By on October 17, 2014

NTU Assoc Prof Chen Xiaodong with research fellow Tang Yuxin and PhD student Deng Jiyang

One of the main roadblocks to wide adoption of EVs is how quickly the battery can be fully charged. While Tesla’s Supercharger could put a Model S P85D back on the road in 30 minutes to an hour, a Dodge Charger Hellcat can pull up to and away from the pump in three minutes, barring a run inside the 7-Eleven for a cup of coffee and a couple of donuts.

That roadblock may come down sooner than later, thanks to researchers at Singapore’s Nanyang Technology University.

The university recently unveiled a new battery that could be recharged to 70 percent capacity within two minutes, and boasts a lifespan of 20 years over the two to three years of life found in current lithium-ion batteries.

The secret? Replacing the graphite anode in those batteries with a nanogel composed of titanium oxide, a chemical commonly found in soil, sunscreen and food. Invented by Professor Chen Xiaodong at the university’s School of Materials Science and Engineering, the gel will be taken to the next level with a proof-of-concept grant to help fund a large-scale prototype.

Meanwhile, at least one company has already purchased a license to develop the titanium oxide battery for production down the road. Chen himself believes his invention will enter the marketplace within the next two years, knocking down more than just the long-charging barrier in so doing:

Electric cars will be able to increase their range dramatically, with just five minutes of charging, which is on par with the time needed to pump petrol for current cars.

Equally important, we can now drastically cut down the toxic waste generated by disposed batteries, since our batteries last ten times longer than the current generation of lithium-ion batteries.

Ease of manufacturing and lower replacement costs may further widespread adoption within the industry, in turn increasing adoption rates for whatever EVs come down the line in the future; the nanogel — a mixture of titanium oxide and sodium hydroxide — is stirred together at a given temperature for easier integration into current production systems.

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81 Comments on “Singapore Researchers Invent New Anode For Faster Battery Charging, Increased Longevity...”


  • avatar

    So what happens when your battery for your cell phone now lasts 20 years? Or your car’s? Goodbye Tesla’s Gigafactory if these guys get a patent on the Titanium Oxide LION battery.

    It’s great for consumers, especially if they make the batteries for all the different form factors for your devices. I mean, I’ll definitely take a 20-year battery for my cell phone, Zune, and my Nokia 1020 (that I bought to replace my 8mp point & shoot digital camera).

    But this news should have manufacturers and companies like AppIe spraying their shorts, as part of the only reason they’re so profitable is their devices are pretty much useless after 2-3 years, forcing people to buy a new one. Mainly because the battery is shot and beyond the capability of most users to replace, if not fully glued into the glued-together frame.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Really? Battery life is the reason for cell-phone replacement? Not new features, new software, faster processors, bigger, more detailed screens? No, it HAS to be the batteries.

      • 0 avatar

        1. New Features – Every “new” feature introduced in the lphone6 & 6+ were features Android phones had 2 years ago. http://www.businessinsider.com/graphic-iphone-6-v-nexus-4-2014-9

        2. New Software – Usually I see people immediately complaining about their iDevices software update, with a raft of security issues and the devices magically deleting your cloud files and such.

        3. Faster Processors – How much protein folding software do you run on your phone? Most of the time, you don’t max out your phone’s processor, it’s the RAM with multiple, multiple processes running and everything demanding to run in the background.

        4. Bigger Screens – Because soon we’ll need to evolve a third hand just to use these phablets. I prefer being able to reach anywhere on my phone screen to type with one thumb if need be. Also, bigger screens demand bigger batteries, or that you wind up recharging your phone 2-3x per day instead of once.

        AppIe phones and laptops are made to be replaced every two to three years, especially the phones with the once a day charge-discharge cycle.

      • 0 avatar
        PandaBear

        Yes, I just replaced my 10 year old Nokia because the battery won’t hold more than 1 day of charge.

