “I’ll talk to my guy.”

      When we got to my place I even had him pop the hood and I showed him the bone dry dipstick.

      “I’ll talk to my guy.”

      If there’s an indictment of the school systems it’s that they’ve let feminism and class bias eliminate auto shop, moving any kind of repair or maintenance instruction to the vocational ed ghetto.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        The indifference of some driver’s is impenetrable. I have a couple people like that, you know “fix it once it’s broke” types. I plead with them, if you can’t be bothered to change your oil, just make sure once in a while that there’s some oil, ANY oil, in it!

        Ain’t nobody got time fo dat apparently.

      • 0 avatar
        Duaney

        All drivers, and apparently these women involved, need to know to pull over at the first safe spot if there are bad noises coming from the vehicle. Just like my example of the exhaust wrapping around the drive shaft and ripping it off, this could cause a fatal accident. Actually much worse than the GM ignition problem.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        2 things:

        1. I did not take auto shop (nor had the desire), it was eliminated back in the 80’s at my school. All of my knowledge was self taught, a thing or two here or there by my Dad, or by my Mom. Her brother was a “auto guy” and showed her the ropes. No Mom didn’t change her own oil, or brakes but she knew how everything worked, and how the car should behave. I did highly enjoy my “Foods” class though in HS. Programs were cut because of educational requirements by the states and lack of funding for those programs in individual school systems.

        2. In the early 2000’s auto repair came about again because of Vocational School. 11th and 12th graders were able to take a half day in the auto shop, or they could do programs like “building trades”, or Computer and Network Repair. And no their programs were not “ghetto”. Vocational schools here came about to funnel in kids from different school systems who didn’t offer classes that these kids wanted to take. You may have 10 kids per school who wanted to take a course such as auto repair; multiply that 5 schools and now you have enough kids to justify an entire program for a year.

      • 0 avatar
        Acubra

        The person displayed all definite signs of idiocy (in medical terms). Failure to comprehend and access a situation and possible circumstances, failure to listen to somebody obviously knowledgeable in the matter, failure to act.
        The person is an idiot, sorry.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    Slapped by early 2000s GM quality. Sweet.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Once I saw a Honda coupe of some sorts make a truly dreadful sound from its suspension when it pulled up to a Mcdonalds, turns out the rear drivers side wheel was almost diagonal.

    Another time I was stuck behind an Integra that was going beneath the speed limit, despite the cars mods the owner hadn’t noticed the smoke leaking from the exaust.

    I’ve seen countless 90’s Saturns with their plastic fenders half-way sheered off or the drivers outer door panel missing, do they not know about pick-n-pull?

    And finally, on the highway I saw an XV20-era Camry that burst into flames, but they at least had the brains to pull over.

  • avatar
    kmoney

    Driving down the highway next to an older Chevy Blazer, stock size tires. Somehow this thing must have lost all of its balance weights, or the guy tried to mount his own tires I don’t know, but all 4 wheels were rhythmically bouncing up and down about 5 inches on smooth level highway. Looking through the window you could see the steering wheel oscillating back and forth about the same amount. Driver was just sitting there with a Homer Simpson grin like it was just business as usual.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Every time I see a Chrysler LH car, I know to stay away.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Chrysler LH, Magnum wagons, Galants, Eclipse, certain Grand Prix/Grand Am cars, any clapped out Navigator or Expedition, or some beat to hell N* DeVille.

    All are avoids.

    • 0 avatar
      Fordson

      Going to be unpopular to say, but to this list I would add most Panther-platform cars driven by the non-elderly.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Oh yes, those as well. Usually they are a GM as opposed to CV.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Around these parts, beat to sh1t 10-15 year old ex cop cars seem to make up the beater Panther demo. The rest are donks which could fit into their own separate category of cars to be weary of.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            Weirdly enough, I see more 90’s-era Mustang convertible donks than Vic donks, more than likely V6 models too.

