By on September 25, 2014

nissan-terrano-10

Tim Cain’s article on how the Micra now accounts for 1 in 10 Nissans sold in Canada led me down the armchair product planner rabbit hole, though my conclusion was not the “Nismo Cube Diesel in Brown” that one might expect of an auto blogger. I think that there’s a strong case to be made for the Dacia Duster to be imported to Canada as an ultra-cheap Nissan crossover.

First of all, let’s take a look at the Canadian market. Behind compact cars, compact SUVs are the second biggest market segment in Canada. Unlike America, smaller cars are the hottest ticket in the Great White North, thanks to higher fuel prices, less disposable income and a propensity for many people to live in dense urban centres. Couple that with poorer weather and the fact that SUVs are very much in vogue, and you have the right conditions for a car market that is very receptive to the compact SUV, even if they cost a bit more than a compact or mid-size car.

Within that segment is a growing number of subcompact-sized SUVs. The Nissan Juke was arguably the pioneer of the segment in much of the world, but the Buick Encore, Jeep Compass and Chevrolet Trax will soon be joined by the Honda HR-V and other nameplates. It’s reasonable to expect that this segment will flourish even further, given that it offers many of the same qualitative advantages of a compact SUV, at an even lower price.

For Nissan, the Dacia Duster, already sold in world markets as the Nissan Terrano, is the sort of vehicle that could be offered as a low-cost companion to the Nissan Micra. Like the Micra, it would be pitched as a vehicle for basic transportation needs, albeit with the added space and practicality of an SUV bodystyle, and even AWD (on upper trim levels). At a low enough price point (less than the Juke’s $19,998 base price, but higher than the Micra’s $9,998 teaser price), a Terrano could be offered an attractive enough MSRP to draw buyers into the showroom, enticed by the idea of a dirt cheap, rugged SUV from a known brand like Nissan. There could be an utterly basic Duster with a manual gearbox, no A/C and lacking other creature comforts that would be offered as a loss-leader/Quebec market special, while higher content versions could be offered at higher prices.

Homologation for both safety and emissions standards would be necessary, but if Nissan can find a way around it for the Micra, it can be done for the Duster/Terrano. Production from Dacia’s Romanian plant would be covered under the soon to be signed Canada-EU free trade deal.

In a market that is extraordinarily price sensitive (Maritz data suggests that price and value for money are leading considerations for Canadian buyers), with high fuel prices, poor roads and even poorer weather, a low-cost small SUV seems like a slam dunk. Nissan took a real gamble on the Micra, but it seems to be paying off handsomely. A low-priced, compact SUV is likely to entail less risk and a far greater reward.

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79 Comments on “Editorial: The Case For Importing The Dacia Duster...”


  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    The Skoda Yeti: arguably dollar for dollar and pound for pound the best automotive buy on the planet?

  • avatar

    Yep, it seems to make all kind of sense for the Canadian market, at least. Sold in Europe as Dacia, Latin America, Northern Africa and possibly other places as Renault (it is available and sold in Mexico as a Renault) and as Terrano basically in Asia, Renault-Nissan could even choose whichever brand suits it better in Canada. Being it is in Europe, hurdles would possibly not be too much to overcome, as the fundamental relationship in the Micra/March and Duster bones show that manufacture in Mexico for Canada and US is possible.

    Could it be that there is some internal tug of war between Nissan and Renault to use its own brand for an eventual Canadian Duster? Could be a good vehicle in which to reintroduce Renault to North America using its own name as it’s already there under the Nissan brand. Of course, would take longer and the Nissan name makes more sense, but it would be fun to watch Renault in North America again.

  • avatar
    Richard Chen

    Interesting, and might be a good addition in the lower 48 lineup. The EuroNCAP results weren’t stellar, so perhaps a mid-cycle structural reinforcement would be warranted.

    Does the X-Trail name still resonate up North?

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I’d love to see a no nonsense, cheap, utilitarian crossover brought over. Sort of a cheaper Subaru alternative.