      • 0 avatar
        GoesLikeStink

        He did say he is still using a Zune. So he obviously does not worry about keeping up with current technology

    • 0 avatar
      zamoti

      Zune? But why, what the f…

      Really a ZUNE!?

      You did say Zune?

      I genuinely don’t know what to say, I am sincerely at a loss for words. Victrola, rubbing sticks together, Hindenburg, Newton, dog eating peanut butter, oh hell it just won’t come out.

      Zune.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      The reason people replace cell phones so often has nothing to do with batteries. You can replace a battery. You can’t upgrade the camera/processor/screen etc on a cell phone. So when a new one comes out, if you want the new performance you have to replace the phone.

      Also +1 to the major WTF on the Zune. Do you have a Minidisc player as well? Some aspirin and dramamine to help with the headaches from your Virtual Boy? An email alert on replacement parts for your Mercury Capri? Where does the madness end!?!??!?????

      • 0 avatar
        Astigmatism

        Hey, some of us love(d) our MiniDisc players!

      • 0 avatar
        afedaken

        So… When someone decides to keep an old CAR, they’re lauded as thrifty, or an enthusiast. When they fail to perform routine preventative maintenance, (Oil change, Tire inflation check) they’re derided.

        On the other hand when someone keeps old electronics they’re happy with running, and perform preventative maintenance (Battery replacement) they’re mad?

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          That’s because the basic car ecosystem (roads, fuel, etc.) doesn’t change much. In the personal device world, that isn’t the case.

          • 0 avatar
            afedaken

            You think so? It’s a music player. It plays his music. Last I checked, the Zune supported most of the major audio and video formats.

            Assuming it’s not broken, functionality hasn’t changed for the device. He’s already using an alternate device for comms and likely apps. He already HAS an in for the current “ecosystem”.

            He wants a separate media player? I don’t get it, and I wouldn’t do it. But there’s no need to call someone MAD because they have something that works well for them and would rather keep it running than replace it.

            It’s a double standard, and I guess that’s what bothers me about the reaction.

            FIX OLD CAR = GOOD.
            FIX OLD DEVICE = STUPID.

            I just can’t get down with that, it strikes me as hypocritical.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            On the other hand, I didn’t have to visit the iFan sites for some daily Microsoft-shaming.

            Truly, I was impressed with SexCpotatoes bravery in the face of inevitable spotty yoof guffaws.

          • 0 avatar
            zamoti

            Also, any cheap mobile phone can do what a Zune does AND has a persistent network connection (and a browser and apps, and etc.)
            That and a Zune was crap when it was new, now it’s fascinating curiosity that turned wonderful punchline. So yes, walking around with a giant electronic turd in your pocket earns you some well deserved ribbing.

        • 0 avatar
          Xeranar

          To be fair, outside of TTAC and some vintage auto circles people who keep 14 year old Camries are pretty much mocked as well.

          There is a difference between keeping something of interest and value vs. something relatively cheap and replaceable. Never mind that the investment in a car as a sheer expense makes keeping them in better condition more valuable. A cell phone is about 1 to 2 payments on a car, a car is about 36-60 payments…

          • 0 avatar

            So, what you’re saying is, if you buy a phone outright, and keep it for 5 years (60 monthly payments saved) you can afford a brand new car!?!? Quelle surprise!

          • 0 avatar
            Xeranar

            If anything your phone depreciates faster in real time but as a factor of money spent depreciates slower. If your car is worth 60 payments and will be worth nil at 10 years but your phone is worth 1 payment but will be worth nil in 2 years the factor value is 1 in 2 for the car and 1 in 24 for the phone. The phone is a stunningly good deal to buy and replace in that time frame simply because you’re paying as a factor of depreciation substantially less.

            Though arguably if you bought a phone and kept it for 5 years you could have an extra 2 payments worth of down payment on a new car.

      • 0 avatar
        mkirk

        And let us not forget…The laserdisc is really the superior format. Too bad my copy of “Weekend at Bernies II” got scratched up.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      Zune.. Good grief..

