By on September 11, 2014

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The list of Canadian-exclusive vehicles is scant, with a large number of them being small minivans and badge-engineered Acuras – in other words, nothing terribly interesting. What you’re looking at here is something that only Canadians will get – for now. But rather than carrying out a concerted effort to bring Canadians something unique, it gives an insight into how product planning decisions are made.

American consumers are limited to getting AWD only on the Genesis 3.8 models, which come with Hyundai’s ubiquitous V6 engine. Even then, it’s an option. Canadian consumers, on the other hand, have only AWD models, but they can get four driven wheels on the five-point-oh V8 engine, unlike those south of the 49th parallel.

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A recent trip to the Canadian Rockies saw us behind the wheel of a Genesis 5.0 equipped with the Magna-developed HTRAC AWD system. Since it was an unseasonably warm August week, there was no foul weather to test the system’s mettle, nor did we have the gumption to take the $64,123 (Canadian) press loaner off-road.

The only way the Canadian 5.0 comes equipped is in the loaded Ultimate trim level, which is packed with every passive and active safety feature imaginable (including a CO2 sensor that supposed helps detect driver drowsiness), a 17 speaker Lexicon audio system (brilliant) and a wonderfully simple infotainment system with a 9.2 inch screen.

There’s no tangible similarity between the RWD 5.0 and its AWD sibling. The chassis is surprisingly adept for a 4687 lb luxury sedan, but the added heft versus 4294 lb AWD V6 models is noticeable, and seems to cancel out whatever performance gains may come from the bigger motor, both in terms of acceleration and handling. Fuel economy is frankly atrocious. Hyundai’s Canadian fuel economy ratings for this car sit at 14 mpg city, 22 highway and 16 mpg combined. We struggled to crack 15 mpg in mixed driving, and a full tank of 91 octane, at $5.32 a gallon, was an expense that didn’t seem worth it compared to the slightly less thirsty 3.8L, which can be had in top-spec for $9,000 less.

When Hyundai announced the Canada-only V8 HTRAC, I asked a source of mine at Hyundai Canada why they went through the expense of creating a whole new variant for such a small market. “Because nobody would buy it if it was rear-drive only,” was the reply. Even so, the Genesis 5.0 is likely to be a very small portion of Hyundai Canada’s total sales. It’s great to see auto makers starting to respond (albeit slowly) to the unique needs of the Canadian market. A $64,000 all-wheel drive V8 luxury car isn’t the first thing you’d think of in that context, but it’s a neat oddity in a product portfolio dominated by frugal subcompacts.

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81 Comments on “Only In Canada: 2015 Hyundai Genesis 5.0 HTRAC AWD...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    It needs an R variant.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    In Canada, the GLK350 has AWD as standard equipment, while that’s an option in the US. I think that it’s also more common to have seat warmers as standard equipment in Canada in cases when they are optional equipment in the US. Those winters of yours do make a difference.

    In this case, I suspect that the issue for the US is a matter of volume. The Canadians won’t buy the RWD model, so that’s an obvious decision. In the US, total sales are too low to justify offering both versions with the two drivetrains, so they picked one for each engine option. I presume that the 5.0 liter won’t be a big seller here, either.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Pch101
      There is one aspect of the US market that is unique other than it’s insular stance regarding regulation/harmonisation.

      Take Australia for example, we receive more variants and models of specific vehicles that the US does as an average.

      Take some of the luxury Euro marques, we receive more variation than the US.

      This does tend to make the US have less to choose from, but it does increase the cost within Australia for these vehicle, but then again we have more choice of drivetrain, trim, etc.

      The Canadians hopefully will move in our direction with it’s trade agreement with Asia and Euro zone countries.

      It do think the Canadians have proven with this Hyundai that it can be offered very nice vehicles that the US doesn’t receive, similar to what we have here in Australia.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “In this case, I suspect that the issue for the US is a matter of volume. The Canadians won’t buy the RWD model, so that’s an obvious decision”

      Given that I almost _never_ see CTSs and ATSs without a little “4” in the badge, and that most BMWs that aren’t low-lease-spec are xi models, this is probably true.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        In the US, I would presume that Hyundai is targeting Lexus and Mercedes, neither of which place much emphasis on AWD.