    A year ago, the Russian car mag “Za Rulem” drove a Duster and a Lada 4×4 (old body Niva) up to the northern reaches of Russia and did some off roading, and no not just the typical US-press oriented “drive it on a gravel road and praise its offroad prowess.” They really put the car through some hard terrain and it acquitted itself pretty well for what it was. The diesel with a super short 1st gear was well liked. The Lada blew it away on actual technical off road sections as well as being better suited to higher speed uneven gravel roads, but that’s besides the point.

    link:http://www.zr.ru/content/articles/576201-severnyj_probeg_na_rybalku_na_rybachij/

    • 0 avatar

      FWIW, here in Brazil, outside the dedicated off-roaders, the Renault Duster 4×4 is fast accumulating a reputation as a tough little bugger that takes well to the activity and is relatively durable. Seems the angles of attack and exit are all right. In this regard it puts its direct competitors here, the Ford EcoSport and Chevy Traxx, to shame.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Cheap, tall and Japanese QA. What’s not to like?

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    How much hockey gear can it haul, eh?

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Is a stripped-down Rogue Classic somehow not cheap enough for Canada? Nissan used to sell previous-gen Sentras up north for a few extra years to satisfy the skinflint market.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    It would be cheaper to just rebadge a lower trim level of the existing Juke.

    One of the reasons that the base model Duster is cheap is that it comes with very little equipment. That approach probably won’t fly in the US these days. (It would have worked thirty years ago, but not now.)

    • 0 avatar

      It would have been cheaper to rebadge a Sentra or Versa, but Nissan brought the Micra to Canada, despite the homologation costs and small market size. The Duster presents a similar case for Canada, not the US.

      • 0 avatar

        Yeah, seems Pch misread. That being said, I believe this car would stand more of a chance in the US than the mythical Fiat Strada/RAM 750. And in the US, only with the Nissan badges.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        The Micra fills what is arguably a hole in the lineup for a city car.

        The Dacia doesn’t do that; Nissan already has a vehicle in its size class. The Duster is just really cheap, but it’s cheap largely for reasons that Americans (and I presume Canadians) won’t tolerate.

        There is a market in Europe for those who don’t get a company car and who are slammed by the high price of entry for new car purchases (such as high VAT rates.) Those conditions don’t exist in North America.

        • 0 avatar

          The Micra accounts for 1 in 10 sales of Nissans in Canada. Small SUVs are the second biggest segment in Canada. A dirt cheap entry in a popular segment is something that does not exist. The Micra shows that Canadians are willing to pay for a car that has levels of content, refinement and a footprint that would not necessarily be accepted by American consumers.

          You either lack an understanding of the Canadian market, the ability to comprehend the argument being made or you’re you’re backpedaling to cover up for mis-reading the article (as evidenced by your first comment). Nice try.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Hey Derek,

            Would you see this vehicle as sort of a spiritual successor to the Suzuki Sidekick? Cheap, simple, no frills, competent, compared to even a base Rogue/CR-V etc being better equipped.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Except for a Canadian willingness to downsize in the passenger car market, I don’t see much of a difference between the US and Canada, no.

            The Micra doesn’t compare to this for the reasons that I stated — it’s a different size class.

            As noted, much of what makes a Dacia cheap is the lack of kit. You could simply strip down a Rogue and stick some different body panels on it if there’s actually a market for that here. There’s nothing special about the Dacia platform, unless you consider its poor crash test results to be some sort of feature.

          • 0 avatar

            ” I don’t see much of a difference between the US and Canada, no.”

            Oh no? How about

            -Higher car prices
            -Higher fuel costs
            -Higher insurance costs
            -Higher taxes
            -Less disposable income
            -A very urban population with smaller roads, parking spaces and other conditions that make a small crossover a good choice.

            What would this “Rogue with different body panels” cost to engineer? Where would it be built? America, Japan and even Korea, where the Rogue is built, would likely mean labor costs that are too high, to say nothing of the fact that “different body panels” have their own R&D costs associated with them that would almost certainly be uneconomical. Your solution is as grounded in reality as the enthusiast whinging about “why can’t they just bring a global midsize truck here?”

            On the other hand, the Duster is as bare bones as a Micra, built in a location that has dirt cheap labor costs and is party to a free trade agreement with Canadians – just like the Micra itself! It is smaller than a Rogue or this fantasy Rogue-based car you image, which prevents it from competing with the Rogue itself.