      BTW, I upgraded the 4GB drive in my iPod mini awhile back with a 32GB CompactFlash and swapped out the battery, and my 17″ Macbook Pro has gotten maxed RAM and an SSD, and it’s good for another 4 years.

      ObArticle: Beyond the fact that this tech would very likely be rolled into Tesla’s batteries if it proves valuable and reliable, even if a battery can take such a charge that quickly you still need to be able to PROVIDE a charge that quickly. What car company is most likely to be able to upgrade their charging infrastructure to handle 1MW+ charges via next-gen batteries or capacitors?

      • 0 avatar

        I applaud you for your handiness in upgrading your iDevices, but the vast majority of consumers just bin and replace things at every opportunity just because there’s a stigma in many circles about not having the newest gadget or the biggest screen. It’s the same old dick-measuring contest plain and simple.

        As far as my Zune goes, I bought it used (1st Gen? 30gb), with a busted screen on Craigslist about 5-6 years ago when I wanted a serviceable mp3 player. Ordered a screen with tool kit on ebay and proceeded to tear the entire thing down to get to the front of the device and replace the screen. No problems since, downloaded all the games for it.

        The Zune software was awesome. I cannot stand the staggering shite-pile known as iTunes, heck, I uninstalled Quicktime because it caused me all sorts of issues downloading free Mp3s from Amazon at one point.

        It’s not like I carry the Zune every day, but if I go outside to mow the lawn, just grab it and put it on Shuffle All. Also, take out an ipod somewhere and nobody bats an eye, take out a Zune and people ask: what is that? Oh cool, haven’t seen one in years.

        And another thing, I hate earbuds. HAAAATE. I actually stocked up on a few pairs of the old plastic adjustable band over the head on the ear foam pads Panasonics for when my $7 Sonys from Sears crap out finally. I do have a pair of Sony MDR-7506 Professional Studio Monitor Over The Ear phones for quality music listening.

        I don’t stream music on my phone, I can put any number of mp3 cds in the car. I did put some of the music I own on my Android phone and on my 1020, but I don’t really use the files for anything but ringtones.

        • 0 avatar
          mkirk

          Ipod mini + 128GB CF card and a 1300mA battery is my mp3 player of choice. rockbox it if you hate iTunes. All for under 100 bucks. I keep the latest phones too but I like to have my whole music collection not in the cloud as I am in the field pretty often. The upgrade took 15 minutes.

          I had a first gen zune. I feel the interface on the iPod is superior in every way and I get way more capacity in a smaller form factor.

          • 0 avatar
            Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

            I have yet to fill the 28ish or so GB available with media, at any given time I doubt I have more than 12GB of music playlists and podcasts, and carrying around a Kingston 64GB silver key is a lot more convenient for non-music playing ;)

            Only problem with the mini is newer in-car systems don’t recognize it, even when it’s formatted as a Windows device. Works fine on my K1600GTL though, with el-cheapo eBay BMW cable even!

            (incidentally, I wonder how much drive an iPod Classic can recognize, what with mSATA adapters etc..)

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I have a Zune! Still use it (phone battery dies too fast if I’m doing music on it), and holds way more than my phone ever could. I’m going to use it on my flights this weekend. It has been very reliable, for years.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Where are you going? 2006?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            LOL. No, Miami!

            What am I supposed to use for lots of music storage, if not some MP3 device?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I’m with you. I have never put music on any of my smart phones. I have an old iPod (No idea what generation or kind. It’s orange and not gigantic), but it is stuck in 2008 as I have not connected it to a computer since then. Realistically, there has only been five or six albums that have come out since 2008 that I’d put on there. Everything else is crap.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Yeah, this thing is from Christmas 09, now that I think about it. It’s not real real big but there are thinner ones.