        One can debate whether Canadians need AWD, but there seems to be little doubt that they want it.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I’m not sure I’ve ever seen a V8 Genesis in the flesh. Every single one I see has the 3.8 badge.

    And to add to the weight debate… Hyundai US claims:

    2015 Genesis 3.8 RWD – 4138 lbs.
    2015 Genesis 5.0 RWD – 4541 lbs.

    Now I *know* there’s not 400 extra pounds of engine weight, so what is accounting for the difference? Is it feature content, so the difference would be smaller if you compared the 5.0 against a loaded RWD 3.8? Is it beefed-up suspension, driveline, and brakes?

    4138 lbs. seems like a reasonable weight for a full-size luxury sedan. 4541 lbs. is just plain porky for any vehicle. The difference is enough to have a major effect on driving dynamics.

  • avatar
    theupperonepercent

    The Genesis 3.8 AWD is an amazing car for the money.
    That V8 would come in handy if you needed to haul a full car load, but for the everyday it’s unnecessary.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    You can’t buy a new Grand Cherokee or Durango with RWD in Canada either.

    I predict the monthly volume of this particular Genesis model never breaks into double digits in Canada. In fact, I’d be surprised if they sold more than a half dozen in any given month.

    • 0 avatar
      kmoney

      Yeah, I don’t think the Suburban or Yukon and for sure the Escalade can be had in 2wd in Canada either. I can see why Hyundai did this: the take rate on the x-drive 7, 4-matic s-class or AWD LS460 is probably 80%+ in Canada — at least from the product mix I see on dealer lots and on the street.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        You can order a Suburban or Yukon in 2WD in Canada, but you’ll have to twist the dealer’s arm to do it for you since if you backed out, they’d be stuck with a very big hunk of lot poison.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Where’s BTSR?

    If one can expect him anywhere it would be this article.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    What does the car do if it detects drowsiness?

    Hopefully not do the whole seat massage stuff, would probably put more people to sleep than wake.

    Also how does anyone even put out a V8 like that?
    That rivals a 6.2l truck for MPG, although the city mpg may be better on the truck.
    The MPG is fine if the V8 premium is $500 over the 6, but not 9k over in a non-lux brand.

    • 0 avatar
      vt8919

      From what I’ve researched, it merely switches the HVAC from fresh air to recirculate if it senses too much CO2 in the car to help avoid drowsiness. Nissan has this feature in the Quest minivan too.

  • avatar
    ect

    In a relatively small market, it doesn’t pay to offer a very low-volume product in multiple SKUs There will be very few sales of the V* Genesis in Canada, so it makes sense for Hyundai to offer only one configuration.

    Likewise, Audi only sells Quattro in Canada, in all its models. No FWD option.

    For Hyundai Caanda, this vehicle is most likely a halo car, not a profit generator.

    • 0 avatar
      Silverbird

      Not quite true, the A4 and A3 line still offers Frontrack; not that you’ll ever see one on a dealer lot – well maybe some of the A3 1.8’s for people who only want an upscale Golf.

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        Interesting, this must be a recent development. The last time I bought an Audi, quattro was the only offering, across the range. We were moving from the US at the time, so it struck me as something different.

  • avatar
    praeliber

    I religiously read TTAC for years, very rarely commented, but i feel i need to get something of off my chest now… I hate where my country – Canada – is going regarding this issue of “winter traction”… I’ve learn to drive in canadian winter on a rwd ford truck with four season tire, i drive a miata all year round including Montreal’s winter since 4 years and some (now with mandatory winter tire, good thing, indeed..!). I’ve learn to drive, to feel the traction and to know how to respond when the car lose it’s traction.