            Lastly, why would Nissan re-engineer a Rogue for a market of 1.7 million vehicles when they could repeat a successful formula and homologate a vehicle built in a low-cost location that is proven and likely already amortized globally? There isn’t anything special about the Dacia, but that’s not the point. It’s a dirt cheap crossover. It doesn’t need to be anything more.

          • 0 avatar

            Oooh! Derek has you beat Pch! Lots and lots of indisputable facts. Plus, Derek, it’s nothing special, but it’s not bad at all. Much better than the cars Monty mentions below for example and much more evolved, comfortable, though probably less off road worthy than the Samurai that Davefromcalcary associated it, too.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The lower incomes and higher taxes don’t translate into a desire for option-free cars that crash badly. Those problems get addressed well enough through downsizing.

            If the idea has merit, then a super stripper Rogue or rebadged/restyled Rogue variant would do the trick. The fact that Nissan hasn’t already done that probably tells us something.

          • 0 avatar

            @Pch, the relatively low scores the Duster and its brothers got on safety test crashes is the lack of special steel, specifically in the area where the roof meets the pillars. To be sold in the US and I guess Canada, that section would have to be reinforced. I don’t think it’s hard to do or prohibitively expensive. Surely simpler and more cost effective than redesigning a Rogue.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            “To be sold in the US and I guess Canada, that section would have to be reinforced. I don’t think it’s hard to do or prohibitively expensive. Surely simpler and more cost effective than redesigning a Rogue.”

            You have it backwards.

            The primary cost of a car is in the parts. A Dacia can be sold cheaply because (a) it doesn’t have much gear and (b) it lacks those reinforcements that you’re talking about.

            If you reengineer the car so that it crashes better to meet US/Canada standards, then that costs hundreds of millions of dollars. Or you can take a Rogue that has already done that and get that for free.

            If you add the safety equipment to the Duster, then the price of the Dacia necessarily goes up. The Rogue has already accounted for that.

            If there is a market for a stripped compact crossover, then strip the gear out of the Rogue and be done with it. If there is a desire to not brand the cheapo as a Rogue for whatever reason, then some cheap value engineering can be performed to make it look and feel a bit different at relatively low cost. Badge engineering can sometimes make sense, just so long as it is done cleverly.

          • 0 avatar

            The floorpan area of the Duster and brethen survived, the steering wheel would not have killed the occupants on impact. Reinforcements would be adding more steel in some still critical areas around the bottom of the car and some special alloy, high resistance steel to the area mentioned. If Fiat Brazil can reinforce the old as the hills 178 Strada platform to sell in Western Europe (for low prices retail prices no doubt), can reinforce the 327 platform to make the new Uno pass Latin NCap testing, surely Renault-Nissan could add some steel to make the Duster Canadian safety compliant (as it and brethren are already sold in Western Europe) without too much ado. All of that on a car family that if taken all members is the 4th most sold in the world.

            Like you say, it’s the features that cost. As the Canadian market can takes a more non frills cars, adding some steel for such a high volume car is nothing much. Better than stripping down and remaking a car for a very small market, most especially if the Rogue is larger and the Duster has a size Canadians don’t reject.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Derek,
            This comment of yours;
            ” Your solution is as grounded in reality as the enthusiast whinging about “why can’t they just bring a global midsize truck here?”

            This comment fails to recognise that an imported vehicle doesn’t require a large market volume to be successful. Particularly when many countries already import these types of vehicles in low volumes.

            No, the US can support a large midsize segment if vehicles can be imported. The same theory applies that you are using with this Duster being manufactured in Romania.

            As it stands and as VW’s CEO stated the “Amarok can’t be manufactured in the US because volumes required exceed 100k per year to make it viable and the chicken tax makes it unviable to import”.

            There is a large midsize pickup market in the US, particularly with a decent midsize offering.

            The only way vehicles like this Duster which is on par with the Tacoma can sell in the Canada or the US is based heavily on pricing. If the price is right then it will sell in huge numbers in Canada, US and even Australia.

            Like midsize pickups, if the cost of the vehicle doesn’t match it’s perceived quality or refinement and it’s like a tractor then it will not have a large market.

            Canada, Australia and the US are similar in this respect. If you offer a sh!t product or vehicle then you expect to pay a sh!t price, which can occur with the Duster.

            The same for midsize pickups. The US only has sh!t midsize pickups (other than the Colorado) with a price point that a quality and refined vehicle should sell.