            But I just can’t see loading up my phone with music, and no real room for photos or anything else. Me Zune is 120gb!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            My only problem now is that I can’t figure out how to get “Chinese Democracy” off my iPod.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Sounds like you might have to plug that thing in afterall.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      I tend to repurpose when the battery has gone. Old iPods from the mid 00s? One is attached to an iHome clock radio in my daughter’s room for her night noises. The other is loaded to the gills with all of my music and stays in the FR-S glovebox connected via USB. I figure the old iPhone 4 will end up in my wife’s Rav with kid friendly music (Sorry Kanye and Marilyn Manson).

      To be fair, though, the only reason I upgraded to the iPhone 6 from our 5 is due to the fact that AT&T isn’t any cheaper out of contract for our data, text, and voice usage. No matter what I do (mobile share, plan based contract, go-phone), I end up around $110/month for 2 lines, so I may as well let AT&T subsidize a new phone for me because they sure won’t lower my bill below that amount for our usage requirements. I actually prefer the smaller screen of my old 5.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    I also thought of the Gigafactory; hopefully Panasonic is one of those companies that bought a license, or the plant will be obsolete before the foundation is poured.

    The battery in my Motorola Razr is in great shape, it’s the rest of the phone that’s erratic after 2 years.

    So, you’re the one who bought the Zune?

  • avatar
    mcs

    “While Tesla’s Supercharger could put a Model S P85D back on the road in 30 minutes to an hour, a Dodge Charger Hellcat can pull up to and away from the pump in three minutes, barring a run inside the 7-Eleven for a cup of coffee and a couple of donuts.”

    Not the way it works. I actually own and drive an EV. The reality is that pretty much every time you leave your driveway you’re charged enough to get where you’re going and back and never have to worry about dealing with the morning line for the pumps.

    I have several different commutes. One is about 24 miles round trip and that isn’t even a challenge for my Leaf much less a Tesla. A couple of other infrequent commutes are about 50 miles each way. In one case I plug into a massive solar array at the destination and the car is ready for the trip home well before it’s time for me to go home.

    For one of the commutes, I stop at a CHAdeMO Level 3 charger to top the car up for the trip home. The battery isn’t totally empty and the fast charge is much less than 30 minutes. Usually 8 to 10 minutes and barely gives me time to pick up the free coffee and hit the bathroom. Sometimes that stop stretches out to 20 or more minutes, but that’s because I get caught up in answering emails etc.

    For the long commutes, I have a choice of 3 ICE cars that I could use, but it’s really hard to get away from that electric powertrain. Smooth quiet power. Yep, I’ll put up with a little extra inconvenience for that.

    With a Tesla, none of my commutes would have to involve a stop. The scenario in the article where a Tesla driver would be stopping for a charge on a commute is unrealistic – again, look at the Tesla’s range. Now, do we want to talk about the hellcat driver’s time sitting in the dealership waiting for oil changes?

  • avatar
    sirwired

    The size of the electrical feed to accommodate such an electrical sink is not really economically feasible on a mass scale.

    Yeah, it’d be nice if we could station large, fast, rechargers along interstates in sufficient quantity to sustain long-haul traffic, but it’d require a complete overhaul of the electrical grid, and significant increased peak generating capacity.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Here ya go:

      http://aviationweek.com/technology/skunk-works-reveals-compact-fusion-reactor-details

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I don’t know if I buy the “mini reactor on every street corner” stuff – it sounds way too Jetsons to me, and I think these plants would need the same level of security as any other nuclear plant – but this technology is crazy awesome. It could revolutionize EVERYTHING about energy production the way John D. Rockefeller did over a century ago.

        And whoever invents it is going to have a license to print money, like Rockefeller did. Lockheed stock looks awfully attractive all the sudden.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          Yea the cost savings from distribution alone would be huge. I don’t see this becoming something anyone will be able to do though; only power generators and military folks really have the experience to deal with nuclear stuff and I don’t see that changing.

          Still though, turning substations into mini fission plants would do so much for power reliability and electricity in general. As well as the environment. If this is legit it’s a real game changer.