            What makes it even weirder is that they drive these things over the ancient battered roads of St Louis.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Clapped out Ford and GM full size SUVs are plentiful in my neck of the woods. First gen Navigators/Expeditions and GMT400 SUVs are all but gone though. Rust never sleeps.

      A few years ago I had an employee with a beat to hell Deville. She lived with her mom and they relied a Deville with a N* and a mid 90s LR Discovery I as their transportation.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Any Windstar.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Ha. They were terrible when new.

        Back in the bad old days of MFT, I visited my dealership often. It was always me and a bunch of Windstar recalls. It made me terrified to drive. People with 230K miles of deferred maintinence just wanted the recall done and nothing else. “I’ve had these tires for 7 years and they are still good.” Horrible.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          God, the recalls on those. The rear axle beam would rust and snap in half, the subframe would rot and fall out. I was on the inside for those.

          It amazed me that they actually recalled 12-13 year old vehicles for rust. A good portion of them had already been recycled. I remember reports of Windbags being dragged out of the boneyards in order to get that sweet sweet 150% “book value” payout when the axles weren’t available.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Man, I hope my reply RE: the Windbag recalls shows up. This busted-ass comment system is a real drag.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        I’d like to add any not brand new Honda or Toyota to that list, I made a comment as to why but it hasn’t appeared yet for some reason.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Remarkable. It appears it rusted off at the converter flange, then they ran it over and then dragged it by the exhaust hanger.

    It’s funny, my wife always notes any noise that’s out of the ordinary and stops to question if it’s safe. Then there are people like this, just giv’er!

  • avatar
    319583076

    The empirical evidence supporting universal misanthropy continues to accumulate…

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    I don’t see any flat spots where the wheel would have driven over the pipe as it rotated to the rear of the car.

    The hell…?

  • avatar
    ja-gti

    If you want to get a woman who does not know anything about cars to realize the urgency of a serious mechanical situation, tell her the car is going to catch on fire or explode.

    My wife tells a funny story of how her 1976 Monza started to diesel after she had shut off the ignition. Being a teenager and having seen too many A-team episodes (it was the eighties), she immediately feared for her life from the imminent explosion and so jumped out of the car and hid behind a metal dumpster – to, of course, protect herself from the ensuing shrapnel!

  • avatar
    fincar1

    My carpool driver once drove her Pontiac Grand Am with a badly out-of-balance front tire or bent wheel for so long that the shaking caused the windshield to crack clear from top to bottom.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    Good point. I’ve had enough cars burn to the ground to learn that it’s actualy pretty uneventful. Your average Joe/Jane doesn’t know that though.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I see far too many people driving around here with one headlight broken or burned out.

    HOW ARE YOU THAT STUPID?! You seriously can’t tell? Are you so dense that you’re made of f**king OSMIUM?!

    Tailights I get. It’s easy to not notice a tailight is out. But you should notice that there’s only light coming from one headlight as soon as you’re facing a wall or a parked car. There’s no excuse.

    • 0 avatar
      raresleeper

      “I see far too many people driving around here with one headlight broken or burned out.

      HOW ARE YOU THAT STUPID?!”

      Meh. They like tickets.

      I could get more detailed, but I’ll keep this friendly for all :)

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      They HAVEN’T GOT the time, they are on their way to pay the bill on their RTO furniture and TV.

      Also, the [email protected] car is probably letting you know you have a light out anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        kvndoom

        Hey! At least they pay! As someone who worked RTO for a couple years back in the 90’s, I’d take any monetary scraps I could get over doing collection runs. Those were the worst of the worst days.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Some of those people drive a MKV Golf/Jetta, and that’s what happens when you drive an MKV Golf/Jetta.

      Sometimes turning the car off and back on will fix it.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Nope, I’ve never seen a VW with this problem. In fact, it’s often minivans and SUVs.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I owned five different MKV VW products. Two made in Germany, three made in Mexico. Some had HIDs, others did not. Every single one of those cars had some sort of headlight issue. I only had to replace a bulb once and a fog light once. My wife was even familiar with the turn GTI off, turn GTI back on procedure to fix the headlight problem.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            Nearly every New Beetle that I see has one of the front driving lights out, seems to be a common “bug”.