            Hence, not many midsizers are sold.

        • 0 avatar
          Monty

          Oh, believe you me, we Canadians, especially Quebecois, will certainly tolerate a Dacia Duster disguised as a Nissan.

          As you pointed out, the same market conditions don’t exist in North America, but there is a difference in market conditions between Canada and the US. A lot have been mentioned above, but what also exists is a populace that is less willing to extend auto loans to 96 or 108 months. If it can’t be paid for in 3 to 4 years we’ll buy the most car we can for a sum that can be financed over 48 months. For some, that’s the Micra, and for others it will be the Orlando or the Mirage.

          In fact, I would say that not only will we tolerate the Duster, some of us would wear it as a badge of honour, akin to how some have adopted the Mirage, the Pony, the Lada, the Skoda, the Chev/Geo/Pontiac/Suzuki Metro/Swift 3 cylinder model and other such illustrious bare bones cars.

          • 0 avatar

            And this time Monty, you wouldn’t even be sacrificing much in terms of how the car drives and is as the whole Logan-Sandero-Duster family is still quite modern and related to the Micra that seems to be doing so well in Canada, just bigger and wider.

          • 0 avatar
            Monty

            Marcelo:

            Yes, no doubt the Logan-Sandero-Duster family are decent vehicles. I’m quite impressed by the Micra, TBH, as it’s an excellent value proposition for Canadians.

            My argument was that the Canadian market is similar to, but not the same, as the American market. Far less population density, farther distances to travel, worse infrastructure and less disposable income translates for some reason into us buying smaller cars and fewer trucks than our neighbours to the south. Vehicles like the Orlando, Micra and Mirage don’t appeal to the average American, but certainly do to the average Canadian.

            Rebadging the Duster and selling it in Canada makes a lot more sense than doing so for the US.

            Sometimes, in our collective cultural psyche, we Canadians just like to be slightly different than Americans!

  • avatar
    TorontoSkeptic

    People need to understand how polarized the Canadian auto market is (ha ha get it “polar”-ized?) I work in downtown Toronto and every day I see many Ferraris, Aston Martins, 7-series, Porsches, your standard six-figure cars. I even saw a Maybach outside the hospital a few days ago (next to an S-class of course). Between the housing bubble, the banking industry and offshore money, a lot of people here are really, really, REALLY rich right now. I know single mothers who bought $40k cars with cash, and high school teachers who have bought $1.3m houses. It’s an unusual time.

    At the same time it has a high unemployment rate, low wages and very high cost of living – rent, insurance, and sales tax are double or triple what americans are used to. This means a lot of “middle class” people are looking at the absolute bottom rung of transportation. There’s a reason the Hyundai Accent is one of the most popular cars year after year. So the Micra’s success doesn’t really surprise me that much. And given how popular other low-end crossover are – I’m thinking of the Rogue in particular – I don’t see the Duster as a crazy idea. I agree with Derek, the infrastructure and weather are bad which adds to the appeal of anything SUV-ish.

    The real loser are the middle and upper-middle cars. There is virtually no market for things like the Avalon, Maxima, Taurus. I think I read they sell <500 Avalons for a country of 30m people. Impalas exist solely as low-end taxis. Even Camrys are fairly uncommon compared to the US – I believe Tim Cain said Camrys aren't in the top 25 most popular vehicles in Canada.

    • 0 avatar
      genuineleather

      You grossly overestimate the wealth of affluent Canadians. $191k/year in income will land you in the top 1% of earners; in the US, you’d need twice that number. A fraction of a fraction does not translate into “a lot” of people being rich.

      • 0 avatar
        TorontoSkeptic

        That’s income… “wealth” is about assets. Assets for most people = real estate, and house prices are now double those in the USA. I would say compared to where I grew up in the US, Toronto is easily 5x more expensive, maybe 8x more.

        My in-laws bought their house a while ago for $65k and are thinking $1.4 million is a reasonable sale price this coming spring. This is a house in bad shape, with no garage or parking and a borderline unusable basement, in a so-so school district.

        For everyone else working a job with no raise since 2009, the Micra/Mirage/Duster looks reasonable. On my young-family block the $13k Fiat 500 has quite a presence, along with the Versa. Lots of 8-10 year old Pontiac Vibes, Honda Elements and Mazda 3s.

