Capsule Review: Jeep Cherokee Take Two

Derek Kreindler
by Derek Kreindler

The problem with a “take-no-prisoners” approach to evaluating new cars is that when you’re the only one adopting a particular stance, it can get pretty lonely – even your own readers begin to doubt you. My initial review of the Jeep Cherokee was a great example of this. Most reports are fairly positive – and indeed, there was plenty to like about the car, as my own review mentioned – but many of the car’s flaws were glossed over or simply not mentioned. On the other hand, we at TTAC gave you the unvarnished truth about the Cherokee – and Chrysler was gracious enough to let us review the Cherokee again.

On the launch program in California, there was some confusion over whether the vehicles were pre-production or production units. This time, there was none, and it showed in the overall fit and finish of the Cherokee. The unsightly stitching on the steering wheel? Gone. The wobbly console? Not quite perfect, but less wobbly than before. Like the newly released Chrysler 200, the fit and finish, particularly of the supplied interior components, is very nicely executed. Next to an Escape, CR-V or RAV4, the interior of our Cherokee Limited tester was undoubtedly a cut above the others. If nothing else, Chrysler has managed to carve out a real leader with the UConnect 8.4, offering the best infotainment system along with excellent tactile controls.

Judging from my test example, Jeep has made strides in other areas that previously came up for criticism. After a harsh winter of volatile temperatures, our local roads have been mutilated by potholes and divots, but the Cherokee handled them with aplomb. It would be a stretch to call the ride “plush”, but the little trucklet felt much more sedate than it did on the launch loop, and if FCA plans on selling these in world markets, it’s a good indication of how it will fare on the roads of Europe and developing countries. Similarly, the ZF 9-speed was far less frenetic in its operation, and felt better equipped to handle the more-than-adequate power of the 3.2L Pentastar V6. The major disappointment here was the rather dismal fuel economy.

Driving mostly in heavy stop-and-go traffic, I netted just 15 mpg, despite slow speeds and a rather gentle foot (helped by the much improved throttle calibration – another bone of contention at launch). One can chalk that up to the (literally) freezing temperatures, winter tires, all-wheel drive or my incompetence as a vehicle reviewer. I had assumed that a V6 would be a more economical alternative to a larger turbo 4-cylinder such as the Escape 2.0T, which is known for delivering sub-par fuel economy in the real world. Apparently not. The EPA rates the AWD V6 Cherokee with Active-Drive II (included on my tester) at just 19 mpg around town, so perhaps the results aren’t terribly off base. This is also one heavy CUV, weighing in at over two tons, thanks to the sophisticated AWD, the V6 engine and the hearty CUSW architecture.

Of course, some of my original complaints still remain. The brakes, which I initially compared to a damp dishrag, are still weak, and seem to engage only when the pedal is millimeters away from the floor, as if the whole system was in bad need of bleeding and some new fluid.

The other problem, which is literally impossible to change barring a total redesign, is the rather cramped rear seat area and small cargo compartment. Having driven every vehicle built of CUSW, I realize that this is something that is endemic to this particular architecture, but the Cherokee especially is the kind of “lifestyle” vehicle that should be able to carry people and property with minimal fuss. Nearly everyone who rode around in the back found it cramped, especially if they were above 5’10”. Cargo room is tight, with just 24.8 cubic feet of space in the back – by comparison, a CR-V has 37.2 cubic feet, which makes all the difference when you’re doing a Costco run.

The last major annoyance was something that was not readily apparent on the launch, though it proved to be a real bear around town. The Rear Cross Path detection system would seemingly brake the car for no reason when parallel parking or backing into a stall at just a touch above crawl speed. While I can understand the good intentions and legal rationale behind this programming, it simply turned into annoyance in the real world, where experienced drivers can perform that at more than a snail’s pace. If I were to buy one, I would do whatever I could to opt out.

Having had the chance to experience the car on my home turf, and gain a better understanding of its capabilities, I was able to warm to it more than I did in September. In a segment full of anodyne entrants, the Cherokee is something unique, both aesthetically and mechanically. Unfortunately, it’s missing a few key elements in terms of practicality that would make it a true class leader.

Nonetheless, I’m far more optimistic after having driven the Chrysler 200. It seems that CUSW improves with each iteration: the Dart’s weak point was the powertrain. The Cherokee had a number of initial quality teething issues. The 200 still needs a bit more space for rear passengers. If the pattern of continuous improvement sustains itself, then the next-Cherokee could be a serious player in the market. Not that the Cherokee isn’t competitive, but you better be willing to accept some compromises for the sake of non-conformity.

Chrysler provided the vehicle and a tank of gas for this review.

Derek Kreindler
Derek Kreindler

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  • Krusty Krusty on Apr 01, 2014

    Small World Dept. My wife just called to tell me a friend of hers bought a 2014 Cherokee to tow behind their RV. "There were so many things wrong with it, they are giving her a new one." Now, I actually LIKE the Cherokee and, somewhere in the distant future, I might buy one, but, I'm glad that I am not part of what Sergio calls, "the evolution stage". If I were, the phone calls from my wife would be entirely different.

    • See 3 previous
    • CJinSD CJinSD on Apr 02, 2014

      @Krusty The last Ram that Car and Driver had in a comparison test, which was a Quad-cab Hemi, had a payload of 801 lbs. That's passengers, anything in the bed and tongue weight for the trailer combined. That's less payload capacity than many a small sedan. http://www.caranddriver.com/comparisons/final-scoring-performance-data-and-complete-specs-page-5-1

  • Krusty Krusty on Apr 01, 2014

    As for whether the Ridgeline, (or, for that matter, the Cherokee) and other such front-wheel drive bias chassis can go "off-roading", here's another link… "Honda Ridgeline Wins Again at Baja" http://www.honda.com/newsandviews/article.aspx?id=5761-en

    • See 3 previous
    • Krusty Krusty on Apr 01, 2014

      @Vulpine Well, I wasn't trying to sell you one.;-) Every vehicle is a compromise of some kind. Even "uncompromising" designs like the Jeep Wrangler. Actually, the first test drive I took in my recent car search was the Wrangler Unlimited, which I found to be "limited" in cargo space, gas mileage, ride comfort, handling, but still cool as a moose. Ironically, the Ridgeline checked all the other boxes I was looking for, except for moose-like coolness (and probably gas mileage). It will do for now, but when I finish my house restoration, I might be seduced by one of these Italian by way of Toledo, OH designs.

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