    But now, suddenly, everybody in my country seems to think winter without awd is dangerous and rwd in the snow is downright inconceivable. What gives? People don’t know how to drive, they mash the pedal and wait for the electronic of the cars to handle things, if they lose control they can’t regain it, they’ll hit you and blame the accident on everything else but their (in)ability to drive. I’m sick of people freakin’ out about how anything else than awd in the snow is nonsense, therefore confirming everybody should buy a Rubicon Trailhawk rock crawler 4×4 thing when there’s 1 inches of snow on the ground. You read canadian reviews of cars like a Jag XF and they literally state the car is “summer only since rwd”… I mean, seriously, summer only? I swear I’ve heard many times people telling me they’ll sell their civic/mazda3/focus and other fwd to buy an SUV because it’s not safe to drive in winter, so how can I drive a rwd car in winter?…

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      Oh, so agree with you!

      I’ve spent more hours driving winter conditions with only 2WD (front & rear) than a politician my age has spent staring in a mirror. Driving skill, meaning a developed sense of car-kinesthetics and quick judgement based upon them, combined with good snow tires are all I’ve ever needed.

      Like literacy and critical thinking, I’m afraid winter driving skills have been consumerized out of our gene pool.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      I’m Canadian too, and I’m fed-up that everytime an AWD car is reviewed, some hero emerges from the woodwork with stories of how RWD is all you need in winter.

      When I got my first Quattro in 1988, and started passing police Caprices sliding backwards down steep hills on icy roads here in Halifax, even stopping and restarting on those hills with no trouble, I was very happy. The constant howling of tires on ice in winter is just about never heard these days, except for stuck buses.

      To me, that’s a distinct improvement over the years.

      If you want to be Captain Canada roaring around Montreal during a snowstorm in a Miata, fine. Let the rest of us drive in something more appropriate for the conditions.

      • 0 avatar
        praeliber

        My point is not to say rwd is all you need in winter. Of course awd has better traction, but since when does rwd in winter became impossible to fathom after a century of driving them in this exact situation. What thick’s me is not being able to buy a certain car in rwd because everybody spread the word around that rwd in the snow is nonsense – including many canadian car journalists – so they don’t sell anymore, everybody want awd, so it’s starting to force itself on us by market demand. I want to keep being able to chose what wheel provides the traction that I personally prefer and stop spreading lies that somehow convince people that not being able to drive properly in winter has nothing to do with their lack of skills. Rwd is not impossible to drive in winter, it’s even a whole lot of fun when you know how.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          Two things have changed since we grew up driving RWD cars in the winter.

          Cars have much wider tires. A 70’s Caprice came with 205s, which is barely enough for a Fiat 500 these days.

          Cars have a lot more power. That same 70s Caprice could barely manage 100 rear-wheel hp at normal revs for 2 tons of weight plus a trunk full of sand bags. A 5.0 Genesis can more than triple that power.

          I’ve driven some powerful modern RWD cars in winter, and it’s just a bad joke. No forward progress can be made if you give it more than the slightest throttle. You just spin tires for a couple of seconds, the back comes around, and then stability control kills your engine for a good five seconds. FWD cars have no such issues because they have inherent traction and stability.

          What Canadian luxury buyer would put up with that? You would be left with a tiny niche of coastal BC buyers who never ever drive to Whistler.

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            I entirely agree. I’d only change your last question to “What Canadian buyer would put up with that, who didn’t absolutely have to?”

            Over the years, I have seen all manner of RWD vehicles sliding around in even light snow conditions – pickups. vans and pony/muscle cars most notoriously. And yes, it often has somewhat to do with the driver. But so what?

            Given the space and traction superiority of FWD,or simply the traction superiority of AWD, one would be foolish not to want that on your side in any place that experiences winter.

        • 0 avatar
          Bun-Bun

          Exactly! Now that ford discontinued the panther platform, it is slim pickings for large RWD V8 cars. I was looking at the Hyundai Genesis as a potential replacement but then was brick walled by AWD only in Canada. AWD/4×4 is not a requirement to drive in Canadian winters. I have been driving RWD land yachts in Canada since I got my license, never have I had any issues. The closest calls I have had have been in FWD vehicles.