            Heck I’ve seen a few 2000-ish Audis like this too.

        • 0 avatar

          Well, if we are going to be anecdotal, it has called my attention how many Honda I see driving around with back lights out. It surprised and maybe now I watch for it, because they were Hondas. But the only person I ever know who got ticketed for this here (brazil) was a friend in a Peugeot 205. Funny thing was I had told her 2 days before her back light was out. Guess she was too busy to pay attention.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            My story is anecdotal, yes, but I still find it weird that all five of the VW products I’ve owned did that. I honestly thought it was a normal thing for cars to do.

          • 0 avatar

            Never owned a VW product, they never interested me. So I can’t comment at that. Just in traffic have not had that perception. BTW, I was not picking on you, I just think it fun to add to the anecdote heap, :)!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            This thread is all anecodotes, so we might as well just keep them coming:).

            BTW, I would love a 205 GTI.

          • 0 avatar

            Me too, bball, me too! Hers was not the GTI, but has the second most powerful engine in the line at the time, a 1.6. One of the best cars I have ever driven in the sense of overall driving enjoyment. The following 206 was such a looker, but comparitavely so staid in driving comparing to the 205. But I digress, suffice to say the new 208 does put Peugeot back in the game!

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Had a 4 series VW ‘shooting brake’ purchased new. When you ‘tooted’ the horn, the front right headlight would go on and off.

          Just one of a litany of issues with that well designed but terrible vehicle which turned our family off VW’s after over a decade of owning them.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I dunno whats dumber, people with a burned out light, or people that don’t even bother to turn on their lights when its dark out.

      • 0 avatar
        raresleeper

        I like those Volvo’s from the 90’s with all kinds of extra rear lights stuck ON!

        Yup, that one brake light is stuck on. So is that rear fog light.

        Nothing to see here, folks.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          The factory wiring is so screwed up on those things I’m surprised that I don’t see it more often.

          240 wagons in particular, where the wires run inside of the hinges in the back.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The rear wiper and CMHSL on my Impreza wagon didn’t work, because they ran the wires through the rear hatch up at the top. They had to pivot every time it was opened. Awful design.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I find that some auto on/off lights are sensitive enough. I leave me C-Max in the auto position, but on rainy days, I sometimes have to manually turn the head lights on.

        • 0 avatar
          raresleeper

          I once had a car which, after a good wash or after a rain storm, I would have sanding water inside one of the lens housings.

          I’d pry it open, and said water would drain out.

          It was the best of times, it was the worst of times.

      • 0 avatar
        jhefner

        I think nowdays a lot of these folks either drive cars with daytime running lights, and don’t realize their lights are off; or have a second car with auto headlights and don’t realize yet that the headlights did not turn themselves on.

    • 0 avatar
      Acubra

      Even worse, when operators (not daring to call them drivers) of more modern motors in which the dash is always lit, do not switch on the lights at dark. I wonder how many of them then complain about poor quality headlights.

      • 0 avatar

        I used to drive for an Audi dealership that gave us a Q7 to drive. If you didn’t have the lights on or in the ‘AUTO’ setting and drove into a tunnel or tried to drive in the dark with the lights off, the gauge lighting would shut off to indicate your SNAFU. I personally think this should be required of all cars where the dash is lit whenever the ignition is on.

        • 0 avatar
          JimC2

          “… tried to drive in the dark with the lights off, the gauge lighting would shut off to indicate your SNAFU. I personally think this should be required of all cars where the dash is lit whenever the ignition is on.”

          Hear, hear!

          That and something about absent-minded idiots who drive never lower their high beams for oncoming traffic or when they’re right behind someone. A high proportion of people, who drive in my area, seem to have no idea what that blue light thingy symbol means!

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    I have told my fiancee and her daughters to question ANYTHING that doesn’t look right, sound right, smell right, or feel right. They’ve been pretty good about it.