          • 0 avatar
            05lgt

            The linked press release is about compact fusion reactors that fit on a truck. Not fission. No uranium required. Of course, it’s just “10 years out”.

      • 0 avatar
        WaftableTorque

        At least we won’t go to war over energy. Unlike energon. Or protoculture.

      • 0 avatar

        What happens if plasma gets unstable? So far it was a challenge. But in any case – nuclear fusion in … 10 years…now this. Bright future is waiting. It officially end Global warming/cooling/ocean rise/overpopulation/religion/asteroid impact/ebola/flu and many other fears. Now we can relax and enjoy life, if we survive these 10 years.

    • 0 avatar
      michal1980

      maybe to some extent. but if ‘gas’ stations are smart they will adopt. It might mean that the ‘gas’ station is now a electrical storage station that helps deal with peaks.

      What would need to change is the power distribution going to homes. If a lot of people use electric cars in the future the grid will burn down when everyone comes home, we’ll need something more then just smart meters to deal with that, smart outlets that are dedicated for charging cars. Ones that could be programmed to limit peaks, and/or allow for peak pricing if you need to charge your car right away.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        If we replaced current plants with fusion plants, I don’t see how the “grid” would be affected that much – you’re just replacing one electricity source with another. As I understand the “grid,” it already is designed to allow more power consumption at different times (best case I can think of is lots of A/C and other appliances being turned on in the late afternoon on hot summer days), and since most of the charging would be happening at night, when demand is lower, I can’t see much of an issue.

        But I’m a layman when it comes to this…if someone has expertise on this, I’d love to hear about it.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      Or, lots and lots of capacitors and batteries.

      Size a charging station in terms of kWh delivered per day, then install adequate capacitors and batteries to deliver that (factoring in peak loads), with a ‘trickle feed’ that keeps them charged. You might still need a substation for popular sites, but it may not need to be that big.

      Adding solar as an alternate input to the batteries could be worth doing as well.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      I appreciate your skepticism but I’m not sure where your argument for this is coming from. Presuming that most Americans could charge their cars at low-off-peak hours and use minimum draw during peak daylight hours for topping off there wouldn’t be a huge drain on the grid at all. Even if we were to route extra power to interstates for interstate charging ports that wouldn’t really be all that problematic since we have the capacity to keep those places rolling with minimal effort since no more than 10% of the cars would ever be using it across the country at any given time and even that number is still extremely high, probably day to day use would be 2-3%.

      As for mini-fusion reactors, I’m actually glad they solved the containment issue it seems or are atleast so close that it will make it feasible soon. I don’t think Lockheed Martin plans on a ‘every street corner’ model though they have advocated for them to be used in 3rd world countries for cheap rural power. In the US they would be able to be placed in the same large network arrays that we use now but scale up our power significantly. A huge coal burning plant could be replaced by 15 or 20 mini-reactors and create a factor of power verging on immeasurable. If fusion works the way they advocate it does in the sense of this containment and size we’re looking at the cusp of a free power society which is revolutionary.

  • avatar
    Bangernomist

    We already have peak consumption on summer days straining the power grid to the edge of rolling blackouts. There is a LOT of energy rolling in trucks to gas stations around the country that will have to be replaced to make this practical. The extra demand from charging fleets of EV’s if you can do it in three minutes will have to be met with more infrastructure…and paid for with more expensive electricity, negating some of the cost advantage. Fast charging batteries are only one piece in a big puzzle.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      >We already have peak consumption on summer days straining the power grid to the edge of rolling blackouts.

      Lol wat? Where? Certainly not in the US. The electrical grid here is robust and nowhere near “rolling blackouts” trying to keep up with summer HVAC needs. Ridiculous.

      • 0 avatar
        rem83

        That’s not the case in Texas (which uses it’s own grid – one of three in the country). We often run at full capacity during peak hours in summer months and brownouts are a threat. One of the mitigation techniques recently implemented is an opt-in brownout program using smart meters. The power utility offers an incentive to the consumer to agree to allow the utility to cut-off power at the meter when the grid is critially loaded.