          AWD adds weight, compelexity and nannies. Do not want.

          Hyundai has lost one potential sale of the Genesis by making it AWD in Canada.

          “Because nobody would buy it if it was rear-drive only,” Greatly disagree with this statement and it shows the incredible ignorance of the person who said it. Those who want a vehicle like this would want it in RWD. Buyers will look to crossovers/suvs/trucks for AWD/4×4.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Some conditions are treacherous no matter which wheels are turning. We in the Northeast US had a particularly snowy winter in 2010, one of my friends who is a near expert driver had more than one occasion where his 97 Civic 5spd slid off the road into a ditch in careful driving. I had sliding issues in my Saturn SL, and more than one occasion where I fishtailed at low speeds on slush or black ice. Friends with AWD made claims of invincibility but there were at least two occasions we got snow so deep these folks had trouble or got flat out stuck. I don’t think there’s a universal silver bullet for winter driving.

    • 0 avatar
      Brumus

      I’ve driven a Focus with dedicated winter rubber through some nasty stuff in the mountains of VT. People who haven’t driven on dedicated winters/snows don’t realize what a significant upgrade these tires are over the almost criminally misnamed “all-seasons” (read: no season) tires.

      Contrary to what my local Subaru dealer said, I’d take a FWD with winters over an AWD with no-seasons.

      Of course, AWD + winter rubber rules o’er all.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      I agree for the most part. Opting for 4WD or AWD on a vehicle simply for the snow traction when a person lives in Southern Ontario or in a city or municipality has competant snow removal is mostly a waste of money up front and a waste of fuel the 99.9% of the time the extra driven wheels are of no benefit.

      Over the past few years I’ve had some new RWD cars for year round use, like a 2013 Charger R/T. Most people’s reactions when I tell them about that car are, “ZOMG how did you not die in the winter?”. *Shrug* the all-seasons were good enough not to get stuck in the rural area I live where inches of snow tend to accumulate. It took about 5 minutes of back and forth to get into the garage in 5-6″ of snow ONE TIME. If I had put actual snow tires I would have wanted for nothing.

      Of course AWD is better in snowy conditions, but do you want to pay the penalty for a feature that in actuality you won’t really use very often? More often the answer seems to be yes, because the marketing has done it’s job.

      I’m glad my F150 has 4×4 when I need it, but sometimes I engage it just to make sure the actuators haven’t seized from lack of use.

    • 0 avatar
      tankinbeans

      I’ve only ever driven FWD as it was all my family had and I learned to drive with that. I did have a van briefly with AWD, but it was a short-lived $700 pile, and I had a Blazer with selectable 4×4 that was rarely selectable (the vacuum tube or whatever was weak). I’ve never had the pleasure of dedicated snows, but keep thinking about them. After all, Minnesota has winters that tend to justify it, and chains are illegal here.

      For what it’s worth, I see far more trucks and SUVs with varying versions of 4 wheel motivation (4×4, AWD, 4WD and any other thing they label with) in the ditch than anything else.

      That whole false sense of security, driving too fast for the conditions, “I can get moving quickly in any conditions ” machismo bullbutter.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        Normally, I do just fine with RWD and dedicated winter tires. I prefer this setup to any FWD setup. Having said that, our weekend house up in Northeastern PA has a sloped driveway (with no garage) and for that reason alone, I’m considering AWD for my next vehicle.

        And I agree totally with the observation that the “AWD makes me invincible” idiocy is rampant in the driving population. Low-traction conditions call for reductions in speed, and sometimes that speed is zero.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Grew up driving big RWD cars in Ontario winters. As a relavite youngster commuted between Kitchener and Toronto driving a Caprice Classic without snow tires one winter. Later drove a Dodge van that could get downright scary (again no winter tires).

          For a few years I had to commute on a regular basis along the 401 between Toronto and Kingston driving a GM mini-van.

          Actually grew to love that vehicle and never once felt unsafe in it.