        • 0 avatar

          What neighborhood are you in?

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Skeptic is generally correct. However his timeline may be incorrect regarding his in-laws house.

            I paid $300k for a house in the Toronto area 25 years ago and will be lucky to sell it for $775k despite close to $100k of upgrades/maintenance over the years.

            And ‘school districts’ is an American term. In the GTA most public schools are relatively equal. Unlike in the U.S. rarely by a house based on which school their children will attend.

          • 0 avatar
            TorontoSkeptic

            My in-laws live in Riverdale. I live further out on the east side. I gather from your writing you are from North York area (but maybe live downtown now)?

            Re: school districts, people will still pay $100k over asking for a small house in order to send their kids to certain public schools (Earl Haig on the north side and Jackman on the east side come to mind).

          • 0 avatar

            I used to live downtown, moved more Midtown which is where I grew up.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    The vehicle pictured is seriously handsome. Looks like a mini 2 box Frontier (which is awesome). Many times better looking than the Rogue or Murano, a million billion times better looking than the Juke (although last nights dinner has more aesthetic appeal than the Juke).

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Absolutely agreed.

      I’d *go further* and argue that it’s better looking, while also probably having more everyday, relevant utility, than many U.S./Canadian sold “upmarket” CUVs with window stickers between 30k and 40k.

      Really.

  • avatar

    It has the same sort of appeal as rugged, basic transportation as the Lada Niva had. The Duster is of course way better. I wish more engines would become available, particularly turbo diesels.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    No A/C + Quebec? Imagine the smell. Yikes.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Note the lack of a preposterous low hanging piece of garden trim on the front fascia. As others have noted, it is a truly handsome little ride, better looking than the bug-eyed Duster it is derived from, I might add. it probably has a better approach angle and clearance than any number of big SUVs and CUVs that are saddled with those plastic aero-beards.

    • 0 avatar

      As I mentioned to you in an answer above!

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Marcelo,

        Agreed. I’m specifically referencing the pathetically low clearance on fullsize GM trucks, the new 2015 Colorado, Nissan’s own Pathfinder, etc. that are on the US market. Now, for most situations that clearance isn’t needed here, and I understand that on most of these vehicles it can be removed without too much hassle. I also understand that it’s a very cheap and effective aero trick that has very real improvements to fuel economy (supposedly 1-2mpg highway on the Colorado for example). The aesthetics just drive me nuts though. And in the winter on an unplowed road, that valence becomes a very real hindrance.

        I applaud Toyota for not tacking one of these things on the Tacoma, even though it could stand to potentially pick up a few highway mpg. Hey maybe that’s a good aftermarket accessory to market…

  • avatar
    infinitime

    I too would love to see the Duster make its way to the Great North. There is certainly some appeal in a minimalist light-duty 4×4. However, such a beast already exists in the Jeep Patriot/Compass, and its sales are far from stellar.

    Even at Cdn$20,000 for the cheapest 4×4 model (truly basic 2wd models with standard can be had for Cdn$15,000), the sales are not that impressive.

    Would a Duster really be that much more appealing an alternative?

    • 0 avatar

      How old are the Jeep Compass/Patriot? Do they share the same size as the Duster/Terrano? Canada has proven time and again they will tolerate a smaller and more basic car than Americans will. The Duster’s design has been a success the world over. Costs are fully amortized, any necessary change would not cost them much. Nissan has a recognized brand. The market has shown a hunger for this kind of car and the smaller engines (economy) and size would be seen as a plus. The cars you mention are huge!

      • 0 avatar
        infinitime

        I would say very similar in size, and given how long the current model has been in production, well amortized in terms of equipment costs….

        http://www.jeep.ca/en/2014/patriot/overview

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    The Duster has been a runaway success in every market they have released it in. I would guess that is because it is a good car, and, good cars sell, no matter the vagaries of the market it is sold in.
    Conclusion: It will sell successfully in Canada and the USA, no matter how it’s badged, although, in the US Nissan has less of a hill to climb.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    After seeing the Duster, especially in France I do think there would even be a market for the Nissan variant.

    The French ones were primarily powered with a diesel.

    The Nissan ‘Duster’ does is far more aesthetically pleasing than the Renault.