        • 0 avatar
          Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

          Meanwhile, most EV charging occurs in off-peak hours, either overnight or early in the day when commuters plug in at the office. Therefore, power companies sell more power that would otherwise be unused base load.

          EVs mean profits for utilities, and adequate infrastructure planning and maintenance will allow for a controlled rollout of upgrades per substation.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      California and Texas are the only two regions with that problem and that can be rectified with better management and the introduction of more solar usage in the desert zones. But this isn’t a problem for 75% of the population, so why should be throw it away because it isn’t perfect for 25%?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Fusion won’t happen in our lifetimes, but – hopefully – this invention will find its way into my second-to-next EV.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

      In-vehicle Mr. Fusion? Probably.

      Some flavor of IEC high-beta D-T fusion? Fingers x’d that we’ll see it in 10 years.

      http://aviationweek.com/technology/skunk-works-reveals-compact-fusion-reactor-details

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      Fusion will happen within the next decade. Forget this Lockheed press release and look at what Washington’s tokamak (sp) is doing.

      Also this battery tech is one if many coming out, not to mention carbon dot fuel cells and platinum free quantum martix tumgsten-paladium fuel cells which cost 40 times less and are just as efficient.

      We are on the edge of an energy revolution, it is an exciting time to be alive!

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        “We are on the edge of an energy revolution, it is an exciting time to be alive!”

        With the education I remember you saying you have, I hope you can find a place in it. Make some effin’ money.

  • avatar
    jjster6

    The other day Lockheed Martin announced a break through on nuclear fusion saying in 10 years they can make a 100 mega watt fusion reactor in a 7 by 10 foot box (we have been 10 years away from a workable fusion reactor for 60 years).

    Couple that with a 300 mile range battery that you can charge in 5 minutes that lasts 20 years (and we have been 2 years from that for 20 years) and all the world’s problems are solved.

    Great if it’s true. I am somewhat skeptical.

    • 0 avatar
      bosozoku

      I think this is relevant to your comment: http://xkcd.com/678/

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      +1

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        Feb 2013: Four years away! See: http://www.dvice.com/2013-2-22/lockheeds-skunk-works-promises-fusion-power-four-years

        Add 18 months and stir…

        Oct 2014: Five years away! See: http://aviationweek.com/technology/skunk-works-reveals-compact-fusion-reactor-details

    • 0 avatar
      WaftableTorque

      Even if they can fit a fusion generator into the size of a compact car, I haven’t been able to google a 50mw generator that’s smaller than a school bus yet. Plus if you’re using steam, you’ll still need cooling towers and all the ancillary equipment involved.

      • 0 avatar
        jjster6

        @ Waftable Torque,

        Please keep your details out of this fantasy.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        WaftableTorque, I think the goal should be to be able to install a power generating unit into and at every home or business, like the portable gas and diesel generators in use today.

        Electricity is so unreliable where I live that, like my neighbors, I also have to keep operational AC generators supplying electricity in case of brown-outs and black-outs, which happen often.

        I have three generators, an Ingersoll-Rand 40KW, a Wacker G70 70KW, and a Honda EU-6500iSA Inverter (for all things electronic).

        The dream is to have ONE 120KW pure-sine nuclear fusion unit running 24/7. If it fails, I would have no one to blame but myself.

    • 0 avatar
      jacob_coulter

      I’m also VERY skeptical.

      I’ll gladly eat my words if I’m wrong, but something tells me in 10 years we’re not going to have all of our energy problems solved in a package that’s smaller than a U-Haul.