          However I encountered many pile-ups and vehicles in the ditches, median and even up on the Canadian Shield along the sides of the highway. And the vast majority was split AWD vehicles and pick-ups. Very rarely would you see a Crown Vickie, Corolla or Volvo crashed into the ditch. But pick-ups, Audis and Bimmers (x-drive) were plentiful. Nearly always with befuddled drivers trying to figure out how their winter specific vehicle “let them down”.

          Sure AWD/4WD can help get you started but it sure doesn’t help you stop. And these drivers because they don’t feel their vehicle slipping start to go too fast, until they exceed their stopping capacity.

          For this reason alone, I don’t recommend AWD/4WD.

          And of course do recommend manual transmissions as they teach you to feel/listen to your vehicle, help to regulate your speed and assist you in using ‘engine braking’.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    How much is a decent Euro prestige vehicle in Canada in comparison to the US?

    How much is a Caddy in Canada compared to the US?

    Maybe Hyundai might find a market in Canada.

    I don’t know if we get this in Australia, but I hope we do.

    It looks like a really nice car.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      At the moment, the price differentials seem to average around 10%. Plus delivery charges in Canada are nearly double in most cases. Prices fluctuate over time with the exchange rate.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        Prices fluctuate up when the exchange rate favours the US dollar. They almost never go down, unless people scream loud enough and/or start cross-border-shopping for cars.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          The prices equalize with the US over time when the Canadian dollar approaches the US one, for some models the price does come down. Over the last decade, there was a great equalization of prices when the CDN dollar moved from nearly 50% the worth of the USD to parity. Car prices tend to lag the exchange rate by a few years for cost amortization reasons, but they do adjust in the favor of Canadians evenutally if the dollar remains strong.

          You’re right about cross border shopping, that’s largely what keeps Canadian prices as honest as possible. Back in ’06-’07 when the exchange rate had moved in favor of the CDN$ but car prices hadn’t adjusted, there was a flood of US vehicles being imported into Canada.

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            You’re right, it does fluctuate with exchange rates.

            When we moved to Canada in ’03, the C$ was around 63-64 cents US, and car prices in Canada were about 10% less than in the US, so the grey market went the other way.

            I had a helluva time trying to buy and insure a car in Canada while I still had my GA driver’s licence (we had a lengthy transition due to daughter finishing high school). I pretty much had to swear in blood that we were moving and I would get an Ontario licence within a month or 2.

  • avatar
    Power6

    28 cars Snowmageddon/Snowpocalypse is a bit of an outlier mid-atlantic on down was hardly prepared for that and 30 inches without enough removal equipment is going to stop most anything.

    This AWD debate comes up any time someone so much as mentions a snow flake. The same people are hugging Bark M’s nuts about his love for “too much horsepower” but dare no mention ones preference for a for “too much traction” clearly that is unnecessary.

    I always love the refusal to empathize, as if one is either in denial or mentally incapable of it. Clearly Canadians like AWD cars, they must be brainwashed right? Just to explain to you the mindset since it seems some actually don’t get it: They don’t care about stopping and turning. If you can’t stop or turn then you can just go slower until you can. This is how most drive in the snow. They have no concept of the performance envelope of the car and tires, no idea it could be much larger with snow tires. But they do know one thing…if you get stuck you might not get unstuck. And if there is one place where AWD absolutely rocks 2WD, starting from a stop, anyone with snow driving experience knows even with winter tires, sometimes 2WD can’t start up a slippery grade or pull out of an unplowed parking spot, thats why you keep moving if at all possible. So “might get stuck” vs “not likely if you keep it out of the ditch” is enough for the peeps to buy AWD. It makes total sense to them.

    They are not stupid people, they are just ignorant of these things. I’m sure they know a whole lot about some subject that you don’t, and maybe even look down on you for it. This is how mass industrialization and specialization work, people know more about specific esoteric matters and less about general things.