    I do think they would even sell in relatively large numbers in the US, after seeing the small Souls and similar vehicles on the road there.

    One must remember even if only 20 thousand sell in the US a year that is a significant number.

    • 0 avatar
      Johannes Dutch

      The Dacia Duster comes with a 1.5 liter diesel engine from Renault. That same engine is used by Mercedes by the way, in the A and B class.

      The gasoline engines in Dacias used to be older type Renault engines, but now they have the same engines as current Renault models, like the 3 cylinder turbo from the Clio hatchback and Captur crossover.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        I was actually surprised at the number of them I saw. I went to France in 2009 and didn’t see one and when I went back in 2012 I saw quite a few and even took photo’s of them.

        The Dusters appeared to be plentiful outside of the larger cities in the rural and suburban areas.

        The Nissan has a much more attractive front end compared to the Dacia. I don’t know what the difference is between the interiors.

        Another facet of France I noticed was I did see a handful of pickups. I mainly saw Navara’s and a couple of Hiluxes. In 2009 I saw more Mitsubishi’s than in 2012.

        The oddest thing I saw at my cousin’s in Les Lilas, Paris was a F-250. If you’ve driven in Paris this would have been a pig of a vehicle.

        The odd thing I noticed regarding the pickups, they were dent free and in a pristine condition. So, they are mainly toys.

        Like the US, French cars have many more dents in them than what we encounter here in Australia. I would even state that French cars have more dents than American vehicles.

        • 0 avatar
          Johannes Dutch

          Al, pickups were, are and will always be rather thin on the ground throughout Europe. Vans and small flatbed trucks with removable sideboards are the norm. Diesel engines, all of them, regardless their size and weight.

          You must have seen them a lot. A Volkswagen, Ford, Mercedes, Iveco etc. with a single or double cab and a flatbed. Single or dual tires on the rear axle.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            We have most all of the vehicle in Australia you have in France. Our market is very Asian, with a large blend of Euro and US.

            I have an Uncle who lives in the Garonne in a town called Villeneuve-sur-Lot, north of Agen. It’s quite a rural area for France.

            I consider this one of the most pleasant parts of France.

            He drives a what we call a Nissan Dualis or a Qashqai, I do know it has a 2 litre engine. I asked him why he didn’t buy a diesel and he said he liked the way the engine revs out. My Aunt drives an old Puegeot 205 with a gasoline engine. So, he likes gasoline.

            I stopped at all of the car dealers in Villeneuve, GM, they had a Colorado and it only comes with the smaller 2.5 litre diesel.

            The Nissan dealer had those NV400? vans, which are a Renault. But nicer looking facia on them. I think Nissan is making a better looking Renault then Renault.

            Driving around I saw plenty of the commercial vehicles you mention. On the Autoroutes they sit comfortably on 130kph.

            France is similar to the US in that French cars prevail. But I do see plenty of German cars on the road and a surprising of Asian vehicles.

          • 0 avatar
            Johannes Dutch

            Vans (small-midsize-big) are one big global cloning party. The Nissan NV400 is the same van as a Renault Master and Opel/Vauxhall Movano.

            All of them can keep up with the rest of the traffic very easily. You know, the notorious “White Van Man”, doing 150 km/h or so with or without load.

  • avatar
    Onus

    IMHO the US is going to beat Canada to a EU free trade deal.

    Eventually we will have some crazy super NAFTA Europe as Mexico has had a deal with the EU for awhile now.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    wow what a weird difference there is in nissan markets worldwide

    canada has NO SUVs

    australia has more than half a dozen SUVs

    i downloaded the Terrano catalog off the India page and the reality is I dont think this CUV meets the safety standards in the Canada or the US or Australia.

    It only has 2 airbags and would get something like an Ncap 4? or less?

    i do like it but i would think that Nissan here would be pushing people into the Dualis Qashkai instead (which I admit is a nice looking CUV)

    we actually have an Xtrail but it is a $35,000 proposition and about 2 sizes up?

  • avatar
    Banger

    Knowing bunk-all about the Canadian vehicle market outside of the insights we get here at TTAC from our contributors above the 49th Parallel, I just came here to say “Nismo cube Diesel in Brown” is perhaps the best damned idea this Nissan cube owner has heard in a long, long time.

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