    This past summer her oldest daughter drove over a branch and caught in the rear axle (didn’t know it at the time). She called panicking because it was late, she was out in BFE and her car was making this loud noise. She was terrified to stop in the dark out in BFE, so we had her drive slowly to a well lit gas station and met her there.

    Hope for some, not for all…

  • avatar
    Russycle

    I was that guy once. Borrowed my brother in laws rusted out Subaru Justy, driving down I-5 and BANG!….followed by much grinding. pulled off on the first offramp and spent some quality time under the car trying to improvise a mount for the exhaust pipe. In the dark of course. Fortunately was only 20 miles from home, and it held.

  • avatar
    kablamo

    A few years ago I was happily cruising down the highway about the speed limit, no traffic except for a junky red Ford Probe a few hundred feet ahead. What happens? THE MUFFLER FALLS OFF. This thing is bouncing around on the pavement unpredictably, much like a football actually. I can’t swerve because it’s going left and right, it’s impossible to tell where it will bounce next.

    Fortunately it’s last bounce before (potential) impact was to the left, out of my way, and onto the shoulder. No harm done.

    A car shouldn’t be driven if something might fall off.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    My best friends first wife took the cake on this. She had a first gen Altima. One day, while driving to work, it starts to overheat. Badly, steam and everything, come to find out. She continues on to work. Now mind you, she and hubby work IN THE SAME BUILDING, but different hours, so they don’t commute together. Does she mention this to him, uh, no. She then drives it HOME – actually made it the 15 miles. She thought it was OK because it wasn’t steaming any more… It never started again. Completely and utterly cooked the motor (cracked head and cracked block, melted accessories), they ended up just giving the car to their mechanic.

    Even my dear partner-in-crime is just terrible when it comes to mechanical sympathy. She used to have a Golf with one of the oil-using 2.sl0 motors. One day she mentions it is making funny noises. I find a bone-dry dipstick. Added 3+ quarts. To the thing’s credit, it didn’t get any worse, and drove perfectly fine. Used about a quart every 1500 miles, so she had not checked it in a LONG time.

    Then there is my roommate, aka Dumb Ass, who the last time he changed over to his snow tires himself (credit to him for having snows though) didn’t tighten the lug nuts. A couple days later he came to me thinking he had a bad diff in his Volvo because of the weird noises. The lugnuts were finger tight to halfway spun off. Luckily he has a 2-mile commute.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Your roommate must’ve owned my 245 Volvo at one point, when I got it the lugnuts on one of the wheels were installed backwards.

      That first case sounds all too common for Japanese cars, “they’re perfect! they run forever”, so you get plenty of old Camcords running around with dented fenders, dark smokey exhausts indicating bad oil rings, bad exhausts, stripped interiors, makes me wish they didn’t “run forever”.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    Minnesota.. Isanti/Cambridge area. 1979. I was a kid visiting family. The rolling abomination was a 77 purple Buick Regal that was forever taking a left turn due to its trapezoidal frame geometry. Broken rear window, and a wood window for the driver’s door with a hole cut out for viewing access. The tires squealed as it moved since the frame was so out of alignment. I reckon there were no inspections back then. Not sure about now. What a mess that thing was.

    • 0 avatar
      Joshua Johnson

      I live in East Bethel just south of Isanti, and not much has changed since then! The locals are still rolling vehicles of questionable condition and road worthiness.

      In Minnesota, in general, there seems to be many people driving around without headlights on (who give you funny looks when you flash your brights at them) and/or with their highbeams permanently on (who also give you funny looks when you flash your brights at them). People are far too oblivious for their own good. I have found though, that taking a smart phone screen and holding it up to reflect the highbeams back at them generally works at getting the other person to shut off their brights.

  • avatar
    THS

    In my defense (and that of my friend/coworker), plans had already been made to take the car into the shop that very day. We were halfway to work (and stopped at a red light in a left turn lane) when another person put on his hazards, parked, and knocked on our window, so there was little ability or inclination to stop at that point.