    I guess praeliber what your fellow countrymen lack in “driving skills” is comparable in your lack of understanding of basic consumerism and economics.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I agree with some of your points, in fact in said snowmageddon I actually did get stuck but it happened to be in my building’s lot ironically after driving 37 miles home. I imagine the conditions you and I experienced are more common in northern Canada which is why I brought it up, and as you point out getting stuck might mean staying stuck in poor driving conditions hence the AWD preference.

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatic

      Keep moving, keep moving, keep moving.

      My winter driving with a snow tired rwd would be so much easier if everyone would remember this. My biggest issue driving to the ski slopes in VT is the awd suv driver who fears any loss of traction and drives overly slow up the steep winding hill approaching the Appalachian Gap (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_Gap). Continuously decreasing speed at the slightest wheel slip until we are going 15 – 25 mph for miles up the hill. On these sections of road I’ll pull over and wait 5 minutes for them to get ahead so I can keep moving and climb the hill. I still invariably catch them at the last top steep section where their low speed white knuckled driving can still on occasion keep me from reaching the top.

      I guess I could just buy an awd but I do not want to pay the fuel and weight penalty for 50 miles (5 mile times ten winter trips per year) of my 10,000 miles yearly driving.

      • 0 avatar
        Brumus

        I too have issues with certain people driving to VT ski hills.

        To wit, a couple of years ago after a day of skiing I was throwing my stuff in the car and getting ready to leave when I noticed the WRX parked beside me (with Maryland or Virginia plates — can’t remember) was outfitted with summer/performance rubber…in February.

        Had I confronted this tool, he likely would’ve stated he didn’t need winter tires because he had AWD. Had I had a few beers in me, punches would have been thrown…

  • avatar

    I think the trimline differences are what are more interesting in Canada. For example, the new Outback is available with a manual transmission still, and the XV and Impress can be had in top trim with a manual. Even better, the 4-cylinder Accord Touring sedan can be had with a stick as well.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    It’s not that complicated. It’s the same deal in the Northeast. Before Audi became a serious luxury force you had to put up with RWD. Then Audi brought quattro up in cars people actually wanted to buy, and manufacturers took notice. MB was first with the W210, and then BMW followed with the 2nd gen E46. By ~2005 the Japanese had caught up as well. Yes, MB and BMW had AWD in the 80s, but they discontinued them until Audi made it an asset again.

    If you drive around the Northeast you will struggle to find RWD variants of cars with available AWD.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “$64,123”

    That’s M56X money (eg. Q70 5.6 AWD), which is ludicrous for a Hyundai.

    EDIT: Cannot think of a current car which is more ruined by a front license plate, either.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Can you translate that to BMW or Mercedes values? People, and I mean almost everyone, are not familiar with this M/Q 5.6 thing you speak of.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        They haven’t heard of it, true. But the Q70 is more directly competing with this bling Hyundai (size, engine, AWD) than a BMW or Merc.

        However, since I enjoy data:

        MB makes the E400 4MATIC, 3.0 V6, $64,850. Next larger engine is the AMG version E63, at over $90K.

        BMW 550 4.4 V8 iX-Drive, $66,850.

        In other words, they want silly money for the E-Class, and it costs slightly less than a 550.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I’m only kind of joking. My “luxury” brand of choice is even more of a zombie than yours. Poor, sad, also ran luxury brands.

        • 0 avatar
          boozysmurf

          Not entirely accurate: At least, not in Canada. I just priced a BMW 550i xdrive on bmw.ca and by the time it matched the feature spec of the Genesis, it was $89,000. (that’s with the techpackage, m-sport wheels, etc)

          By comparison, the $64k cdn for the Genesis, is fully loaded.

          The E550 (we apparently skip the e400 and go right to E550, from E350) plus the advanced driving assist package tops at about $79k cdn.

          So the Genesis remains a relative bargain. Ok, it’s STILL a Hyundai. I don’t have an issue with that (I drive a Genesis Coupe, so, let that color your opinion as you see fit) but I can see people buying at this level having exactly that problem.

          That said, dropping $20,000 to $30,000 cdn from the price of your AWD, V8 luxury sedan, if you don’t care what badge is on it, is attractive.