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      Actually we have a workable fusion reactor, Yale had one more than a decade ago. They shut it down due to problematic containment. Lockheed Martin and a few other companies have outright stated they’ve solved containment. Now the issue is getting the package down to a workable size. So skeptic or not the reality is Fusion works today, we just don’t want a factory-sized version that produces 100 megawatts when a much better unit is coming sooner. It needs to scale down to make sense in the current system.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        For the matter of that, yes, we do have a workable fusion reactor that provides heat, light and could be harnessed for other forms or energy.

        • 0 avatar
          jjster6

          Are you referring to the sun?

        • 0 avatar
          Xeranar

          I knew he was referring to the sun, I chose not to honor his wry wit because frankly it doesn’t further my own agenda. I applaud his efforts but I fear I doubt I’ll be around on this board to make note (or remember for that matter) in 15 years when Lockheed Martin rolls out its first reactor.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I fear others will not wait 15 years to leave this board but have already gone and been gone.

            Also I noticed that Dave Ruggles, among others, hasn’t made an appearance recently in the comments section and what he brings to the table is always pure gold derived from real-world experience.

            Where have all these B&B gone?

      • 0 avatar
        jjster6

        The workable reactor of which you speak required more energy in than came out. Workable, yes. Useful, no.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I enjoyed your food preference characterization of Hellcat owners.

  • avatar
    Lynn E.

    What is it with some of you guys? Nuclear power, straining the grid, and all new infrastructure needed – all nonsense. Please talk to some people who own electric vehicles and then use some common sense. Here are some questions to help you find your common sense:

    Have you heard of solar panels? I have them on my roof and now use much less grid power with my electric car than I used to use before my electric car.
    Have you seen the solar panels installed by businesses and even supermarkets?
    Have you heard that electric vehicles have about 90% fewer moving parts than ICE cars?
    Have you heard that solar panel installers want used car batteries that are too wore out for car use (60% – 70% capacity left) to store solar power for night time use in homes and businesses?
    Have you figured in the time spent repairing your ICE cars along with fill up times?
    Do you understand that electric car owners seldom have to actually use roadside charging stations? They charge their cars at home, at work, and at newly built apartments.
    Do you understand it costs the military $400 to deliver one gallon of gas or diesel to their vehicles on the front lines? Wouldn’t it be safer to have solar panels installed along their routes or on their vehicles?
    Do you understand that the military wants quiet planes, drones, and transport vehicles?

    Forget about just ICE vehicles now being obsolete our power companies will soon be smaller operations. A lot of freedom from oil companies, pipelines, and grids is coming. Welcome your increase in independence.

  • avatar

    If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. This would revolutionize not only personal transportation, but geopolitics.

    If there were anything in this story, the major media, the NYT, The WaPo, NPR, and various other outlets that have competent science writing staffs would have been all over it.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I’m optimistic. A few years ago many of the electronic toys and devices we now accept as common every day items did not exist. Tech made that happen.

      Solar is coming down in price. Wind-generation is so over-abundant that many windmills don’t even turn most of the time. They’re even building a new nuclear plant, unheard of since 1973. Better tech made that happen.

      As technology builds upon itself I would like to believe that the best is yet to come.

      AC generation used to be a real bulky affair but out of three relatively small generators I am able to crank out nearly 120KW to keep my home electrified during brown-outs and black-outs so common in my area.

  • avatar
    dragthemagicpuffin

    They tell us it’s gonna take two minutes to charge the thing, but what’s really gonna happen is you’re gonna pay for $20 worth of charge and then when it gets to $19.50 it’s gonna tick away at one watt per second for an extra two minutes while you pull your hair out.

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  • FreedMike: A friend of mine had a G20. The Integra was far better.
  • SCE to AUX: “why aren’t the prices of EV’s going down every year?” They are, if one considers the product...
  • mcs: @ImageFont:”I think every EV should include an extra $7500 charge tacked on to the sticker price that is...
  • mcs: @ImageFont: “so why aren’t the prices of EV’s going down every year? ” It’s supply and demand....
  • Imagefont: Wait, I though battery prices were going down every year. The cells Tesla uses should be like $10/kwh so...

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