    Though we had no idea the situation was as bad as it was, I did suggest we pull over while en route. After parking at work, we were surprised to find a six-foot-long tail hanging off the back of the vehicle. It was so outrageous that I took a picure with my phone.

    I do not live or work in Ontario, though I spend weekends there sometimes.

  • avatar
    claytori

    Three stories, all about my wife. She is the opposite of the object person of this thread.
    1. I get a call. Something wrong, idiot lights on. I ask her if there is a garage nearby. Yes, right in front. She drives in and finds out the lower rad hose popped off the rad. Re-seat the clamp and throw in some coolant = $Cheap.
    2. I get a call (same car). It is running rough. I tell her to take it to X garage. Kid phones and says I need a new engine, no compression on Cyl #3 (of 6). I tell him thanks and go and get the car and drive it home (lumpy). Suspicious, I remove the valve cover. While I am wiping it clean(er), wife asks “Is this supposed to be like that”. One of the stud type intake valve rocker arm mounts is broken off. Fixed for $Cheap. Remember to pull the connector of the injector solenoid if you do this.
    #3. I get a call (different car much later on). Car is parked. Very funny noises and no drive. Engine cradle rotted out, pulling the CV joint out of the transmission. “New” cradle from a wrecker (they call them K-Frames) for not quite $Cheap.

    Regarding the follies of others, the best one I have seen, Hmmm…
    Windows replaced by plastic garbage bags.
    Door held closed by rope around the pillars.
    Use of a wine bottle under the windshield wiper to gravity feed a carburetor because the in-tank fuel pump had failed (Chevy Vega, natch).
    Collapsed rear suspension (Chrysler Cirrus, very fragile setup)
    Deafening screech from a car attempting unsuccessfully to stop. This as a result of “metal-to-metal” instead of brake lining material. Fortunately this guy managed to miss me.
    The Indonesian standard for replacing tires is not when the tread is completely worn away, but when the cords are exposed.
    Then there are the taxis – Rusted out floor in the right rear seat for a Flintstones car effect(cabby wasn’t wearing shoes or socks), no muffler or rear seat, no interior door panels. All these are absolutely true.
    I am sure I have missed a few.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Just earlier today I went into an Autozone, I overheard a conversation where a guy was literally spouting the same dribble about his Honda Accord you see online everywhere, “keep taking care of it and it’ll last forever!”, then he mentioned all the rust issues in the back.

    I think that most 90’s Japanese cars should be taken off the road, either you’ll get behind a slow Prelude with a dark smoke emanating from the exhaust, or a 1997 Toyota Camry will burst into flames in front of you, on the highway.

    Its really quite shocking what people are willing to put up with in their cars.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      So many badly repainted Civics with fart cans and 17 inch Pep Boys rims.

      So. Many.

      • 0 avatar
        Ryoku75

        I never thought I’d say this, but thank the Lord for rust.

        Now we just need to do something about those custom mini-hood scoops everyone has these days, even Camry sedans.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          For some reason, the one vehicle I see fake plastic hood scoops on the most is GMT400 1-ton dually trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            Ryoku75

            Custom grilles and Buick holes are the norm here, add chrome dubs for MAXIMUM OFFENSIVENESS.

            I recall once seeing a Ranger with the hood scoop off a Dodge Charger, an 80’s Omni based one, still with the “2.2” sign on it. That actually looked kinda cool!

            Then I turn around and see a huge Nissan truck with long, wide blue stripe pouring over the nose. Why is it that Nissan and “taste” just can’t get along?

  • avatar

    I saw a Civic with two young girls in it a few weeks ago driving on two rims as the tires were essentially gone. I honestly don’t think they knew….they appeared to be looking for an address so it makes me wonder just how long that went on for.

  • avatar
    Audiofyl

    A little late to the party with my comment, but I think this qualifies as a vehicle in very bad need of repair, or someone to take it out of its misery. Taken outside the garage where we store/fix our lemons vehicle.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ty54ZSFrgpE&list=UUaya1Bg8_Vh84EXjH_FldfA

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