          I’ve no doubt that the build quality is better on the BMW and Merc. But I don’t think the difference is as much as it used to be. And I’m not entirely sure it’s $20,000 better.

          (first post on TTAC, after years of reading, so … be gentle)

    • 0 avatar
      Aquineas

      “Ludicrous for a Hyundai?” What exactly makes it ludicrous? If it’s engineered well with solid content, why does it matter?

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        The average person doesn’t know that Hyundai actually offers luxury cars. So you can’t really brag about your new Hyundai at the country club. That matters to some people and is the major reason this car won’t hit the volumes of it’s rivals. Lower demand usually translates to cut rate prices.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Would it be ludicrous for a Q70 wearing a Mitsubishi badge, like it does in Japan?

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Canadian sales YTD:

      Genesis – 2,253
      Q70 – 55

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      Since a fully loaded Genesis V8 in the USA is about $55,700 and they charge an extra $2,500 for AWD in the V6, then an AWD V8 in the USA would be about $58,200.

  • avatar
    klossfam

    This is actually a little stranger than it seems on the surface: I live on the border (Buffalo) and see WAY more RWD versions of vehicles in Southern Ontario than I see in Western NY. Prime example is the Infiniti G35/G37 variants. 9 out of 10 sold in WNY are AWD according to the local Infiniti dealership owner. Cross the border and you’ll see close to 40% or so of the G series being RWD. Part of this is cost (generally less expendable income for Canadians) but mostly the fact that Canadians understand winter tires better and USE them vs people in the States making due with All Seasons and AWD. With the cost of fuel in Canada, I can’t see Hyundai selling very many 5.0 AWD Gennys but it is going to be an exclusive car in Canada any ways. I’d imagine 3 of 4 Gennys in North America as a whole will be the 3.8L.

  • avatar
    JREwing

    Hyundai’s reasoning about why Canada gets the AWD V8 and the United States does not still makes no sense, despite their explanation.

    There’s easily as many (if not more) residents in the US’s Snow Belt areas, and therefore potential AWD V8 buyers, as there are in all of Canada. More importantly, the US buyers are generally clueless on the concept of snow tires.

    My guess is that the cost of certifying the AWD V8 for the United States made it unprofitable.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Does CAFE apply to Canada as well, or just by default because our cars are so similar? Maybe they were avoiding having such a gas pig in their lineup.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      It makes perfect sense for Hyundai to take this approach.

      It’s about inventory management. When volumes are low, it becomes risky to offer too many variations. Every new drivetrain combination creates another opportunity to produce lot poison that doesn’t sell and makes no money.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The reason why Hyundai has not offered the V8 HTRAC for the US market is due to it being hit by the gas guzzler tax.

      Hyundai is working on the V8 HTRAC so that it would avoid the gas guzzler hit and if they can’t somehow work it out, then we’ll at least see the new 3.3L turbo with HTRAC.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Then it should get hit with the gas guzzler tax in Canada just the same. They pretty it up a bit and call it a “Green Levy”, but it’s a guzzler tax just the same.

  • avatar
    RHD

    Hyundai has aimed at the North American market by attempting to copy the characteristics of popular domestic vehicles.
    By weighing in at nearly 5,000 lbs and burning more than a gallon of gas every 15 miles, they have certainly hit the bullseye, which has “1976” written on it in tiny little numbers.

  • avatar
    EspritdeFacelVega

    “Less expendable income”???? Compare Buffalo to Toronto, lad. Years ago, maybe, but not lately. Higher-end luxury car market in Canada is proportionately larger than in the US, esp. mainly as a result of tax laws that make it advantageous for small-business (biz under $500k is only taxed at 13%) to bulk up their auto leases/purchasing. Also, low biz taxes mean you can’t compare like-to-like for avg salary or wage income. I’m an economist – you have to watch these odd little difference between countries to get an accurate read.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Canadians have less expendable income because they have to give to every beggar they see. Some Canadian here once told me it was their way. Beggars in Canada do very well!

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